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All candidates for Virginia’s 8th Congressional District complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

All three of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Virginia’s 8th Congressional District —incumbent Don Beyer (D), Karina Lipsman (R), and Teddy Fikre (I) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office.

The outcome of this race will affect the partisan balance of the U.S. House of Representatives in the 118th Congress. All 435 seats in the House are up for election. As of September 26, 2022, Democrats hold a 221-212 advantage in the U.S. House with two vacant seats. Virginia’s current congressional delegation consists of 9 Democrats and 4 Republicans.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What areas of public policy are you personally passionate about?                            

Beyer:       

“Don’s passions and key legislation are focused on climate change and the environment. In Congress, he is the leading voice on fusion energy and carbon pricing, leading the charge in working to take carbon out of the atmosphere.”

Lipsman:               

“As your congresswoman, I will engage with you directly and represent your interests and put solutions for our district before partisan politics. I will advocate for common-sense policies that fight crime, modernize immigration, reduce inflation and improve the educational standards and opportunities for our children.”

Fikre:

“My number one priority when it comes to policies is ensuring that the needs of workers and small businesses are placed ahead of the needs of Wall Street and the billionaire class. It is immoral and deeply offensive that someone like Jeff Bezos pays less in marginal taxes than teachers, janitors and veterans who came back from overseas broken by wars.”

Click here to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

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All candidates for Illinois’ 3rd Congressional District complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Illinois’ 3rd Congressional District — Delia Ramirez (D) and Justin Burau (R) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office.

The outcome of this race will affect the partisan balance of the U.S. House of Representatives in the 118th Congress. All 435 seats in the House are up for election. As of September 12th, Democrats hold a 220-210 advantage in the U.S. House with five vacant seats. Illinois’ current congressional delegation consists of 13 Democrats and 5 Republicans.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office?

Ramirez:

“As State Representative, Delia helped lead the fight for the Reproductive Health Act, which enshrined the right to abortion access in Illinois – even if Roe v. Wade is overturned. Delia passed a law that extends Medicaid to all low-income people over the age of 42, making Illinois the first state in the nation to grant healthcare access to seniors regardless of immigration status. She will fight to expand healthcare access and pass Medicare for All in Congress.”

Burau:

“Healthcare is one of the main issues we face as a nation and Justin is ready to tackle this challenge. Justin is in favor of expanding healthcare options for all citizens to help make premiums lower. He supports competition across state lines and pledges to never support a federal mandate. Those with Pre-existing conditions will be protected. Additionally, consumers will be protected by requiring insurance companies to disclose the cost they pay for procedures for all patients.”

Click here to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

Additional reading:



All candidates for Illinois’ 1st Congressional District complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Illinois’ 1st Congressional District — Jonathan Jackson (D) and Eric Carlson (R) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office.

The outcome of this race will affect the partisan balance of the U.S. House of Representatives in the 118th Congress. All 435 seats in the House are up for election. As of September 9th, Democrats hold a 220-210 advantage in the U.S. House with five vacant seats. Illinois’s current congressional delegation consists of 13 Democrats and 5 Republicans.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What areas of public policy are you personally passionate about?

Jackson:

“STEMMING VIOLENT CRIME Jonathan will address gun violence by working to bring funds for youth programs and better community policing. He will strongly support legislation to end unlawful access to guns.

INCREASING AFFORDABLE HOUSING Jonathan will work with the Department of Housing and Urban Development to increase affordable housing in the Chicagoland region. He will support legislation that benefits first-time home buyers.”

Carlson:

“Education, employment, and cost of living. These are the key issues that affect everyone on a daily basis. When these issues are properly addressed it betters the lives of everyone in the community.

Foreign policy and the military. We live in a dangerous world, and if we lose focus of the threats facing us, we risk serious damage to our way of life.”

Click here to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

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All candidates for California’s 49th Congressional District complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for California’s 49th Congressional District —incumbent Mike Levin (D) and Brian Maryott (R)— completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office.

