Tagmichigan

Stories about Michigan

Michigan Democratic candidates have spent $2.46 million more than Republicans

In Michigan, state-level candidates spent $22.83 million between Jan. 1, 2021, and Apr. 20, 2022. Democratic candidates spent $12.43 million and Republican candidates spent $9.97 million. 

Michigan Campaign Finance Snapshot (1/1/2021 – 4/20/2022)

Source: Transparency USA

Top 10 Democratic candidates, by expenditures (1/1/2021 – 4/20/2022)

In the 2022 election cycle, 158 state-level Democrats have filed campaign finance reports with the Michigan Secretary of State. Here are the 10 Democratic candidates who have spent the most.

RankDemocratic CandidateTotal Spent
1.Gretchen Whitmer$8,625,119.83
2.Dana Nessel$389,381.57
3.Donna Lasinski$231,734.78
4.Stephanie Chang$182,987.69
5.Jocelyn Benson$176,057.21
6.Jim Ananich$174,453.65
7.Winnie Brinks$157,361.48
8.Sarah Anthony$155,630.27
9.Curtis Hertel Jr$129,861.78
10.Angela Witwer$109,643.95

Top 10 Republican candidates, by expenditures (1/1/2021 – 4/20/2022)

During the same time period, 181 Republicans have filed campaign finance reports with the Michigan Secretary of State. These are the 10 Republican candidates with the highest reported expenditures for the 2022 election cycle so far.

RankRepublican CandidateTotal Spent
1.James Craig$1,352,240.63
2.Garrett Soldano$1,139,452.04
3.Kevin Rinke$537,177.93
4.Jason Wentworth$526,953.88
5.Tudor Dixon$408,932.00
6.Mark Huizenga$314,943.85
7.Aric Nesbitt$267,150.97
8.Thomas Albert$244,889.25
9.Ralph Rebandt$235,640.93
10.Jim Marleau$233,750.96

In some states, officeholders may make expenditures from their campaign accounts when they are not up for election. Those expenditures are included in candidate campaign finance numbers.

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Michigan candidate PACs submitted to the Michigan Secretary of State. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Report NameReport Due Date
2022 Annual/January1/31/2022
2022 April (PACs)4/25/2022
2022 July (PACs)7/25/2022
2022 Post-Primary9/1/2022
2022 Pre-General10/28/2023

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



Facebook was paid $194,180 from Michigan campaign accounts; other states reported millions

In Michigan, state-level candidates and PACs have spent $194,180 from their campaign accounts on services from Facebook in the 2022 election cycle so far. Facebook received 0.27 percent of all reported expenditures. 

According to reports filed with the Michigan Secretary of State between Jan. 1, 2021, and Apr. 20, 2022, here are the top candidates and PACs that have spent campaign funds with Facebook.

Top 10 Michigan campaigns spending money with Facebook

Of the $194,180 spent with Facebook, 92.58 percent came from these 10 campaign accounts.

Top Campaign Expenditures with Facebook (1/1/2021 – 4/20/2022)

RankTotal Paid to FacebookNameAccount Type
1.$65,000.00Michigan ActionNon-candidate PAC
2.$39,618.50Let MI Kids LearnNon-candidate PAC
3.$33,000.00Get Michigan Working Again (Superpac)Non-candidate PAC
4.$16,084.86For Our Future Michigan (Superpac)Non-candidate PAC
5.$6,541.65Mark HuizengaCandidate PAC
6.$5,785.19Steven GilbertCandidate PAC
7.$4,960.00Great Lakes Education ProjectNon-candidate PAC
8.$3,880.10Lana TheisCandidate PAC
9.$3,058.53Livingston County Republican CommitteeNon-candidate PAC
10.$1,849.54Northwest Wayne County State-Local PACNon-candidate PAC

Campaign expenditures with Facebook in 12 states

Here is how spending with Facebook in Michigan compares to 12 other states with data available from Transparency USA for the most recent election cycle:

