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Results in the five Texas Senate Democratic primaries with the most candidate fundraising

Democratic primary elections for 24 of 31 seats in the Texas State Senate took place on March 1, 2022. Of the 24 seats up for election in 2022, six had a primary election with more than one candidates.

Across all contested Democratic primary elections, candidates raised $1.1 million. Incumbents raised an average of $505,196 per candidate and challengers raised an average of $48,330 per candidate.

Five primary elections with the most fundraising

The table below details the five Democratic primary elections with the most fundraising in the State Senate. Winning candidates’ names are in bold.

DistrictMoney RaisedOfficeholderCandidates
District 15$612,131John Whitmire (D)John Whitmire and Molly Cook
District 27$398,263Eddie Lucio (D)Morgan LaMantiaSara Stapleton-Barrera, Alex Dominguez, and Salomon Torres
District 25$75,776Donna Campbell (R)Robert Walsh and Jinny Suh
District 12$37,227Jane Nelson (R)Francine Ly and Ferdi Mongo
District 17$6,877Joan Huffman (R)Titus Benton and Miguel Gonzalez

#1 District 15 – $612,131

Incumbent John Whitmire raised $505,196 and Molly Cook raised $106,935.

John Whitmire advanced to the general election with 58% of the vote and Molly Cook received 42% of the vote.

#2 District 27 – $398,263

Morgan LaMantia raised $246,275, Alex Dominguez raised $111,121, Sara Stapleton-Barrera raised $30,552, and Salomon Torres raised $10,315.

Morgan LaMantia advanced to a runoff election with 34% of the vote, Sara Stapleton-Barrera advanced to a runoff election with 33% of the vote, Alex Dominguez received 25% of the vote, and Salomon Torres received 8% of the vote.

#3 District 25 – $75,776

Jinny Suh raised $75,728 and Robert Walsh raised $48.

Robert Walsh advanced to the general election with 100% of the vote. Jinny Suh withdrew and ran for Texas Land Commissioner.

#4 District 12 – $37,227

Francine Ly raised $33,025 and Ferdi Mongo raised $4,202.

Francine Ly advanced to the general election with 73% of the vote and Ferdi Mongo received 27% of the vote.

#5 District 17 – $6,877

Titus Benton raised $4,527 and Miguel Gonzalez raised $2,350.

Titus Benton advanced to the general election with 51% of the vote and Miguel Gonzalez received 49% of the vote.

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Texas PACs submitted to the Texas Ethics Commission. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Report NameReport Due Date
2022 Jan Semiannual1/18/2022
2022 Pre-Primary (30 Days)1/31/2022
2022 Pre-Primary (8 Days)2/22/2022
2022 Primary Runoff5/16/2022
2022 Jul Semiannual7/15/2022
2022 Pre-General (30 Days)10/11/2022
2022 Pre-General (8 Days)10/31/2022
2022 Semiannual Data1/17/2023

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



Results in the five Texas Senate Republican primaries with the most candidate fundraising

Republican primary elections for 29 of 31 seats in the Texas State Senate took place on March 1, 2022. Of the 29 seats up for election in 2022, nine had a primary election with more than one candidates.

Across all contested Republican primary elections, candidates raised $9.0 million. Incumbents raised an average of $663,005 per candidate and challengers raised an average of $320,452 per candidate.

Five primary elections with the most fundraising

The table below details the five Republican primary elections with the most fundraising in the State Senate. Winning candidates’ names are in bold.

DistrictMoney RaisedOfficeholderCandidates
District 11$2,348,027Larry Taylor (R)Mayes Middleton, Bob Mitchell, Robin Armstrong, and Bianca Gracia
District 24$1,917,728Dawn Buckingham (R)Peter P. FloresRaul Reyes Jr., Lamar Lewis, and Ellen Troxclair
District 31$1,451,623Kel Seliger (R)Kevin Sparks, Tim Reid, Stormy Bradley, and Jesse Quackenbush
District 10$1,027,211Beverly Powell (D)Phil King and Warren Norred
District 8$851,882Angela Paxton (R)Angela Paxton and Matt Rostami

#1 District 11 – $2,348,027

Mayes Middleton raised $2,014,767, Robin Armstrong raised $147,974, Bob Mitchell raised $133,405, and Bianca Gracia raised $51,881.

