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Stories about Texas

Texas Republican candidates have spent $190.9 million more than Democrats

In Texas, state-level candidates have spent $488.7 million between Jan. 1, 2021, and Oct. 29, 2022. Democratic candidates have spent $146.1 million and Republican candidates have spent $337 million. 

Texas Campaign Finance Snapshot (1/1/2021 – 10/29/2022)

Top 10 Democratic candidates, by expenditures (1/1/2021 – 10/29/2022)

In the 2022 election cycle, 684 state-level Democrats have filed campaign finance reports with the Texas Ethics Commission. Here are the 10 Democratic candidates who have spent the most.

RankDemocratic CandidateTotal spent
1.Beto O’Rourke$70,108,690.06
2.John Whitmire$8,368,553.94
3.Morgan LaMantia$5,772,304.07
4.Michael Collier$4,935,294.81
5.Rochelle Garza$3,398,021.63
6.Jay Kleberg$3,309,259.47
7.Joe S Jaworski$1,873,117.72
8.Chuy Hinojosa$1,115,448.96
9.Judith Zaffirini$1,111,843.20
10.Richard Pena Raymond$1,002,241.89

Top 10 Republican candidates, by expenditures (1/1/2021 – 10/29/2022)

During the same time period, 750 Republicans have filed campaign finance reports with the California Secretary of State. These are the 10 Republican candidates with the highest reported expenditures for the 2022 election cycle so far.

RankRepublican CandidateTotal spent
1.Greg Abbott$141,326,022.77
2.Dan Patrick$24,416,309.39
3.Donald Huffines$20,148,810.78
4.Ken Paxton$15,701,394.30
5.George P Bush$9,997,762.92
6.Glenn Hegar$7,272,686.15
7.Eva Guzman$6,350,149.38
8.Dade Phelan$6,207,521.58
9.Dawn Buckingham$4,539,400.94
10.David Middleton II$2,443,309.31

In some states, officeholders may make expenditures from their campaign accounts when they are not up for election. Those expenditures are included in candidate campaign finance numbers.

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Texas candidate PACs submitted to the Texas Ethics Commission. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

StateReport NameDue Date
TX2021 Annual Lobbying1/10/2022
TX2022 Jan Semiannual1/18/2022
TX2022 Pre-Primary (30 Days)1/31/2022
TX2022 Pre-Primary (8 Days)2/22/2022
TX2022 Mar Lobbying4/10/2022
TX2022 Primary Runoff5/16/2022
TX2022 June Lobbying7/10/2022
TX2022 Jul Semiannual7/15/2022
TX2022 Pre-General (30 Days)10/11/2022
TX2022 Sept Lobbying10/10/2022
TX2022 Pre-General (8 Days)10/31/2022
TX2022 Dec Lobbying1/10/2023
TX2022 Semiannual Data1/17/2023

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



All candidates for Tarrant County Criminal Court No. 6 in Texas complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Tarrant County Criminal Court No. 6 in Texas — Ebony Turner (D) and Randi Hartin (R) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office. 

The Tarrant County Criminal Courts are trial courts in Tarrant County, Texas.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office?                            

Turner:       

  • “I am passionate about persons who suffer with mental health issues, drug and alcohol addictions, and persons with disabilities.”
  • “The first tenet of my platform is Effective Judgments. Effective Judgments means not just locking people up, but coming up with creative solutions to prevent recidivism.”
  • “The second tenet of my platform is Efficient Justice. This means I want to save taxpayer dollars by reducing the backlog of cases plaguing Tarrant County. As a former public defender, I handled thousands of cases successfully, so I am the perfect person to come up with creative ways to reduce the backlog while also ensuring justice is served and rights are preserved.”

Hartin:               

  • “First and foremost, voters should know that I will enforce the law as it is written. Given the climate of our political arena, I have found some people misunderstand a judge’s role. A courtroom is no place for personal biases or agendas.”
  • “Secondly, all citizens who come before me should expect to be treated with respect, whether they are a victim, defendant, witness or attorney.”
  • “Finally, beginning November 1st, CCC6 begins transitioning from a misdemeanor court that hears all misdemeanors to a dedicated family violence court. Solely handling family violence cases presents challenges for all parties that handling a mix of DWIs, thefts, and low-level drug offenses does not. I plan to prioritize reducing the docket size of Criminal Court Six and create a new case management plan to address that change in caseload.”

Click on candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

Additional reading:

Tarrant County Municipal elections, 2022



All candidates for Travis County Clerk in Texas complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Travis County Clerk in Texas — Dyana Limon-Mercado (D) and Susan Haynes (R) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office. 

According to the Travis County website, the county clerk’s responsibilities include “the conduct of elections; the filing and preservation of real property records; and the management of civil, probate, and misdemeanor court documents. This office also serves as Clerk of the Courts and manages the documents used in the County’s probate, civil, and misdemeanor court proceedings.”

