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Stories about New York

Incumbent Kathy Hochul (D) and Lee Zeldin (R) are running for governor of New York

Incumbent Kathy Hochul (D) and Lee Zeldin (R) are running in the November 8, 2022, general election for governor of New York.

TIME’s Charlotte Alter wrote, “In a normal year, New York Governor Kathy Hochul might be coasting to victory in November. She’s a reasonably popular Democrat running for re-election in a blue state that hasn’t elected a Republican governor in 20 years. […] Yet as Democrats brace for a Republican wave in the midterm elections, Hochul’s race has tightened, getting too close for Democrats’ comfort.”

Hochul was the lieutenant governor of New York under former Governor Andrew Cuomo (D) and replaced him in August 2021 after Cuomo resigned from office. Hochul represented New York’s 26th Congressional District from 2011 to 2012 and served as Erie County clerk from 2007 to 2011. Hochul is New York’s first female governor.

Zeldin, an attorney and officer with the U.S. Army Reserve, has represented New York’s 1st Congressional District since 2015. Before being elected to Congress, Zeldin represented the 3rd District in the New York State Senate.

Zeldin has centered his campaign around public safety and said crime rates in New York have risen during Hochul’s tenure. Zeldin said Hochul should do more to revise the state’s bail laws and accused her of supporting “catch-and-release policies.” Zeldin said, “There is a crime emergency right now in New York State. The governor is unwilling to call it for what it is. Many of her allies are unwilling to call it for exactly what it is. The public is being lectured to and told to look away.” Zeldin said that, if elected, he would change the state bail laws and “fire weak prosecutors.”

In response, Hochul said she had prioritized New Yorkers’ safety by focusing on removing weapons from the streets. Hochul highlighted her support for gun control measures and criticized Zeldin for not supporting bills regulating assault weapons while in Congress. “While our extreme opponents are trying to keep people scared, I’m working to keep New Yorkers safe with real action to get dangerous weapons out of our communities,” Hochul said. On bail reform, Hochul said she had already signed into law changes to the state’s bail laws in April 2021.

Hochul has also focused on abortion and said she would fight against measures rolling back access to it. At a debate in October, Hochul criticized Zeldin for his record on the issue. “You’re the only person standing on this stage whose name right now — not years past — that right now, is on a bill called ‘Life Begins at Conception,’ ” Hochul said.

In response, Zeldin said he would not seek to change the state’s laws regarding abortion. “Let me be clear. As Governor, I will not change and could not change New York’s abortion law,” Zeldin said in a campaign ad.

Each candidate has a running mate for lieutenant governor. Hochul’s running mate is incumbent Lieutenant Governor Antonio Delgado (D), and Zeldin’s running mate is Alison Esposito (R).

This is one of 36 gubernatorial elections taking place in 2022. The governor serves as a state’s top executive official and is the only executive office that is elected in all 50 states. There are currently 28 Republican governors and 22 Democratic governors. Click here for a clickable map with links to our coverage of all 50 states’ responses to the pandemic and here for an overview of all 36 gubernatorial elections taking place in 2022.

Heading into the 2022 elections, there are 23 Republican trifectas, 14 Democratic trifectas, and 13 divided governments where neither party holds trifecta control. There are 23 Republican triplexes, 18 Democratic triplexes, and nine divided governments where neither party holds triplex control.

A state government trifecta refers to a situation where one party controls a state’s governorship and majorities in both chambers of the state legislature. A state government triplex refers to a situation where the governor, attorney general, and secretary of state are all members of the same political party.



All candidates for New York State Assembly District 116 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for New York State Assembly District 116 — Susan Duffy (R) and Scott Gray (R) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office. 

Eighty-eight of the country’s 99 state legislative chambers will hold regularly scheduled elections in 2022. The Democratic Party controls both chambers of New York’s state legislature. New York is one of 14 states with a Democratic trifecta.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What areas of public policy are you personally passionate about?           

Duffy:           

“We need to fight for our constitutional rights. We need to repeal the HALT act, bail reform laws and work to overturn the overtime threshold that will break our family farms. We need job opportunities in the north country to keep our young families working and thriving in our communities. We need to deal with homelessness, mental health issues and make CPS transparent.”

