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Election results day 2 – what we know now that we’ve slept

Welcome to the Thursday, November 10, Brew. 

By: Samuel Wonacott

Here’s what’s in store for you as you start your day:

  1. A roundup of election results from key state-level races
  2. Walker, Warnock advance to Dec. 6 runoff election

A roundup of election results from key state-level races

Now we’re able to return to your inboxes having gotten some sleep. Ever since the first polls closed Tuesday night, the country’s attention has focused on critical battleground races for governor, U.S. Senate, and U.S. House. Some of those elections remain uncalled.. 

Today, we’re stepping back from the headline-grabbing elections to bring you results and analysis from five key—but often overlooked—areas of politics that we’ve been closely tracking this election cycle: state legislatures, state financial officers, state supreme courts, secretaries of state, and attorneys general

Let’s jump right in. 

State legislatures

Key takeaway: Democrats gain four chambers and two trifectas; Republicans expand margins in several states. 

Legislators in 88 of the country’s 99 state chambers were up for election last night, accounting for 6,278 of the country’s 7,383 state legislative seats. In primaries this year, 4.7% of incumbents who filed for re-election lost to challengers, including 69 Democratic incumbents and 160 Republican incumbents. In the 2020 general elections, 4.7% of incumbents who filed for re-election lost to challengers. Keep that number in mind, because we’ll be back in the coming days with this year’s figures. 

Here’s how Democrats did: Democrats gained control of four chambers, creating new trifectas in Michigan and Minnesota. Both states previously had divided governments. In total, Democrats gained at least four trifectas. In addition to Michigan and Minnesota, Democrats also gained trifectas in Maryland and Massachusetts where the party maintained legislative majorities but gained control of governorships.

  • In Michigan, Democrats won a majority in the House and at least 19 seats in the 38-member Senate, with a tie-breaking vote going to Lt. Gov. Garlin Gilchrest (D). Democrats last held a trifecta in Michigan in 1983.
  • In Minnesota, Democrats maintained a majority in the House and gained a majority in the Senate. Democrats last held a trifecta in Minnesota in 2014.

Here’s how Republicans did: While Republicans have not yet gained control of any new chambers this cycle, the party has expanded its control in several states. In Florida, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Wisconsin, Republicans gained veto-proof majorities in at least one chamber

  • In Florida, Republicans gained veto-proof majorities in both the House and Senate.
  • In North Carolina, Republicans gained a veto-proof majority in the Senate. In the House, the party won 71 seats, one shy of the veto-proof threshold.
  • In South Carolina, Republicans gained a veto-proof majority in the House. The party also came one seat away from winning a veto-proof majority in the Senate.
  • In Wisconsin, Republicans gained a veto-proof majority in the Senate. 

Here’s a breakdown of the changes we know so far:

With four chambers changing party control, this cycle has surpassed 2020, when only two chambers—the New Hampshire House and Senate—changed hands, going from Democrats to Republicans.

Learn more about state legislative election results here.

State supreme courts

Key takeaway: Republicans win control of one state supreme court—three of 70 seats up for election change party control. 

Twenty-five states held state supreme court elections last night, accounting for 70 (20%) of the nation’s 344 supreme court seats. Heading into the elections, Republicans had majorities on 26 state supreme courts, Democrats controlled 17, and control of the nine remaining courts was either split between parties or unclear.

Here’s how Republicans did: Republicans gained two seats on the Democratically-controlled North Carolina Supreme Court, flipping the court to Republican control. 

Here’s how Democrats did: A Democrat won a seat in Illinois currently held by a Republican. 

Overall, Democrats will hold majorities on 16 courts, Republicans will hold majorities on 27, and the remaining nine courts’ majorities will either be split between parties or unclear. (Texas and Oklahoma both have two courts of last resort.)

Two incumbent justice lost a re-election campaign last night. In North Carolina, Trey Allen (R) defeated Justice Sam Ervin IV (D). Mary O’Brien (D) defeated Justice Michael Burke (R) in Illinois. 

Most state supreme courts are officially nonpartisan. In June 2020, Ballotpedia conducted a nationwide study to determine each state supreme court justice’s affiliation with one of the two major political parties. Those findings were used for this analysis.

For the partisan labels of justices who assumed office after that study was published, factors considered include, but are not limited to: whether the justice previously held office with a party label, trifecta status at the time of appointment, and whether the justice donated to candidates from a certain party.

Click here to follow updates and learn more about state supreme court election results. 

Attorneys general

Key takeaway: Partisan balance of state attorneys general remains unchanged (so far).

Heading into the election, Republicans controlled 28 offices, the party’s largest number in more than three decades. Voters decided who would control 34 of 50 state attorney general offices last night. Thirty offices were up for election, and four offices’ appointment authorities were on the ballot.

Here’s how Republicans did: Republicans gained one office that Democrats currently hold in Iowa.

Here’s how Democrats did: Democrats gained one office that Republicans currently hold in Vermont.

Two elections remain uncalled: the Republican-controlled office in Arizona and the Democratic-controlled office in Nevada. Alaska’s governor appoints the state attorney general with confirmation from the state legislature, and that state’s gubernatorial election is also uncalled. If none of three uncalled races change party control, the nationwide partisan balance of attorneys general will remain the same at 22 Democrats and 28 Republicans.


Click here to follow updates and learn more about attorneys general election results. 

Secretaries of state

Key takeaway: Democrats gain control of one secretary of state office so far. 

Heading into the election, Democrats controlled 20 secretaries of state offices, while Republicans controlled 27. The position does not exist in Alaska, Hawaii and Utah. Voters decided who would control 35 of the country’s 47 secretary of state offices yesterday. Twenty-seven offices were up for election, and eight offices’ appointment authorities were on the ballot.

Democrats won the governorship in Maryland, which currently has a Republican secretary of state, giving the Democrats appointment control. Among contested elections, no secretary of state positions changed partisan control. 

Five offices remain uncalled: the Democratic-controlled offices in Arizona, Washington, and Wisconsin, and the Republican-controlled office in Nevada. New Hampshire’s secretary of state, elected jointly by both chambers of the state legislature, is also unknown.

The high water mark for a party controlling secretary of state offices since 1992 was in 2017 when there were 30 Republican secretaries. 

All but 11 secretaries of state either certify election results, oversee election administration, or both. With four uncalled offices remaining, Democrats control 13 offices that oversee election administration and Republicans oversee 19.

Click here to follow updates and learn more about secretaries of state election results. 

State financial officers

Key takeaway: Republicans make gains in state financial officer races.

State financial officeholders—treasurers, auditors, and comptrollers (or controllers)—are responsible for billions of dollars in state government funds. Heading into the election, Republicans controlled 56 offices, Democrats controlled 42, and officeholders with unclear affiliations held the remaining seven.

Here’s how Republicans did: Republicans gained at least four offices that Democrats currently control, defeating two incumbents in the process.

Here’s how Democrats did: Democrats gained full appointment authority over two offices: Massachusetts, where a Republican appointee’s term is expiring, and Minnesota, where the current appointee’s affiliation is unclear.

Ten races remain uncalled. Six directly elected positions remain uncalled—Democrats currently control five and Republicans control one. Four are appointed positions, where gubernatorial and/or state legislative control remains undetermined. Of the six directly elected positions, Republicans currently lead in two, Democrats lead in one, and three are too close to call.

The table below shows partisan control before and after the election for all 105 state financial officerships, including those that were not decided yesterday.

One area to watch moving forward with respect to these offices: the investment of state funds and environmental, social, and corporate governance (ESG).

Twenty-nine of the 38 offices decided last night are responsible for investing state funds. The map below shows all 38 states where SFOs have that responsibility.

  • Republicans gained one office Democrats currently hold with investment responsibilities: Iowa. The party will control at least 18.
  • Democrats did not gain any new offices and will control at least 13.
  • Control of offices in Alaska, Arizona, Nevada, and New Hampshire remains undecided.

Click here to follow updates and learn more about state financial officeholder elections. 

Keep reading 

Walker, Warnock advance to Dec. 6 runoff election 

Although several U.S. Senate races remain uncalled as of the time of this writing, we now know one thing for sure—election season just got a little longer. On Nov. 9, Georgia election officials declared that incumbent U.S. Sen. Raphael Warnock (D) and Herschel Walker (R) would advance to a Dec. 6 runoff election because neither candidate received more than 50% of the vote.

As of this writing, Warnock led with 49.4% of the vote to Walker’s 48.5%. In the Nov. 8 general election, Libertarian candidate Chase Oliver won 2.1% of the vote.

Depending on what happens in uncalled U.S. Senate elections in Arizona and Nevada, the outcome of the Georgia runoff could determine control of the U.S. Senate. A similar situation occurred in 2021, when Georgia held two runoff elections for the U.S. Senate, both of which Democrats won. The victories gave Democrats effective control of the U.S. Senate (with Vice President Kamala Harris (D) casting tie-breaking votes). 

Including the 2021 runoffs, four Senate runoffs have taken place in Georgia. In 2008, Saxby Chambliss (R) won re-election in a runoff. The first Senate runoff occurred in 1992. Incumbent Wyche Fowler (D) lost in the runoff.

Read more about the Dec. 6 runoff at the link below. 

Keep reading



The Daily Brew, November 9, 2022: A morning dose of election results

Welcome to the Wednesday, November 9, Brew. 

