TagFundraising

RNC outraises DNC for first time since March

The Republican National Committee (RNC) outraised the Democratic National Committee (DNC) last month for the first time since March, according to July 2021 campaign finance reports filed with the Federal Election Commission on July 20.

Last month, the RNC raised $16.3 million and spent $13.4 million, while the DNC raised $11.2 million and spent $8.0 million. This was the first set of reports since the April 2021 reports (which cover the month of March), to show the RNC leading the DNC in fundraising. So far in the 2022 cycle, the DNC has raised 2.4% more than the RNC ($87.1 million to $85.0 million), down from a 9.9% fundraising advantage last month.

Republicans also led in fundraising between the U.S. House campaign committees. The National Republican Congressional Committee (NRCC) raised $20.1 million and spent $7.3 million while the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee (DCCC) raised $14.4 million and spent $6.3 million. So far this cycle, the NRCC has raised 11.5% more than the DCCC ($79.3 million to $70.7 million). The NRCC’s 11.5% fundraising advantage is up from 5.0% last month.

On the Senate side, the National Republican Senatorial Committee (NRSC) raised $10.5 million and spent $6.2 million last month, while the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee (DSCC) raised $10.1 million and spent $11.2 million. So far this cycle, the NRSC has raised 9.5% more than the DSCC ($51.2 million to $46.6 million).

Since the beginning of the campaign cycle, the RNC, NRSC, and NRCC have raised 5.3% more than the DNC, DSCC, and DCCC ($215.5 million to $204.3 million). The Republican committees’ fundraising advantage is up from 0.03% last month.

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Democrats outraise Republicans by 400% in Virginia state legislative races

Campaign finance filings for Virginia state legislative races show Democrats outpaced Republicans in fundraising. Between January 1, 2020, and May 7, 2021, Democratic primary election candidates outraised Republican candidates by 400 percent.

Democrats have a 21-19 majority in the Virginia State Senate and a 55-45 majority in the Virginia State House. State legislative primary elections were held on May 8, 2021, for Republicans and on June 8, 2021, for Democrats. In some cases, party nominees may have been chosen earlier.

So far in the election cycle, 118 Democratic candidates have raised $16.36 million compared to $3.27 million taken in by 73 Republicans.

The candidates who have raised the most money so far are incumbent Jerrauld Jones (D) in House District 89 ($1,940,351), incumbent S. Rasoul (D) in House District 11 ($1,465,694), and incumbent Eileen Filler-Corn (D) in House District 41 ($826,004).

Campaign finance requirements govern how much money candidates may receive from individuals and organizations, how much and how often they must report those contributions, and how much individuals, organizations, and political parties may contribute to campaigns. All campaign financial transactions must be made through the candidate’s committee. Campaign committees are required to file regular campaign finance disclosure reports with the Virginia Department of Elections.

This article was published in partnership with Transparency USA. Click here to learn more about that partnership.



Republicans outraise Democrats by 13% in Pennsylvania state legislative races

New campaign finance filings for Pennsylvania state legislative special elections show Republicans outpaced Democrats in fundraising. Between January 1, 2021, and May 17, 2021, Republican general election candidates outraised Democratic candidates by 13 percent.

Republicans have a 28-21 majority in the Pennsylvania State Senate and a 113-89 majority in the Pennsylvania State House. State legislative special elections were held on May 18, 2021, in four districts.

In the election cycle in those districts, six Republican candidates raised $1.13 million compared to $1 million taken in by four Democrats.

The candidates who raised the most money in that period are Martin Flynn (D) in Senate District 22 ($948,983), Chris Chermak (R) in Senate District 22 ($821,136), and Chris Gebhard (R) in Senate District 48 ($146,581).

Campaign finance requirements govern how much money candidates may receive from individuals and organizations, how much and how often they must report those contributions, and how much individuals, organizations, and political parties may contribute to campaigns. All campaign financial transactions must be made through the candidate’s committee. Campaign committees are required to file regular campaign finance disclosure reports with the Pennsylvania Department of State.

