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Stories about Michigan

These Michigan State House candidates raised the most money and lost

Elections for all 110 seats in the Michigan House of Representatives took place on Nov. 8, 2022. Republicans held a 56-53 majority heading into the election.

This article details the five candidates who raised the most money and lost their election. In the 2022 election cycle, 109 of 110 general elections were contested. The losing candidates are shown along with the percentage of the vote they received compared to the winner. In cases where the race was pushed to a runoff, vote percentages for both advancing candidates are included.

House candidates who raised the most money and lost their general election

This information comes from candidate reports to the Michigan Secretary of State covering the period of Jan. 1, 2021, through Oct. 24, 2022.

The candidates who raised the most money and lost their election were:

  • Jack O’Malley – $296,139 – District 103 (Lost general 48% – 50%)
  • Alex Garza – $252,062 – District 29 (Lost general 49% – 51%)
  • Kevin Whiteford – $250,762 – District 38 (Lost general 48% – 52%)
  • Shadia Martini – $216,269 – District 54 (Lost general 49% – 51%)
  • Lynn Afendoulis – $207,850 – District 81 (Lost general 44% – 56%)

House candidates who raised the most money and lost their general election last cycle

This information comes from candidate reports to the Michigan Secretary of State covering the period of Jan. 1, 2019, through Dec. 31, 2020.

The candidates who raised the most money and lost their election were:

  • Dan O’Neil – $547,296 – District 104 (Lost general 47% – 51%)
  • Julia Pulver – $522,512 – District 39 (Lost general 47% – 52%)
  • Bronwyn Haltom – $463,558 – District 61 (Lost general 46% – 54%)
  • Barb Anness – $457,299 – District 45 (Lost general 48% – 52%)
  • Martha Ptashnik – $269,327 – District 19 (Lost general 50% – 50%)

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Michigan PACs submitted to the Michigan Secretary of State. Political expenditures that are not controlled by candidates or their campaigns, known as satellite spending, are not included in candidate totals. Federal PACs are not required to report to state agencies. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines.

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



These Michigan State Senate candidates raised the most money and lost

Elections for all 38 seats in the Michigan State Senate took place on Nov. 8, 2022. Republicans held a 22-16 majority heading into the election.

This article details the five candidates who raised the most money and lost their election. In the 2022 election cycle, 38 of 38 general elections were contested. The losing candidates are shown along with the percentage of the vote they received compared to the winner. In cases where the race was pushed to a runoff, vote percentages for both advancing candidates are included.

State Senate candidates who raised the most money and lost their general election

This information comes from candidate reports to the Michigan Secretary of State covering the period of Jan. 1, 2021, through Nov. 18, 2022.

The candidates who raised the most money and lost their election were:

  • Padma Kuppa – $900,743 – District 9 (Lost general 50% – 50%)
  • David LaGrand – $752,339 – District 30 (Lost general 49% – 49%)
  • Annette Glenn – $729,475 – District 35 (Lost general 47% – 53%)
  • Terry Sabo – $602,744 – District 32 (Lost general 47% – 53%)
  • Pamela Hornberger – $419,335 – District 12 (Lost general 50% – 50%)

State Senate candidates who raised the most money and lost their general election last cycle

This information comes from candidate reports to the Michigan Secretary of State covering the period of Jan. 1, 2019, through Dec. 31, 2020.

The candidates who raised the most money and lost their election were:

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Michigan PACs submitted to the Michigan Secretary of State. Political expenditures that are not controlled by candidates or their campaigns, known as satellite spending, are not included in candidate totals. Federal PACs are not required to report to state agencies. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines.

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



Fifteen of 20 Michigan State Senate committee chairs raised less money than the average member this cycle

Elections for all 38 seats in the Michigan State Senate took place on Nov. 8, 2022. Republicans held a 22-16 majority heading into the election.