Gray:               

  • ”Behavioral health issues including substance use disorders
  • Fiscal policies
  • Tourism development
  • Smart renewable energy policies”

Click on the candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

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All candidates for New York State Senate District 17 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for New York State Senate District 17 — Iwen Chu (D) and Vito LaBella (R) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office. 

Eighty-eight of the country’s 99 state legislative chambers will hold regularly scheduled elections in 2022. The Democratic Party controls both chambers of New York’s state legislature. New York is one of 14 states with a Democratic trifecta government.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What areas of public policy are you personally passionate about?

Chu:       

“Public safety for all communities is one of my top priorities. I’ve spent many years as a 68th Precinct community partner, working to strengthen ties between NYPD and community. We must tackle public safety for everyone including stopping the flow of illegal guns into our city and advocate for change on the Federal level.”

LaBella:                   

“As State Senator, I want to focus on Law & Order, Education Integrity, Tax Reform, Helping Small Business and Improving New York’s Future. I will work to end cashless bail, reverse the Less Is More Act, push to fund drug treatment and mental health resources and enforce Kendra’s Law.”

Click on candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

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New York State Senate elections, 2022



Democrat Josh Riley and Republican Marc Molinaro are running in New York’s 19th Congressional District

Josh Riley (D) and Marc Molinaro (R) are running in the November 8, 2022, general election for New York’s 19th Congressional District. Incumbent Pat Ryan (D) is running for re-election in New York’s 18th Congressional District due to redistricting.

Riley is a private attorney and former congressional staffer. Riley highlighted his ties to the district and said he would work to encourage job growth in Upstate New York. Riley said, “We should be saying no to bad trade deals. We can invest in high-tech jobs that restore manufacturing and fight climate change. We can build an upstate economy that works for working families. That’s why I’m running for Congress.”

Molinaro was elected Dutchess County executive in 2011 and was the 2018 Republican nominee for governor of New York. Molinaro said, “As a County Executive, I’ve worked with both sides to cut taxes and spending, fully fund police and lend a hand to those with disabilities through our Think Differently initiative. I’m running for Congress because it’s time they think differently as well.”

Molinaro lost to Pat Ryan 51.1% to 48.8% in a special election on August 23, 2022, to fill the remainder of former Rep. Antonio Delgado’s (D) term. Delgado represented the 19th district from 2019 until May 25, 2022, when he resigned to become lieutenant governor.

The 19th district was redrawn after the 2020 census to encompass the cities of Ithaca and Binghampton. According to the Cook Political Report, the old district had a partisan lean of R+2, while the redrawn district has an even partisan lean.

In the 2020 presidential election, President Joe Biden (D) received 49.8% of the 19th district’s vote to former President Donald Trump’s (R) 48.3%. According to data from Daily Kos, Biden would have received 51.3% of the vote in the redrawn district, and Trump would have received 46.7%.

As of June 2022, 36% of the district’s active voters were registered Democrats, 32% were registered Republicans, and 31% were either registered with some other party or unaffiliated.

Both candidates have the organizational and financial support of their respective national parties. Riley is a member of the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee’s “Red to Blue” program, a project that supports Democratic candidates in competitive congressional districts. Molinaro is part of the National Republican Congressional Committee’s Young Guns program, an initiative that supports Republican candidates running for Congress in open or Democratic-held House districts.

The outcome of this race will affect the partisan balance of the U.S. House of Representatives in the 118th Congress. All 435 districts in the House are up for election. As of September 30, 2022, Democrats hold a 220-212 advantage in the U.S. House with three vacancies. 



New York judge dismisses petition to compel the state’s redistricting commission to submit new congressional, legislative maps for use in 2024

Albany County Supreme Court justice Peter Lynch dismissed on Sept. 12 a petition seeking to compel the New York State Independent Redistricting Commission (IRC) to submit a second set of redistricting plans for the legislature to consider as part of redistricting after the 2020 census. Several New York state residents filed the petition.

The plaintiffs argued that “the IRC did not complete its constitutionally required redistricting duties because it failed to submit a second set of plans” and “the Court of Appeals also made clear that the Legislature was powerless to enact a new redistricting plan once the IRC refused to submit a second set of plans.” The petition sought to have the IRC meet and submit new map proposals that would be used for the 2024 elections and beyond.