This article was published in partnership with Transparency USA. Click here to learn more about that partnership.



National Republican Congressional Committee overtakes Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee in fundraising, according to June FEC filings

Six party committees have raised a combined $337 million over the first five months of the 2022 election cycle. In May, the committees raised $65 million, according to recent filings with the Federal Election Commission. Here’s a closer look at May’s fundraising numbers:

The National Republican Congressional Committee (NRCC) raised $14.1 million and spent $6.1 million in May, while the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee (DCCC) raised $9.9 million and spent $6.0 million. So far in the 2022 election cycle, the NRCC has raised 5.0% more than the DCCC ($59.2 million to $56.3 million). The NRCC overtook the DCCC fundraising lead this month. In April, the DCCC led by 2.7% ($46.3 million to $45.1 million).

The senatorial committees raised less than their house counterparts last month, with the National Republican Senatorial Committee (NRSC) raising $10.4 million and spending $3.9 million and the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee (DSCC) raising $7.2 million and spending $7.3 million. The gap between the NRSC’s and DSCC’s total fundraising is the widest of the three committee pairs we track. The NRSC has raised 10.9% more than the DSCC so far in the 2022 election cycle ($40.7 million to $36.5 million). The NRSC fundraising lead widened between April and May. In April, the NRSC led by 3.4% ($30.3 million to $29.3 million). 

At this point in the 2020 election cycle, the NRSC also led the DSCC in fundraising but by a wider 24.3% margin ($28.9 million to $22.6 million). The DCCC led the NRCC in fundraising by a 32.3% margin ($49.2 million to $35.5 million).

Between the national committees, the Democratic National Committee (DNC) raised more in May and the Republican National Committee (RNC) spent more. The DNC raised $12.1 million and spent $8.7 million, while the RNC raised $11.1 million and spent $22.7 million. The DNC has raised 9.9% more than the RNC ($75.9 million to $68.7 million), down from the 10.1% margin in April.

At this time in the 2020 election cycle, the opposite was true. The RNC led the DNC in fundraising by 75.9% ($76.4 million to $34.3 million).

So far in the 2022 election cycle, the DNC, DSCC, and DCCC have raised 0.03% more than the RNC, NRSC, and NRCC ($168.6 million to $168.5 million), down from the Democrats’ 4.7% lead in April.

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Democratic and Republican Party committee total fundraising about even, according to April FEC filings

Six party committees have raised a combined $206 million over the first three months of the 2022 election cycle. The committees raised about $83 million in March, according to April filings with the Federal Election Commission. Here’s a closer look at this month’s filings:

The Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee (DSCC) raised $9.3 million and spent $6.3 million in March, while the National Republican Senatorial Committee raised $8.3 million and spent $11.2 million. So far in the 2022 cycle, the NRSC has raised 2% more than the DSCC ($23.1 million to $22.7 million).

The House committees saw higher fundraising last month than their senatorial counterparts, with the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee (DCCC) raising $15.6 million and spending $11.2 million. The National Republican Congressional Committee (NRCC) raised $19.1 million and spent $5.0 million. So far in the 2022 cycle, the DCCC has raised 1% more than the NRCC ($34.1 million to $33.8 million).

At this point in the 2020 election cycle, the NRSC also led the DSCC in fundraising, but by a wider 35% margin ($19.5 million to $13.8 million). Similarly, the DCCC also led the NRCC in fundraising, but by a 25% margin ($32.5 million to $25.1 million).

Between the national committees, Republicans outraised and outspent Democrats this March. The Democratic National Committee raised $12.8 million and spent $7.0 million. The Republican National Committee (RNC) raised $17.8 million and spent $15.1 million. The gap between the DNC and RNC total fundraising in the 2022 cycle is the widest of the three committee pairs we track. The DNC raised 8% more than the RNC ($48.2 million to $44.4 million).

At this time in the 2020 election cycle, the opposite was true. The RNC led the DNC in total fundraising by 75% ($45.8 million to $20.9 million).

