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All candidates for Illinois House of Representatives District 16 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Illinois House of Representatives District 16 — Kevin Olickal (D) and Vince Romano (R) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office. 

Eighty-eight of the country’s 99 state legislative chambers will hold regularly scheduled elections in 2022. The Democratic Party controls both chambers of Illinois’ state legislature. Illinois is one of 14 states with a Democratic trifecta.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office?

Olickal:           

  • “I want to provide the 16th District with the kind of ethical, effective, and proactive representation it deserves.”
  • “I am a progressive Democrat committed to fighting for middle-class and working families,”
  • “I have been endorsed by our nations leading gun violence prevention groups because they know I am committed to keeping our community safe.”

Romano:       

  • “SAFETY/CRIME- If you value safety for your families and community, you need to vote for me. My opponent is a champion of NO CASH BAIL and wants criminals back on the streets ASAP.”
  • “ECONOMY/JOBS- If you value good jobs and a keeping business in Illinois, you need to vote for me.”
  • “TAXES- Illinois has the highest overall tax rate of all states, with over 7000 units of government( over 3 times that of Texas which has 4 times our population)”

Click on the candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

Additional reading:

Illinois House of Representatives elections, 2022



All candidates for Illinois House of Representatives District 91 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Illinois House of Representatives District 91 — Sharon Chung (D) and Scott Preston (R) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office. 

Eighty-eight of the country’s 99 state legislative chambers will hold regularly scheduled elections in 2022. The Democratic Party controls both chambers of Illinois’ state legislature. Illinois is one of 14 states with a Democratic trifecta.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office?

Chung:           

  • “Lower Costs for Families: Skyrocketing costs are unacceptable, and Sharon is fighting to deliver real results for all of us.”
  • “End Violence Against Women: A committed leader in the struggle to end violence against women, Sharon will work tirelessly to invest in domestic violence shelters, provide mental and physical health care for survivors, and keep guns out of the hands of abusers.”
  • “Advocate for our Communities: Sharon believes strongly in the power of education and getting the resources families need.”

Preston:               

  • “For too long, Springfield’s poor policy and partisan divide has let the families and businesses of Illinois down. Serving on council, I’ve seen first-hand how a functioning government can solve real problems for people, which sometimes includes the government getting out of the way.”
  • “During my time serving as a Normal City Councilman, I have always put the people of my community first. I have voted against increasing taxes while encouraging economic development by bringing businesses into my hometown.”
  • “I’m best equipped to bring a pragmatic, no-nonsense approach to the problems facing Illinois families, workers, job creators and taxpayers.”

Click on the candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

Additional reading:

Illinois House of Representatives elections, 2022



All candidates for Illinois State Senate District 56 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Illinois State Senate District 56 — incumbent Kris Tharp (D) and Erica Harriss (R) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office. 

Eighty-eight of the country’s 99 state legislative chambers will hold regularly scheduled elections in 2022. The Democratic Party controls both chambers of Illinois’ state legislature. Illinois is one of 14 states with a Democratic trifecta.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office?

Tharp:                       

  • “Protecting peoples access to healthcare so that people are not choosing between medical procedures and feeding their families.”
  • “Protecting jobs and creating an economy to support the middle class is a priority in the 56th district. We need to bring good-paying manufacturing jobs back to Illinois.”
  • “Keeping our communities safe from dangerous criminals. I have been in law enforcement my entire life, and my son is a police officer and my wife is a corrections officer. We need to make sure that our police officers have what they need to keep our communities safe and invest more money in mental health services.”

Harriss:       

  • “To reduce the overbearing tax burden on Illinois families by supporting legislation to cap and freeze property taxes, by opposing a progressive income tax, and voting against taxing retirement income.”
  • “To confront Springfield corruption by supporting comprehensive ethics reform, greater power for the Legislative Inspector General, and term limits for leaders in both chambers.”
  • “To support law enforcement and repeal the SAFE-T Act, keeping them and our communities safe.”

Click on the candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

Additional reading:

Illinois State Senate elections, 2022



All candidates for Cook County Commissioner District 13 in Illinois complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Cook County Commissioner District 13 in Illinois — Josina Morita (D) and Andrew Border (R) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office. 

The board of commissioners functions as the county’s primary legislative and policy-making body. Most boards also control county land usage, oversee environmental issues and possess executive powers, meaning they have the authority to appoint or remove departmental heads. Cook County has 17 commissioners who are elected by district to four-year terms. In addition to the 17 commissioners, there is a president of the board of commissioners who serves as the chief executive officer of Cook County.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office? 

Morita:       

  • “I am running for Cook County Board to make Cook County more equitable, accessible and sustainable.”
  • “I am a working mom, urban planner, and community advocate.”
  • “I will be the first Asian American woman elected to the Cook County Board.”

Border:       

  • “GOVERNMENT REFORM: Repeal the June 2022 Cook County public official pay increase. Push anti-corruption reforms outlined by the Independent Voters of Illinois.”
  • “TAX RELIEF: No new taxes, no tax increases. Hold the Cook County Cook County Assessor Office accountable issuing accurate property taxes issued in a timely and consistent matter.”
  • “PUBLIC SAFTEY MANAGEMENT: Demand transparency and real-time data on offenders who are on electronic monitoring.”