By: David Luchs

Here’s what’s in store for you as you start your day:

  1. Control of Congress remains too close to call
  2. What happened in the states
  3. Six top ballot measure results
  4. A look at winning candidates who completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey
  5. When will results be finalized? A look ahead to certification

Good morning! We hope you got some sleep last night. If you stayed up following the results, you likely have a good sense of what happened. If you hit a normal bedtime, this may be one of your first updates and we hope to give you a general summary of results from across the country. We’ll be back in your inbox at our regular time tomorrow morning. Visit Ballotpedia.org all day today for updated results as states continue to process ballots. All results and updates below are as of 5am EST.

Control of Congress remains too close to call

Control of both chambers of the U.S. Congress remains too close to call. Republicans needed to gain one seat in the U.S. Senate and five seats in the U.S. House to win control. Democrats needed to lose no seats, or gain seats, in the U.S. Senate and to lose four or fewer seats in the U.S. House in order to maintain their control.

Democrats had the narrowest governing majorities heading into a midterm in decades. Since 1990, the next-narrowest majorities were Republicans’ majorities heading into the 2002 midterms, when Democrats needed to gain one seat in the U.S. Senate and eight seats in the U.S. House to win control.

Midterm elections for U.S. Congress tend to favor the party that does not control the White House. Ballotpedia’s analysis of wave elections between 1918 and 2016 found that the president’s party lost an average of 29 seats in the House and four seats in the Senate during the first midterm of a new administration. The president’s party lost an average of 14 seats in the House and two in the Senate across all even-numbered elections during the same period.

Although we expect most races will be called at some point this week, Senate control could rest in Georgia for the second cycle in a row. If neither incumbent Raphael Warnock (D) nor challenger Herschel Walker (R) wins 50% of the vote in the final tally, both candidates will advance to a runoff on December 6. In the 2020 election, two runoff elections in Georgia decided final control of the U.S. Senate. Georgia law allows election officials or candidates to request a recount, although a candidate may only request a recount if the initial margin of victory is 0.5 percentage points or less.

Keep reading

What happened in the states

If the current results hold, there will be more state trifectas than at any time in the past 30 years. At least two states—Maryland and Massachusetts—became Democratic trifectas when Democrats won the governorship. 

If trifecta control does not change in any other state, this would leave 39 total trifectas – Republicans with 23, Democrats with 16, and 11 states where neither party has a trifecta. This would be an increase from 14 states with Democratic trifectas before the election. This would also be the fewest number of states with divided government since at least 1992. The previous low was 12 states with divided government in 2021. 

Early indications are that Michigan’s legislature may flip from Republican control to Democratic. If it does, that would give Democrats a trifecta and make 40 trifectas nationally. If Democrats also flip the Minnesota Senate, that would add a 41st trifecta nationally – 23 Rs, 18 Ds, 9 divided. Follow along at ballotpedia.org throughout the day for updates. The chart above does not include Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, or Minnesota. 

Massachusetts and Maryland had been Democratic trifectas heading into the 2014 elections, when both elected Republican governors. This year, Maryland voters elected Wes Moore (D) as governor and Massachusetts voters elected Maura Healey (D), handing control of both offices back to Democrats.

Both states were among the seven where we projected Democrats had a chance at winning a trifecta this year. Control of 26 state legislative chambers remains too close to call. 

Republicans gained veto-proof majorities thus far in four chambers: the Florida Senate, Florida House, North Carolina Senate, and South Carolina House. As of writing, Republicans had not gained veto-proof majorities in the North Carolina House or the South Carolina Senate.

Heading into the election, there were 24 states where one party controlled a veto-proof legislative majority. Republicans held 16 of those majorities and Democrats held eight.

While many results are still coming in, here are 10 additional election results of note where we know the outcome:

  1. U.S. House Ohio District 1: Greg Landsman (D) defeated incumbent Steve Chabot (R). Chabot was first elected in 1994 and lost re-election in 2008 before winning election again in 2010. Landsman has served on the Cincinnati City Council since 2017. Two election forecasters called this race a toss-up and one said it leaned towards Chabot. Chabot was among four U.S. House incumbents to have lost re-election in 2022 thus far, alongside Mayra Flores (R), Elaine Luria (D), and Al Lawson (D). In 2020, 13 U.S. House members—all Democrats—lost re-election. Thirty-four incumbents lost bids for re-election in 2018.
  2. Governor of Florida: Incumbent Ron DeSantis (R) defeated Charlie Crist (D), Carmen Gimenez (I), and Hector Roos (L). In 2018, DeSantis defeated Andrew Gillum (D) 49.6% to 49.2%. DeSantis’ win preserves Florida’s Republican trifecta. Election night returns show DeSantis with 59.5% of the vote. If these results hold, they would be the largest percentage of the vote won by any Republican candidate for governor of Florida in state history, surpassing Harrison Reed’s (R) 59.1% share in 1868.
  3. Iowa Attorney General: Brenna Bird (R) defeated incumbent Thomas John Miller (D) in Iowa’s election for attorney general. Because Secretary of State Paul Pate (R) and Governor Kim Reynolds (R) won their re-election campaigns, Republicans gained a triplex in Iowa. Miller was first elected state attorney general in 1978. He did not run for re-election in 1990 but was re-elected in 1994 and has held the office ever since. This is one of 30 elections for attorney general this year; 16 are in states where the office is held by a Democrat and 14 are in states where it is held by a Republican.
  4. Iowa Treasurer: Roby Smith (R) defeated incumbent Michael Fitzgerald (D), who has been in office since 1983. In 2018, Fitzgerald defeated Jeremy Davis (R) 55% to 43%. The Iowa Treasurer is one of 68 state financial offices on the ballot this year. State financial officers’ roles vary from office to office and state to state, but they are broadly responsible for things like auditing other government offices, managing payroll, and overseeing pensions. For more information on state financial officer elections this year, click here.
  5. Kansas Treasurer: Steven Johnson (R) defeated incumbent Lynn Rogers (D) and Steve Roberts (L). Rogers was appointed to the post in 2021 after Jacob LaTurner (R) was elected to the U.S. House. LaTurner defeated Marci Francisco (D) 58% to 42% in 2018.
  6. North Carolina Supreme Court: Republicans won a majority on the court by gaining two seats. Before the election, Democrats had a 4-3 majority. Now, Republicans have a 4-3 majority. Richard Dietz (R), a judge on the North Carolina Court of Appeals, defeated fellow appellate judge Lucy Inman (D) to win election to the seat currently held by retiring Justice Robin Hudson (D). Trey Allen (R), the general counsel to the North Carolina Administrative Office of the Courts, defeated incumbent Sam Ervin IV (D), who was first elected in 2014. This year, 25 states held supreme court elections for 84 seats.
  7. Ohio Supreme Court: Three seats on the Ohio Supreme Court were up for partisan election, none of which had a change in partisan control, maintaining Republicans’ 4-3 majority. Justices Pat Fischer (R) and Pat DeWine (R) were both up for retention election. Both judges defeated Democratic challengers. Two other justices—Sharon L. Kennedy (R) and Jennifer L. Brunner (D)—ran against one another for the chief justice position currently held by retiring Justice Maureen O’Connor (R). Kennedy won that election, opening a vacancy for her associate justice post that Gov. Mike DeWine (R) will fill. 
  8. Wisconsin Assembly District 63: Incumbent Robin Vos (R) defeated write-in candidates Joel Jacobson (D) and Adam Steen (R). Vos, who was first elected in 2005 and has served as speaker of the House since 2013, defeated Steen 51% to 49% in the August primary. Former President Donald Trump (R) endorsed Steen.
  9. Oregon Measure 113: Oregon voters approved a measure disqualifying state legislators who missed more than 10 floor sessions without permission or excuse from seeking re-election. There have been at least three instances of legislators leaving the state to prevent votes in the Oregon state legislature since 2020.
  10. Maryland Question 4: Maryland voters approved a ballot measure legalizing the recreational use of marijuana for adults 21 and older. Marijuana was already legal for medical use in Maryland and possession of 10 grams or under was decriminalized. The measure makes Maryland the 20th state to legalize recreational marijuana. There are four other states with ballot measures to legalize marijuana this year: Arkansas, Missouri, North Dakota, and South Dakota.

