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54% of state legislatures are Republican, 44% Democratic following 2022 general election

As of November 17, 2022, 54% of all state legislatures in the United States are Republican while 44% are Democratic. There are 7,383 state legislative seats in the country.

Republicans hold the majority in 56 chambers, and Democrats hold the majority in 39 chambers. One chamber (Alaska House) is organized under a multipartisan, power-sharing coalition. As of November 17, control of four legislative chambers remained uncalled following the 2022 elections. Click here for more details.

Democrats hold 860 state Senate seats and 2,396 state House seats, and lost 16 seats since September of this year. Republicans hold 1,097 state Senate seats and 2,921 state House seats, and gained 24 seats since September.

Independent or third-party legislators hold 36 seats across 14 different states, including 30 state House seats and six state Senate seats. There are 64 vacant state House seats and nine vacant state Senate seats.

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State senators

State representatives



Seven new U.S. senators and 77 new U.S. representatives won election to the 118th Congress

As of November 16, 2022, 84 new members have won election to the 118th Congress, including seven U.S. senators and 77 U.S. representatives. For comparison, 71 new members were elected to Congress in the 2020 election and subsequent runoffs, including nine U.S. senators and 62 U.S. representatives. 102 new members were elected to Congress in the 2018 election and subsequent runoffs, including nine U.S. senators and 93 U.S. representatives.

All seven new U.S. senators elected in 2022—one Democrat and six Republicans—replaced retiring incumbents from the same party. Twenty-four of the new U.S. representatives elected in 2022—12 Democrats and 12 Republicans—replaced 16 Democratic incumbents and eight Republican incumbents who either announced they would not seek re-election in 2022, withdrew from their races, or passed away while in office. 

Eighteen of the new U.S. representatives elected in 2022—eight Democrats and ten Republicans—replaced ten Democratic incumbents and eight Republican incumbents who ran for other offices instead of running for reelection. 

Due to redistricting, 14 incumbent U.S. representatives—eight Democrats and six Republicans—sought re-election in different congressional districts in 2022 than they represented in 2020. In addition, five of the seven new congressional districts created during the reapportionment process after the 2020 U.S. Census resulted in the election of new members. To fill these 19 seats, nine Democrats and eight Republicans were elected in 2022. As of November 16, 2022, two races that may result in new members of Congress due to redistricting remain uncalled.

16 incumbents—six Democrats and ten Republicans—lost their races for re-election in 2022 in either the primary or general election. Six Democrats and ten Republicans were elected to fill these seats. 



U.S. Rep. Vicente Gonzalez Jr. (D) defeats U.S. Rep. Mayra Flores (R) in TX-34

U.S. Rep. Vicente Gonzalez Jr. (D) defeated U.S. Rep. Mayra Flores (R) in the general election for Texas’ 34th Congressional District on Nov. 8, 2022. This election was one of two U.S. House races in which two incumbents faced off in the general election.

Texas’ congressional district boundaries were redrawn after the 2020 census. According to data from Daily Kos, voters in the redrawn 34th District backed Joe Biden (D) over Donald Trump (R) 57.3% to 41.8% in the 2020 presidential election.

Gonzalez was first elected to represent Texas’ 15th Congressional District in 2016. Gonzalez’s campaign website said, “Vicente has stood by our promise to veterans, helping constituents cut through red tape at the VA and working across the aisle to prevent the shameful deportation of our honorably discharged veterans. He’s working to lower prescription drug prices, protect the benefits and healthcare of seniors, and ensure that jobs and opportunities are there for all with the ganas to work. … As a Congressman, he is delivering billions to support our schools, families, and small businesses and continues helping South Texans recover the federal benefits they are owed.”

Flores was elected to represent the old 34th district in a June 2022 special election to fill the seat vacated by Rep. Filemon Vela (D). Flores’ campaign website stated, “As the first Mexican-born woman to serve in Congress, I am fighting for opportunity and security for all those living in our amazing district. Our America First policies resonate with the Hispanic community and others who live in this district. For over 100 years, the Democrat Party has taken for granted the loyalty and support South Texas has given them for decades. But they do nothing to earn our vote or our support. And meanwhile, President Biden is killing Texas jobs, weakening border security, and weakening our standing in the world. Enough is enough.”