So far in the 2022 election cycle, the DNC, DSCC, and DCCC have raised 3.5% more than the RNC, NRSC, and NRCC ($105.0 million to $101.4 million).

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Six national party committees raised a combined $2.65 billion in 2019 and 2020

Six committees associated with the Democratic and Republican parties raised a combined $2.65 billion in 2019 and 2020.

Democrats and Republicans each have three major national committees: an overall national party committee, one dedicated to U.S. Senate elections, and one dedicated to U.S. House elections. The six committees were each among the top 15 spenders nationally in the 2019-20 campaign cycle.

The top fundraiser among the six committees in the 2019-20 campaign cycle was the Republican National Committee (RNC), which reported raising $890 million and spending $833 million. The RNC’s $890 million in fundraising represents a 174% increase over its $325 million raised during the 2018 cycle, when it was also the top fundraiser among the six.

On the Democratic side, the Democratic National Committee (DNC) reported raising $490 million and spending $462 million, the second-highest sum of any of the six committees. The DNC’s $490 million in fundraising was a 179% increase over the committee’s $176 million in fundraising during the 2018 cycle, the largest proportional increase among the six committees.

On the Senate side, the National Republican Senatorial Committee (NRSC) led in fundraising with $338 million raised and $331 million spent. The NRSC raised 123% more than its 2018 total of $152 million. The Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee (DSCC) raised $304 million and spent $300 million, a 104% increase over its $149 million in fundraising in 2018.

Both parties’ House committees reported smaller increases in fundraising relative to 2018. The Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee (DCCC) raised $346 million and spent $330 million, up 17% from its $296 million in fundraising in 2018. The National Republican Congressional Committee (NRCC) raised $281 million and spent $285 million, up 37% from its $206 million in fundraising in 2018.

The three Republican committees’ overall fundraising total of $1.510 billion was 27.9% more than the Democratic committees’ overall fundraising of $1.140 billion. Across the 2019-20 campaign cycle, the RNC raised 58.0% more than the DNC and the NRSC raised 10.7% more than the DSCC. Democrats led in House fundraising, with the DCCC raising 20.7% more than the NRSC.

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Republican and Democrat national party committees raised $467 million between October 15 and November 23

Six party committees raised a combined $467 million between October 15 and November 23 this year, according to post-general election campaign finance reports filed with the Federal Election Commission on December 3. One more campaign finance report is due this cycle, covering fundraising and spending through December 31.

Democrats and Republicans each have three party committees; a national committee to coordinate overall party objectives and one committee each dedicated to electing members to the Senate and House. The latter two are referred to as Hill committees. During the 2018 campaign cycle, the six committees spent a combined $1.3 billion. So far in the 2020 cycle, they have spent a combined $2.37 billion out of $2.49 billion in fundraising.

The Republican National Committee (RNC) raised $202.5 million and spent $217.3 million during the five-and-a-half-week reporting period, while the Democratic National Committee (DNC) raised $61.0 million and spent $113.8 million. So far in the 2020 cycle, the RNC has raised 59.9% more than the DNC ($845.2 million to $455.4 million). The RNC’s 59.9% advantage is up from 47.9% as of the pre-general campaign finance reports and 51.5% at the end of September.

At this point in the 2016 election cycle (the most recent presidential cycle), the DNC had a 7.2% fundraising advantage over the RNC ($351.9 million to $327.2 million).

The National Republican Senatorial Committee (NRSC) raised $75.5 million and spent $57.1 million during the reporting period, while the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee (DSCC) raised $35.6 million and spent $49.9 million. So far in the 2020 cycle, the NRSC has raised 5.3% more than the DSCC ($295.2 million to $279.9 million). The NRSC’s 5.3% fundraising advantage is up from a 10.6% fundraising advantage for the DSCC as of the pre-general election campaign finance reports and a 4.2% advantage for the DSCC as of the end of September.

On the House side, the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee (DCCC) raised $48.0 million and spent $51.0 million, while the National Republican Congressional Committee (NRCC) raised $44.8 million and spent $57.8 million. So far in the 2020 campaign cycle, the DCCC has raised 22.3% more than the NRCC ($338.6 million to $270.5 million). The DCCC’s 22.3% fundraising advantage is down from 25.1% as of the pre-general election reports and 26.1% as of the end of September.