Keep reading 

Six top ballot measure results

Here’s a quick rundown of results for six of our top 15 ballot measures to watch. Subscribe to our State Ballot Measures newsletter for a more detailed update in your inbox later this afternoon. Here’s how voters decided on those questions:

  • California Proposition 26: Voters rejected this proposition 70% to 30%. Proposition 26 would have legalized sports betting at American Indian casinos and licensed racetracks and enacted a 10% tax on sports betting profits. The Peace and Freedom Party of California and at least two dozen American Indian tribes supported the measure, while the Republican Party of California opposed it. Supporters and opponents contributed a combined $176 million to campaigns related to Proposition 26, making it this year’s second most-expensive ballot measure.
  • California Proposition 27: Voters rejected this proposition 84% to 16%. Like Proposition 26, Proposition 27 would have legalized online sports betting for gaming tribes and gaming companies that contract with gaming tribes. Individuals living within the state but outside of Indian land who were 21 years or older would have been permitted to place bets. Because voters rejected both Propositions 26 and 27, sports betting remains illegal in California. Heading into the election, 36 states and the District of Columbia allowed for betting on sports. Supporters and opponents contributed a combined $419 million to campaigns related to Proposition 27, making it this year’s most expensive ballot measure.
  • California Proposition 31: Voters approved this proposition 65% to 35%. The measure upheld a law the legislature passed in August 2020 outlawing the sale of flavored tobacco products, with exceptions for hookah tobacco, loose leaf tobacco, and premium cigars. Gov. Gavin Newsom (D), the Democratic Party of California, and the Peace and Freedom Party of California supported the measure. The Republican Party of California opposed it. As of 2020, only California and Massachusetts had banned flavored tobacco products.
  • Nebraska Initiative 433: Voters approved this initiative 59% to 41%. The measure will increase the state’s minimum wage from $9 to $15 by 2026 and will annually adjust the minimum wage based on the cost of living from 2027 on. The first minimum wage increase will be a $1.50 increase on January 1, 2023, with further increases of $1.50 each on Jan. 1, 2024, Jan. 1, 2025, and Jan. 1, 2026. The last change to the minimum wage in Nebraska was in 2016, when voters approved Initiative 425 to increase the rate from $7.25 to $9.
  • Iowa Amendment 1: Voters approved this amendment 66% to 34%. The amendment adds a right to own and bear firearms to the state constitution and requires that a court apply strict scrutiny to any alleged violations of the right. As of 2021, 44 states included a right to firearms in their constitutions.
  • Alabama Recompiled Constitution Ratification Question: Voters approved this question 76% to 24%. This question was the final step in ratifying a rewritten version of the Alabama Constitution. Major changes introduced in the rewrite included arranging the constitution into proper articles, parts, and sections, the removal of racist language, and the deletion of duplicative and repealed provisions. Alabama’s current constitution, adopted in 1901, has been amended 977 times and is the longest written constitution in the world.

Keep reading 

A look at winning candidates who completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey offers candidates the opportunity to tell voters directly about their personal and political priorities. More than 6,000 candidates submitted surveys this election cycle. 

Here are some sample responses from candidates who submitted surveys and won last night:

Keith Self (R), U.S. House Texas District 3

  • Who are you? Tell us about yourself.

    “I am a Texan, graduate of West Point, 25-year Army veteran, 12-year County Judge. I served in Airborne Infantry, Special Forces, and Joint assignments on four continents. My wife and I have lived overseas for a decade in Europe and the Middle East. I was stationed in Germany twice, Belgium, and Egypt. I served in the Pentagon in waived Special Access Programs. In elected office, I presided over the Commissioners Court for 12 years, cutting the tax rate by almost thirty percent, reducing the cost of the pension plan to the taxpayer, putting the checkbook on line first among the 3100 counties across the nation. I am a fiscal, social, and national security conservative.”

Shri Thanedar (D), U.S. House Michigan District 13

  • Who are you? Tell us about yourself.

    “I am a scientist, businessman, husband, father, grandfather, and State Representative. I grew up in abject poverty in India, in a home with no running water with his 8 siblings. With some luck, a good education, and hard work, I immigrated to the United States, became a chemist and a successful entrepreneur that built several businesses.”

Dave Yost (R), Attorney General of Ohio

  • A state’s attorney general has many responsibilities. Which of those do you personally consider the most important?

    “That’s a bit like asking a parent which of their many responsibilities is most important. The answer is, you must attend to them all. But just as a parent might say that their most important responsibility is to love their children, an attorney general’s most important job is to advocate for and protect Ohio and the rule of law. A myriad of actions is contained in those words.”

Peter Neronha (D), Attorney General of Rhode Island

  • What do you believe are the core responsibilities for someone elected to this office?

    “To be an effective advocate for the people of Rhode Island across a broad range of subject areas, including keeping them safe from crime, holding those would take advantage of them accountable, ensuring their access to affordable and high-quality healthcare, protecting them as consumers, safeguarding the environment, and much more.”

Gabe Evans (R), Colorado House of Representatives District 48

  • What areas of public policy are you personally passionate about?

    “I’ve sworn three oaths to uphold and defend the Constitution and care for my neighbors. Unfortunately, recent policies from Colorado’s ruling Left have absolutely handcuffed my ability to serve my community. Crime is spiking, cost of living is skyrocketing, and parents’ ability to select a successful education for their kids is in danger. I’m running for House District 48 because I’m a proven leader, and I have two decades of service-based experience necessary to solve the problems that are crippling our families, neighbors, and communities. I stand for freedom, the Constitution, and common sense.”

Elinor Levin (D), Iowa House of Representatives District 89

  • What areas of public policy are you personally passionate about?

    “I focus on people rather than policy, but, of course I have my own strong opinions. I want to see strong public unions, amply funded-public schools, common sense gun laws, infrastructure to support reliable, high speed internet service and renewable energy across the state. I support farm programs that work towards healthy, long-term stewardship of the land and transparent access to health care, including mental, dental, and vision, for everyone.”

Keep reading 

When will the results be finalized? A look ahead to certification

Now that the ballots are in, states must certify election results before they are considered final and officeholders are sworn in. Guidelines for election certification vary from state to state. Once a state has certified elections, no more challenges may be heard to the election’s outcome.

Delaware will be the first state to certify results, doing so tomorrow, Nov. 10. Twenty-six more states and the District of Columbia have certification dates later in November. Eighteen states have certification deadlines in December, ending with California’s Dec. 16 deadline. Five states do not have specific certification deadlines in state law.

Keep reading 



Election Day is here!

Welcome to the Tuesday, November 8, Brew. 

By: Samuel Wonacott

Here’s what’s in store for you as you start your day:

  1. Election Day is here—here’s where to vote
  2. Where to find results
  3. 50 states in 50 days—the end of the road

Happy Election Day!

Election Day 2022 is here! We’ll be back tomorrow morning with election results and analysis. In the meantime here is a list of resources on everything to do with today’s election:

  • Sample ballot: Our Sample Ballot Lookup tool allows you to learn about the candidates and issues on your ballot. 
  • Election Help Desk: Our 2022 Election Help Desk answers your most pressing questions about today’s elections—and what happens next. 
  • Poll opening and closing times: The opening and closing times for polling locations vary from state to state and in the District of Columbia. This page provides state-by-state poll opening and closing times. 
  • Where to vote: If you’re not sure where to vote, check this page out. The page provides links to information about where to find polling locations in your state. 
  • Identification: The rules governing voter identification vary by state. Click here to read about the voter ID requirements in your state, so you know what to expect when you head to the polls. 

We’ll see you bright and early tomorrow with analysis and takeaways from today’s elections. 

Keep reading 

Battleground elections and where to find results  

We’re covering tens of thousands of races up and down the ballot today. Once polls close, we’ll be up late into the night and into the early hours of the morning reporting results and updating analysis articles. To help you get your bearings, we’ve compiled lists of our top battleground elections and top ballot measures:

  • Top 15 elections: This battleground list includes congressional and state executive elections (including for governor), and elections for state supreme court judgeships, state legislatures, and mayors. 
  • Top 15 ballot measures: Voters in 37 states will decide on 132 statewide ballot measures that address topics like abortion, marijuana, voting policies, firearms, sports betting, and state constitutional rights. 

Additionally, you can find our coverage of state-level executive races that tend not to get as much attention. That includes elections for state financial officers like treasurers, auditors, and controllers—officials who are, generally, responsible for things like auditing other government offices, managing payroll, and overseeing pensions. 

Below is a chart showing the partisan composition of state financial officers going into the election. 

You can find our election pages for each office below:

Overall, our list of battleground elections include some of the following (click a state to learn more about the election).  

Here’s where you can follow along our results coverage:

  • Election results overview page: Bookmark this one. We’ll update this page throughout the night as races are called. On this page, you can find election updates, results summaries, and results for battleground races—including U.S. Senate and U.S. House elections, gubernatorial elections, and state supreme court elections. 
  • Election analysis overview page: With thousands of elections taking place across the country, we’ll have in-depth analysis of outcomes at the federal, state, and local levels once results come in. 

Finally, we’d like to invite you to register for our 2022 ballot measure recap webinar on Nov. 10 at 1:00 p.m. ET. Our Editor in Chief, Geoff Pallay, and Managing Editor for Ballot Measures, Ryan Byrne, will analyze ballot measure results compared to previous elections, as well as discuss what happened with measures related to abortion, marijuana, and election policy. Register today!

Keep reading 

50 states in 50 days—the end of the road

On Aug. 29, we embarked on a circuitous journey across the U.S. to preview elections in every state. We started in Pennsylvania and completed the tour, ten weeks later, in New Hampshire. In the series, we previewed what’s on the ballot in each state, which parties control state and congressional offices, and what you need to know to cast your ballot. 

We want to thank you for taking this trip alongside us! If you missed your state or wish to revisit it as you head to the polls, we’ve included links below to every part of the series below:

Week One: Pennsylvania, Indiana, South Dakota, Nebraska, North Dakota
Week Two: California, Georgia, Texas, Montana
Week Three: North Carolina, Virginia, New Mexico, Illinois, Idaho
Week Four: Kentucky, Michigan, Arkansas, Minnesota, West Virginia
Week Five: Vermont, Nevada, Wyoming, Arizona, Ohio
Week Six: South Carolina, Iowa, Kansas, Oregon, Tennessee
Week Seven: Colorado, New Jersey, Washington, Alabama, Utah
Week Eight: Mississippi, Maryland, Rhode Island, Oklahoma, Maine
Week Nine: Massachusetts, Wisconsin, Alaska, Hawaii, Florida
Week Ten: Missouri, Louisiana, New York, Connecticut, New Hampshire

Click here to learn more about elections in your state. 