The Texas Tribune‘s Matthew Choi described the race as “a high-drama, multi-month affair of desperate pleas, dashed hopes and political gamesmanship that highlighted the stakes of when national forces come into play in a hyperlocal race.”

According to Insider‘s Hanna Kang and Dorothy Cucci, “As of early November, several dozen super PACs, national party committees, politically active nonprofits, and other non-candidate groups … together spent about $10.9 million to advocate for or against candidates in this race, including during the race’s primary phase. The Congressional Leadership Fund, a national Republican hybrid PAC that backs Flores, alone [accounted] for nearly half that spending.”

All 435 House districts were up for election on Nov. 8.



U.S. Rep. Neal Dunn (R) defeats U.S. Rep. Al Lawson (D) in FL-02

U.S. Rep. Neal Dunn (R) defeated U.S. Rep. Al Lawson (D) in the general election for Florida’s 2nd Congressional District on Nov. 8, 2022. Dunn received 60% of the vote to Lawson’s 40%. This election was one of two U.S. House races in which two incumbents faced off in the general election.

Florida’s congressional district boundaries were redrawn after the 2020 census. According to data from Daily Kos, voters in the redrawn 2nd District backed Donald Trump (R) over Joe Biden (D) 55% to 44% in the 2020 presidential election.

Dunn, who was first elected to represent the old 2nd District in 2016, told the Tallahassee Democrat, “My conservative principles are more in line with the people of Florida-02. … One of the many things I would like to accomplish in the next congressional session is stopping the Biden Administration’s failed policies that are driving up inflation.” Dunn said, “The Biden administration’s decisions and actions are a reckless, unnecessary disaster, choking off opportunity for everybody in America, and Al votes with this President 100% of the time. … I have and will continue to offer this district steadfast, conservative, Republican leadership to work to unleash the potential for the American economy.”

Lawson was first elected to represent Florida’s 5th Congressional District in 2016. He said, “I have served North Florida since 1982, first in the Legislature and now Congress. I put policy ahead of politics to get results[.] … From my time in the Florida Legislature until now in Congress, I have prided myself in working across party lines to make positive change for North Florida.” According to Politico‘s Gary Fineout, Lawson “tried to appeal to north Florida voters by stressing his ability to win federal funding for hometown projects as well as hitting Dunn over his vote in opposition to a new law that expands health care benefits for veterans.”

All 435 House districts were up for election on November 8.



Monica De La Cruz (R) defeated Michelle Vallejo (D) and Ross Lynn Leone (L) in Texas’ 15th Congressional District

Monica De La Cruz (R) defeated Michelle Vallejo (D) and Ross Lynn Leone (L) in the general election for Texas’ 15th Congressional District on November 8, 2022. De La Cruz is the first Republican to be elected to represent the district since it was created following the 1990 Census.

Texas’ 15th district was redrawn during redistricting after the 2020 Census to include a region of South Texas along the U.S.-Mexico border in the Rio Grande Valley. The New York Times called it “the only competitive House seat left in Texas.” Former President Donald Trump (R) endorsed De La Cruz. Her campaign focused on border security and opposition to abortion. De La Cruz discussed cultural issues as well, saying, “South Texas is not woke, but they are awakened.”

Matthew Choi and Stephen Neukam of The Texas Tribune wrote, “In the most competitive congressional race in the state, De La Cruz pushed ahead to victory, riding the momentum of a better-than-expected run in 2020 and a wave of outside funding from national Republicans eager to gain new ground in the region…De La Cruz defeated Democrat Michelle Vallejo, a political newcomer who ran on a platform of progressive social policy and close family ties to the region. Vallejo had run an aggressive ground operation and was able to rally handsome donations from across the state. But she faced a death knell after less-than-favorable forecasts led national Democrats to dedicate their resources to protecting incumbents and supporting more promising races.”

Daily Kos calculated what the results of the 2020 presidential election in this district would have been following redistricting. Joe Biden (D) would have received 48.1% of the vote in this district and Donald Trump (R) would have received 51.0%.



All candidates for Florida’s 10th Congressional District complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

All four of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Florida’s 10th Congressional District completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office. 