Mayes Middleton advanced to the general election with 63 percent of the vote, Bob Mitchell received 15 percent of the vote, Robin Armstrong received 15 percent of the vote, and Bianca Gracia received 8 percent of the vote.

#2 District 24 – $1,917,728

Peter P. Flores raised $1,033,830, Ellen Troxclair raised $496,375, Raul Reyes Jr. raised $339,434, and Lamar Lewis raised $48,088.

Peter P. Flores advanced to a runoff election with 46% of the vote, Raul Reyes Jr. advanced to a runoff election with 33% of the vote, and Lamar Lewis received 21% of the vote. Ellen Troxclair withdrew and ran for Texas House of Representatives District 19.

#3 District 31 – $1,451,623

Kevin Sparks raised $1,204,386, Tim Reid raised $205,585, Stormy Bradley raised $41,652, and Jesse Quackenbush raised $0.

Kevin Sparks advanced to the general election with 55% of the vote, Tim Reid received 23% of the vote, Stormy Bradley received 16% of the vote, and Jesse Quackenbush received 6% of the vote.

#4 District 10 – $1,027,211

Phil King raised $936,332 and Warren Norred raised $90,880.

Phil King advanced to the general election with 77% of the vote and Warren Norred received 23% of the vote.

#5 District 8 – $851,882

Incumbent Angela Paxton raised $838,760 and Matt Rostami raised $13,121.

Angela Paxton advanced to the general election with 65% of the vote and Matt Rostami received 35% of the vote.

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Texas PACs submitted to the Texas Ethics Commission. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Report NameReport Due Date
2022 Jan Semiannual1/18/2022
2022 Pre-Primary (30 Days)1/31/2022
2022 Pre-Primary (8 Days)2/22/2022
2022 Primary Runoff5/16/2022
2022 Jul Semiannual7/15/2022
2022 Pre-General (30 Days)10/11/2022
2022 Pre-General (8 Days)10/31/2022
2022 Semiannual Data1/17/2023

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



Results in the five Texas House Democratic primaries with the most candidate fundraising

Democratic primary elections for 109 of 150 seats in the Texas House of Representatives took place on March 1, 2022. Of the 109 seats up for election in 2022, 31 had a primary election with more than one candidates.

Across all contested Democratic primary elections, candidates raised $5.3 million. Incumbents raised an average of $167,831 per candidate and challengers raised an average of $42,751 per candidate.

Five primary elections with the most fundraising

The table below details the five Democratic primary elections with the most fundraising in the House of Representatives. Winning candidates’ names are in bold.

DistrictMoney RaisedOfficeholderCandidates
District 42$576,290Richard Raymond (D)Richard Raymond and Jorge Delgado
District 114$496,440John Turner (D)Alexandra GuioJohn W. Bryant, Kendall Scudder, Chris Leal, and Charles Gearing
District 51$417,300Eddie Rodriguez (D)Maria Luisa Flores, Cynthia Valadez-Mata, Matthew Worthington, Claire Campos-O’Neal, Albino Cadenas, Mike Hendrix, and Cody Arn
District 147$367,261Garnet Coleman (D)Jolanda JonesDanielle Keys Bess, Reagan Flowers, Aurelia Wagner, Namrata Subramanian, Somtoochukwu Ik-Ejiofor, and Akwete Hines
District 50$361,879James Talarico (D)James Talarico and David Alcorta

#1. District 42 – $576,290

Incumbent Richard Raymond raised $509,459 and Jorge Delgado raised $66,830.

Richard Raymond advanced to the general election with 63% of the vote and Jorge Delgado received 37% of the vote.