Committee chair fundraising

State legislative committee chairs set a committee’s legislative agenda. Some committee chairs raise significantly more money than their non-chair counterparts in the state legislature. The average amount raised by delegates who did not serve as a committee chair was $382,445. The funds raised by each of the State Senate’s 20 committee chairs are shown below.

  • Advice and Consent Committee – Aric Nesbitt – $1,284,510
  • Communications and Technology Committee – Michele Hoitenga – $250,267
  • Economic and Small Business Development Committee – Ken Horn – $48,771
  • Education and Career Readiness Committee – Lana Theis – $392,102
  • Education Committee – Pamela Hornberger – $392,290
  • Elections Committee – Ruth Johnson – $191,115
  • Energy and Technology Committee – Dan Lauwers – $98,165
  • Energy Committee – Joseph Bellino – $257,158
  • Environmental Quality Committee – Rick Outman – $172,945
  • Families, Seniors, and Veterans Committee – John Bizon – $93,450
  • Finance Committee – Jim Runestad – $124,492
  • Health Policy and Human Services – Curt VanderWall – $458,414
  • House Regulatory Reform Committee – Roger Hauck – $468,830
  • Insurance and Banking Committee – Lana Theis – $392,102
  • Judiciary and Public Safety Committee – Roger Victory – $105,600
  • Local Government Committee – Dale Zorn – $96,175
  • Natural Resources Committee – Ed McBroom – $185,216
  • Senate Agriculture Committee – Kevin Daley – $226,590
  • Senate Appropriations Committee – Jim Stamas – $279,850
  • Senate Government Operations Committee – Mike Shirkey – $17,400
  • Senate Oversight Committee – Ed McBroom – $185,216
  • Senate Regulatory Reform Committee – Aric Nesbitt – $1,284,510
  • Transportation and Infrastructure Committee – Tom Barrett – $80,020

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Michigan PACs submitted to the Michigan Secretary of State. Political expenditures that are not controlled by candidates or their campaigns, known as satellite spending, are not included in candidate totals. Federal PACs are not required to report to state agencies. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines.

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



Fifteen of 24 Michigan House committee chairs raised less money than the average member this cycle

Elections for all 110 seats in the Michigan House of Representatives took place on Nov. 8, 2022. Republicans held a 56-53 majority heading into the election.

Committee chair fundraising

State legislative committee chairs set a committee’s legislative agenda. Some committee chairs raise significantly more money than their non-chair counterparts in the state legislature. The average amount raised by delegates who did not serve as a committee chair was $209,365. The funds raised by each of the House’s 24 committee chairs are shown below.

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Michigan PACs submitted to the Michigan Secretary of State. Political expenditures that are not controlled by candidates or their campaigns, known as satellite spending, are not included in candidate totals. Federal PACs are not required to report to state agencies. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines.

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



These are the results in the top five most expensive Michigan State Senate elections

General elections for all 38 districts in the Michigan State Senate took place on Nov. 8, 2022. Of the 38 districts up for election in 2022, 38 had a general election with more than one candidate.

Across all contested general elections, candidates raised $19.5 million. Incumbents raised an average of $337,142 per candidate and challengers raised an average of $183,415 per candidate.

Five general elections with the most fundraising

The table below details the five general elections with the most fundraising in the State Senate. Winning candidates’ names are in bold.

District Money Raised Officeholder Candidates
District 30 $1,344,710 Roger Victory (R) Mark Huizenga, David LaGrand, and Theo Petzold
District 20 $1,324,640 Sean McCann (D) Aric Nesbitt and Kim Jorgensen Gane
District 35 $1,310,275 Curt VanderWall (R) Kristen McDonald Rivet and Annette Glenn
District 32 $1,162,169 Ken Horn (R) Jon Bumstead and Terry Sabo
District 9 $1,161,635 Paul Wojno (D) Michael Webber and Padma Kuppa

The officeholders above are listed for the current districts they hold. However, this is a redistricting year, so candidates have been identified below as incumbents even if they are running in a different district than they currently hold.

#1 District 30 – $1,344,710

Incumbent Mark Huizenga raised $648,033, David LaGrand raised $696,677, and Theo Petzold raised $0.

Mark Huizenga won with 49 percent of the vote, David LaGrand received 49 percent of the vote, and Theo Petzold received 2 percent of the vote.

#2 District 20 – $1,324,640

Incumbent Aric Nesbitt raised $1,284,510 and Kim Jorgensen Gane raised $40,130.

Aric Nesbitt won with 61 percent of the vote and Kim Jorgensen Gane received 39 percent of the vote.

#3 District 35 – $1,310,275

Kristen McDonald Rivet raised $663,355 and Annette Glenn raised $646,920.

Kristen McDonald Rivet won with 53 percent of the vote and Annette Glenn received 47 percent of the vote.

#4 District 32 – $1,162,169

Incumbent Jon Bumstead raised $568,385 and Terry Sabo raised $593,785.

Jon Bumstead won with 53 percent of the vote and Terry Sabo received 47 percent of the vote.

#5 District 9 – $1,161,635

Padma Kuppa raised $842,028 and Michael Webber raised $319,607.

Michael Webber won with 50 percent of the vote and Padma Kuppa received 50 percent of the vote.

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Michigan PACs submitted to the Michigan Secretary of State. Political expenditures that are not controlled by candidates or their campaigns, known as satellite spending, are not included in candidate totals. Federal PACs are not required to report to state agencies. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines.

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



These are the results in the top five most expensive Michigan State House elections

General elections for all 110 districts in the Michigan House of Representatives took place on Nov. 8, 2022. Of the 110 districts up for election in 2022, 109 had a general election with more than one candidate.

Across all contested general elections, candidates raised $19.8 million. Incumbents raised an average of $173,010 per candidate and challengers raised an average of $57,315 per candidate.

Five general elections with the most fundraising

The table below details the five general elections with the most fundraising in the House of Representatives. Winning candidates’ names are in bold.

District Money Raised Officeholder Candidates
District 42 $1,639,668 Ann Bollin (R) Matt Hall and Justin Mendoza
District 103 $709,893 Daire Rendon (R) Betsy Coffia, Jack O’Malley, and Courtney Evans
District 73 $545,288 Bryan Posthumus (R) Julie Brixie and Norm Shinkle
District 38 $525,190 Kelly Breen (D) Joey Andrews and Kevin Whiteford
District 102 $505,723 Michele Hoitenga (R) Curt VanderWall and Brian Hosticka

The officeholders above are listed for the current districts they hold. However, this is a redistricting year, so candidates have been identified below as incumbents even if they are running in a different district than they currently hold.

#1 District 42 – $1,639,668

Incumbent Matt Hall raised $1,556,502 and Justin Mendoza raised $83,166.

Matt Hall won with 55 percent of the vote and Justin Mendoza received 45 percent of the vote.

#2 District 103 – $709,893

Incumbent Jack O’Malley raised $279,289, Betsy Coffia raised $430,604, and Courtney Evans raised $0.

Betsy Coffia won with 50 percent of the vote, Jack O’Malley received 48 percent of the vote, and Courtney Evans received 2 percent of the vote.

#3 District 73 – $545,288

Incumbent Julie Brixie raised $469,588 and Norm Shinkle raised $75,700.

Julie Brixie won with 57 percent of the vote and Norm Shinkle received 43 percent of the vote.

#4 District 38 – $525,190

Joey Andrews raised $289,726 and Kevin Whiteford raised $235,464.

Joey Andrews won with 52 percent of the vote and Kevin Whiteford received 48 percent of the vote.

#5 District 102 – $505,723

Curt VanderWall raised $458,414 and Brian Hosticka raised $47,310.