Keep reading



Robe & Gavel November 7, 2022: Federal Judicial Vacancy Count released for Nov. 1

Welcome to the Nov. 7 edition of Robe & Gavel, Ballotpedia’s newsletter about the Supreme Court of the United States (SCOTUS) and other judicial happenings around the U.S.

Hello again, gentle readers! What an action-packed week we have on our hands: it’s election week, the second week of SCOTUS’ November sitting, and we have a fresh set of monthly data on the federal judiciary to unpack. Let’s mop our brows and gavel in, shall we?

Follow Ballotpedia on Twitter or subscribe to the Daily Brew for the latest news and analysis.

If you haven’t yet seen, we’re keeping our readers up to date with special coverage and reporting of the 2022 midterm elections this week. Keep an eye on your inbox for exclusive analysis and results reporting up and down the ballot. You can also visit Ballotpedia for election results and ongoing analysis.

We #SCOTUS and you can, too!

Grants

Since our previous issue, SCOTUS has accepted three new cases to its merits docket.

On Nov. 4, the court granted review in the following cases: 

  • Amgen Inc. v. Sanofi originates from the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit and concerns federal patent applications.
  • Abitron Austria GmbH v. Hetronic International, Inc. originates from the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 10th Circuit. The case involves the Lanham Act and trademark infringement claims.
  • Arizona v. Navajo Nation (Consolidated with Department of the Interior v. Navajo Nation)
  •  originate from the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit and concern a water rights dispute over the Colorado River.

To date, the court has agreed to hear 39 cases during its 2022-2023 term

Arguments

The Supreme Court will hear arguments in five cases this week. Click here to read more about SCOTUS’ current term.

Nov. 7

Nov. 8

Nov. 9

The court’s December argument sitting begins on Nov. 28. The court will hear arguments in nine cases.

Nine cases have not yet been added to the argument calendar.

Opinions

SCOTUS has not issued any opinions since our previous edition. 

The Federal Vacancy Count

The Federal Vacancy Count tracks vacancies, nominations, and confirmations to all United States Article III federal courts in a one-month period. 

The Nov. 1 report covers nominations, confirmations, and vacancies from Oct. 2 through Nov. 1. The U.S. Courts data used for this report is published on the first of each month and covers the previous month.

Highlights

  • Vacancies: There were two new judicial vacancies. There were 87 vacancies out of 870 active Article III judicial positions. Including the U.S. Court of Federal Claims and the U.S. territorial courts, 89 of 890 active federal judicial positions were vacant.  
  • Nominations: There was one new nomination. 
  • Confirmations: There were no new confirmations.

Vacancy count for Nov. 1, 2022

A breakdown of the vacancies at each level can be found in the table below. For a more detailed look at the vacancies in the federal courts, click here.

*Though the United States territorial courts are named as district courts, they are not Article III courts. They are created in accordance with the power granted under Article IV of the U.S. Constitution. Click here for more information.

New vacancies

Two judges left active status, creating Article III life-term judicial vacancies. The president nominates individuals to fill Article III judicial positions. Nominations are subject to U.S. Senate confirmation.

The following chart compares the number of vacancies on the United States Courts of Appeals on the date of President Joe Biden’s (D) inauguration to vacancies on Nov. 1.

U.S. District Court vacancies

The following map shows the vacancy percentage in each of the United States District Courts as of Nov. 1, 2022.

New nominations

President Biden announced one new nomination:


The president has announced 142 Article III judicial nominations since taking office Jan. 20, 2021. For more information on the president’s judicial nominees, click here.

New confirmations

The U.S. Senate has confirmed no new nominees since our previous edition.

As of Nov. 1, 2022, the Senate had confirmed 84 of President Biden’s judicial nominees—58 district court judges, 25 appeals court judges, and one Supreme Court justice.

Comparison of Article III judicial appointments over time by president (1981-Present)

  • Presidents have appointed an average of 77 judges through Nov. 1 of their second year in office.
  • President Bill Clinton (D) made the most appointments through Nov. 1 of his second year with 128. President Barack Obama (D) made the fewest with 43.
  • President Donald Trump (R) made the most appointments through four years with 234. President Reagan made the fewest through four years with 166.

Need a daily fix of judicial nomination, confirmation, and vacancy information? Click here for continuing updates on the status of all federal judicial nominees.

Or, keep an eye on this list for updates on federal judicial nominations.

Looking ahead

We’ll be back on Nov. 28 with a new edition of Robe & Gavel to herald in the new SCOTUS term. Until then, gaveling out! 

Contributions

Kate Carsella compiled and edited this newsletter with contributions from Caitlin Styrsky, Myj Saintyl, and Sam Post.



Our top analyses and resources for Election Week

Welcome to the Monday, November 7, Brew. 

By: Samuel Wonacott

Here’s what’s in store for you as you start your day:

  1. Our top analyses and resources for Election Day
  2. Both of New Hampshire’s U.S. House elections are rated as toss ups

Our top analyses and resources for Election Day

Welcome to election week! Tomorrow, on Nov. 8, millions of voters will be heading to the polls. Over the last month, our coverage has focused on battleground races, ballot measure previews, and analyses of what’s at stake for federal, state, and local politics. We’ll be in your inbox all week bringing you resources to help you vote – and then follow the election results throughout the coming days ahead. 

So, let’s run through our most important articles and resources for Election Day. 

Sample Ballot Lookup

If you’re heading to the polls tomorrow (or voting today), use our Sample Ballot Lookup tool to learn about the candidates and issues on your ballot. 

Election Help Desk

Our Election Help Desk is ready to answer your most pressing questions about tomorrow’s elections. Are you curious why states have different election rules or whether you can take a ballot selfie? Are you wondering when states can begin counting absentee/mail-in ballots and what rules govern recounts? You’ll find answers to those questions and a lot more at the Election Help Desk, which features 30 articles covering six broad categories of questions. 

Election results

This page is our hub for reporting the results of elections up and down the ballot. You’ll find election updates, battleground election results, an overview of race ratings, and more. Bookmark this page for tomorrow evening, when results start trickling in. We’ll be working late into the morning reporting results. 

Election Analysis Hub

This is another hub page you’ll want to bookmark. With thousands of elections taking place across the country, we’ll have plenty of analysis articles on outcomes at the federal, state, and local levels. Here’s a sampling of the analysis articles on that hub page: 

Top 15 elections to watch

This is our list of top races to watch. It includes congressional and state executive elections (including for governor), and elections for state supreme court judgeships, state legislatures, and mayors. 

Top 15 ballot measures to watch

Voters in 37 states will decide on 132 statewide ballot measures that address topics like abortion, marijuana, voting policies, firearms, sports betting, and state constitutional rights. This is our list of the top 15 measures to watch. 

Annual State Legislative Competitiveness Report

The national conversation about Election Day tends to overlook state legislative elections in favor of high-profile congressional and gubernatorial races. Our recent report on state legislative competitiveness found a decade-high level of competition in the 6,278 state legislative elections taking place this year. Click here to read about the 28 state legislative chambers that we’ve identified as battlegrounds. Also, last week’s episode of On the Ballot, our weekly podcast, breaks down the state legislative races to watch with CNalysis founder and director Chaz Nuttycombe. Download it wherever you get your podcasts!

State financial officers

If state legislative elections tend to get overlooked in busy election years, then that’s even more true about the elections for state financial officers. These officials—treasurers, auditors, and comptrollers—play an important role in things like auditing other government offices, managing payroll, and overseeing pensions. You can learn all about the elections for state financial officers in your state at the link above. 

Happy voting, and we look forward to bringing you results and analysis throughout the week. 

Keep reading

Both of New Hampshire’s U.S. House elections are rated as toss ups

Way back on Aug. 29, before the leaves changed colors and before we swapped iced coffee for hot coffee, we ran the first story in our 50 states in 50 days series. Today, on Election Day eve, we’re bringing you the final installment—New Hampshire, the Granite State! Happy voting! 

Week One: Pennsylvania, Indiana, South Dakota, Nebraska, North Dakota
Week Two: California, Georgia, Texas, Montana
Week Three: North Carolina, Virginia, New Mexico, Illinois, Idaho
Week Four: Kentucky, Michigan, Arkansas, Minnesota, West Virginia
Week Five: Vermont, Nevada, Wyoming, Arizona, Ohio
Week Six: South Carolina, Iowa, Kansas, Oregon, Tennessee
Week Seven: Colorado, New Jersey, Washington, Alabama, Utah
Week Eight: Mississippi, Maryland, Rhode Island, Oklahoma, Maine
Week Nine: Massachusetts, Wisconsin, Alaska, Hawaii, Florida
Week Ten: Missouri, Louisiana, New York, Connecticut

On the ballot in New Hampshire

At the federal level, New Hampshire voters will elect one U.S. Senator and two U.S. Representatives. 

At the state level, the offices of governor and state executive council are up for election. 

All 24 seats in the state Senate and all 400 seats in the state House of Representatives are up for election.

None of the U.S. House districts up for election are open. Of the 424 state legislative districts up for election, 126 are open. 