Comparison of total campaign finance expenditures with Facebook, by state

RankStateTotal Paid to FacebookReporting Period
1California$5,290,7451/1/2021- 4/23/2022
2Virginia$4,486,8631/1/2020-12/31/2021*
3Texas$2,675,2761/1/2021 – 5/14/2022
4Michigan$194,1801/1/2021 – 4/20/2022
5Minnesota$166,0721/1/2021 – 3/31/2022
6Arizona123,1541/1/2021 – 3/31/2022
7Pennsylvania$106,5131/1/2021 – 3/9/2022
8Wisconsin$101,9781/1/2021 – 3/21/2022
9North Carolina$78,9601/1/2021 – 4/30/2022
10Florida$38,5421/1/2021 – 3/31/202
11Indiana$29,5341/1/2021 – 4/8/2022
12Ohio$19,9241/1/2021 – 4/13/2022

*Virginia’s two-year election cycles end in an odd-numbered year. The first available reports for Virginia’s 2023 election cycle are due Jul. 17, 2022.

While spending varies widely between states, no state on Transparency USA has reported more than 1.06 percent of total campaign expenditures on services from Facebook in the most recent cycle.

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Michigan PACs submitted to the Michigan Secretary of State. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Report NameReport Due Date
2022 Annual/January1/31/2022
2022 April (PACs)4/25/2022
2022 July (PACs)7/25/2022
2022 Post-Primary9/1/2022
2022 Pre-General10/28/2023
2022 Post-General12/8/2022

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



Michigan waives 55,000 pandemic unemployment insurance overpayments

The Michigan Unemployment Insurance Agency announced May 4 that an additional 55,000 unemployment insurance claimants who received overpayments during the coronavirus pandemic will not have to repay the funds. The agency also said about 400,000 overpayments totalling $4.3 billion had already been forgiven.

Michigan Governor Gretchen Whitmer (D) signed a bill Feb. 28 allowing for the forgiveness of overpayments related to the conflict of state and federal policies for the payment of federal Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA) benefits.

PUA benefits were designed to assist workers who did not qualify for regular unemployment insurance benefits, such as gig workers, self-employed workers, and part-time workers. Michigan’s unemployment insurance law conflicted with the federal law and did not allow part-time workers to claim unemployment insurance benefits. The state required claimants to be able and available to work full time. Due to the conflict, the Michigan Unemployment Insurance Agency requested repayment of benefits from some part time workers (and from workers who were not available to work for pandemic-related reasons, such as caretaking) who attested to their ability and availability to work full time.

Unemployment insurance refers to a joint federal and state program that provides temporary monetary benefits to eligible laid-off workers who are actively seeking new employment. Qualifying individuals receive unemployment compensation as a percentage of their lost wages in the form of weekly cash benefits while they search for new employment.

The federal government oversees the general administration of state unemployment insurance programs. The states control the specific features of their unemployment insurance programs, such as eligibility requirements and length of benefits.

Additional reading:



Michigan Secretary of State raises $1.5 million this election cycle

According to the most recent campaign finance reports filed with the Michigan Secretary of State’s office, Michigan Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson has raised $1.5 million and spent $176,057 between Jan. 1, 2021 and Apr. 20, 2022. Benson is currently ranked fifth in state-level donations in the 2022 election cycle.

Benson is a member of the Democratic Party and assumed office in 2019. In Michigan, the secretary of state is an elected position. Duties vary by state but are generally administrative in nature and may include recordkeeping, certification of state documents, and serving as chief election official. Benson is running for reelection in 2022.

Benson’s reported campaign finance activity, by quarter (2017-2021)

Source: Transparency USA\

Contributions to Benson

Of the $1,510,808 already reported in the 2022 election cycle, 15.1 percent came from the top 10 donors.

Top Donors to Benson (1/1/2021 – 4/20/2022)

RankTotal AmountDonor NameDonor Type
1.$71,500.00Democratic Association of Secretaries of State FederalENTITY
2.$36,500.00Michigan Regional Council of Carpenters PACENTITY
3.$35,000.00Michigan Education Association PACENTITY
4.$29,000.00Inspire MichiganENTITY
5.$14,250.00Ivote Action FundENTITY
6.$13,300.00Mark J BernsteinINDIVIDUAL
7.$7,150.00Anne SullivanINDIVIDUAL
8.$7,150.00Arn TellemINDIVIDUAL
9.$7,150.00Arthur D LipsonINDIVIDUAL
10.$7,150.00Ashley OberheideINDIVIDUAL

Expenditures by Benson

On the expenditures side, Benson reported $176,057, with 97.39 percent of all spending going to the 10 payees topping this list. 