The outcome of this race will affect the partisan balance of the U.S. House of Representatives in the 118th Congress. All 435 seats in the House are up for election. As of September 9th, 2022, Democrats hold a 220-210 advantage in the U.S. House with five vacant seats. California’s current congressional delegation consists of 42 Democrats and 11 Republicans.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What areas of public policy are you personally passionate about?                                      

Levin:       

“Before I ran for Congress, I was a longtime advocate for climate action and a passionate believer in clean energy, with over a decade of experience in the industry helping to accelerate the transition towards more sustainable power generation and transportation options.”

Maryott:       

“We must get our nation’s financial house in order. I am eager to collaborate and lead on efforts to re-evaluate the role of federal government, and prioritize areas for reform. The CBO did a recent study and concluded that at the current rate of borrowing and spending increases – in twenty years over half of our annual tax revenues will be spent just servicing our debt.”

Click here to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

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All candidates for Florida’s 23rd Congressional District complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

All four of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Florida’s 23rd Congressional District completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office.

The candidates are Jared Moskowitz (D), Joe Budd (R), Mark Napier (I), and Christine Scott (I).

The outcome of this race will affect the partisan balance of the U.S. House of Representatives in the 118th Congress. All 435 seats in the House are up for election. As of September 3rd, 2022, Democrats hold a 220-210 advantage in the U.S. House with five vacant seats. Florida’s current congressional delegation consists of 16 Republicans, 10 Democrats, and 1 vacancy.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What areas of public policy are you personally passionate about?            

Moskowitz:           

“Gun violence prevention is personal to me because of the shooting at my alma mater, Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School. It’s a scar on our community and like our neighbors, my wife and I feel the constant fear that our children are at risk. In America, I believe we should be able to make parents a simple promise: when you drop your kids off at school, you get to pick them up alive. Our community deserves that peace of mind. I championed the Florida gun violence prevention law after the Parkland school shooting, and I want to build on the recently passed federal bill by banning assault weapons.” 

Budd:           

“I’ve often said, “Society cannot pay enough for what is earned by an honest police officer”. Liberal cities which have gone down the road of wokeness by defunding police and instituting criminal justice reforms quickly releasing violent criminals back on the streets are reaping the chaos of a substantial rise in crime. I will always have the backs of the men and women who wear a uniform. It’s one of my priorities. It’s personal.”

Napier:

“Political partisanship, in addition to “The Wall” between the Intelligence Community and Law Enforcement have jeopardized our freedoms. The CV-19 pandemic alone demonstrated how far one party will go to weaponize a virus for political control and over our everyday lives. I would reconstruct that wall again. I would pursue more protections for Whistleblowers and prohibit efforts by our own government to unwittingly collect information–even DNA via heritage test kits or facial recognition, unless incarcerated or consent.” 

Scott:

“Abortion: I believe in a woman’s right to choose. It just needs to be done in the first trimester. Killing babies is not a viable or necessary option. With the advent of cheap pregnancy tests, the day after pill and contraceptive options, there is no reason we cannot protect both women rights and that of the unborn child.”

Click here to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

Additional reading:



A rematch of last year’s third-closest U.S. House race taking place this year in CA-27

U.S. Rep. Mike Garcia (R) and Christy Smith (D) are running in the general election for California’s 27th Congressional District on November 8, 2022. Incumbent Judy Chu (D) is running for re-election in California’s 28th Congressional District because of redistricting.

In 2020, Garcia defeated Smith in the 25th District by 333 votes, making it the third-closest U.S. House race that year. Brianna Lee of LAist said the 2022 race would likely be more competitive because redistricting “jettisoned the district’s most conservative outpost in Simi Valley, giving Democratic voters even more of an edge.” In the June 7 top-two primary, Garcia received 49.6% of the vote and Smith received 35.4%. Republican votes for all candidates in the primary combined for 53.4% of the vote, while Democratic votes combined for 46.6%.

Garcia was first elected to represent California’s 25th Congressional District in May 2020, when he won a special election to succeed Rep. Katie Hill (D). Garcia served in the U.S. Navy as a pilot for 20 years and worked for Raytheon after his retirement. Garcia’s website lists the economy, jobs, taxes, and inflation as his key campaign issues.