Justice Lynch wrote in his order that “In this Court’s view, the Congressional maps approved by the Court on May 20, 2022, corrected by Decision and Order dated June 2, 2022, are in full force and effect, until redistricting takes place again following the 2030 federal census…In turn, there is no authority for the IRC to issue a second redistricting plan after February 28, 2022, in advance of the federal census in 2030, in the first instance, let alone to mandate such plan be prepared.”

Here is a summary of the timeline of New York’s redistricting after the 2020 census:

  • Jan. 3, 2022 – The IRC deadlocked 5-5 on two different proposed redistricting maps and submitted both proposals to the legislature.
  • Jan. 10 – The New York legislature rejected both proposals, and under the provisions of the state’s 2014 constitutional amendment adopting new redistricting procedures, the IRC had until Jan. 25 to submit a second proposal.
  • Jan. 24 – The IRC announced that it would not submit a new set of proposed maps by the deadlines.
  • Feb. 3 – The state legislature enacted its own congressional and legislative district boundaries.
  • March 31 – In response to a lawsuit, Steuben County Surrogate Court justice Patrick McAllister struck down the enacted congressional and legislative maps and ordered the state legislature to draw new maps.
  • April 27 – The New York Court of Appeals, the state’s highest court, upheld McAllister’s ruling overturning the congressional and state Senate maps.
  • May 20 – Justice McAllister ordered the adoption of a new congressional map drawn by a court-appointed special master.

Justice McAllister’s March 31 order said “Part of the problem is these maps were void ab initio for failure to follow the constitutional process of having bipartisan maps presented by the [Independent Redistricting Commission]. The second problem was the Congressional that was presented was determined to be gerrymandered.” McAllister ordered the legislature to pass new maps that “receive bipartisan support among both Democrats and Republicans in both the senate and assembly.” The New York Court of Appeals’ April 27 ruling stated that the maps were enacted in violation of the state’s constitutional redistricting process and found that the congressional plan was drawn with unconstitutional partisan intent.

Additional reading:



All candidates for New York State Assembly District 105 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for New York State Assembly District 105 — Jill Fieldstein (D) and Anil Beephan Jr. (R) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office.

Eighty-eight of the country’s 99 state legislative chambers will hold regularly scheduled elections in 2022. The Democratic Party controls both chambers of New York’s state legislature. New York is one of 14 states with a Democratic trifecta.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office?            

Fieldstein:           

  • “Economic Development: New York is a hub of innovation and entrepreneurship. I will collaborate with public and private partners to attract these innovators—and good-paying jobs—to our area.”
  • “Affordable Housing To support a growing workforce, we must offer more affordable housing: I will encourage the development of attractive, affordable, single family homes and mixed-use developments in communities throughout the 105th District.”
  • “Education: Our children’s future is our most important investment, and it must start with our youngest children. Publicly funded, high quality pre-K must be available to every three- and four-year-old in our district.”

Beephan:   

  • “MAKE NEW YORK SAFE AGAIN: Cashless Bail has turned our criminal justice system upside down. Our state now sympathizes with criminals and repeat offenders over our uniformed heroes while simultaneously placing victims, witnesses, and emergency services at risk of retaliation.” 
  • “Reduce the Cost of Energy: Our residents are struggling to fill their gas tanks at the pump, purchase heating oil, and power their homes. We need representatives in Albany that will fight for real solutions to the energy crisis.”
  • “PRO-BUSINESS Coming from a family of small business owners, I understand the difficulties of starting and owning a business in New York. I started the #HometownHotspot initiative highlighting our small businesses and non-profits to receive feedback on how we can become better partners in government.”

Click on candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

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Pilot program for New York City’s Asian American and Pacific Islander history curriculum launches for the 2022-2023 school year

A pilot program of New York City’s Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) history curriculum was launched in select schools in September 2022. The New York City Department of Education announced in May 2022 that it had developed the curriculum, titled the Hidden Voices Project, in partnership with the Museum of the City of New York. The new curriculum will be widely implemented throughout the city in 2024 for all grades. 

The curriculum aims to teach students to “learn about and honor the innumerable people, often ‘hidden’ from the traditional historical record, who have shaped and continue to shape our history and identity.” K-12 curriculum guides for the Hidden Voices Project are available on the NYC Department of Education website to assist teachers with implementing the new area of instruction. 

