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Stories about Nevada

Campaign for initiative to allow municipalities to create school districts submits signatures in Nevada

In Nevada, a campaign supporting an initiative that would allow municipalities to opt-out of county school districts filed about 220,000 signatures to counties for verification.

The Community Schools Initiative PAC filed the initiative, and the signatures submitted will have to be verified by county clerks. The initiative needs 140,777 valid signatures to proceed to the state legislature. If the legislature approves the initiative, and the governor signs it into law, the initiative is enacted. If this does not happen, the initiative will go before Nevada voters at the 2024 general election.

The Community Schools Initiative PAC stated, “Nevada school districts are some of the largest in size, too bureaucratic, and unresponsive. It’s time to return our public schools back to the community and give students the education they deserve.”

If enacted, the initiative would amend state statute to allow municipalities to opt-out of a county school district to create a new community school district, which the Community Schools Initiative campaign says may better serve students. 

“Individual municipalities or municipalities working together may, in some instances, prefer to form more appropriately-sized school districts, because communities may determine that they can better represent and serve children, parents, and families in smaller administrative units,” the initiative reads.

Jess Jara, the superintendent of the Clark County School District, which serves 300,000 students, says that the initiative may not address the needs of students. 

“If anything is to change, Nevada must provide more funding and academic rigor to improve educational outcomes,” said Jara,  “Educating our students adequately requires an honest, reasoned, equitable, accountable, and sustainable strategy supported with optimal funding for the new pupil-centered funding formula to produce outcomes other than Nevada’s current 49th in the nation funding levels. This initiative achieves none of these.”

Nevada counties have until December 23 to certify the submitted signatures. If the initiative has at least 140,777 verified signatures, it will go to the Nevada State Legislature in 2023. If no action is taken in 40 days, the initiative will be put on the 2024 ballot.



All candidates for Nevada State Assembly District 22 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Nevada State Assembly District 22 — incumbent Melissa Hardy (R) and Rick Ramos (D) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office.

Eighty-eight of the country’s 99 state legislative chambers will hold regularly scheduled elections in 2022. The Democratic Party controls both chambers of Nevada’s state legislature. Nevada is one of 14 states with a Democratic trifecta.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office?

Hardy:   

  • “A quality education in Nevada should not be available only to those with the right zip code. That is why I am a strong supporter of school choice.”
  • “Right now, Southern Nevada is facing an unprecedented crime wave and we need leaders ready to go to Carson City and make sure that the rule of law is being enforced and existing laws are strengthened to punish offenders.”
  • “We must continue to diversify our economy. The COVID-19 pandemic has shown us the fragility of our current economy and while we have taken steps in the past toward this goal, much work remains.”

Ramos:       

  • “We need to address out of control spending and skyrocketing inflation.”
  • “Womens choice should not be suppressed or taken away. The government should not interfere in this area between a woman and her dr.”
  • “School safety for teachers and students”

Click on candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

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All candidates for Nevada State Assembly District 2 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

All three of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Nevada State Assembly District 2 — incumbent Heidi Kasama (R), Nick Christenson (D), and Jason Bednarz (L) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office.

Eighty-eight of the country’s 99 state legislative chambers will hold regularly scheduled elections in 2022. The Democratic Party controls both chambers of Nevada’s state legislature. Nevada is one of 14 states with a Democratic trifecta.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office?

Kasam:       

  • “To support the our small business owners, and all business owners to create a vibrant and active economy.”
  • “Our schools rank near the bottom nationally so I support our new per pupil funding for transparency and accountability. I also favor changes to our current school boards.”
  • “We have an alarming lack of health care workers in our state and I want to support policies that incentivize growth of health care professionals.”

Christenson:           

  • “We need to move Las Vegas along a path to long term sustainability.”
  • “We are facing additional crises in several key areas, including housing, education, and health care. We need to move aggressively and creatively to address these.”
  • “We need to continue to diversify the valley’s economy. We have abundant opportunities to promote Las Vegas as a center for technology, clean energy, and outdoor recreation as well as in other fields.”