#2. District 114 – $496,440

Charles Gearing raised $219,545, Kendall Scudder raised $97,442, John W. Bryant raised $75,815, Alexandra Guio raised $59,898, and Chris Leal raised $43,739.

Alexandra Guio advanced to a runoff election with 25 percent of the vote, John W. Bryant advanced to a runoff election with 21% of the vote, Kendall Scudder received 19% of the vote, Chris Leal received 18% of the vote, and Charles Gearing received 17% of the vote.

#3. District 51 – $417,300

Maria Luisa Flores raised $212,971, Matthew Worthington raised $115,344, Mike Hendrix raised $62,410, Claire Campos-O’Neal raised $13,713, Cynthia Valadez-Mata raised $11,076, Cody Arn raised $1,785, and Albino Cadenas raised $0.

Maria Luisa Flores advanced to the general election with 60% of the vote, Cynthia Valadez-Mata received 11% of the vote, Matthew Worthington received 11% of the vote, Claire Campos-O’Neal received 7% of the vote, Albino Cadenas received 5% of the vote, Mike Hendrix received 4% of the vote, and Cody Arn received 2% of the vote.

#4. District 147 – $367,261

Jolanda Jones raised $122,707, Reagan Flowers raised $103,644, Danielle Keys Bess raised $90,689, Namrata Subramanian raised $33,529, Aurelia Wagner raised $16,045, Somtoochukwu Ik-Ejiofor raised $647, and Akwete Hines raised $0.

Jolanda Jones advanced to a runoff election with 41% of the vote, Danielle Keys Bess advanced to a runoff election with 20% of the vote, Reagan Flowers received 18% of the vote, Aurelia Wagner received 9% of the vote, Namrata Subramanian received 7% of the vote, Somtoochukwu Ik-Ejiofor received 3% of the vote, and Akwete Hines received 2% of the vote.

#5. District 50 – $361,879

Incumbent James Talarico raised $360,465 and David Alcorta raised $1,414.

James Talarico advanced to the general election with 78% of the vote and David Alcorta received 22% of the vote.

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Texas PACs submitted to the Texas Ethics Commission. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Report NameReport Due Date
2022 Jan Semiannual1/18/2022
2022 Pre-Primary (30 Days)1/31/2022
2022 Pre-Primary (8 Days)2/22/2022
2022 Primary Runoff5/16/2022
2022 Jul Semiannual7/15/2022
2022 Pre-General (30 Days)10/11/2022
2022 Pre-General (8 Days)10/31/2022
2022 Semiannual Data1/17/2023

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



Results in the five Texas House Republican primaries with the most candidate fundraising

Republican primary elections for 124 of 150 seats in the Texas House of Representatives took place on March 1, 2022. Of the 124 seats up for election in 2022, 56 had a primary election with more than one candidates.

Across all contested Republican primary elections, candidates raised $21.6 million. Incumbents raised an average of $362,608 per candidate and challengers raised an average of $75,220 per candidate.

Five primary elections with the most fundraising

The table below details the five Republican primary elections with the most fundraising in the House of Representatives. Winning candidates’ names are in bold.

DistrictMoney RaisedOfficeholderCandidates
District 133$1,608,554Jim Murphy (R)Shelley Torian BarineauMano Deayala, Greg Travis, Will Franklin, Bert Keller, and Jim Murphy
District 31$1,041,221Ryan Guillen (R)Ryan Guillen, Michael Monreal, and Alena Berlanga
District 122$963,829Lyle Larson (R)Elisa ChanMark Dorazio, Adam Blanchard, Mark Cuthbert, and Nicholas LaHood
District 68$826,169David Spiller (R)David Spiller, Mark Middleton, Gary Franklin, and Craig Carter
District 60$793,130Glenn Rogers (R)Glenn RogersMike Olcott, Kit Marshall, and Lucas Turner

#1 District 133 – $1,608,554

Incumbent Jim Murphy raised $48,400, Mano Deayala raised $490,544, Shelley Torian Barineau raised $471,076, Will Franklin raised $331,871, Greg Travis raised $156,510, and Bert Keller raised $110,154.