Redistricting highlights

New Hampshire was apportioned two seats in the U.S. House of Representatives after the 2020 census, the same number it was apportioned after the 2010 census. 

Congressional and state legislative elections will take place under new district lines following the census. Our side-by-side map comparison tool allows you to immediately see what redistricting looks like in your state. Here are the congressional maps in effect before and after the 2020 redistricting cycle in New Hampshire:  

To use our tool to view New Hampshire’s state legislative maps in effect before and after the 2020 redistricting cycle, visit our New Hampshire redistricting page

Partisan balance

  • Both of New Hampshire’s U.S. Senators–Maggie Hassan and Jeanne Shaheen–are Democrats. 
  • Democrats represent both of the state’s U.S. House districts. 
  • Republicans hold a 13-11 majority in the state Senate and a 202-198 majority in the state Assembly. The governor–Chris Sununu–is a Republican.
  • As a result, New Hampshire is one of 13 states under divided trifecta control and one of nine states under divided triplex control.

Seats contested by only one major party

In 2022, 59 state legislative seats in New Hampshire, or 13.9% of all seats up for election, do not have major party competition. When a candidate from only one of either the Democratic or Republican parties runs for a state legislative seat, that party is all but guaranteed to win.

Democrats are running in 96% of all state legislative races. 17 state legislative seats (4% of all state legislative seats) lack a Democratic candidate and a Republican is likely to win. 

Republicans are running in 90.1% of all state legislative races. 42 seats (9.9% of all state legislative seats) lack a Republican candidate and a Democrat is likely to win. 

Key races

Ballot measures

New Hampshire voters will decide two statewide ballot measures on Nov. 8: 

A total of 21 ballot measures appeared on statewide ballots between 1985 and 2020. Of that number, seven ballot measures were approved, and 14 were defeated.

Voting

  • On Election Day, polling place hours of operation can vary. However, New Hampshire polling places must be open between 11:00 a.m. and 7:00 p.m. ET, according to state law.
  • New Hampshire requires voters to present photo identification at the polls in most cases. For more information about voter ID requirements in New Hampshire, click here
  • New Hampshire does not permit early voting.
  • The voting registration deadline in New Hampshire is Election Day, November 8, 2022. Registration can be done in person or by mail. 
  • New Hampshire voters can only vote absentee by mail if they meet certain requirements. To learn more about these requirements, click here. The deadline to request an absentee ballot is Nov. 7. Ballots can be returned in person or by mail. Ballots must be received by Nov. 8 at 7:00 p.m. 
  • To check the status of your ballot, click here.

Want to learn more about the elections you’ll be voting in this year? Click here to use our Sample Ballot Lookup tool! 

Keep reading



ICYMI: Top stories of the week

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Five states to decide in November on legalizing recreational marijuana

In November, five states will decide on marijuana legalization ballot measures. In the central U.S., voters in Arkansas, Missouri, North Dakota, and South Dakota will consider citizen initiatives to legalize marijuana. These four states are Republican trifectas. In Maryland, which has a divided government, the legislature voted to put the issue before voters.

Read more

28 state legislative chambers we’ll be watching next week

Ballotpedia has identified 28 of the 88 state legislative chambers up for election in November as battlegrounds. The individual elections for these chambers could affect partisan control, create supermajorities, or end them.

Republicans control 19 of the 28 battleground chambers. Democrats control eight. The final chamber, the Alaska House of Representatives, has a numerical Republican majority, but a multiparty coalition runs the chamber.

Read more

What you need to know about this year’s state financial officer elections

In 2022, either directly or indirectly, voters will decide who controls 68 of the 105 state financial officerships nationwide.

Broadly, these officials are responsible for things like auditing other government offices, managing payroll, and overseeing pensions. In some states, certain SFOs are also responsible for investing state retirement and trust funds, meaning they get to decide where that public money goes.

The way in which voters will affect the control of these offices varies by state, with some being directly elected and others being appointed.

Read more

President Joe Biden’s approval rating rises to 44% in October, highest since 2021

Recent approval polling averages show President Joe Biden (D) at 44% approval, the highest rating he’s received since 2021. Fifty-four percent of voters disapprove of his performance.

Biden last had a 44% approval rating on December 22, 2021. The lowest approval rating he’s received is 38% on July 27, 2022. The highest approval rating Biden has received is 55% on May 26, 2021.

Read more



Election Legislation Weekly Digest: November 4, 2022

Here is our weekly round-up on election-related legislation. In it, you’ll find the following information: 

  • Recent activity: Here, we report on the number of bills acted on within the past week. 
  • The big picture: Here, we look at the bills in the aggregate. 
    • Legislative status: How many bills have been introduced, voted upon, or enacted into law?
    • Concentration of activity: What states have seen the highest concentration of legislative activity?
    • Partisan affiliation of sponsorship: How many bills have been sponsored by Democrats vs. Republicans? 
    • Subject: What subjects are most commonly addressed in the bills? 

Recent activity

Since October 28, no bills have been acted on in any way (representing a 100 percent decrease as compared to last week’s total of 3 bills).

The bar chart below compares recent activity on a week-to-week basis over the last eight weeks. 

The big picture

To date, we have tracked 2,524 election-related bills. These bills were either introduced this year or crossed over from last year’s legislative sessions. 

Legislative status 

The pie charts below visualize the legislative status of the bills we are tracking. The following status indicators are used: 

  • Introduced: The bill has been pre-filed, introduced, or referred to committee but has not otherwise been acted upon.
  • Advanced from committee: The bill has received a favorable vote in committee. It has either advanced to another committee or to the floor for a vote. 
  • Passed one chamber: The bill has been approved by one legislative chamber.
  • Conference committee: Differing versions of the bill have been approved by their respective chambers and a conference committee has been appointed to reconcile the differences. 
  • Passed both chambers: The bill has cleared both chambers of the legislature. 
  • Enacted: The bill has been enacted into law, by gubernatorial action or inaction or veto override. 
  • Vetoed: The bill has been vetoed. 
  • Dead: The bill has been defeated in committee or by floor vote. 

The pie charts below visualize the legislative status of bills in Democratic and Republican trifectas, respectively. 

Concentration of activity

The map below visualizes the concentration of legislative activity across the nation. A darker shade of yellow indicates a higher number of relevant bills that have been introduced. A lighter shade of yellow indicates a lower number of relevant bills. 

Partisan affiliation of sponsor(s)

The pie chart below visualizes the partisan affiliation of bill sponsors.

The bar chart below visualizes the correlation between the partisan affiliation of bill sponsors and trifecta status (e.g., how many Democratic-sponsored bills were introduced in Democratic trifectas vs. Republican trifectas).

Bills by topic

The chart below presents information on the total number of bills dealing with particular topics. The number listed on the blue portion of each bar indicates the number of Democratic-sponsored bills dealing with the subject in question. The number listed on the red portion of the bar indicates the number of Republican-sponsored bills. The purple and gray portions of the bar indicate the number of bipartisan-sponsored bills and bills with unspecified sponsorship, respectively. Note that the numbers listed here will not, when summed, equal the total number of bills because some bills deal with multiple topics.



State financial officers—what they are and why you should care

Welcome to the Friday, November 4, Brew. 

By: Douglas Kronaizl

Here’s what’s in store for you as you start your day:

  1. What you need to know about this year’s state financial officer elections
  2. All major party candidates in 45 battleground races completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey
  3. Connecticut voters to consider allowing in-person early voting

Chaz Nuttycombe, founder and director of CNalysis, joins the On the Ballot podcast to discuss forecasting the upcoming midterms and the state legislative elections to watch next week. Check out the episode here or wherever you get your podcasts!

What you need to know about this year’s state financial officer elections

Across the country, voters are gearing up to decide the control of the U.S. Senate, U.S. House, and state governments nationwide.

Beyond the usual high-profile races, let’s take a look at another set of important offices: state financial officers (SFOs).

In 2022, either directly or indirectly, voters will decide who controls 68 of the 105 state financial officerships nationwide (65%).

Different states have different names for these officials, but they all fall into three groups: treasurers, auditors, and controllers.

Broadly, these officials are responsible for things like auditing other government offices, managing payroll, and overseeing pensions.

In some states, certain SFOs are also responsible for investing state retirement and trust funds, meaning they get to decide where that public money goes.

In these states, one issue that comes into play is environmental, social, and corporate governance (ESG). This is an investment approach where, before investing in a corporation, an investor considers the extent to which that corporation conforms to certain “environmental, social, and corporate” standards.

For example, an SFO might avoid investing in a fossil fuel company if they are concerned about climate change. Or they might make investment decisions based on whether a fund shares or promotes a particular social standard.

Voters will decide control of 32 SFOs responsible for investing either trust funds, retirement funds, or both. Democrats currently control 16 of these offices, Republicans control 15, and the partisan affiliation of one could not be determined.

Regarding all offices that could be affected this year—not just those with investment responsibilities—Democrats and Republicans both currently hold 33, and two positions are marked as other because they were bipartisan appointees.

Most SFOs are officially nonpartisan, but we can use the party of the appointing authority to estimate the appointed SFOs’ affiliations.