Bednarz:       

  • “Get the government out of our lives!”
  • “End the wars.”
  • “End the FED.”

Click on candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

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Lee, Becker running in general election for Nevada’s 3rd Congressional District

Incumbent Susie Lee (D) and April Becker (R) are running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Nevada’s 3rd Congressional District.

The Las Vegas Review-Journal’s Gary Martin wrote, “Nevada’s Congressional District 3 is…seen by national Republicans as one of their best opportunities to flip the seat because of President Joe Biden’s low approval ratings and national economic woes. Democrats, however, are confident in their chances to hold the seat because of recent legislative victories to lower health care costs for seniors and with a recent U.S. Supreme Court ruling that struck down a 50-year constitutional right for women to have an abortion.”

Lee, who previously worked for education organizations focused on after-school programming and dropout prevention, was first elected in 2018. Lee has campaigned on bipartisanship, protecting access to abortion, and diversifying Nevada’s economy. On bipartisanship, Lee said, “I think that people in Congressional District 3 are craving a pragmatic type of leader who’s not afraid to roll up their sleeves to reach across the aisle and work on tough issues and deliver results.” She pointed to her work alongside Republican and Democratic House members on the Problem Solvers Caucus, and her support for the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act of 2021, which President Joe Biden (D) signed in November 2021. On abortion, Lee said, “I support all women across this country having access to safe, legal abortions if they choose to have one. I respect the voters of Nevada who protected reproductive rights in our state over two decades ago.”

Becker is an attorney who owns a law practice. Becker has campaigned on education, reducing inflation, and securing the southern border by completing construction of a border wall. On education, Becker said, “school choice is a common-sense approach that allows children to escape failing schools.” Becker also said that funding for “bureaucrats and failed programs should immediately be reallocated directly to schools so we can pay teachers more.” Becker said government spending is the reason for elevated rates of inflation and said the solution is to “stop spending money we don’t have.” Becker said she is “a pro-life mom, with exceptions for rape, incest, and life of the mother,” and would oppose a federal ban on abortion.

The outcome of this race will affect the partisan balance of the U.S. House of Representatives in the 118th Congress. All 435 House districts are up for election. As of November 1, 2022, Democrats held a 220-212 majority in the U.S. House with three vacancies. Republicans need to gain a net of five districts to win a majority in the chamber.

Daily Kos calculated what the results of the 2020 presidential election in this district would have been following redistrictingJoe Biden (D) would have received 52.4% of the vote in this district and Donald Trump (R) would have received 45.7%.



Incumbent Aaron Ford (D) and Sigal Chattah (R) running for Nevada Attorney General

Incumbent Aaron D. Ford (D) and Sigal Chattah (R) are running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Nevada Attorney General. John T. Kennedy (L) unofficially withdrew from the race in September 2022.

In September 2022, Sabato’s Crystal Ball released an analysis of state attorney general election competitiveness. Nevada’s attorney general election was rated as at least somewhat competitive: “[Democrat] Ford is polished, well-funded, and has largely avoided any major hiccups in office. But he won only narrowly in the Democratic wave year of 2018, and for 2022, Nevada is one of the states where Democrats are concerned about possible GOP gains. On the Republican side, attorney Sigal Chattah has attracted notice for suing the state over COVID restrictions; she won one case but lost the others.”

Ford was first elected in 2018, defeating Wesley Duncan (R) 47.2% to 46.8%. Ford previously worked as an attorney and served in the Nevada State Senate from 2013 to 2019. In an interview with The Record-Courier, Ford said he was running because, “As Nevada’s People’s Attorney and Top Law Enforcement Officer, I believe there is no task greater than the pursuit of justice. Under my leadership, the Nevada Attorney General’s Office has proven there is no criminal too ruthless and no corporation too powerful to take on if they are hurting Nevadans.”

Chattah is a civil and criminal defense attorney who previously served on the City of Las Vegas Planning Commission and as a member of the Southern Nevada Disciplinary Board of the State Bar of Nevada. In an interview with The Record-Courier, Chattah said she was running “To end Government public corruption, restore public safety, protect our children from wrongful indoctrination at schools, and provide the people of the State of the Nevada government transparency that they are entitled to.”