Shelley Torian Barineau advanced to a runoff election with 28% of the vote, Mano Deayala advanced to a runoff election with 27% of the vote, Greg Travis received 23% of the vote, Will Franklin received 13% of the vote, Bert Keller received 8% of the vote, and Jim Murphy withdrew.

#2 District 31 – $1,041,221

Incumbent Ryan Guillen raised $950,605, Michael Monreal raised $90,616, and Alena Berlanga raised $0.

Ryan Guillen advanced to the general election with 59% of the vote, Michael Monreal received 32% of the vote, and Alena Berlanga received 9% of the vote.

#3 District 122 – $963,829

Adam Blanchard raised $692,765, Elisa Chan raised $102,661, Mark Dorazio raised $93,512, Mark Cuthbert raised $74,890, and Nicholas LaHood raised $0.

Elisa Chan advanced to a runoff election with 37% of the vote, Mark Dorazio advanced to a runoff election with 28% of the vote, Adam Blanchard received 23% of the vote, Mark Cuthbert received 12% of the vote, and Nicholas LaHood withdrew.

#4 District 68 – $826,169

Incumbent David Spiller raised $804,221, Craig Carter raised $17,160, Mark Middleton raised $3,896, and Gary Franklin raised $892.

David Spiller advanced to the general election with 68% of the vote, Mark Middleton received 13% of the vote, Gary Franklin received 10% of the vote, and Craig Carter received 9% of the vote.

#5 District 60 – $793,130

Incumbent Glenn Rogers raised $575,367, Mike Olcott raised $158,644, Kit Marshall raised $42,725, and Lucas Turner raised $16,394.

Glenn Rogers advanced to a runoff election with 44% of the vote, Mike Olcott advanced to a runoff election with 36% of the vote, Kit Marshall received 12% of the vote, and Lucas Turner received 9% of the vote.

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Texas PACs submitted to the Texas Ethics Commission. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Report NameReport Due Date
2022 Jan Semiannual1/18/2022
2022 Pre-Primary (30 Days)1/31/2022
2022 Pre-Primary (8 Days)2/22/2022
2022 Primary Runoff5/16/2022
2022 Jul Semiannual7/15/2022
2022 Pre-General (30 Days)10/11/2022
2022 Pre-General (8 Days)10/31/2022
2022 Semiannual Data1/17/2023

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



These 10 Texas donors gave over $23.7 million

In Texas politics, state-level candidates and political action committees have received $375.3 million in total donations between January 1, 2021, and February 19, 2022. The 10 largest donors gave more than $23.7 million, or 6 percent of all contributions.

These are the top 10 individual donors to Texas state-level candidates and political action committees (PACs) in the 2022 election cycle, according to the most recent campaign finance reports submitted to the Texas Ethics Commission:

Top 10 Texas Donors (1/1/2021 – 2/19/2022)

RankDonor NameTotal Donations
1Richard Weekley$4,066,334
2Timothy M and Terri Dunn$3,032,500
3Michael & Mary Porter$2,445,000
4Dr Miriam Adelson$2,300,000
5Farris & JoAnn Wilks$2,272,500
6H Ross Perot Jr$2,212,700
7John L and Barbara Nau III$2,134,088
8Harlan R Crow$1,958,000
9Robert B Rowling$1,805,000
10Reed Hastings$1,511,000

The list of Texas donors in this time period includes more than 8,329 individuals identified by name in the Texas Ethics Commission’s public records.

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Texas PACs submitted to the Texas Ethics Commission. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Report NameReport Due Date
2022 Jan Semiannual1/18/2022
2022 Pre-Primary (30 Days)1/31/2022
2022 Pre-Primary (8 Days)2/22/2022
2022 Primary Runoff5/16/2022
2022 Jul Semiannual7/15/2022
2022 Pre-General (30 Days)10/11/2022
2022 Pre-General (8 Days)10/31/2022
2022 Semiannual Data1/17/2023

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



Texas Supreme Court ruling effectively ends lawsuits over abortion law

On March 11, 2022, the Texas Supreme Court ruled that state agencies could not enforce Senate Bill 8, bringing an end to the legal challenges that the Supreme Court of the United States had heard in Whole Women’s Health v. Jackson.