The way in which voters will affect the control of these offices varies by state, with some being directly elected and others being appointed. These SFOs fall into four categories:

  • Direct elections: voters will directly elect 50 SFOs this year. Fourteen are on the ballot in 2024.
  • Appointees with expiring terms: nine SFOs’ terms are set to expire in 2023 or 2024, with decision-making power for the next term falling to the governors and legislators elected on Nov. 8.
  • Contingent appointees: nine SFOs don’t have a term length, but instead serve at the pleasure of elected officials who are on the ballot this year. If an elected official loses or the office switches party control, their predecessor will get to decide whether to keep those SFOs or appoint new ones.
  • Other: four SFOs’ terms are contingent upon either a non-elected appointee or a multi-member board.

We will be following these races closely on Election Day and will share those results with you right here in the Brew after the votes come in. You can also use the link below to follow our coverage of the results.

Keep reading 

All major party candidates in 45 battleground races completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

We’ve talked a lot about full houses this election cycle—races where every candidate has completed our Candidate Connection survey—but let’s look at some of the marquee races where all major party candidates have replied.

There are 45 battleground races nationwide where all major party candidates have completed the Candidate Connection survey.

These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about their key messages and what motivates them to run.

These 45 races represent 20% of the 225 federal, state executive, and state legislative elections where all major party candidates have completed our survey. Here’s a look at some of the highlights:

At the federal level, all major party candidates in Michigan’s 3rd and Pennsylvania’s 17th Congressional Districts have completed our survey. Click the links to view candidates’ responses.

  • Michigan’s 3rd: Hillary Scholten (D) faces John Gibbs (R), who defeated incumbent U.S. Rep. Peter Meijer (R) in the Republican primary on Aug. 2. Three election forecasters rate this contest as Lean Democratic.
  • Pennsylvania’s 17th: Christopher Deluzio (D) and Jeremy Shaffer (R) are running in an open race. U.S. Rep. Conor Lamb (D) did not run for re-election and instead sought the Democratic U.S. Senate nomination. Three election forecasters rate this race as Toss-up.

We’ve received responses from all major party candidates in the following battleground state executive races:

  • Arizona Attorney General: Kris Mayes (D) and Abraham Hamadeh (R) are running in an open race. Incumbent Mark Brnovich (R) is term-limited. Arizona has had a Republican attorney general since 2011.
  • California Controller: Malia Cohen (D) and Lanhee Chen (R) are running in an open race. Incumbent Betty Yee (D) is term-limited. California has had a Democratic controller since 1975.
  • Iowa Secretary of State: Incumbent Paul Pate (R) faces Joel Miller (D). Pate was first elected in 2014, and was re-elected in 2018 with 53% of the vote. 

Both candidates running for seat 5 on the North Carolina Supreme Court also completed the survey:

The remaining 39 battleground races with full major party completion are taking place at the state legislative level. You can find those responses here.

Use the link below to learn more about Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey, taken by over 5,000 candidates nationwide so far.

Keep reading 

Connecticut voters to consider allowing in-person early voting

Today is the 49th day of our 50 States in 50 Days series, and we’re featuring Connecticut, the Constitution State!

Week One: Pennsylvania, Indiana, South Dakota, Nebraska, North Dakota
Week Two: California, Georgia, Texas, Montana
Week Three: North Carolina, Virginia, New Mexico, Illinois, Idaho
Week Four: Kentucky, Michigan, Arkansas, Minnesota, West Virginia
Week Five: Vermont, Nevada, Wyoming, Arizona, Ohio
Week Six: South Carolina, Iowa, Kansas, Oregon, Tennessee
Week Seven: Colorado, New Jersey, Washington, Alabama, Utah
Week Eight: Mississippi, Maryland, Rhode Island, Oklahoma, Maine
Week Nine: Massachusetts, Wisconsin, Alaska, Hawaii, Florida
Week Ten: Missouri, Louisiana, New York

On the ballot in Connecticut

Connecticut voters will elect one U.S. Senator and five U.S. Representatives.

Six state executive offices are also up for election: governor, lieutenant governor, attorney general, secretary of state, treasurer, and comptroller.

All 187 state legislative seats—36 in the Senate and 151 in the House—are on the ballot.

Connecticut has fusion voting, meaning candidates can run with multiple party affiliations. On the ballot, candidates are listed separately for each party whose label they are running under.

Redistricting highlights

The number of U.S. House districts in Connecticut remained the same at five following the 2020 census.

Congressional and state legislative elections will take place under new district lines following the census. Our side-by-side map comparison tool allows you to compare each district. Here’s an example of what Connecticut’s congressional map looked like before and after the 2020 census:

You can interact with our map comparison tools by visiting our Connecticut redistricting page here.

Partisan balance

  • Both of Connecticut’s U.S. Senators—Richard Blumenthal and Chris Murphy—are Democrats.
  • Democrats represent all five of the state’s U.S. House districts.
  • Connecticut has had a Democratic governor since 2011.
  • Democrats hold a 23-13 majority in the Senate and a 97-54 majority in the House.
  • With a Democratic governor and majorities in both legislative chambers, Connecticut is one of 14 Democratic trifectas, a status it has held since 2011.
  • In addition to the governor, Connecticut has a Democratic attorney general and secretary of state, making it one of 18 Democratic triplexes.

Seats contested by one major party

This year, 42 state legislative seats in Connecticut, or 23% of those up for election, do not have major party competition. When a candidate from only one of either major party runs for a state legislative seat, that party is all but guaranteed to win.

Democrats are running for 174 seats (93%). Thirteen seats (75) do not feature a Democratic candidate, meaning Republicans will likely win.

Republicans are running for 158 seats (84%). Twenty-nine seats (16%) do not feature a Republican candidate, meaning Democrats will likely win.

Key races

  • Governor: incumbent Ned Lamont (D) faces Bob Stefanowski (R) and Robert Hotaling (I), setting up, along with Georgia, one of the country’s two gubernatorial rematches. In 2018, Lamont defeated Stefanowski, 49% to 46%. Two election forecasters rate the election as Solid Democratic and one rates it as Likely Democratic.
  • U.S. House District 5: incumbent Jahana Hayes (D) faces George Logan (R). The 5th District’s borders were largely unchanged during redistricting, with President Joe Biden (D) defeating former President Donald Trump (R) under both pre- and post-redistricting lines 55% to 44%. Two election forecasters rate the election as Lean Democratic and one rates it as a Toss-up.

Ballot measures

One ballot measure is on the ballot this year:

  • Question 1 would amend the constitution, authorizing the Legislature to pass laws allowing for in-person early voting. Currently, Connecticut is one of four states that does not allow in-person early voting in some form. In 2014, voters defeated an amendment 52% to 48% that would have allowed early voting and removed restrictions on absentee voting. The 2022 amendment does not involve absentee voting.

Between 1985 and 2018, 13 measures appeared on statewide ballots. Voters approved 10 (77%) and defeated three (23%).

Voting

  • Polls are open from 6 a.m. to 8 p.m. on Election Day.
  • Connecticut requires photo identification when voting. For more information, click here.
  • Connecticut does not allow early voting.
  • Certain voters are allowed to vote absentee/by-mail. The deadline to submit a completed ballot in person is Nov. 7. Election officials must receive ballots submitted by mail no later than the time polls close on Nov. 8.
  • The voter registration deadline passed on Nov. 1. Connecticut also allows same-day registration if voting in person on Election Day. Check the status of your registration here.

Want to learn more about the elections you’ll be voting in this year? Click here to use our Sample Ballot Lookup tool!

Keep reading



Marijuana is on the ballot in five states on Election Day

Welcome to the Thursday, November 3, Brew. 

By: Samuel Wonacott

Here’s what’s in store for you as you start your day:

  1. Five states to decide in November on legalizing recreational marijuana
  2. Bass, Caruso face off in Los Angeles mayoral election
  3. In Delaware, 58% of all state legislative seats up for election lack major party competition

Five states to decide on legalizing recreational marijuana

We’re down to the wire, with only a few days to go before Election Day. Over the last few weeks, we’ve brought you stories about the statewide ballot measures voters will decide on Nov. 8. For our final story on this topic, let’s look at where voters will decide on marijuana legalization. Be sure to bookmark our election hub page so that, on Election Day and throughout next week, you can see results for all 132 measures on the ballot. 

Let’s jump in.

In November, five states will decide on marijuana legalization ballot measures. In the central U.S., voters in Arkansas, Missouri, North Dakota, and South Dakota will consider citizen initiatives to legalize marijuana. These four states are Republican trifectas. In Maryland, which has a divided government, the legislature voted to put the issue before voters.

Here’s a summary of those measures:

  • Arkansas Issue 4: Amends the constitution to legalize the possession and use of up to one ounce of marijuana for people 21 and older, enacts a 10% tax on marijuana sales, and requires the state Alcoholic Beverage Control Division to develop rules to regulate marijuana businesses.
  • Maryland Question 4: Amends the constitution to legalize marijuana for people 21 and older beginning in July 2023 and directs the Maryland legislature to pass laws for the use, distribution, regulation, and taxation of marijuana.
  • Missouri Amendment 3: Amends the constitution to legalize marijuana for people 21 and older , allows individuals convicted of non-violent marijuana-related offenses to petition to be released from incarceration and/or have their records expunged, and enacts a 6% tax on the sale of marijuana.
  • North Dakota Statutory Measure 2: Amends state law to legalize the use and possession of up to one ounce of marijuana for people 21 and older, allows individuals to grow up to three marijuana plants, and requires the Department of Health and Human Services to establish rules regulating marijuana by Oct. 1, 2023
  • South Dakota Initiated Measure 27: Amends state law to legalize marijuana for persons who are 21 years old and allows adults to possess one ounce or less of marijuana

Marijuana is legal in 19 states and D.C. Eleven of those states and D.C. legalized marijuana through the ballot initiative process. One state, New Jersey, passed a legislatively referred measure.