Before Ford was elected in 2018, Adam Laxalt (R) held the position of Nevada Attorney General. The attorney general is Nevada’s chief legal counsel. He or she represents the people of Nevada in civil and criminal matters in court. The attorney general also serves as legal counsel to state officers and to most state agencies, boards, and commissions. In addition, the attorney general establishes and operates projects and programs to protect Nevadans from fraud or illegal activities that target consumers or threaten public safety, and enforces laws that safeguard the environment and natural resources.

This is one of 30 elections for attorney general taking place in 2022. There are currently 27 Republican attorneys general and 23 Democratic attorneys general. Heading into the 2022 elections, there are 23 Republican triplexes, 18 Democratic triplexes, and nine divided governments where neither party holds triplex control. A state government triplex refers to a situation where the governor, attorney general, and secretary of state are all members of the same political party.



All candidates for Reno Municipal Court Department 3 in Nevada complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Reno Municipal Court Department 3 in Nevada — Justin Champagne and Pete Sferrazza — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office. 

According to the city website, the Reno Municipal Courts’ mission is to “impartially adjudicate misdemeanors and code violations; to provide supervised rehabilitation for those needing treatment; and to operate our Court cost-effectively, providing safety and equal access to all while maintaining the integrity and independence of the judiciary, and the respect and confidence of those who come before the Court.” 

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office?            

Champagne:

  • “We can keep Reno safe by using an intelligent approach to criminal justice that combines incarceration with treatment for mental health and addiction problems.”
  • “Offering offenders help at the municipal court level will help keep them out of higher level courts and keep people out of prison.”
  • “I have the combination of knowledge, dedication and vast experience to be a great judge for the City of Reno.”

Sferrazza:           

  • “I believe I have a constitutional duty to insure the safety of our community with equal Justice for all.”
  • “I am proud to be the only candidate endorsed by the Reno police protective association, Washoe County Sheriff Deputies, School Police and Reno Firefighters.”
  • “The Municipal Court‘s most important function is judging issues dealing with misdemeanors including DUIs and domestic violence cases. As a Reno Justice of the Peace I presided over the DUI and the domestic battery Courts.”

Click on the candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

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City elections in Reno, Nevada, 2022



All candidates for Nevada Board of Regents District 6 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Nevada Board of Regents District 6 — Heather Brown and Jeanine Dakduk — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office.

The Nevada State Board of Regents is an elected executive agency of the Nevada state government, responsible for managing the state’s system of higher education.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office?                    

Brown:   

  • “Prioritize students by ensuring better graduation preparedness and a renewed focus on ethics throughout the Nevada System of Higher Education (NSHE).”
  • “Refocus the budget to cut out wasteful spending so that every dollar goes where it can make the biggest impact for our students and communities.”
  • “Attract and continue to retain top talent, both faculty and students, while rebuilding NSHE’s reputation with our institutions and community.”

Dakduk:               

  • “All institutions in Nevada must continue to provide high-quality education at an affordable price.”
  • “Nevada’s higher education system must focus on broadening education that meets the workforce demands of the state.”
  • “Nevada’s institutions of higher learning must close the achievement gap and constantly strive for greater student retention, persistence, and graduation rates.”

Click on candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

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Nevada State Board of Regents election, 2022



All candidates for Nevada State Assembly District 9 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Nevada State Assembly District 9 — incumbent Steve Yeager (D) and Ryan Fleming (R) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office. 

Eighty-eight of the country’s 99 state legislative chambers will hold regularly scheduled elections in 2022. The Democratic Party controls both chambers of Nevada’s state legislature. Nevada is one of 14 states with a Democratic trifecta.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office?           

Yeager:           

  • “I believe in our democracy. We should make it as easy to vote as possible so every eligible voter who wants to participate in our electoral process can do so without having to scale artificial and unnecessary barriers.”
  • “I believe in a woman’s right to choose abortion.”
  • “I believe that education is the gateway to success and that, to improve our education system, we must hold both the local school districts and the local school boards accountable.”