Senate Bill 8 is a Texas law that banned abortion procedures after six weeks of pregnancy and authorized private civil right of action related to violations of the law. This meant that private citizens, including citizens residing outside of the state of Texas, could bring civil actions against individuals for aiding a patient with getting an abortion. 

Justice Jeffrey S. Boyd delivered Texas Supreme Court’s opinion. He wrote, “Senate Bill 8 provides that its requirements may be enforced by a private civil action, that no state official may bring or participate as a party in any such action, that such an action is the exclusive means to enforce the requirements, and that these restrictions apply notwithstanding any other law. Based on these provisions, we conclude that Texas law does not grant the state-agency executives named as defendants in this case any authority to enforce the act’s requirements, either directly or indirectly.” 

This ruling meant that agencies, such as the Texas Medical Board and the Texas Board of Nursing, and their heads could not be targeted in lawsuits to stop the enforcement of SB8. Steve Vladeck, a professor at The University of Texas School of Law, wrote that “[t]he providers’ suit against state defendants is now effectively over” following the ruling.

The Texas Supreme Court’s ruling follows the United States Court of Appeals for the 5th Circuit remanding a case to the Texas Supreme Court in January 2022 for clarity over several issues raised in the Supreme Court ruling. On December 10, 2021, the Supreme Court of the United States ruled 8-1 in Whole Women’s Health v. Jackson that abortion providers may file suit in federal court against certain Texas executive officials to prevent them from enforcing provisions of S.B. 8 against abortion providers; it further held by a 5-4 vote that the abortion providers cannot bring suit against state judicial officials to prevent private lawsuits from being tried.



Garza, Jaworski advance to May 24 runoff in Democratic primary for Texas attorney general

Rochelle Garza and Joe Jaworski advanced from the March 1 Democratic primary for Texas attorney general when third-place finisher Lee Merritt conceded his spot in the runoff on March 10. Garza finished first in the primary with 43.0% of the vote and Jaworski received 19.7%. Merritt finished in third place with 19.4%, Mike Fields was fourth with 12.3%, and S. T-Bone Raynor was fifth with 5.5%.

Because no candidate won more than 50% of the votes cast, Garza and Jaworski will meet in a May 24 primary runoff election.

Garza is a former attorney with the American Civil Liberties Union who originally announced she would run for Texas’ 34th Congressional District. After Texas enacted new congressional district maps in October 2021, Garza decided to run for attorney general instead. In an interview with The Texas Tribune, Garza said, “Given my background, my work, I believe that this race is the right place to be. I also believe that if we’re gonna change anything in Texas, it’s gonna have to come at the state level because we’ve seen the damage that the governor, lieutenant governor and attorney general have done to this state and the harm they’ve done to the people.”

Jaworski is an attorney and the former mayor of Galveston. His campaign website lists several top priorities, including supporting the Affordable Care Act, expanding Medicaid, leading a statewide effort to legalize recreational marijuana, and supporting the decision-making authority of local governments. “Local decision-making authority is under attack in state government these days and I can personally say that local government is the best government. So I think as attorney general, Texans can rest assured whether they live in Republican jurisdiction, Democratic jurisdiction or any independent-type jurisdiction, that local government will be a focus of my attorney general opinion.”

The attorney general is an executive office that serves as the chief legal advisor and chief law enforcement officer for the state government and is empowered to prosecute violations of state law, represent the state in legal disputes and issue legal advice to state agencies and the legislature. In most states, the attorney general has a substantial influence on a state’s approach to law enforcement.