At this point in the 2018 campaign cycle, Republicans had a narrower lead in Senate fundraising and Democrats had a wider lead in House fundraising. The NRSC had raised 1.5% more than the DSCC ($148.8 million to $146.7 million), while the DCCC had raised 35.8% more than the NRCC ($291.3 million to $202.8 million).

So far in the 2020 campaign cycle, the RNC, NRSC, and NRCC have raised 27.1% more than the DNC, DSCC, and DCCC ($1.411 billion to $1.074 billion). Republicans’ 27.1% fundraising advantage is up from 15.7% as of the pre-general election reports and 18.7% as of the end of September.

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33 committees supporting and opposing Colorado’s 11 November ballot measures raised over $59 million, spent over $57 million

Thirty-three committees registered to support and oppose the eleven measures that appeared on the Nov. 3 ballot in Colorado.

The 33 committees raised $59,164,321.52 and spent $57,392,791.82 according to reports due on November 2 that covered election information through October 28. The next regular reports are due on December 3.

Eight of these 11 measures on the ballot were placed on the ballot through citizen petition drives. These measures concern issues like wolf reintroduction, abortion restrictions, citizenship requirements for voting, a national popular vote, paid medical leave, gambling and taxes. The other three measures were referred to the ballot by the legislature.

The campaigns that raised the most money won in all cases — except Proposition 116 to decrease the state income tax rate, where supporters raised $1.55 million and opponents raised more than double that amount, though that measure was approved by Colorado voters.

Three Colorado ballot measures (Amendment C concerning charitable bingo, Proposition 114 concerning wolves and Proposition 117 concerning state enterprises) were too close to call as of Friday afternoon.

The measure with the highest amount of contributions was Proposition 115, which would have prohibited abortions after 22 weeks of gestational age.
This measure was defeated. Opponents of Proposition 115 raised over $9.5 million, while the proposition’s supporters raised nearly $690,000.

The other top most expensive measures in Colorado in 2020 were:

  • Proposition 118 to create a state-run paid medical and family leave program, which was (approved):
    • Support — $8,918,452.11
    • Opposition — $785,423.2
  • Proposition EE to create a tobacco and vaping products tax to fund health and education programs (approved):
    • Support — $4,711,452.39
    • Opposition — $4,410,902.45
  • Amendment B to repeal the Gallagher Amendment and freeze current property tax rates (approved):
    • Support — $7,311,344.10
    • Opposition — $722,140.10

So far in 2020, Ballotpedia has tracked $1.18 billion in contributions to committees supporting or opposing the 129 statewide measures in 2020. Colorado currently ranks fourth among states with the highest ballot measure campaign contributions, behind California ($739.0 million), Illinois ($121.2 million) and Massachusetts ($61.6 million). These numbers and the total dollar-amount will continue to grow based on post-election campaign finance reports.

The most expensive ballot measure in 2020 was California Proposition 22 concerning app-based drivers and relevant labor policies. A total of $223 million was spent on the measure ($203 million by supporters and $20 million by opponents). The measure was approved.

In 2018, Ballotpedia tracked $1.19 billion in contributions to the ballot measure campaigns supporting and opposing the 167 certified 2018 measures. Campaigns supporting and opposing the 13 statewide ballot measures on the 2018 ballot in Colorado raised $70.4 million, making Colorado the state with the sixth-highest ballot measure campaign contributions in 2018. In the Ballotpedia tracking, California ballot measures were first at $369 million in contributions.

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DNC outraises RNC for second consecutive month

The Democratic National Committee (DNC) outraised the Republican National Committee (RNC) in September, its second consecutive month leading in fundraising, according to campaign finance reports filed with the Federal Election Commission.

Last month, the RNC raised $71.8 million and spent $108.6 million, while the DNC raised $76.0 million and spent $62.8 million. So far in the 2020 cycle, the RNC has raised 51.5% more than the DNC ($604.5 million to $357.0 million). The RNC’s 51.5% fundraising advantage is down from 61.9% in September and 78.6% in August.