David Banks, Chancellor of the New York City Department of Education, said, “We want each child to be heard and seen for who they are, to feel deep in their bones that they are respected and important,” according to Chalkbeat New York.  

State Sen. John Liu (D) has introduced legislation that, if passed, would require all New York public schools to include Asian American history in K-12 curriculum.  

Additional reading:



All candidates for New York State Assembly District 75 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for New York State Assembly District 75 — Tony Simone (D) and Joseph A. Maffia (R) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office.

Eighty-eight of the country’s 99 state legislative chambers will hold regularly scheduled elections in 2022. The Democratic Party controls both chambers of New York’s state legislature. New York is one of 14 states with a Democratic trifecta.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office?            

Simone:       

  • “Government can be a force for equity, progress, and the improvement of all our lives. (That’s why I’m a Democrat!) Our district has had strong representation over the last fifty years by Assembly Member Gottfried fighting for our district’s interests here at home and for progressive values in Albany.” 
  • “I believe in co-governance. It takes a collaborative approach to find lasting solutions to our most complex problems. That’s how we’ll get things done.”
  • “I’m not running for this seat for a fancy title. I’m running because I love the community that I’ve lived in, and have served, for over two decades — from serving on the community board to working for local elected officials and most recently working for Friends of Hudson River Park.”

Maffia:       

  • “NYS finances are in dire straights. Unfunded retirement benefit have put the state at risk which must be addressed now! It is not often publicized enough because of the inherent nature of the budgeting and accounting system – long term structural problems, i.e. if the bill is not due today we can kick the can down the road. This has to stop.”
  • “Art stirs imagination, engages, heals, and promotes economic expansion and like the saying goes ‘Art saves lives’.”
  • “Crime, quality of life and education are significant concerns for the 75th Assembly district. NYS’s dire fiscal health and conditions on the ground in this important district demands a proven leader, with a business background and a vision to support the 75th Assembly District which is the life blood of New York.”

Click on candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

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New York’s Democratic-held 3rd Congressional District draws attention following local Republican gains in 2021

Robert Zimmerman (D), George Devolder-Santos (R), Mekita Coe (People’s Party), and Melanie D’Arrigo (Working Families Party) are running in the general election for New York’s 3rd Congressional District on November 8, 2022.

Incumbent Tom Suozzi (D) is not running for re-election.

The 3rd District, located on Long Island including the northern portion of Nassau County and parts of Queens, voted for Democrats by an average margin of 13 percentage points between 2012 and 2020 before redistricting.

In 2021, Republican candidates won a number of local races in the district, including the defeat of Nassau County’s incumbent executive and winning the county’s open district attorney position.

As of June 2022, 40% of the district’s active voters were registered Democrats, 28% were registered Republicans, and 32% were either registered with some other party or unaffiliated.

Zimmerman, a Democratic National Committee member, owns a marketing communications company. Zimmerman said, “I’ll fight to defend abortion rights, stop gun violence, protect voting rights, address the climate crisis, and make Long Island and Queens more affordable for middle-class families.”

Devolder-Santos works in finance and investing and was the district’s Republican nominee in 2020. In a Candidate Connection survey submitted to Ballotpedia, Devolder-Santos said, “I will work to end the inflation crisis and lower gas prices … make New York’s Third Congressional District a safer place for everyone … [and] preserve the American dream for many generations to come.”



All candidates for New York State Assembly District 30 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for New York State Assembly District 30 — Steven Raga (D) and Sean Lally (R) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office.

Eighty-eight of the country’s 99 state legislative chambers will hold regularly scheduled elections in 2022. The Democratic Party controls both chambers of New York’s state legislature. New York is one of 14 states with a Democratic trifecta.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: Who are you? Tell us about yourself. 

Raga:               

“For four years, I worked as a Chief of Staff to Assemblymember Brian Barnwell. From experience, I can tell you issues that everyday residents are facing; I’ve worked with non-profit organizations that are filling vital gaps in providing community resources and services.”

Lally:

“I am a Medical Freedom, law and order candidate for New York State Assembly in Queens, NY. I have removed trash in my neighborhood, educated about the importance of health as the first line of defense against disease, and work with a group that rejects the policies of the New World Order. “

Click on candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

Additional reading: