Tagnevada

Stories about Nevada

Nevada Supreme Court Justice Abbi Silver retires

Nevada Supreme Court Justice Abbi Silver retired on Sept. 29, 2022. Silver was the only judge in Nevada’s history to be elected to every court in the state’s court system.

Silver was elected to the state supreme court in 2018, filling the seat vacated by Justice Michael Douglas. Prior to this election, Silver served on the Nevada Court of Appeals from 2015 to 2019. She was one of three judges appointed to form the court, which was created by a voter-approved constitutional amendment. Silver became chief judge of the court on Jan. 2, 2017. She also served on the Las Vegas Municipal Court, Las Vegas Justice Court, and the Nevada Eighth Judicial District Court.

In the event of a midterm vacancy, the Nevada Commission on Judicial Selection solicits and screens applicants. The commission presents a list of three nominees to the governor, who appoints one to fill the vacancy until the next general election. If the predecessor’s term is not expiring that election cycle, the appointed justice must win election to the court in order to serve the remainder of the unexpired term.

In 2022, there have been 19 supreme court vacancies in 14 of the 29 states where replacement justices are appointed instead of elected. The vacancies were caused by retirements.

Additional reading:

https://ballotpedia.org/Nevada_Supreme_Court_justice_vacancy_(September_2022)

https://ballotpedia.org/State_supreme_court_vacancies,_2022

https://ballotpedia.org/Nevada_Supreme_Court



All candidates for Nevada State Senate District 12 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Nevada State Senate District 12 — Julie Pazina (D) and Cherlyn Arrington (R) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office.

Eighty-eight of the country’s 99 state legislative chambers will hold regularly scheduled elections in 2022. The Democratic Party controls both chambers of Nevada’s state legislature. Nevada is one of 14 states with a Democratic trifecta.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office?            

Pazina:               

  • “Creating Jobs, Diversifying the Economy”
  • “Ensuring Accessible and Affordable Health Care”
  • “World Class Education for Nevada’s Students”

Arrington:           

  • “EDUCATION – SCHOOL CHOICE – QUALITY EDUCATION – NO COMMOM CORE…”
  • “MEDICAL FREEDOM – GOVERNMENT SHOULD NOT TELL US WE MUST HAVE A SHOT TO WORK AND PROVIDE FOR OUR FAMILIES…”
  • “STAND STRONG WITH OUR LAW ENFORCMENT AND FIRST RESPONDERS…”

Click on candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

Additional reading:



All candidates for Nevada State Assembly District 25 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Nevada State Assembly District 25 — Selena La Rue Hatch (D) and Sam Kumar (R) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office.

Eighty-eight of the country’s 99 state legislative chambers will hold regularly scheduled elections in 2022. The Democratic Party controls both chambers of Nevada’s state legislature. Nevada is one of 14 states with a Democratic trifecta.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office?            

La Rue Hatch:           

  • “We face many challenges in Nevada. From an underfunded education system to the highest unemployment in the nation to the ravages of climate change.”
  • “We’ve known it for years – education is broken in Nevada. And yet, nothing seems to change. Every two years, our leaders promise to fix our education system, but as someone who is in the classroom, I can tell you, I don’t see the fixes happening.”
  • “Our district needs a teacher’s voice in the room where decisions are made. A voice of someone who understands what it means to carry thousands of dollars in student debt and pay almost half your income in childcare expenses.”

Kumar:           

  • “We need a free market system in education where the funding travels with the child. Schools need to focus on Reading, wRiting and aRithmetic, not politics and sex education”
  • “We need better ballot integrity. Proof of citizenship and valid picture ID should be presented to vote. Mail ballot on request only, with real signature verification. End ballot harvesting.”
  • “Immigration should be legal, limited and merit based. No welfare, stimulus or other types of payments to illegal aliens.”

Click on candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

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U.S. Rep. Dina Titus (D), Mark Robertson (R) running in a district that became less Democratic due to redistricting

U.S. Rep. Dina Titus (D), Mark Robertson (R), and Ken Cavanaugh (L) are running in the general election for Nevada’s 1st Congressional District on November 8, 2022.

The partisan balance of Nevada’s 1st Congressional District changed as a result of redistricting following the 2020 census. According to data compiled by Daily Kos, Joe Biden (D) would have won this district in the 2020 presidential election with 53% of the vote. Under the old district lines, Biden won the 1st District with 62% of the vote. The district’s Partisan Voter Index, a measurement tool that scores each congressional district based on how strongly it leans toward one political party, changed from D+15 in 2018 to D+3 in 2022.

Titus was elected to the U.S. House in 2013 and also served a term from 2009 to 2011. Titus served in the Nevada State Senate from 1998-2008 and worked as a professor at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Titus outlined her policy stances to Nevada Newsmakers. She said: “I am a progressive, but I don’t believe in defunding the police. I’m for Medicare for all, but you’ve got to do it in a step-by-step process. I am for every environmental issue out there … But I can’t just say overall the ‘Green New Deal’ because that is a push toward nuclear power.”

Robertson served in the U.S. Army and retired as a colonel in the U.S. Army Reserves. He also taught as an assistant professor and adjunct faculty at UNLV, the National Defense University, and the American College. In his response to Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey, Robertson said, “He can use his national and international experience to develop solutions to the complex problems we face as a Nation.” He highlighted school choice, 1st Amendment issues, border control, police funding, and balancing the federal budget as top issues.

The outcome of this race will affect the partisan balance of the U.S. House of Representatives in the 118th Congress. All 435 districts in the House are up for election. As of September 13, 2022, Democrats hold a 221-212 advantage in the U.S. House with two vacancies. Republicans need to gain a net of six districts to win a majority in the chamber.



All candidates for Nevada State Assembly District 18 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Nevada State Assembly District 18 — incumbent Venicia Considine (D) and Christine DeCorte (R) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office.

Eighty-eight of the country’s 99 state legislative chambers will hold regularly scheduled elections in 2022. The Democratic Party controls both chambers of Nevada’s state legislature. Nevada is one of 14 states with a Democratic trifecta.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office?            

Considine:           

  • “A good paying job, a stable home, access to quality healthcare, and an equitable education system are requirments to build a life with dignity.”
  • “Equality and equal rights.”
  • “Protecting our environment so we can leave the next generations a sustainable planet.”

DeCorte:       

  • “A Government For the people BY the people.”
  • “Education and family values”
  • “Small Business/ Entrepreneurialism is the backbone of our country”

Click on candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

Additional reading:



All candidates for Nevada State Assembly District 13 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Nevada State Assembly District 13— Will Rucker (D) and Brian Hibbetts (R) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office.

Eighty-eight of the country’s 99 state legislative chambers will hold regularly scheduled elections in 2022. The Democratic Party controls both chambers of Nevada’s state legislature. Nevada is one of 14 states with a Democratic trifecta.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What areas of public policy are you personally passionate about?

Rucker:

“Being married to a nurse has provided me with a unique perspective on the immense challenges our first responders face. I’m the grandson of a teacher, army veteran, and domestic worker, the son of a dad who owned a small business and a mom who worked a traditional job. I know the benefits of hard work, the sacrifice of service, and that our quality of life isn’t guaranteed. We need to modernize our economy and that can only happen if we modernize our consciousness. I am passionate about creating a social floor that supports all of us without exceeding the bounds of our ecological limits.”

Hibbetts:

“Having been born and raised in Las Vegas, I have dedicated my life to protecting our communities as a member of the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department. I believe that every individual has the right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. However, during the pandemic we saw the majority party infringe on our constitutional rights through blanket mandates that closed our schools and businesses. I support reforms that limit the governor’s emergency powers and places them with the people’s house. As your representative, I will always fight to ensure that our individual liberties are not infringed.”

Click on candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

Additional reading:



All candidates for Nevada State Board of Regents District 8 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Nevada State Board of Regents District 8— Michelee Crawford and John Patrick Rice — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office.

The Nevada State Board of Regents is an elected executive agency of the Nevada state government, responsible for managing the state’s system of higher education.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office?

Crawford:           

  • “Increasing opportunities for access to college while expanding high school to college dual enrollment programs.”
  • “Increasing programming resources for rural NSHE institutions.”
  • “Restoring board credibility with collective work focused on outcomes measured by student enrollment, program diversification, and stakeholder climate surveys.”