Fleming:               

  • “Pro Law & Order”
  • “Pro School Choice”
  • “Pro 2nd Amendment”

Click on the candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

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All candidates for Nevada Board of Regents District 11 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Nevada Board of Regents District 11 — Jeffrey Downs and Steve Laden — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office.

The Nevada State Board of Regents is an elected executive agency of the Nevada state government, responsible for managing the state’s system of higher education.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What areas of public policy are you personally passionate about?

Downs:   

“I would like to see NSHE focus on growing its mission to serve the people of Nevada through educational opportunities. Too often the focus of the board has been on the two universities and especially the sports teams. NSHE is supposed to serve Nevada by offering programs to help people to include workforce development. NSHE, through the colleges, has been expanding dual enrollment connections for high school students, but this, too, can be expanded.”

Laden:               

“I am most passionate about public policy relating to education at all levels. Since the Nevada System of Higher Education is populated mainly by Nevada citizens, what happens at the K-12 level is of utmost importance to Nevada’s colleges and universities. In the long-run, how we educate our students at all levels is one of the primary factors in determining the quality of our state, economy and society as a whole.”

Click on candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

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Cisco Aguilar (D), Jim Marchant (R), Ross Crane (L), and Janine Hansen (I) are running for Nevada secretary of state on November 8, 2022

Cisco Aguilar (D), Jim Marchant (R), Ross Crane (L), and Janine Hansen (I) are running for Nevada secretary of state on November 8, 2022. Incumbent Barbara Cegavske (R) can not run for re-election due to term limits. According to the Las Vegas Review-Journal, this race is “arguably the most important on the statewide ballot in November, outside of only the races for U.S. Senate and governor, as the victor will be able to exert control over how elections are conducted in Nevada for the next four years.”

Aguilar worked as special legal counsel to the chancellor of the Nevada System of Higher Education and the Andre Agassi Foundation for Education. Former governors Jim Gibbons (R) and Brian Sandoval (R) both appointed Aguilar to the Nevada Athletic Commission as a boxing and mixed martial arts regulator. Aguilar says he is running for secretary of state because “[m]ore than ever, we need to defend every eligible American’s right to vote, remove barriers to voter participation, and make our elections as transparent as possible to maintain the public trust…I am committed to building on the work that many have started in a bi-partisan way, including modernizing, safeguarding and strengthening our democracy, our elections process and the voting rights of every Nevadan.” Aguilar has said Marchant would “use this position in a political way, and that’s detrimental…It really should be neutral, it should be impartial, it should be nonpartisan.”

Marchant represented District 37 in the Nevada State Assembly from 2017 to 2021. Marchant says he is running for secretary of state because “Nevadans want to see the Secretary of State address their concerns about doing business and conducting fair and transparent elections in our state. I’m listening.” Marchant’s campaign website says, “In 2020 [he] ran for Congress for Nevada’s Congressional District 4 and was a victim of election fraud.” According to Marchant, “We haven’t, in Nevada, elected anybody since 2006…They have been installed by the deep state cabal.” If elected, Marchant says his “number one priority [would] be to overhaul the fraudulent election system in Nevada” by repealing universal mail-in voting, requiring voter ID, allowing candidates to request election audits at their own expense, and mandating the use of paper ballots instead of electronic voting machines.

This is one of 27 elections for secretary of state taking place in 2022. All but three states have a secretary of state. Although the specific duties and powers of the office vary from state to state, secretaries of state are often responsible for the maintenance of voter rolls and for administering elections. Other common responsibilities include registering businesses, maintaining state records, and certifying official documents. There are currently 27 Republican secretaries of state and 20 Democratic secretaries of state. Click here for an overview of all 27 secretary of state elections taking place in 2022.

A state government triplex refers to a situation where the governor, attorney general, and secretary of state are all members of the same political party.

As of October 17, 2022, there are 23 Republican triplexes, 18 Democratic triplexes, and 9 divided governments where neither party holds triplex control. Nevada does not have a state government triplex.