At this point in the 2016 campaign cycle (the most recent presidential cycle), the RNC had a smaller 19.6% fundraising advantage over the DNC ($270.7 million to $222.5 million).

The Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee (DSCC) raised $43.8 million and spent $54.7 million last month, while the National Republican Senatorial Committee (NRSC) raised $32.7 million and spent $23.7 million. So far in the 2020 cycle, the DSCC has raised 4.2% more than the NRSC ($209.0 million to $200.3 million). The DSCC’s 4.2% fundraising advantage is up from a 1.5% fundraising disadvantage it had relative to the NRSC in September and a 7.3% fundraising disadvantage it reported as of August.

On the House side, the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee (DCCC) raised $29.5 million and spent $69.7 million, while the National Republican Congressional Committee (NRCC) raised $23.1 million and spent $38.8 million. So far in the cycle, the DCCC has raised 26.1% more than the NRCC ($278.3 million to $214.1 million). The DCCC’s 26.1% advantage is down from 26.3% in September and 26.2% in August.

At this point in the 2018 campaign cycle, Republicans led in Senate fundraising, while Democrats led in House fundraising. The NRSC had raised 4.9% more than the DSCC ($114.3 million to $108.8 million), while the DCCC had raised 33.5% more than the NRCC ($228.6 million to $163.0 million).

So far in the 2020 campaign cycle, the RNC, NRSC, and NRCC have raised 18.7% more than the DNC, DSCC, and DCCC ($1.019 billion versus $844.3 million). Republicans’ 18.7% fundraising advantage is down from 24.8% in September and 32.6% in August.

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Illinois Gov. Pritzker and Citadel CEO Griffin are funding the campaigns surrounding the state’s graduated income tax ballot measure

Over $107 million has been raised for and against a constitutional amendment that would allow for a graduated income tax in Illinois. On November 3, voters will decide the constitutional amendment, which wouldn’t require a graduated income tax itself. Rather, the amendment would repeal the state constitution’s requirement that the state personal income tax is a flat rate. In 2019, the Illinois State Legislature passed a bill that would enact a graduated income tax with six brackets should voters approve the amendment.

Gov. J.B. Pritzker advocated for a graduated income tax on the campaign trail in 2018. Through October 2, Pritzker provided $56.50 million, or 96 percent, of the support campaign’s $59.00 million. “People like me should pay more and people like you should pay less,” said Pritzker.

Opponents of the constitutional amendment have organized several PACs, which together raised $58.69 million through October 2. Kenneth Griffin, CEO of the investment firm Citadel, contributed $46.75, or 96 percent, of the opposition campaign’s total funds. Griffin said a graduated income tax would mean “the continued exodus of families and businesses, loss of jobs and inevitably higher taxes on everyone.”

Pritzker and Griffin have each provided 96 percent of their respective side’s total campaign funds. On the support side, other top donors include the AARP ($674,445), the Omidyar Network ($500,000), and the National Education Association ($350,000). On the opposition side, other top donors include the Illinois Opportunity Project ($550,000), Duchossois Group Executive Chair Craig Duchossois ($200,000), and Petco Petroleum CEO Jay Bergman ($200,000).

Of the 128 statewide ballot measures in 2020, the Illinois constitutional amendment has the second-largest sum of contributions to its support and opposition campaign. In September, The Chicago Tribute reported that the Illinois constitutional amendment “is expected to be the most expensive ballot proposition debate in Illinois history.”

The most expensive in the country for 2020 is California Proposition 22, which would define app-based drivers as independent contractors. The combined support and opposition campaign contributions exceeded $200 million on October 2. Uber, Lyft, Instacart, Doordash, and Postmates provided $186.19 million to the campaign supporting Proposition 22. Opposing PACs received $13.91 million through October 2, with top funders including labor unions, such as the International Brotherhood of Teamsters, SEIU-UHW West, and Service Employees International Union.


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