The candidates are: Maxwell Alejandro Frost (D), Calvin Wimbish (R), Jason Holic (I), and Usha Jain (I).  

The outcome of this race will affect the partisan balance of the U.S. House of Representatives in the 118th Congress. All 435 seats in the House are up for election. As of November 3, 2022, Democrats hold a 220-212 advantage in the U.S. House with three vacant seats. Florida’s current congressional delegation consists of 9 Democrats and 16 Republicans.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office?  

Frost:       

  • “Ending Gun Violence 40,000 Americans die due to gun-related deaths each year. The most vulnerable members of our society account for the majority of those deaths.”
  • “Medicare For All The United States has failed to provide a basic social minimum to its citizens.”
  • “Environmental Justice The greatest challenge facing our country and the world is the climate crisis.”

Wimbish:               

  • “I Heard You! I’m answering the call to put on the ARMOR OF GOD to defend our Homeland from all enemies!”
  • “We’re at war to unseat corrupt political leaders who push systematically transforming America into a socialist nation!”
  • “In the same spirit of ‘Frederick Douglas, Martin Luther King and Ronald Reagan’, let’s be active in defending conservative values and join me in the “Call to Action” 

Holic:

  • “No Party. When politicians reach across the aisle, they risk fighting in a tug of war, and that’s a scenario in which someone inevitably loses – more often than not, it’s the people those politicians serve.”
  • “No Politics. Candidate should be free from the influence of money.”
  • “Just Solving Problems. Candidates that are free of monetary and political influence are free to express a wider range of ideas without repercussion.”

Jain:

  • “Patient’s right to chose the doctor and not the insurance company. Doctor should be in charge to do the required tests for the diagnosis and treatment.”
  • “I want to fight for equal rights and justice for all specially small businesses and empower to stand up for your rights.”
  • “In the education system, teachers and parents should be incharge and curriculum should not be dictaed by the Govt.”

Click here to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

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Wiley Nickel (D), Bo Hines (R) running in North Carolina’s 13th Congressional District

Wiley Nickel (D) and Bo Hines (R) are running in the November 8, 2022, general election for North Carolina’s 13th Congressional District. Incumbent Rep. Ted Budd (R) did not run for re-election, instead running for U.S. Senate in North Carolina.

Spectrum News‘ Reuben Jones wrote North Carolina’s 13th “is one of a limited number of swing districts around the country, so both national parties are focusing on it, with control of the U.S. House potentially hinging on the outcome.”

The district lines of North Carolina’s 13th changed substantially after redistricting, with the new district containing none of the old 13th district. According to FiveThirtyEight, the old 13th district had an R+38 partisan lean, while the new district has an R+3 lean. A partisan lean indicates the difference between how a state or district votes and how the country votes overall.

Mitchel Northam and Jeff Tiberii wrote for North Carolina Public Radio, “This district has been newly reconfigured — and essentially relocated — by redistricting. […] Now, the new 13th District is Triangle-centric. It includes the southern half of Wake, all of Johnston, and portions of Harnett and Wayne Counties — spanning from Apex to Mount Olive.”

Nickel, a criminal defense attorney, has represented District 16 in the North Carolina State Senate since 2019. Nickel previously worked in several district attorney offices and as advance staff for former President Barack Obama (D). In a campaign ad, Nickel said, “I’ll stand up to the extremes in both parties to get things done. Like increasing funding for police and cutting taxes for the middle class, while lowering healthcare and prescription costs.”

Hines, a former college football player for North Carolina State University, interned for Indiana Gov. Eric Holcomb (R) and U.S. Sen. Mike Rounds (R-S.D.). This race marks his first run for political office. A Hines campaign ad said, “North Carolinians deserve a leader who puts in the hours like we do — fighting inflation, creating jobs, standing up to Joe Biden, and protecting North Carolina values.”

The outcome of this race will affect the partisan balance of the U.S. House of Representatives in the 118th Congress. All 435 House districts are up for election. As of October 23, 2022, Democrats held a 220-212 majority in the U.S. House with three vacancies. Republicans need to gain a net of five districts to win a majority in the chamber.

Daily Kos calculated what the results of the 2020 presidential election in this district would have been following redistricting. Joe Biden (D) would have received 50.1% of the vote in this district and Donald Trump (R) would have received 48.4%.