Rice:               

  • “Further invest in in-person and online instruction access for underserved communities in urban and rural Nevada.”
  • “Using NSHE’s current distance learning infrastructure, capitalize on the world-wide distance learning market to enhance brick and mortar operations in Nevada.”
  • “Using the developing NSHE strategic plan and the ongoing conversations surrounding ‘Question One’, engage in a comprehensive transformation of NSHE’s governing operations.”

Click on candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

Additional reading:



Incumbent Steve Sisolak (D), Joe Lombardo (R), Edward Bridges II (I), and Brandon Davis (L) are running in the general election for governor of Nevada

Incumbent Steve Sisolak (D), Joe Lombardo (R), Edward Bridges II (I), and Brandon Davis (L) are running in the general election for governor of Nevada on November 8, 2022.

Sisolak was first elected governor in 2018 after serving on the Clark County Commission and the Nevada Board of Regents. Discussing his performance as governor, Sisolak said that he is “committed to protecting the well-being of Nevadans who’ve called the Silver State home for generations,” which is why he “followed through on his promise to not raise taxes on everyday Nevadans, increased the minimum wage, and lowered health care, child care, and housing costs for families in every corner of our state.” Sisolak also highlighted his record on abortion, saying, “Governors like me are the last line of defense for protecting abortion access…I signed an executive order protecting anyone seeking reproductive care in Nevada from their states’ restrictive, anti-abortion laws.”

Lombardo served in the U.S. Army, Army Reserves, and the National Guard. After two decades as an officer in the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department, he was elected Clark County sheriff in 2014. Lombardo has been critical of Sisolak’s performance as governor, saying, “November is our chance to bring relief to our state. No more reckless spending. No more prioritizing criminals over citizens. No more fake promises. It’s time for Nevadans to stop paying the price for Sisolak’s failures…Say no to four more years of Steve Sisolak’s failed policies.” Lombardo has also been critical of Sisolak’s record on crime, saying, “Signing bills that create an environment of chaos. Preventing police from doing their jobs. Allowing criminals to walk the streets. Sisolak’s soft-on-crime policies are making our communities less safe!” In response, Sisolak released a campaign ad saying that homicide rates increased while Lombardo was sheriff.

Nevada has had a Democratic trifecta since 2019. Nevada does not have a state government triplex.

A state government trifecta refers to a situation where one party controls a state’s governorship and majorities in both chambers of the state legislature. A state government triplex refers to a situation where the governor, attorney general, and secretary of state are all members of the same political party.

As of August 26, 2022, there are 23 Republican trifectas, 14 Democratic trifectas, and 13 divided governments where neither party holds trifecta control.

This is one of 36 gubernatorial elections taking place in 2022. The governor serves as a state’s top executive official and is the only executive office that is elected in all 50 states. There are currently 28 Republican governors and 22 Democratic governors.



Catherine Cortez Masto, Adam Laxalt, and three others running for Senate in Nevada

Incumbent U.S. Sen. Catherine Cortez Masto (D), former state Attorney General Adam Laxalt (R), and three others are running for a seat in the U.S. Senate from Nevada on November 8, 2022.

Time’s Philip Elliott wrote, “The match-up [between Cortez Masto and] Republican Adam Laxalt is seen as a two-point race at best—and one that could decide if the Democrats hold their narrow majority in the Senate.”

Cortez Masto took office in 2017 after defeating Joe Heck (R) 47.1% to 44.7%, becoming the first-ever Latina elected to the U.S. Senate. Sen. Harry Reid (D) held the seat from 1987 to 2017. Before being elected to the Senate, Cortez Masto served as Nevada’s attorney general from 2007 to 2015.

Laxalt replaced Cortez Masto as state attorney general, serving from 2015 to 2019. Laxalt was the Republican gubernatorial nominee in 2018, losing to Steve Sisolak (D) 49.4% to 45.3%. Laxalt is the grandson of former Nevada governor and U.S. Senator Paul Laxalt (R), and is the son of former New Mexico Senator Pete Domenici (R).

Three election forecasters rate the race a toss-up, and recent statewide elections in Nevada have been decided by five percentage points or fewer.

In the Nevada 2018 U.S. senate race, Jacky Rosen defeated incumbent Sen. Dean Heller (R) by five percentage points. In 2016, Cortez Masto defeated Heck (R) by 2.4 percentage points. The two most recent presidential elections in Nevada were similarly close. Joe Biden (D) defeated incumbent President Donald Trump (R) by 2.4 percentage points in the 2020 presidential election. Hillary Clinton (D) defeated Trump in the 2016 presidential election by 2.4 percentage points.