Smith served in the California State Assembly from 2018 to 2020. She worked as an analyst at the U.S. Department of Education and founded the Valencia Valley Technological Education Foundation. Smith’s campaign website highlights expanding access to healthcare, improving the quality of public education, and codifying Roe v. Wade as key campaign issues.

The district’s representation shifted party hands multiple times in the past decade, from Stephen Knight (R) to Hill (D) to Garcia (R). Joe Biden (D) won the district by 10.1% in the 2020 presidential election.



Incumbent Kim Schrier (D) and Matt Larkin (R) are running in the general election for Washington’s 8th Congressional District

Incumbent Kim Schrier (D) and Matt Larkin (R) are running in the general election for Washington’s 8th Congressional District on November 8, 2022.

Schrier, a pediatrician, was first elected in 2018, winning the open seat by a margin of five percentage points. Before that election, Republicans had represented the 8th District since 1983. Schrier was re-elected in 2020 in one of 37 U.S. House races decided by five percentage points or less.

Larkin, an attorney and owner of a manufacturing business, was the 2020 Republican nominee for Washington attorney general.

Politico’s Jessica Piper wrote after the top-two primary, “The [party vote share in the primary] indicates a close race brewing this fall[.] … [Schrier, who] spent significantly on early ads boosting her standing and seeking some distance from the Biden administration, remains in a competitive position. But Republicans may be able to invest more in the race now that they have a clear candidate[.]”

Both the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee (DCCC) and the National Republican Congressional Committee (NRCC) have prioritized this election. The DCCC designated Schrier as a member of its 2022 Frontline Program, a program providing resources intended to help incumbents hold competitive seats. The NRCC included this district in its target list for 2022 and named Larkin as an “On the Radar” member of its Youngs Guns program.

Voters in the district backed Joe Biden (D) in the 2020 presidential election by a margin of seven percentage points. According to The Cook Political Report and FiveThirtyEight, the district’s partisan lean did not change after redistricting.

The outcome of this race will affect the partisan balance of the U.S. House of Representatives in the 118th Congress. All 435 seats in the House are up for election. As of August 18, 2022, Democrats hold a 220-211 advantage in the U.S. House with four vacant seats. Republicans need to gain a net of seven seats to win a majority in the chamber.



Ryan defeats Molinaro in New York’s 19th Congressional District special election

Pat Ryan (D) defeated Marc Molinaro (R) in the special election for New York’s 19th Congressional District on Aug. 23, 2022. Ryan received 51% of the vote to Molinaro’s 49%.

Former incumbent Antonio Delgado (D) resigned from Congress in May after New York Gov. Kathy Hochul (D) selected him as lieutenant governor. Ryan will serve the rest of Delgado’s term, which ends on Jan. 3, 2023.

The Times Union‘s Timmy Facciola wrote in May, “The current 19th is a swing district, and the special election has outsized national implications, as it will determine the size of the Democratic majority in the House of Representatives for the remainder of the 117th Congress.”

Ryan has served as Ulster County executive since 2019. In 2018, he ran in the Democratic primary for the 19th District, finishing in second place with 18% of the vote to Delgado’s 22%.

According to the Times Union‘s Roger Hannigan Gilson, “Ryan connected Molinaro with the Republican-supported Supreme Court decision overturning Roe v. Wade, stating repeatedly that ‘choice was on the ballot'[.] … Ryan has called the election ‘a referendum on Roe.'” Ryan also highlighted his military service as an Army intelligence officer.

Molinaro was elected Dutchess County executive in 2011. In 2018, he was the Republican nominee for governor of New York, losing to then-incumbent Andrew Cuomo (D) 60% to 36%. Molinaro has also served as a member of the New York State Assembly and as mayor of Tivoli, New York.

Gilson wrote that Molinaro “attacked Ryan as being soft on crime” and said Molinaro “touted his broad experience in elected office and pointed to his history of keeping taxes low in [Dutchess County].” Molinaro also highlighted his support for measures encouraging investment in digital assets.

Both candidates also focused on opioid addiction and mental health issues.