Click on the candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

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All candidates for Illinois House of Representatives District 13 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Photo of the Illinois State Capitol building

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Illinois House of Representatives District 13 — Hoan Huynh (D) and Alper Turan (R) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office.

Eighty-eight of the country’s 99 state legislative chambers will hold regularly scheduled elections in 2022. The Democratic Party controls both chambers of Illinois’s state legislature. Illinois is one of 14 states with a Democratic trifecta government.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office?

Huynh:

  • “Everyone one of us in our communities must be safe from crime”
  • “Housing and healthcare are human rights”
  • “We must support our small businesses”

Turan:

  • “ILLINOIS HAS THE HIGHEST TOTAL STATE AND LOCAL TAX RATES ON A MEDIAN U.S. HOUSEHOLD, AT 15.1%.” 
  • “Our students and parents deserve better. We need to implement and expand the school choice policy across the state.” 
  • “The rise of violent crime in our largest city, Chicago, is getting out of hand, while our politicians are more talk and less action.”

Click on candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

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All candidates for Illinois’ 3rd Congressional District complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Illinois’ 3rd Congressional District — Delia Ramirez (D) and Justin Burau (R) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office.

The outcome of this race will affect the partisan balance of the U.S. House of Representatives in the 118th Congress. All 435 seats in the House are up for election. As of September 12th, Democrats hold a 220-210 advantage in the U.S. House with five vacant seats. Illinois’ current congressional delegation consists of 13 Democrats and 5 Republicans.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office?

Ramirez:

“As State Representative, Delia helped lead the fight for the Reproductive Health Act, which enshrined the right to abortion access in Illinois – even if Roe v. Wade is overturned. Delia passed a law that extends Medicaid to all low-income people over the age of 42, making Illinois the first state in the nation to grant healthcare access to seniors regardless of immigration status. She will fight to expand healthcare access and pass Medicare for All in Congress.”

Burau:

“Healthcare is one of the main issues we face as a nation and Justin is ready to tackle this challenge. Justin is in favor of expanding healthcare options for all citizens to help make premiums lower. He supports competition across state lines and pledges to never support a federal mandate. Those with Pre-existing conditions will be protected. Additionally, consumers will be protected by requiring insurance companies to disclose the cost they pay for procedures for all patients.”

Click here to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

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All candidates for Illinois’ 1st Congressional District complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Illinois’ 1st Congressional District — Jonathan Jackson (D) and Eric Carlson (R) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office.

The outcome of this race will affect the partisan balance of the U.S. House of Representatives in the 118th Congress. All 435 seats in the House are up for election. As of September 9th, Democrats hold a 220-210 advantage in the U.S. House with five vacant seats. Illinois’s current congressional delegation consists of 13 Democrats and 5 Republicans.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What areas of public policy are you personally passionate about?

Jackson:

“STEMMING VIOLENT CRIME Jonathan will address gun violence by working to bring funds for youth programs and better community policing. He will strongly support legislation to end unlawful access to guns.

INCREASING AFFORDABLE HOUSING Jonathan will work with the Department of Housing and Urban Development to increase affordable housing in the Chicagoland region. He will support legislation that benefits first-time home buyers.”

Carlson:

“Education, employment, and cost of living. These are the key issues that affect everyone on a daily basis. When these issues are properly addressed it betters the lives of everyone in the community.

Foreign policy and the military. We live in a dangerous world, and if we lose focus of the threats facing us, we risk serious damage to our way of life.”

Click here to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

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Eric Sorensen and Esther Joy King are running for Illinois’ 17th Congressional District on November 8, 2022

Eric Sorensen (D) and Esther Joy King (R) are running in the general election for Illinois’ 17th Congressional District on November 8, 2022. Incumbent Rep. Cheri Bustos (D) is not running for re-election.

Sorensen worked as a TV meteorologist in Rockford and the Quad Cities area for nearly 20 years, and this is his first run for public office. King, a lawyer and JAG officer in the U.S. Army, was the Republican nominee for the 17th district in 2020. King lost to Bustos 54% to 48%.

Bloomberg Government’s Greg Giroux said, “This race will test the sturdiness of a Democratic gerrymander in an election that’s more likely than not to favor Republicans. Legislators boosted the district’s Democratic leanings after Rep. Cheri Bustos (D) announced her retirement, though Republicans say the reconfigured district—one of 23 nationwide that Biden would have won in 2020 by between 5 and 10 percentage points—is competitive enough for them to flip.”

Three election forecasters rate the race a Toss-up. Monmouth College Professor Robin Johnson said, “It will be very competitive, and I anticipate the parties are going to try to kick money in and resources to try to win this seat.”

A Democrat has represented the 17th district since 1983, except for the period between 2011 and 2013, when former Rep. Bobby Schilling (R) represented the district. Bustos defeated Schilling 53.3% to 46.7% in the 2012 general election and has represented the district since.