The Cook Political Report’s Jessica Taylor said demographic shifts are one reason for the state’s competitiveness. “Nevada is a uniquely transient state: half of those on the state’s voter rolls have registered since 2016, when Cortez Masto was first elected,” Taylor said. “Unaffiliated voters became the largest bloc in the state last fall,” Taylor also said.

Times’s Elliott said the state’s Latino population will play an important role in the election’s outcome. “Strategists anticipate about 15% to 20% of the electorate to identify as Hispanic or Latino—and could be even bigger as both sides are working to register new voters,” Elliot said.

Minor party, independent, and write-in candidates include Barry Rubinson (Independent American Party), Neil Scott (Libertarian), and Barry Lindemann (Independent).

The outcome of this race will affect the partisan balance of the U.S. Senate. Thirty-five of 100 seats were up for election, including one special election.] Democrats have an effective majority, with the chamber split 50-50 and Vice President Kamala Harris (D) having the tie-breaking vote. Fourteen seats held by Democrats and 21 seats held by Republicans are up for election in 2022. 



Top-five ranked choice initiative voting initiative certified for Nevada ballot

On July 21, 2022, the Nevada Voters First campaign announced that the Secretary of State verified 170,941 of their 266,000 submitted signatures for a top-five ranked choice voting initiative, qualifying it for the ballot this November. The campaign needed at least 135,561 valid signatures.

If approved by voters, the measure would establish an open top-five primary and ranked-choice voting for general elections in Nevada. This would apply to U.S. congressional, gubernatorial, state executive offices, and legislative elections. It would not not apply to presidential elections.

Ranked-choice voting is a system of voting in which voters rank multiple candidates by preference on their ballots rather than voting for a single candidate.

Here is how top-five ranked choice voting would work under this initiative:

  • For primary elections, the initiative would establish a top-five open primary rather than a primary held for each partisan office. Instead of nominating a Republican nominee and a Democratic nominee for the general election, the primary would allow the five candidates, regardless of party affiliation, who receive the most votes to proceed to the general election. A candidate does not need to be affiliated with a party to run in the primary election.
  • For the general election, the top five candidates from the primary would be placed on the general election ballot. The voter would then rank each candidate in order of preference. When the ballots are being counted, the registrar or county clerk would initially tabulate each cast ballot as a vote for the highest-ranked candidate. If a candidate is highest-ranked on the majority of ballots cast, that candidate is the winner. If no candidate wins a majority of first-preference votes, the candidate with the fewest first-preference votes is eliminated. First-preference votes cast for the failed candidate are eliminated, lifting the second-preference choices indicated on those ballots. A new tally would be conducted to determine whether any candidate has won a majority of the adjusted votes. The process is repeated until a candidate wins a simple majority.

Two states currently use ranked-choice voting in some federal or statewide elections. Alaska allows ranked-choice voting in both federal and statewide elections, while Maine allows ranked-choice voting in federal elections and certain statewide primaries. Hawaii has also enacted that ranked-choice voting for federal special elections would take place starting in 2023.

Sandra Cosgrove, an initiative supporter and professor of history at the College of Southern Nevada, said, “We want to have more options. We don’t want just two people moving forward from the primary to the general election. We want five people, because oftentimes when you look at the people who move forward, it’s just the people with the most money.”

Emily Persaud-Zamora, an initiative opponent and executive director of Silver State Voices, said, “Ranked choice voting makes casting a ballot more time consuming, more complicated and more confusing for voters. It will inevitably lead to increased errors. Ranked choice vote ballots are significantly more likely to be thrown out and uncounted because of those voters’ mistakes, ultimately disenfranchising more voters because of an overly complex and burdensome process.”

For an initiated constitutional amendment to pass in Nevada, voters must approve of the measure by a simple majority at two consecutive elections. In this case, the measure must pass in the 2022 and 2024 general elections.

In Nevada, citizen initiatives were approved 73% of the time and defeated 27% of the time between 1985 and 2020. Out of the 30 total initiatives that have been on the ballot during this period, 22 were approved and 8 were defeated.

Additional reading:

Nevada 2022 ballot measures