The boundaries of the 19th District changed due to redistricting after the 2020 census. The special election was held under the old district lines, while the November general election will be held in the newly redrawn district. The old district had a partisan lean of R+4, according to FiveThirtyEight, while the redrawn district has a partisan lean of R+1.

In addition to running in the special election for the 19th District, Molinaro is running in the general election for the redrawn 19th District, and Ryan is running in the general election for the redrawn 18th district.

This election was one of 17 special elections called so far during the 117th Congress.



Eric Sorensen and Esther Joy King are running for Illinois’ 17th Congressional District on November 8, 2022

Eric Sorensen (D) and Esther Joy King (R) are running in the general election for Illinois’ 17th Congressional District on November 8, 2022. Incumbent Rep. Cheri Bustos (D) is not running for re-election.

Sorensen worked as a TV meteorologist in Rockford and the Quad Cities area for nearly 20 years, and this is his first run for public office. King, a lawyer and JAG officer in the U.S. Army, was the Republican nominee for the 17th district in 2020. King lost to Bustos 54% to 48%.

Bloomberg Government’s Greg Giroux said, “This race will test the sturdiness of a Democratic gerrymander in an election that’s more likely than not to favor Republicans. Legislators boosted the district’s Democratic leanings after Rep. Cheri Bustos (D) announced her retirement, though Republicans say the reconfigured district—one of 23 nationwide that Biden would have won in 2020 by between 5 and 10 percentage points—is competitive enough for them to flip.”

Three election forecasters rate the race a Toss-up. Monmouth College Professor Robin Johnson said, “It will be very competitive, and I anticipate the parties are going to try to kick money in and resources to try to win this seat.”

A Democrat has represented the 17th district since 1983, except for the period between 2011 and 2013, when former Rep. Bobby Schilling (R) represented the district. Bustos defeated Schilling 53.3% to 46.7% in the 2012 general election and has represented the district since.

Following the 2020 census, the redrawn district has a more Democratic partisan lean than the old district, according to The Cook Political Report and FiveThirtyEight. The Cook PVI (Partisan Voting Index) score for the old district was R+3, while the score for the new district is D+4. According to FiveThirtyEight, the old district had a partisan lean of R+5, while the new district has a partisan lean of D+4.

The redrawn district includes parts of Rockford, Peoria, Bloomington-Normal, Macomb, and the Quad Cities. President Joe Biden (D) received 53% of the redrawn district’s vote in 2020, while former President Donald Trump (R) received 45%.

The outcome of this race will affect the partisan balance of the U.S. House of Representatives in the 118th Congress. All 435 seats in the House are up for election. As of August 3, 2022, Democrats hold a 220-210 advantage in the U.S. House with five vacant seats. Republicans need to gain a net of eight seats to win a majority in the chamber.



Harris at 26 tie-breaking votes in the U.S. Senate, most ever cast in a single term

Vice President Kamala Harris (D) cast three tie-breaking votes in the U.S. Senate related to the Inflation Reduction Act. On August 6, she cast a vote to proceed with debate on the bill, and on August 7 she cast votes to approve an amendment and to pass the bill.

During her tenure, Harris has also cast 20 tie-breaking votes related to confirmations and three related to the American Rescue Plan, bringing her total to 26.

Harris has cast the most tie-breaking votes in the Senate during a single vice presidential term in American history. Harris is followed by John Adams, who cast 20 tie-breaking votes during his first vice presidential term, and George M. Dallas, who cast 19 tie-breaking votes during his one term in office.

Accounting for a vice president’s full tenure, Harris has cast the third most tie-breaking votes. The most were cast by John C. Calhoun (31), and the second most by John Adams (29).

Among vice presidents who have held office since 1981, Harris is followed by Mike Pence (R) at 13 tie-breaking votes, Dick Cheney (R) at 8, and George H.W. Bush (R) at 7. 

Under Article I, Section 3, Clause 4 of the U.S. Constitution, the vice president of the United States also serves as the president of the Senate. In this capacity, he or she may cast the deciding vote when there is a tie in the Senate.