In 12 states where marijuana is currently prohibited, the initiative process could be used to legalize recreational or medical marijuana. In addition to the four states deciding marijuana initiatives in 2022, Oklahoma will vote on marijuana legalization in 2023. Marijuana legalization initiatives targeting the 2023 and 2024 ballots have also been filed in Ohio, Wyoming, Florida, and Nebraska and could be filed in Idaho, Mississippi, Nebraska, and Utah.

Keep reading

Bass, Caruso face off in Los Angeles mayoral election

Let’s turn to the most closely watched mayoral race on Nov. 8—in Los Angeles, California. 

Karen Bass and Rick Caruso are running in the nonpartisan general election for mayor of Los Angeles on Nov. 8. The candidates advanced from the June 7 primary election since neither received 50% of the vote, a threshold necessary to win outright. Incumbent Mayor Eric Garcetti is term-limited.

Bass was first elected to the California Assembly in 2004 and served until 2010, including a term as speaker from 2008 to 2010.. Bass was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives in 2010 and currently represents California’s 37th Congressional District. In a campaign ad, Bass said, “I’m running for mayor to meet today’s challenges: crime, homelessness, and the soaring cost of housing.”

Caruso is the founder and chief executive officer of a retail complex development company. He has also served on Los Angeles’ Department of Water and Power Commission, as the president of Los Angeles’ Police Commission, and on the USC Board of Trustees. In a campaign ad, Caruso said, “I’m running for mayor because the city we love is in a state of emergency: rampant homelessness, people living in fear for their safety, and politicians at city hall just in it for themselves.” 

Though the election is officially nonpartisan, both candidates are registered Democrats. Caruso said he changed his party registration from no party preference to Democrat in January 2022. Bass has held elected office as a Democrat since 2005.

Among others, President Joe Biden (D), Speaker of the U.S. House Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.), and Los Angeles Councilmember Bob Blumenfield have endorsed Bass. Among others, former Los Angeles Mayor Richard Riordan, Los Angeles Councilmember Joe Buscaino, and former Chief of the Los Angeles Police Department Charlie Beck have endorsed Caruso.  

The New York Times‘ Jennifer Medina wrote that the race “has focused on voters’ worries about public safety and homelessness in the nation’s second-largest city” and could “become a test of whether voters this year favor an experienced politician who has spent nearly two decades in government or an outsider running on his business credentials.” 

This is the first even-year election for Los Angeles mayor since the 2015 passage of Charter Amendment 1, which shifted city elections to even-numbered years beginning in 2020. The city uses a strong mayor and city council system. In this form of municipal government, the city council serves as the city’s primary legislative body and the mayor serves as the city’s chief executive.

The mayors of 62 of the country’s 100 largest cities were affiliated with the Democratic Party. Republicans held 26 mayoral offices, independents held four, and seven mayors were nonpartisan. One mayor’s partisan affiliation was unknown. Los Angeles has a Democratic mayor.

Click below to read more about the Los Angeles mayoral election.

Keep reading 

In Delaware, 58% of all state legislative seats up for election lack major party competition

Today is the 48th day of our 50 States in 50 days series, and we’re featuring Delaware, the First State.

Week One: Pennsylvania, Indiana, South Dakota, Nebraska, North Dakota
Week Two: California, Georgia, Texas, Montana
Week Three: North Carolina, Virginia, New Mexico, Illinois, Idaho
Week Four: Kentucky, Michigan, Arkansas, Minnesota, West Virginia
Week Five: Vermont, Nevada, Wyoming, Arizona, Ohio
Week Six: South Carolina, Iowa, Kansas, Oregon, Tennessee
Week Seven: Colorado, New Jersey, Washington, Alabama, Utah
Week Eight: Mississippi, Maryland, Rhode Island, Oklahoma, Maine
Week Nine: Massachusetts, Wisconsin, Alaska, Hawaii, Florida
Week Ten: Missouri, Louisiana, New York 

On the ballot in Delaware

At the federal level, Delaware voters will elect one member to the U.S. House Representatives.

Three state executive offices are on the ballot this year: attorney general, treasurer, and auditor.

All 41 seats in the state House of Representatives and all 21 seats in the state Senate are up for election. Seven incumbents did not run for re-election in seven seats. 

Redistricting highlights

After the 2020 census, Delaware’s number of congressional districts remained the same at one, making it one of six states that elects a single at-large representative.

State legislative elections will take place under new district lines following the census. Our side-by-side map comparison tool allows you to immediately see what redistricting looks like in your state. Here are the state senate maps in effect before and after the 2020 redistricting cycle in Delaware:  

To use our tool to view Delaware’s state legislative maps in effect before and after the 2020 redistricting cycle, visit our Delaware redistricting page.

Partisan balance

  • Both of Delaware’s U.S. Senators—Chris Coons and Tom Carper—are Democrats.
  • Rep. Lisa Blunt Rochester, a Democrat, has represented Delaware’s At-Large Congressional District since 2017.
  • Democrats hold a 26-15 majority in the state House and a 14-7 majority in the state Senate. Because the governor is a Democrat, Delaware is one of 14 states with a Democratic state government trifecta. It has held this status since 2009.
  • Along with the governor, Delaware’s secretary of state and attorney general are also Democrats, making the state one of 18 Democratic triplexes among those offices. 

Seats contested by only one major party

In 2022, 36 state legislative seats in Delaware, or 58% of all seats up for election, do not have major party competition. When a candidate from only one of either the Democratic or Republican parties runs for a state legislative seat, that party is all but guaranteed to win the seat.

Democrats are running in 74% of all state legislative races. Sixteen state legislative seats (26% of all state legislative seats) do not feature a Democratic candidate and a Republican is likely to win.

Republicans are running in 68% of all state legislative races. Twenty state legislative seats (32% of all state legislative seats) do not feature a Republican and a Democrat is likely to win.

Key races

Ballot measures

Delaware does not allow citizen initiative, referendum, or recall.

Only two advisory questions have been put before the people of Delaware: the Delaware Slot Machines Referendum in 1976, which was defeated, and the Delaware Charitable Gambling Referendum in 1984, which was approved. Both related to issues of gambling in the state.

Voting

  • Polls are open from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. local time.
  • Delaware requires voters to present non-photo identification while voting. To read more about Delaware’s ID requirements, click here
  • Early voting is available from Oct. 28 to Nov. 6.
  • The voting registration deadline in Delaware was Oct. 15. Voters could have registered online, by mail, or in person. Mail registration forms are valid as long as they are postmarked Oct. 15 or earlier. Delaware does not allow Election Day registration. 
  • Delaware places some limits on who may vote absentee. To read more about the requirements to vote absentee in Delaware, click here
  • The deadline for requesting a mail-in ballot in person, by mail, or online is Nov. 4. Mail-in ballots must be returned in person or by mail by Nov. 8. 

Want to learn more about the elections you’ll be voting in this year? Click here to use our Sample Ballot Lookup tool!  

Keep reading



Hall Pass: Your Ticket to Understanding School Board Politics, Edition #36

Welcome to Hall Pass, a newsletter written to keep you plugged into the conversations driving school board politics and governance.

A note to readers: Election Day is next week, and we’ll be taking a break from our regularly scheduled Hall Pass programming to keep you abreast of the latest election results and analysis up and down the ballot. This newsletter will return to your inboxes on Nov. 16. Subscribe to Ballotpedia’s Daily Brew for election results next week. Or bookmark this article for election results, updates, and analysis. 

Reply to this email to share reactions or story ideas!

In today’s edition, you’ll find:

  • On the issues: The debate over community schools  
  • School board filing deadlines, election results, and recall certifications
  • School board general election previews: Maryland, North Carolina, and Kentucky
  • Extracurricular: education news from around the web
  • Candidate Connection survey

On the issues: The debate over community schools

In this section, we curate reporting, analysis, and commentary on the issues school board members deliberate when they set out to offer the best education possible in their district.

The Biden Administration’s 2023 budget proposal included a plan to spend $468 million on the Full-Service Community Schools program. In 2022, the administration spent $68 million on the program. During the Obama and Trump administrations, the federal government spent between $5 million and $17 million on the program annually. The spending increases have been a topic of debate in recent years.

Full-service community schools offer many types of services to students, such as health care, mental health counseling, nutrition assistance, and programs that involve students in their communities. 

Stanley Kurtz writes that community schools promote critical race theory and leftist political activism. He also says they are an attempt by progressives to block conservative efforts to promote school choice. 

Raymond Pierce writes that community schools are good public investments that help promote what he calls “education equity.” He says students can only reach their peak potential when their physical, mental, and emotional needs are met, and that community schools meet those needs in poorer school districts.