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office?                            

Limon-Mercado:           

  • “FAIR & SECURE ELECTIONS: Our democracy is better when more eligible voters have access to the ballot box and voters are confident that their vote is protected.”
  • “EFFICIENT & ACCESSIBLE COURT ADMINISTRATION: It is the County’s duty to ensure that all residents have access to the records they need.”
  • “RELIABLE & ACCURATE COUNTY AND PROPERTY RECORDS: It is the County’s duty to ensure that all residents have access to the records they need.”

Haynes:       

  • “One person, one vote, must be legal resident with proper ID”
  • “Return to paper ballots and hand counting, no more voting machines.”
  • “There is one Election Day, not an election month. Elections are a serious event, we must make time to show up on Election Day. Election months present opportunities for cheating and manipulation.”

Click on candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

Additional reading:

Travis County Municipal elections, 2022



Campaign finance deadline today in Texas

Candidates and organizations involved in Texas’ statewide elections must file campaign finance information by October 31, 2022. The general election will take place in Texas on November 8, 2022.

What state-level offices are on the ballot this year in Texas?

Want to review the campaign finance data in Texas so far? Click here to explore the data on Transparency USA.

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here. 



Texas Republican candidates have raised $129.8 million more than Democrats

In Texas, state-level candidates have raised $376.3 million between Jan. 1, 2021, and Sept. 29, 2022. Democratic candidates have raised $120.9 million and Republican candidates have raised $250.7 million. 

Texas Campaign Finance Snapshot (1/1/2021 – 9/22/2022)

Top 10 Democratic candidates, by donations (1/1/2021 – 9/22/2022)

In the 2022 election cycle, 684 state-level Democrats have filed campaign finance reports with the Texas Ethics Commission. Here are the 10 Democratic candidates who have raised the most.

RankDemocratic CandidateTotal Raised
1.Beto O’Rourke$65,702,684.74
2.Michael Collier$4,326,533.72
3.Jay Kleberg$2,837,009.10
4.Rochelle Garza$2,714,367.61
5.Joe S Jaworski$1,472,799.23
6.Lee Merritt$1,038,818.91
7.Morgan LaMantia$836,887.63
8.Luke Warford$802,755.49
9.Judith Zaffirini$729,522.49
10.Richard Pena Raymond$635,695.92

Top 10 Republican candidates, by donations (1/1/2021 – 9/22/2022)

During the same time period, 749 Republicans have filed campaign finance reports with the Texas Ethics Commission. These are the 10 Republican candidates with the highest reported donations for the 2022 election cycle so far.

RankRepublican CandidateTotal Raised
1.Greg Abbott$94,297,885.83
2.Dan Patrick$16,422,590.25
3.Donald Huffines$10,602,220.73
4.Ken Paxton$10,262,827.46
5.Eva Guzman$8,927,000.95
6.George P Bush$8,411,014.30
7.Dade Phelan$6,505,603.24
8.Allen B West$3,878,825.16
9.Dawn Buckingham$3,315,583.11
10.Glenn Hegar$2,797,327.19

In some states, officeholders may accept donations to their campaign accounts when they are not up for election. Those donations are included in candidate campaign finance numbers.

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Texas candidate PACs submitted to the Texas Ethics Commission. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Report NameReport Due Date
2022 Jan Semiannual1/18/2022
2022 Pre-Primary (30 Days)1/31/2022
2022 Pre-Primary (8 Days)2/22/2022
2022 Primary Runoff5/16/2022
2022 Jul Semiannual7/15/2022
2022 Pre-General (30 Days)10/11/2022
2022 Pre-General (8 Days)10/31/2022
2022 Semiannual Data1/17/2023

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



These are the most expensive contested elections in the Texas Senate

Elections for all 31 seats in the Texas State Senate will take place on Nov. 8, 2022. Republicans hold an 18-13 majority heading into the election.

This article details the five most expensive contested general elections in the State Senate.

This information comes from candidate reports to the Texas Ethics Commission covering the period of Jan. 1, 2021, through Sept. 29, 2022.

Five general elections with the most fundraising

#1 District 24 – $1,792,111

Peter P. Flores (R) raised $1,784,254 and Kathy Jones-Hospod (D) raised $7,857.

#2 District 12 – $1,201,684

Tan Parker (R) raised $1,114,345 and Francine Ly (D) raised $87,339.

#3 District 10 – $1,196,056

Incumbent Beverly Powell (D) raised $91,018 and Phil King (R) raised $1,105,038.

#4 District 8 – $1,144,097

Incumbent Angela Paxton (R) raised $1,136,243, Jon Cocks (D) raised $7,854, and Ed Kless (U) raised $0.

#5 District 27 – $1,067,839

Morgan LaMantia (D) raised $836,888, Adam Hinojosa (R) raised $230,951, and Javier Navarro (I) raised $0.