Additional reading:



Republicans outraise Democrats by 117% in Texas House races

Campaign finance requirements govern how much money candidates may receive from individuals and organizations, how often they must report those contributions, and how much individuals, organizations, and political entities may contribute to campaigns.

While campaign finance is not the only factor in electoral outcomes, successful fundraising can provide a candidate with advantages during a campaign. Fundraising can also indicate party momentum.

This article lists top fundraisers in the Texas House of Representatives, overall and by party. It is based on campaign finance reports that officeholders in and candidates for the House submitted to the Texas Ethics Commission. It includes activity between January 1, 2021, and February 19, 2022.

Top fundraisers in the Texas House of Representatives by party

The top fundraisers in Texas House of Representatives elections are shown below. Individuals are presented with the office that they are on the ballot for in 2022, if applicable.

In the Democratic Party, the top fundraisers were:

  • Richard Raymond (District 42) – $509,459
  • James Talarico (District 50) – $360,465
  • Frank Ramirez (District 118) – $302,573
  • Julie Johnson (District 115) – $298,231
  • Chris Turner (District 101) – $280,454

In the Republican Party, the top fundraisers were:

  • Dade Phelan (District 21) – $2,905,247
  • Mayes Middleton – $2,014,767
  • Ryan Guillen (District 31) – $950,605
  • Phil King – $936,332
  • Tan Parker – $822,571

Fundraising totals

Overall, Democratic officeholders and candidates raised $9.19 million in this period. Republican officeholders and candidates raised $34.89 million. Combined, all House fundraisers in the January 1, 2021, through February 19, 2022, filing period raised $44.08 million.

The five largest Democratic fundraisers were responsible for 19 percent of all Democratic House fundraising. The five largest Republican fundraisers were responsible for 22 percent of all Republican House fundraising.

The table below provides additional data from the campaign finance reports from the top ten fundraisers during this period.

TOP TEN FUNDRAISERS – TEXAS HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES (January 1, 2021, through February 19, 2022)

NameParty AffiliationRaisedSpent
Dade PhelanRepublican Party$2,905,247$2,536,948
Mayes MiddletonRepublican Party$2,014,767$1,897,663
Ryan GuillenRepublican Party$950,605$985,417
Phil KingRepublican Party$936,332$1,017,324
Tan ParkerRepublican Party$822,571$1,039,875
David SpillerRepublican Party$804,221$505,235
Adam BlanchardRepublican Party$692,765$385,756
John LujanRepublican Party$683,537$244,132
Glenn RogersRepublican Party$575,367$453,232
Dustin BurrowsRepublican Party$537,605$259,377

Campaign finance reporting periods

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that candidate PACs submitted to the Texas Ethics Commission. Candidate PACs represent individuals who have run for state or local office at any point, including past and present officeholders. This article does not include non-candidate PACs. In 2022, Transparency USA will publish campaign finance data after the following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Report NameReport Due Date
2022 Jan Semiannual1/18/2022
2022 Pre-Primary (30 Days)1/31/2022
2022 Pre-Primary (8 Days)2/22/2022
2022 Primary Runoff5/16/2022
2022 Jul Semiannual7/15/2022
2022 Pre-General (30 Days)10/11/2022
2022 Pre-General (8 Days)10/31/2022
2022 Semiannual Data1/17/2023

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



Republicans outraise Democrats by 126% in Texas Senate races

Campaign finance requirements govern how much money candidates may receive from individuals and organizations, how often they must report those contributions, and how much individuals, organizations, and political entities may contribute to campaigns.

While campaign finance is not the only factor in electoral outcomes, successful fundraising can provide a candidate with advantages during a campaign. Fundraising can also indicate party momentum.

This article lists top fundraisers in the Texas State Senate, overall and by party. It is based on campaign finance reports that officeholders in and candidates for the State Senate submitted to the Texas Ethics Commission. It includes activity between January 1, 2021, and February 19, 2022.

Top fundraisers in the Texas State Senate by party

The top fundraisers in Texas State Senate elections are shown below. Individuals are presented with the office that they are on the ballot for in 2022, if applicable.