Top Expenditures by Benson (1/1/2021 – 4/20/2022)

RankTotal AmountPayee NamePayee Type
1.$57,750.00Farough and AssociatesENTITY
2.$44,000.00Anne Lewis StrategiesENTITY
3.$23,608.18Vantiv LLCENTITY
4.$13,402.07Act BlueENTITY
5.$11,539.00Ngp Van IncENTITY
6.$7,100.00Ivote FundENTITY
7.$6,150.00Mark J BernsteinINDIVIDUAL
8.$4,900.00Elizabeth D BoydINDIVIDUAL
9.$1,906.00Delta AirlinesENTITY
10.$1,100.00Apollo ArtistryENTITY

How donations to Benson compare to the same office in other states

Contributions vary widely among officeholders in the same role. A number of factors, including whether the position is appointed or elected, can influence donor activity. Here is how Benson compares to the 10 other state and commonwealth secretaries with campaign finance data available from Transparency USA in 2022:

Across the U.S., 27 secretaries of state are members of the Republican Party and 20 are members of the Democratic Party. Voters elect the secretary of state in 35 states, while they are appointed by either the governor or state legislature in the other 12. Alaska, Hawaii, and Utah do not have secretaries of state. In 2022, 27 states are holding elections for the position.

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Michigan PACs submitted to the Michigan Secretary of State. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Report NameReport Due Date
2022 Annual/January1/31/2022
2022 April (PACs)4/25/2022
2022 July (PACs)7/25/2022
2022 Post-Primary9/1/2022
2022 Pre-General10/28/2023
2022 Post-General12/8/2022

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



Michigan legislature puts legislative term limits, financial disclosure amendment on November ballot

Thirty years ago, Michigan voters approved an initiated constitutional amendment, Proposal B, that enacted term limits on state legislators, as well as other elected officials. This November, voters will decide on a constitutional amendment to modify the state legislative term limits. The Legislature passed House Joint Resolution R (HJR R) on May 10, placing the new constitutional amendment on the ballot. House Speaker Jason Wentworth (R-97) introduced HJR R earlier in the day. 

In Nov. 1992, 58.7% voted to approve Proposal B, which was designed to limit the number of times that a person could be elected to congressional, state executive, and state legislative offices in Michigan. In the Michigan State Senate, members were limited to two 4-year terms. In the Michigan House of Representatives, members were limited to three 2-year terms.

This year’s ballot measure would replace Proposal B’s state legislative term limits with a new requirement: a combined 12 years in the state Legislature. Under Proposal B, an individual could serve 14 years in the state Legislature–6 in the House and 8 in the Senate. The 2022 ballot measure would allow for 12 years, which is less than Proposal B; however, a legislator could serve that entire time in one legislative chamber.

Senate Majority Leader Mike Shirkey (R-16) said, “In my view, Michigan’s current term limits discourage good people from running for office, shifting the power from the people to the bureaucracy and interest groups, which negatively impacts the legislative process.”

The ballot measure contains a second provision on financial disclosure statements for elected state legislative and state executive officials. Under the proposal, they would be required to file annual financial disclosure reports on their income, assets, liabilities, gifts from lobbyists, positions held in certain organizations, and agreements on future employment beginning in April 2024. 

A political action committee, Voters for Transparency and Term Limits, was collecting signatures for a ballot initiative to change the term limits and require financial disclosure statements. The group called on the Legislature to act sooner. “We’re gaining momentum, and we are determined to get this proposal on the ballot in November. The sooner we can start a healthy debate between Michiganders about amending our state constitution, the better off we will be,” said Rich Studley, a former Michigan Chamber of Commerce CEO and co-chairperson of Voters for Transparency and Term Limit.