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Texas PACs submitted to the Texas Ethics Commission. Political expenditures that are not controlled by candidates or their campaigns, known as satellite spending, are not included in candidate totals. Federal PACs are not required to report to state agencies.

Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports. Data from additional reports due in between the deadlines below are published along with the reports listed here.

Report Name Report Due Date
2022 Jan Semiannual 1/18/2022
2022 Pre-Primary (30 Days) 1/31/2022
2022 Pre-Primary (8 Days) 2/22/2022
2022 Primary Runoff 5/16/2022
2022 Jul Semiannual 7/15/2022
2022 Pre-General (30 Days) 10/11/2022
2022 Pre-General (8 Days) 10/31/2022
2022 Semiannual Data 1/17/2023

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



Cuellar, Garcia running for Texas’ 28th Congressional District on Nov. 8

Incumbent Henry Cuellar (D) and Cassy Garcia (R) are running in the general election for Texas’ 28th Congressional District on November 8, 2022.

Cuellar, in Congress since 2005, is a member of the Blue Dog Coalition. He was the only House Democrat to vote against a bill in 2021 that would have codified the right to abortion in federal law. Cuellar has run on his record in Congress, saying his membership on the House Appropriations Committee has helped fund education, healthcare, small businesses, veterans, and immigration services programs in the district. Cuellar said, “I think people want us to govern from the center, whether we are Democrats or Republicans. I think people are getting tired of the extreme left and the extreme right.”

Garcia worked as the deputy state director for U.S. Senator Ted Cruz (R) and the regional field representative for the Texas Commissioner of Agriculture. Garcia has campaigned on reducing inflation, lowering healthcare premiums, and hiring more border patrol agents to secure the border. Garcia said, “The reason why I am running for Congress is to defend faith, family and freedom. The current incumbent Henry Cuellar, who says all the right things, has done absolutely nothing to secure our southern border.”

The outcome of this race will affect the partisan balance of the U.S. House of Representatives in the 118th Congress. All 435 House districts are up for election. As of October 10, 2022, Democrats held a 220-212 majority in the U.S. House with three vacancies. Republicans need to gain a net of five districts to win a majority in the chamber.

Daily Kos calculated what the results of the 2020 presidential election in this district would have been following redistricting. Joe Biden (D) would have received 52.9% of the vote in this district and Donald Trump (R) would have received 45.9%.

A Democrat has represented the 28th Congressional District since its creation in 1993.



All candidates for Texas House of Representatives District 65 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Texas House of Representative District 65 — Brittney Verdell (D) and Kronda Thimesch (R) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office. 

Eighty-eight of the country’s 99 state legislative chambers will hold regularly scheduled elections in 2022. The Republican Party controls both chambers of Texas’s state legislature. Texas is one of 23 states with a Republican trifecta.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office? 

Verdell:

  • “Brittney will fight for better education and our children’s safety.”
  • “Brittney will work to codify women’s rights and expand Medicaid in Texas.”
  • “Brittney draft legislation for common sense gun laws.”       

Thimesch:   

  • “We need real property tax reform.” 
  • “We need to secure the Texas border for our safety now and to protect our future.”
  • “We need to provide a quality education that prepares our future workforce.”

Click on the candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

Additional reading:



All candidates for Williamson County Justice of the Peace Precinct 4 in Texas complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Williamson County Justice of the Peace Precinct 4 in Texas — Stacy Hackenberg (D) and Rhonda Redden (R)  — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office. 

According to the Williamson County website, justices of the peace “serve both as Judges and Magistrates. As Judges, they preside over justice criminal court, and justice civil court. Criminal cases include but are not limited to traffic cases, school attendance cases, minor alcohol violation cases, and minor tobacco violation cases… As magistrates, Justices of the Peace issue warrants, conduct criminal examining trials, admonish prisoners, and set bonds.”

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What areas of public policy are you personally passionate about?            

Hackenberg:           

“Education. I hear truancy cases regularly. I work with schools, students, and parents to ensure a positive outcome. Working with schools means ensuring they understand the filing process and don’t wait until a student’s missed many classes, making getting caught up harder. Working with students means impressing upon them the importance of their education and listening to their concerns.”

Redden:           

“The courtroom is a place where objectivity and impartiality are essential. It should provide an objective and neutral legal system to the public it serves. The JP is responsible to both the victim and offender, the plaintiff and defendant, and it is essential to give a fair and equitable hearing to all involved. The JP Court should hear and weigh evidence and/or testimony from all involved sides and then apply rulings fairly, responsibly, and in accordance with the law.”

Click on candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

Additional reading:



Campaign finance deadline today in Texas

Candidates and organizations involved in Texas’ statewide elections must file campaign finance information by October 11, 2022. The general election will take place in Texas on November 8, 2022.

What state-level offices are on the ballot this year in Texas?

Want to review the campaign finance data in Texas so far? Click here to explore the data on Transparency USA.

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.