Curt VanderWall won with 61 percent of the vote and Brian Hosticka received 39 percent of the vote.

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Michigan PACs submitted to the Michigan Secretary of State. Political expenditures that are not controlled by candidates or their campaigns, known as satellite spending, are not included in candidate totals. Federal PACs are not required to report to state agencies. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines.

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



Michigan Democratic candidates have spent $18.7 million more than Republicans

In Michigan, state-level candidates have spent $157.4 million between Jan. 1, 2021, and Oct. 23, 2022. Democratic candidates have spent $84.6 million and Republican candidates have spent $65.9 million. 

Michigan Campaign Finance Snapshot (1/1/2021 – 10/23/2022)

Top 10 Democratic candidates, by expenditures (1/1/2021 – 10/23/2022)

In the 2022 election cycle, 307 state-level Democrats have filed campaign finance reports with the Michigan Bureau of Elections. Here are the 10 Democratic candidates who have spent the most.

RankDemocratic CandidateTotal spent
1.Gretchen Whitmer$48,011,305.14
2.Jocelyn Benson$6,154,826.08
3.Dana Nessel$5,053,215.01
4.Darrin Camilleri$1,223,308.21
5.Sam Singh$922,908.04
6.Kevin Hertel$896,987.73
7.Padma Kuppa$838,831.88
8.Kristen Rivet$835,095.06
9.David LaGrand$818,854.52
10.Veronica Klinefelt$797,216.52

Top 10 Republican candidates, by expenditures (1/1/2021 – 10/23/2022)

During the same time period, 325 Republicans have filed campaign finance reports with the Michigan Bureau of Elections. These are the 10 Republican candidates with the highest reported contributions for the 2022 election cycle so far.

RankRepublican CandidateTotal spent
1.Perry Johnson$14,070,179.32
2.Kevin Rinke$10,487,714.12
3.Tudor Dixon$3,839,923.40
4.James Craig$3,535,425.97
5.Garrett Soldano$3,041,362.75
6.Jason Wentworth$1,978,004.94
7.Matt Hall$1,460,753.25
8.Aric Nesbitt$1,363,959.97
9.Kristina Karamo$992,430.73
10.Matthew DePerno$948,509.48

In some states, officeholders may make expenditures from their campaign accounts when they are not up for election. Those expenditures are included in candidate campaign finance numbers.

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Michigan candidate PACs submitted to the Michigan Bureau of Elections. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

StateReport NameDue Date
MI2022 Annual/January1/31/2022
MI2022 April (PACs)4/25/2022
MI2022 July (PACs)7/25/2022
MI2022 Post-Primary9/1/2022
MI2022 Pre-General10/28/2022
MI2022 Post-General12/8/2022

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



All candidates for Michigan House of Representatives District 81 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Michigan House of Representatives District 81 — incumbent Rachel Hood (D) and Lynn Afendoulis (R) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office. 

Eighty-eight of the country’s 99 state legislative chambers will hold regularly scheduled elections in 2022. The Republican Party controls both chambers of Michigan’s state legislature. Michigan is one of 13 states with a divided government.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What areas of public policy are you personally passionate about? 

Hood:           

“Michigan needs tweaks to maximize our competitive edge in the 21st Century. In order to accomplish this, our communities must be attractive places to raise families, live, work and play. Preparing our state for its future as a refuge from climate change impact is my core focus. In order to achieve that vision, Michigan must have great schools, a dynamic workforce, and vibrant local economies; Accessible, affordable healthcare and environmental justice; Clean energy, and protected watersheds.”

Afendoulis:               

“I am passionate about a healthy Michigan — economies, communities, families, environmental ecosystems, and all the things that I want to improve for our children. So, I am passionate about the policy at hand that will allow us to do those things. That said: Health policy is critical because we need to make healthcare affordable and accessible to all. There are things we can do at the state level to help do that. Economic policy is critical because without jobs or opportunity, our systems & communities collapse.”