In the Democratic Party, the top fundraisers were:

  • John Whitmire (District 15) – $505,196
  • Royce West (District 23) – $414,698
  • Judith Zaffirini (District 21) – $313,071
  • Nathan Johnson (District 16) – $283,286
  • Morgan LaMantia (District 27) – $246,275

In the Republican Party, the top fundraisers were:

  • Mayes Middleton (District 11) – $2,014,767
  • Dawn Buckingham – $1,755,669
  • Kevin Sparks (District 31) – $1,204,386
  • Peter P. Flores (District 24) – $1,033,830
  • Phil King (District 10) – $936,332

Fundraising totals

Overall, Democratic officeholders and candidates raised $3.27 million in this period. Republican officeholders and candidates raised $14.40 million. Combined, all State Senate fundraisers in the January 1, 2021, through February 19, 2022, filing period raised $17.67 million.

The five largest Democratic fundraisers were responsible for 54 percent of all Democratic State Senate fundraising. The five largest Republican fundraisers were responsible for 48 percent of all Republican State Senate fundraising.

The table below provides additional data from the campaign finance reports from the top ten fundraisers during this period.

TOP TEN FUNDRAISERS – TEXAS STATE SENATE (January 1, 2021, through February 19, 2022)

NameParty AffiliationRaisedSpent
Mayes MiddletonRepublican Party$2,014,767$1,897,663
Dawn BuckinghamRepublican Party$1,755,669$2,447,281
Kevin SparksRepublican Party$1,204,386$1,190,819
Peter P. FloresRepublican Party$1,033,830$877,928
Phil KingRepublican Party$936,332$1,017,324
Angela PaxtonRepublican Party$838,760$323,331
Tan ParkerRepublican Party$822,571$1,039,875
Kelly HancockRepublican Party$542,910$323,792
John WhitmireDemocratic Party$505,196$6,052,058
Charles SchwertnerRepublican Party$503,829$359,302

Campaign finance reporting periods

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that candidate PACs submitted to the Texas Ethics Commission. Candidate PACs represent individuals who have run for state or local office at any point, including past and present officeholders. This article does not include non-candidate PACs. In 2022, Transparency USA will publish campaign finance data after the following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Report NameReport Due Date
2022 Jan Semiannual1/18/2022
2022 Pre-Primary (30 Days)1/31/2022
2022 Pre-Primary (8 Days)2/22/2022
2022 Primary Runoff5/16/2022
2022 Jul Semiannual7/15/2022
2022 Pre-General (30 Days)10/11/2022
2022 Pre-General (8 Days)10/31/2022
2022 Semiannual Data1/17/2023

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



One incumbent defeated in Texas’ state legislative primaries, continuing a decade-long decrease

Texas held the first statewide primary of the 2022 election cycle for federal and state offices on March 1. Heading into the primaries, it was guaranteed that at least one of the 151 state legislative incumbents seeking re-election would lose.

Rep. Claudia Ordaz Perez (D), who currently represents House District 76, was drawn into House District 79 as a result of redistricting, setting up an incumbent vs. incumbent primary between Ordaz Perez and District 79’s Rep. Art Fierro (D). Ordaz won, receiving 65% of the vote to Fierro’s 35%.

As of March 4, Fierro is the only state legislative incumbent who lost in Texas’ primaries, representing 2.4% of the 41 House incumbents who faced primary challengers. If no other incumbents lose re-election when additional races are called, it would be a decade-low for the legislature.

There are several outstanding races featuring incumbents, all of which involve House Republicans.

Two races are uncalled—Districts 64 and 91—and, in three, the incumbents advanced to runoff elections on May 24 after finishing in the primary’s top-two. Those runoffs will be held in:

In the Senate, three of the 26 senators seeking re-election faced and defeated their primary challengers. No incumbent senator in Texas has lost a primary or primary runoff since 2014.

Additional reading:

  1. Texas House of Representatives elections, 2022
  2. Texas State Senate elections, 2022