Following the 2020 census, the redrawn district has a more Democratic partisan lean than the old district, according to The Cook Political Report and FiveThirtyEight. The Cook PVI (Partisan Voting Index) score for the old district was R+3, while the score for the new district is D+4. According to FiveThirtyEight, the old district had a partisan lean of R+5, while the new district has a partisan lean of D+4.

The redrawn district includes parts of Rockford, Peoria, Bloomington-Normal, Macomb, and the Quad Cities. President Joe Biden (D) received 53% of the redrawn district’s vote in 2020, while former President Donald Trump (R) received 45%.

The outcome of this race will affect the partisan balance of the U.S. House of Representatives in the 118th Congress. All 435 seats in the House are up for election. As of August 3, 2022, Democrats hold a 220-210 advantage in the U.S. House with five vacant seats. Republicans need to gain a net of eight seats to win a majority in the chamber.



Davis defeated Collins in Illinois’ 7th Congressional District on June 28, 2022

Incumbent Danny K. Davis, Kina Collins, and Denarvis Mendenhall ran in the Democratic primary for Illinois’ 7th Congressional District on June 28, 2022. Davis, who has represented the district in Congress since 1997, won the primary with 52.3% of the vote. Collins received 45.3% of the vote, and Mendenhall received 2.4%.

Davis focused his campaign on familiarity with the district’s voters, saying, “This is my community…This is my home. This is my life.” Davis’ campaign yard signs read, “Re-elect Danny Davis. He’s someone you know,” and his campaign website highlighted his congressional voting record and seniority on congressional committees and caucuses. Collins’ campaign did not draw a contrast with Davis on policy but said Collins would provide the district with a fresh voice in Washington. Collins emphasized the fact that Davis has represented the district since she was in kindergarten and said that it was time for a change. She said, “I’m not just running to be the congresswoman in the Illinois 7th, but to talk about a vision for the Democratic Party, which includes young people, people of color, women, and those who do not come from traditional political backgrounds.” Collins’ campaign raised more money than Davis’, according to reports from the Federal Election Commission. Analysts described this primary race as a bellwether for generational tensions within the Democratic Party.

Prior to serving in Congress, Davis served on the Chicago City Council for 11 years as alderman of the 29th Ward. He also served on the Cook County Board of Commissioners from 1990 to 1996. He was elected to the U.S. House to represent Illinois’ 7th Congressional District in 1996. Davis served on the U.S. House Ways and Means Committee and was a member of the Congressional Black Caucus and the Progressive Caucus. Davis’ re-election was endorsed by President Joe Biden (D), Illinois Governor J.B. Pritzker (D), Illinois Senators Tammy Duckworth (D) and Dick Durbin (D), and Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot.

Collins became a protest organizer in the wake of the Chicago police shooting of Laquan McDonald in 2014 and founded the Chicago Neighborhood Alliance, a group describing its goal as to help end gun violence through civic engagement, in 2017. Collins lost to Davis in Illinois’ 7th Congressional District’s 2020 Democratic primary. She also served on the transition team and task force for gun violence prevention under President Joe Biden (D). Collins’ campaign was endorsed by several aldermen in the 7th District and the national political organizations Indivisible, Justice Democrats, and National Organization for Women.

Before the primary, the Cook Political Report, Sabato’s Crystal Ball, and Inside Elections all rated Illinois’ 7th Congressional District as a solid/safe Democratic seat, meaning that as the winner of the Democratic primary, Davis is very likely to win the general election as well.



Krishnamoorthi defeats Democratic primary challenger in Illinois’ 8th Congressional District

Incumbent U.S. Rep. Raja Krishnamoorthi defeated Junaid Ahmed in the Democratic primary for Illinois’ 8th Congressional District on June 28, 2022.

According to unofficial results, Krishnamoorthi received 71% of the vote to Ahmed’s 29%.

Krishnamoorthi was first elected to represent the 8th District in 2016. Before entering office, Krishnamoorthi was a partner at the law firm Kirkland & Ellis and president of a research and development company. He also worked as a policy director on Barack Obama’s (D) 2004 Senate campaign.

Krishnamoorthi, who immigrated to the U.S. as a child, emphasized his experience in office and said he “worked his hardest to ensure other Americans have the same opportunities his family had to achieve the American Dream.” Krishnamoorthi said he “co-authored successful legislation to expand federal support for career and technical education” and “[advocated] for protecting Social Security and Medicare.” Krishnamoorthi received endorsements from the Chicago Tribune and Planned Parenthood Action Fund.

As of June 8, 2022, Krishnamoorthi had raised $6.5 million and Ahmed had raised $1.1 million.

During the primary, Ahmed criticized Krishnamoorthi on the amount of money the incumbent raised, saying, “[W]e are being represented by a political class who are more interested in representing the needs of their corporate donors … than in representing the needs of the hard working families of the 8th district.”

In a debate, Krishnamoorthi said, “I raise as much as I can because I go after the special interests in Washington. … You can ask the rental car companies, the meat processing companies, the oil and gas companies that I’m now investigating what they think of me.”

Following redistricting, the 8th District remained in the Chicago area. At the time of the primary, three election forecasters rated the general election as Solid or Safe Democratic.