Click on the candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

Additional reading:



All candidates for Michigan State Senate District 27 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Michigan State Senate District 27 — incumbent John Cherry (D) and Aaron Gardner (R) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office. 

Eighty-eight of the country’s 99 state legislative chambers will hold regularly scheduled elections in 2022. The Republican Party controls both chambers of Michigan’s state legislature. Michigan is one of 13 states with a divided government.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office? 

Cherry:           

  • “We need to bring jobs back to Genesee County. I work every day in Lansing to bring good-paying union jobs back home to Genesee County.”
  • “I’m focused on protecting families. I’m leading the fight against lead in our water and homes.”
  • “I’ve fought to get critical education funding to Genesee County, including initial funding for a new Beecher High School, historic increased per-pupil funding, and special education funding.”

Gardner:               

  • “After decades of corruption and poor leadership, we need to show Genesee County’s residency by “ Putting Genesee County First”
  • “Empowering parents. Parents matter and they are being shamed out of schools for caring for their students education.”
  • “We must end the ability of our leadership having so much control and power to use the state of emergency to push political policies and agendas, establishing and utilizing a checks an balance , of which is already in place with the federal and state constitution.”

Click on the candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

Additional reading:

Michigan State Senate elections, 2022



Incumbent Jocelyn Benson (D), Kristina Karamo (R), and three others are running for Michigan Secretary of State

Incumbent Jocelyn Benson (D), Kristina Karamo (R), and three others are running for Michigan Secretary of State on November 8, 2022.

A dispute between Benson and former President Donald Trump (R) about the outcome of the 2020 election has brought national attention to this race. According to the Detroit Free Press, “In 2020, Trump blasted Benson’s decision to mail absentee ballot applications to every voter in Michigan during the COVID-19 pandemic, shining a spotlight on her office. She has vigorously defended how the election was administered that year and spoken out against lies and misinformation attacking its legitimacy.”

Benson has served as secretary of state since 2017. She worked with the Democratic National Committee and the Michigan Democratic Party to develop training programs for election law attorneys from 2004 to 2008, and she wrote a book that she says is about the role secretaries of state play in defending democracy. Benson says she is “[c]ommitted to the nonpartisan operation of the Secretary of State’s Office” and says she “transformed its operations to provide faster and more convenient service for every Michigander…while ensuring that elections are free, fair, secure and accurate, and fighting to protect voting rights for all Michigan voters whether Republicans, Democrats or Independents.”

Karamo is a community college educator and podcast host. After serving as a poll challenger during the 2020 election, Karamo says she witnessed fraud on Detroit’s absentee counting board, which motivated her to run for secretary of state. Karamo criticizes Benson’s performance in office, saying, “Our voting rights consist of ballot access, ballot security, and preventing illegal ballots from being injected into the system and the current officeholder has not done a sufficient job in protecting our voting rights.” If elected, Karamo said she will audit the state’s voter registration list, “With so many people voting absentee we have to make sure that that voting list is accurate because we open the door for individuals to request ballots for people who are not Michigan citizens [or] do not exist…”

Minor party, independent, and write-in candidates include Larry Hutchinson, Jr. (G), Gregory Stempfle (L), and Christine Schwartz of the U.S. Taxpayers Party.

This is one of 27 elections for secretary of state taking place in 2022. All but three states have a secretary of state. Although the specific duties and powers of the office vary from state to state, secretaries of state are often responsible for the maintenance of voter rolls and for administering elections. Other common responsibilities include registering businesses, maintaining state records, and certifying official documents. There are currently 27 Republican secretaries of state and 20 Democratic secretaries of state.

A state government triplex refers to a situation where the governor, attorney general, and secretary of state are all members of the same political party.

As of October 31, 2022, there are 23 Republican triplexes, 18 Democratic triplexes, and 9 divided governments where neither party holds triplex control.

Michigan is a Democratic triplex.