Stealth CRT in Biden’s Budget | Stanley Kurtz, National Review

“Few Americans know what community schools are. When first explained, the idea may even sound harmless. In reality, unfortunately, more community schools will mean a whole lot more critical race theory — not to mention more school-sponsored leftist political activism. … Progressives hope to convert as many low-performing public schools as possible into community schools. They see this as a way to block conservative attempts to create alternatives to poorly performing public schools via charters, choice, and competition for enrollment based on a school’s academic performance as measured by tests. Unions especially love community schools because they prevent teachers at low-performing public schools from experiencing consequences for meager academic results. Conservatives, on the other hand, are suspicious of community schools precisely because they de-emphasize academics in favor of social services. At their worst, as we’ll see below, community schools substitute progressive political indoctrination for academics. Teachers give up on excellence, and progressives get an army of student converts to boot.”

Community Schools: A Game Changer For Public Education? | Raymond Pierce, Forbes

“While they may appear new to some, community schools have been a part of the American education system for more than 100 years. Almost since their inception, they have been a central strategy in establishing education equity. As we approach a post-COVID reset of our public education system, community schools must be one of the models we expand. They serve not only as hubs for high-quality education, but also places that support communities. They meet local community needs and help to ensure that the whole child is addressed in education by providing what are known as “wrap-around services,” such as health care, afterschool tutoring, school meals, and more. … Many people may not understand why a school should also function as a health center. The answer is not complicated – a student is better able to receive a high-quality education and the opportunities that go with it, if they are ready and able to learn. That means having enough to eat, a safe place to live, and a healthy body and mind. … Clearly, this is an approach that requires significant resources, but studies show that community schools are a good investment and an effective school improvement strategy.”

School board update: filing deadlines, election results, and recall certifications

Ballotpedia has historically covered school board elections in about 500 of the country’s largest districts. We’re gradually expanding the number we cover with our eye on the more than 13,000 districts with elected school boards.

We’re covering over 500 school board elections in 23 states on Nov. 8. We’re also covering over 500 conflict races, some of which fall outside our normal scope, where a candidate has taken a stance on race in education/critical race theory, responses to the coronavirus pandemic, and/or sex and gender in schools.

Over the last few weeks, we’ve previewed school board battleground elections in Texas, Florida, and California—the country’s three biggest states. For our last election preview edition, we’re spotlighting a handful of races that have gotten comparatively little national attention. 

Maryland 

Frederick County Public Schools: Four out of the district’s seven at-large seats are up for election. Seven candidates are running in the elections, including Karen Yoho, an incumbent. The seven candidates have divided themselves into two slates—the Students First Slate and the Education Not Indoctrination (ENI) slate. The Students First Slate, which includes Yoho, Ysela Bravo, Rae Gallagher, and Dean Rose, says it is committed to “Safe, welcoming schools for all,” a “Diverse, well-trained staff,” and “Family & community involvement.” The ENI slate, which includes Olivia Angolia, Nancy Allen, and Cindy Rose, says it is running to “ensure that feelings don’t define truth, that academically-sound curricula are adopted, that decision-making is transparent, and that parents are respected.” The Frederick County Teachers Association (FCTA) has endorsed the Students First slate, while the 1776 Project PAC has endorsed the ENI.

As of the 2020-2021 school year, Frederick County Public Schools had 43,828 students, 2,693 teachers, and 68 schools.

North Carolina

Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools: Six nonpartisan seats on the nine-member board are up for election. The seats were originally scheduled to be on the ballot on Nov. 2, 2021, but were moved to 2022 due to redistricting delays. Eighteeen candidates are running for the six seats. Incumbents are running four of the races—Rhonda Cheek (District 1), Thelma Byers-Bailey (District 2), Carol Sawyer (District 4), and Sean Strain (District 6). 

In District 1, Cheek is running against Melissa Easley, Hamani Fisher, Bill Fountain, and Ro Lawsin. Easley and Fountain completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. Cheek, who assumed office in 2009, is a registered Republican who has said “I’ve been very nonpartisan in my service to the school board because kids don’t need politicians, they need people who care.” 

The Mecklenburg County Republican Party endorsed Lawsin. Lawsin said, “The lack of transparency and open communication by the current board members to the community is dismal and borders on dismissive when parents are pleading for answers and solutions to the many problems plaguing CMS.” The Charlotte-Mecklenburg Association of Educators (CMAE), the county’s largest teacher organization, endorsed both Cheek and Easley, a registered Democrat. The African American Caucus also endorsed Easely. 

In her survey response, Easley said, “The three areas that I am personally passionate about our culture in CMS, school safety and student achievement.” 

The Black Political Caucus endorsed Fisher, a Democrat. Fisher said, “as a board member, I’m looking for three C’s, I’m looking for character, the character, the next superintendent, that superintendent needs to have the character that is going to reflect the educational values of our community. That’s why they elect us as a board because they want us to represent their educational values.” 

Fountain, who is unaffiliated with a political party, said, “The eight women on this board have forced in woke, disturbing, disrupting agents like the pornographic books, gender identification, that I think is spinning the moral compass of our students from wrong to right.”

In District 4, incumbent Sawyer, a Democrat, is running against Clara Kennedy Witherspoon and Stephanie Sneed, both Democrats. Sawyer was first elected in 2017, defeating Sneed 47.4% to 30.98%. Sneed also ran unsuccessfully for an at-large seat in 2019, and chaired the Black Political Caucus before resigning to run this cycle. 

Low-performing schools in the district have been an issue in the race. Sawyer said voters should choose her over her opponents because “I understand how policy can change outcomes. I shepherded creation of a new Equity Policy and a new Community Equity Committee. Establishing that committee was difficult – several board members opposed its creation, but I persisted because I was committed to having community members engaging with the board on our equity work.” 

Witherspoon and Sneed completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey.

Sneed said, if elected, she would focus “on pandemic learning losses, closing achievement gaps; broadening advanced performers opportunities; and student and family access to mental health support to ensure all students are college or career ready.” Witherspoon said, “Children and their families are our school district’s most important stakeholders. Therefore, I will be sensitive to the needs of all children and their parents, focusing on equity and equality for all schools.”

The CMAE endorsed Sawyer, while the Black Political Caucus and the African American Caucus endorsed Sneed. According to WFAE 90.7, Charlotte’s NPR station, a group called Success 4 CMS endorsed Sneed and put up a billboard that said, “Carol Sawyer Voted For Empty Classrooms.” The president of the local Mom’s for Liberty chapter, Brooke Weiss, tweeted that people should support Sneed to oust Sawyer, though Mom’s for Liberty did not formally endorse Sneed. 

As of the 2020-2021 school year, Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools had 149,845 students, 9,183 teachers, and 176 schools.

Kentucky

Jefferson County Public Schools: Four of the board’s seven seats are up for election—Districts, 1, 3, 5, and 6. 

Better Schools Kentucky PAC, an arm of the Jefferson County Teachers Association (JCTA), endorsed incumbent Diane Porter (District 1), incumbent James Craig (District 2), incumbent Linda Duncan (District 5), and incumbent Corrie Shull (District 6). 

The Jefferson County Republican Party endorsed Charlie Bell (District 1), J. Stephen Ullum (District 3), Gregory Puccetti (District 5), and Misty Glin (District 6). 

If the Republican-backed candidates win, it would change the board’s partisan makeup. If the incumbents win, the balance of power on the board would be preserved. At a rally on Oct. 28, U.S. Sen. Rand Paul said voters should remove all four incumbents: “How long have the Jefferson schools been failing us? Decades. They keep electing the same people. Maybe it’s time for a new slate of people on the school board.”

As of the 2020-2021 school year, Jefferson County Public Schools had 100,348 students, 6,160 teachers, and 172 schools. It is Kentucky’s largest school district by enrollment. 

Extracurricular: education news from around the web

This section contains links to recent education-related articles from around the internet. If you know of a story we should be reading, reply to this email to share it with us! 

Take our Candidate Connection survey to reach voters in your district

In 22 school board elections happening on Nov. 8, every candidate on the ballot filled in Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. Today, we’re highlighting one of those races—the general election for Canyons Board of Education District 5 in Utah. Four seats are up for election. 

You can read more about the races with a 100% Candidate Connection completion rate here

Incumbent Steve Wrigley and Karen Pedersen are running in the nonpartisan race. 

Here’s how Wrigley answered the question “What areas of public policy are you personally passionate about?

“With our exceptional teachers and many state-of-the-art programs, we are poised to move forward into the future. We need to expand on these successes and fully implement them to meet our students’ needs. We have developed a Student Services Division that is focused on supporting our students’ emotional needs in this post-pandemic environment. We have built quality educational environments that are equipped to meet the needs of 21st Century Education.

The past two years has seen an increase in level of student behaviors and mental health issues. Our teachers and administration are stressed and need our support. Our community has become fractured. We need to provide a comprehensive student support system that will get our students back on track and support them to become life ready. We need to keep the concepts and philosophies of CRT out of our schools. We need a foundational character education program that will teach respect, resiliency, and other key emotional skills. We need to work closely with our parents, patrons, and teachers to build an environment of open communication, trust, and respect.”

Click here to read the rest of Wrigley’s answers. 

Here’s how Pedersen answered the question “What areas of public policy are you personally passionate about?

“As a recently retired educator, I have experienced the weight of the demands placed on teachers, the expectations to have all students at or above grade level, and the constant implementation of new initiatives without the time and support to accomplish them. This is one of the main of teacher stress and burnout. I will look to see what can be streamlined or eliminated from current employee workload. Less stressed teachers are better able to meet the diverse needs of our students.”

Click here to read the rest of Pedersen’s answers.