All candidates for Virginia’s 1st Congressional District complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

All three of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Virginia’s 1st Congressional District — incumbent Rob Wittman (R), Herb Jones (D), and David Bruce Foster (I) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office. 

The outcome of this race will affect the partisan balance of the U.S. House of Representatives in the 118th Congress. All 435 seats in the House are up for election. As of October 20th, 2022, Democrats hold a 220-212 advantage in the U.S. House with three vacant seats. Virginia’s current congressional delegation consists of 9 Democrats and 4 Republicans.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What areas of public policy are you personally passionate about?                                

Wittman:       

“Since 2007, I have been focused on strengthening our military and supporting veterans, promoting economic development through fiscal responsibility, fixing our crumbling infrastructure, increasing access to high-speed internet, conserving our environment and protecting our wildlife and public lands and waters, and promoting workforce development through Career and Technical Education (CTE) and Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) programs.”

Jones:       

“-Being a veteran myself, I am particularly focused on veterans’ issues.

-Being a small business owner and a former county treasurer, I am also focused on fiscal responsibility

-Being a dad, uncle, and grandpa, I am also focused on leaving a clean and inhabitable environment for our children and grandchildren.”

Foster:

“We keep hearing from the corrupt political base that we are a Nation of Law and Order. Great, but what use is it when the Rule of Prosecution is left out for the Elites who literally are getting away with Murder! America is done, finished with this Quid Pro Quo Political Ideology. November 8th, 2022, is America’s last chance to Save Herself. We have to come together from all sides now because the Elites do not have our best interests as a priority when making important life decisions.”

Click here to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

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All candidates for Virginia’s 8th Congressional District complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

All three of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Virginia’s 8th Congressional District —incumbent Don Beyer (D), Karina Lipsman (R), and Teddy Fikre (I) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office.

The outcome of this race will affect the partisan balance of the U.S. House of Representatives in the 118th Congress. All 435 seats in the House are up for election. As of September 26, 2022, Democrats hold a 221-212 advantage in the U.S. House with two vacant seats. Virginia’s current congressional delegation consists of 9 Democrats and 4 Republicans.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What areas of public policy are you personally passionate about?                            

Beyer:       

“Don’s passions and key legislation are focused on climate change and the environment. In Congress, he is the leading voice on fusion energy and carbon pricing, leading the charge in working to take carbon out of the atmosphere.”

Lipsman:               

“As your congresswoman, I will engage with you directly and represent your interests and put solutions for our district before partisan politics. I will advocate for common-sense policies that fight crime, modernize immigration, reduce inflation and improve the educational standards and opportunities for our children.”

Fikre:

“My number one priority when it comes to policies is ensuring that the needs of workers and small businesses are placed ahead of the needs of Wall Street and the billionaire class. It is immoral and deeply offensive that someone like Jeff Bezos pays less in marginal taxes than teachers, janitors and veterans who came back from overseas broken by wars.”

Click here to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

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All candidates for Illinois’ 3rd Congressional District complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Illinois’ 3rd Congressional District — Delia Ramirez (D) and Justin Burau (R) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office.

The outcome of this race will affect the partisan balance of the U.S. House of Representatives in the 118th Congress. All 435 seats in the House are up for election. As of September 12th, Democrats hold a 220-210 advantage in the U.S. House with five vacant seats. Illinois’ current congressional delegation consists of 13 Democrats and 5 Republicans.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office?

Ramirez:

“As State Representative, Delia helped lead the fight for the Reproductive Health Act, which enshrined the right to abortion access in Illinois – even if Roe v. Wade is overturned. Delia passed a law that extends Medicaid to all low-income people over the age of 42, making Illinois the first state in the nation to grant healthcare access to seniors regardless of immigration status. She will fight to expand healthcare access and pass Medicare for All in Congress.”

Burau:

“Healthcare is one of the main issues we face as a nation and Justin is ready to tackle this challenge. Justin is in favor of expanding healthcare options for all citizens to help make premiums lower. He supports competition across state lines and pledges to never support a federal mandate. Those with Pre-existing conditions will be protected. Additionally, consumers will be protected by requiring insurance companies to disclose the cost they pay for procedures for all patients.”

Click here to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

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