Patrick Anderson, one of the principal authors of Proposal B, responded to the legislative process, which saw the amendment introduced and passed on the same day. He said, “Not a single citizen in the entire state has had a chance to take a look at the resolution they passed, ambushing the voters before noon. The stench of this will last all the way to November.” 

The constitutional amendment is the first ballot measure certified for the 2022 ballot in Michigan. Voters could see additional legislative referrals, along with citizen-initiated ballot measures. The deadline to file signatures for initiated statutes is June 1, and the deadline for initiated constitutional amendments is July 11. 

Michigan voters have approved most (10 of 11) constitutional amendments put on the ballot by the Legislature since 1985. The last time voters rejected a legislatively referred constitutional amendment was in 2015, when 80% voted against a proposal to increase the fuel excise tax, eliminate the sales tax on fuel, increase the earned income tax credit, and make other tax and spending changes.

Additional reading:



Michigan county commissioner recall results in party control flip

William Bunek (R) was removed as Leelanau County Commissioner in Michigan through a recall election on May 3, 2022. Bunek lost the seat with 55% of votes cast in favor of the recall. Lois Bahle (D) was elected as the replacement candidate in tandem with the recall. Bahle’s election switched the board majority from Republican to Democratic. 

Recall supporters criticized Bunek for statements he made in a county board meeting on Sept. 14, 2021. In that meeting, Bunek and three other Republicans on the board recommended zeroing out the Early Childhood Services millage passed by voters in Nov. 2019. According to the Traverse City Record Eagle, “Bunek at that time said the United States is a constitutional republic and when voters make a wrong decision, the county board is there to make sure that it doesn’t go on.” Before the recall, Bunek held the seat for 14 years.

Bunek appealed the factual nature of the recall petition in the 13th Circuit Court, stating that he felt his statements were misrepresented. The appeal was denied and recall supporters were able to gather 663 signatures to send the recall to a vote. 

There have been 15 recall efforts against 33 county commissioners in 2022. Of those, nine are underway, 19 did not go to a vote, one resulted in a resignation, two were approved, one was defeated, and one is on the ballot in May 2022.

There have already been more recall efforts against county commissioners in 2022 than in the first half of 2021. Between January and June of 2021, 12 county commissioners were targets of recall efforts. As of May 9, 2022, 33 county commissioners had been the targets of recall efforts. 

Additional reading:



Here are the top 10 places Michigan candidates and PACs are spending campaign money

In Michigan politics, state-level candidates and PACs spent $71.97 million between Jan. 1, 2021, and Apr. 20, 2022. More than $16.74 million or 23.26 percent of all campaign finance expenditures went to the 10 payees at the top of the list. 

A payee is an entity or individual who has received money from a campaign account. Candidates and PACs must report campaign expenditures, including payments to vendors, donations to other campaign accounts, and bank transfers, to the Michigan Secretary of State.

Top 10 Michigan payees (1/1/2021 – 4/20/2022)

Here are the top 10 recipients of Michigan campaign money in the 2022 election cycle, as of the most recent reports. 

RankPayee Name Total Received
1.Fieldworks LLC$4,973,008.06
2.National Petition Management Inc$2,597,849.75
3.K2K Consulting LLC$2,081,183.33
4.Run the World Digital$1,713,564.32
5.MRP Federal Account$1,440,436.60
6.Field Works LLC$1,054,436.37
7.Paychex Inc$1,037,992.86
8.Campaign Works LLC$776,387.86
9.Strategic Media Placement$537,040.00
10.Pinpoint Media LLC$530,864.00

Total Expenditures in nine states during the 2022 election cycle

Campaign finance expenditures vary widely among state-level candidates and PACs. A number of factors, including state-specific campaign finance regulations, influence how expenditure activity varies across states. Here is how total campaign finance expenditures in Michigan compared to eight other states with data available from Transparency USA for the 2022 election cycle:

Comparison of total expenditures, by state

RankStateTotal ExpendituresReporting Period
1Texas$337,432,3511/1/2022 – 2/19/2022
2Pennsylvania$319,374,3891/1/2022 – 3/9/2022
3Florida$302,254,1341/1/2022 – 2/28/2022
4Michigan$71,971,7871/1/2022 – 4/20/2022
5Arizona63,716,6171/1/2022 – 3/31/2022
6Ohio$59,240,3971/1/2022 – 4/13/2022
7Wisconsin$34,706,0221/1/2022 – 3/21/2022
8Indiana$32,159,3981/1/2022 – 4/8/2022
9North Carolina$22,543,0371/1/2022 – 12/31/2021

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Michigan PACs submitted to the Michigan Secretary of State. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Report NameReport Due Date
2022 Annual/January1/31/2022
2022 April (PACs)4/25/2022
2022 July (PACs)7/25/2022
2022 Post-Primary9/1/2022
2022 Pre-General10/28/2023
2022 Post-General12/8/2022

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



The top 10 Michigan candidates raised 28.4% of all donations

In Michigan politics, state-level candidates and PACs raised $89.2 million between Jan. 1, 2021, and Dec. 31, 2021. More than $25.4 million or 28.4 percent of all donations was raised by the 10 individuals at the top of the list. 

Top 10 Michigan candidates (1/1/2021 – 12/31/2021)

Here are the 10 Michigan candidates who have raised the most money so far in the 2022 election cycle, according to the most recent campaign finance reports filed with the Michigan Secretary of State. 

RankCandidate Name Total DonationsTotal Expenditures
1.Gretchen Whitmer$14,281,060.98$8,625,119.83
2.James Craig$2,030,650.85$1,352,240.63
3.Kevin Rinke$2,004,938.02$537,177.93
4.Dana Nessel$1,846,598.81$389,381.57
5.Jocelyn Benson$1,510,808.43$176,057.21
6.Garrett Soldano$1,370,097.82$1,139,452.04
7.Tom Leonard$634,061.36$55,606.80
8.Jason Wentworth$601,900.00$369,916.02
9.Aric Nesbitt$572,540.36$154,004.95
10.Tudor Dixon$505,766.32$408,932.00

Donations to top candidates in 10 states during the 2022 election cycle

Among state-level candidates and officeholders, fundraising varies widely. A number of factors, including state-specific campaign finance regulations, influence how donor activity varies across states. Here is how donations to the top 10 Michigan candidates compare to nine other states with data available from Transparency USA for the 2022 election cycle:

Comparison of donations to top 10 candidates, by state

RankStateDonations to Top 10 CandidatesTotal DonationsReporting Period
1Florida$110,704,048.67$532,230,957.551/1/2021 – 2/28/2022
2Texas$105,345,995.42$375,309,268.771/1/2021 – 2/19/2022
3Pennsylvania$34,501,470.61$343,783,026.521/1/2021 – 3/09/2022
4Michigan$25,358,422.95$89,192,492.111/1/2021 – 12/31/2021
5Ohio$24,752,903.97$79,210,717.621/1/2021 – 4/13/2022
6Arizona$22,291,313.55$72,806,908.751/1/2021 – 12/31/2021
7Wisconsin$19,907,524.3755,603,885.141/1/2021 – 3/21/2022
8North Carolina$8,927,365.01$39,859,339.461/1/2021 – 12/31/2021
9Indiana$7,661,472.0249,459,363.581/1/2021 – 4/8/2022
10Minnesota$5,201,704.60$36,935,152.761/1/2021 – 12/31/2021

In some states, officeholders may accept donations to their campaign accounts when they are not up for election. Any reported donations by those officeholders are included in candidate donation numbers.

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Michigan candidate PACs submitted to the Michigan Secretary of State. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Report NameReport Due Date
2022 Annual/January1/31/2022
2022 April (PACs)4/25/2022
2022 July (PACs)7/25/2022
2022 Post-Primary9/1/2022
2022 Pre-General10/28/2023
2022 Post-General12/8/2022

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



Michigan pauses collection of pandemic unemployment insurance overpayments

The Michigan Unemployment Insurance Agency announced April 8 a temporary pause on the collection of unemployment insurance overpayments issued during the coronavirus pandemic. The pause prevents the state from garnishing wages or intercepting state tax returns until at least May 7.

The agency said the pause would give officials time to determine which claimants are eligible to have the overpayment waived under the federal Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA) program. Collections for overpayments incurred before March 2020 will continue during the freeze.

Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer (D) signed a bill on Feb. 28 allowing part-time workers who received federal PUA to keep their benefits. Federal PUA benefits were designed to assist workers who did not qualify for regular unemployment insurance benefits, such as gig workers, self-employed workers, and part-time workers. Until Whitmer signed the February 28 bill, Michigan’s unemployment insurance law conflicted with federal law under the CARES Act and did not allow part-time workers to claim PUA benefits. The state required claimants to be able and available to work full-time.

Due to the conflict, the Michigan Unemployment Insurance Agency requested repayment of benefits from some part-time workers (and from workers who were not available to work for pandemic-related reasons, such as caretaking) who attested to their ability and availability to work full-time. The April 8 pause will give officials time to determine who is eligible to keep PUA benefits they were paid.

Unemployment insurance refers to a joint federal and state program that provides temporary monetary benefits to eligible laid-off workers who are actively seeking new employment. Qualifying individuals receive unemployment compensation as a percentage of their lost wages in the form of weekly cash benefits while they search for new employment.

The federal government oversees the general administration of state unemployment insurance programs. The states control the specific features of their unemployment insurance programs, such as eligibility requirements and length of benefits.

Additional reading:



Democratic State Central Committee outraises every other Michigan PAC with $3.74 million

In Michigan, the Democratic State Central Committee has raised more than any other non-candidate political action committee (PAC) in the 2022 election cycle so far. According to the most recent campaign finance reports filed with the Michigan Secretary of State, the Democratic State Central Committee raised $3.74 million and spent $26.18 million between Jan. 1, 2021 and Dec. 31, 2021. 

In Michigan politics, donations to the Democratic State Central Committee represent 7.34 percent of the $51.02 million all Michigan state-level PACs have raised in total. Here are the Democratic State Central Committee’s top donors and recipients, as reported to the Michigan Secretary of State.

Donations to the Democratic State Central Committee

Of the $3,743,006 raised in the 2022 election cycle, 99.31 percent came from Democratic State Central Committee’s top 10 donors.

Top Donations to Democratic State Central Committee (1/1/2021 – 12/31/2021)

RankTotal AmountDonor NameDonor Type
1.$3,556,365.61Gretchen WhitmerENTITY
2.$41,975.00Donna LasinskiENTITY
3.$35,000.00Brian MosallamENTITY
4.$25,000.00Michigan State Utility Workers Council AFL-CIO PACENTITY
5.$21,000.00Grand Traverse County Democratic CommitteeENTITY
6.$11,000.00David NachtINDIVIDUAL
7.$10,000.00Michigan Education Association PACENTITY
8.$7,000.00Grand Travrse County Democratic CommENTITY
9.$5,000.00Gloria PageINDIVIDUAL
10.$5,000.00Martha LinetINDIVIDUAL

Expenditures by the Democratic State Central Committee

On the expenditures side, Democratic State Central Committee reported $176,326, with 93.43 percent of all spending going to the 10 payees topping the list. Payees include both contribution recipients and vendors, as filed by the PAC.

Top Expenditures by the Democratic State Central Committee (1/1/2021 – 12/31/21)

RankTotal AmountPayee NamePayee Type
1.$60,997.50Gretchen WhitmerENTITY
2.$40,000.00Michigan House Democratic FundENTITY
3.$14,297.32Empower MI VoteENTITY
4.$10,719.43Scholten FantENTITY
5.$10,000.00Grand Traverse County Democratic CommitteeENTITY
6.$8,585.56Mass Mailing LLCENTITY
7.$8,130.00American Printing and Graphics IncENTITY
8.$5,000.00Michigan Democratic Black CaucusENTITY
9.$3,507.27Daniel CentersENTITY
10.$3,507.27Hess PrintingENTITY

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Michigan PACs submitted to the Michigan Secretary of State. Federal PACs are not required to report to state agencies. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Report NameReport Due Date
2022 Annual/January1/31/2022
2022 April (PACs)4/25/2022
2022 July (PACs)7/25/2022
2022 Post-Primary9/1/2022
2022 Pre-General10/28/2023
2022 Post-General12/8/2022

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.