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Washington enacts new legislative districts

Washington enacted new legislative districts on Feb. 8 when the Washington State Senate approved an amended version of a map proposal drafted by the Washington State Redistricting Commission. The maps will take effect for Washington’s 2022 state legislative elections.

Washington’s four redistricting commissioners each released their proposed state legislative maps on Sept. 21, 2021. The commission announced on Nov. 16 that it was not able to produce new maps by its Nov. 15 deadline and had submitted plans to the Supreme Court for consideration, as authority to draw new maps passed to the court if the commission failed to agree on maps before the deadline. The court decided to accept the final legislative map drafts the commission submitted, ruling that it had “substantially complied” with the deadline. The Washington House approved the final state legislative map proposal by an 88-7 vote on Feb. 2, and the Senate approved the proposal on Feb. 8 in a 35-14 vote.

Senate Majority Leader Andy Billig (D) voted for the new maps but said, “I continue to have significant concern that the Yakima Valley legislative district may not be compliant with the federal Voting Rights Act.” Senator Jamie Pedersen (D) said, “I think I’m not the only one who was surprised and disappointed that this past Nov. 15, as the clock approached midnight, without actually having agreed on a plan, without having published a plan for public comment, our redistricting commission voted to approve some sort of oral agreement that they had to send that over to us.”

Commission member April Sims said, “I just think there is something really powerful about forcing folks who normally wouldn’t come together to come together. It means everyone has to give a little in the process and no one side wins. And I think that’s good for democracy and good for the public.” Senate Minority Leader John Braun (R) said the commission’s work was a bipartisan process and “We can, none of us, expect to get all the things we want.”

Thirty-three states have adopted legislative district maps for both chambers as of Feb. 9, and one state has adopted maps that have not yet gone into effect. The state supreme courts in two states have overturned previously enacted maps, and 14 states have not yet adopted legislative redistricting plans after the 2020 census. Thirty-eight states had enacted legislative redistricting plans after the 2010 census as of Feb. 9, 2012.

Nationwide, states have completed legislative redistricting for 1,387 of 1,972 state Senate seats (70.3%) and 3,256 of 5,411 state House seats (60.2%).

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Washington enacts new congressional districts

Washington enacted new congressional districts on Feb. 8 when the Washington State Senate approved an amended version of a map proposal drafted by the Washington State Redistricting Commission. Washington was apportioned 10 seats in the U.S. House of Representatives after the 2020 census, the same number it received after the 2010 census. This map will take effect for Washington’s 2022 congressional elections.

Washington’s four redistricting commissioners each released their proposed congressional maps on Sept 28, 2021. On Nov. 16, the commission announced that it was not able to produce new maps by its Nov. 15 deadline and had submitted plans to the Washington Supreme Court for consideration, as authority to draw new maps passed to the court if the commission failed to agree on maps before the deadline. The court accepted the final map drafts the commission submitted, ruling that it had “substantially complied” with the deadline. The Washington House approved the final congressional map proposal on Feb. 2 in an 88-7 vote, and the Senate approved the plan 35-14 on Feb. 8.

Critics of the redistricting plans said the commission’s vote to approve the plan left no time for public input. Mike Fancher of the Washington Coalition for Open Government said, “The commission damaged public trust in our system of governing, which always happens when secrecy prevails over transparency.” Rep. Sharon Wylie (D) said the commission process was still effective. “I’ve not always been happy with the results, but I’ve always felt that our system worked better than in a lot of other states and was more fair,” Wylie said.

As of Feb. 9, 31 states have adopted congressional district maps, and one state has approved congressional district boundaries that have not yet taken effect. Federal or state courts have blocked previously adopted maps in two states, and 10 states have not yet adopted congressional redistricting plans after the 2020 census. Six states were apportioned one U.S. House district, so no congressional redistricting is required. As of Feb. 9 in 2012, 36 states had enacted congressional redistricting plans.

States have completed congressional redistricting for 315 of the 435 seats (72.4%) in the U.S. House of Representatives.

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Signature deadline for Washington 2022 Initiatives to the Legislature passes with no campaigns submitting signatures

The signature deadline for 2022 Washington Initiatives to the Legislature (ITL) was December 30, 2021. For an ITL to be taken up by the Washington State Legislature and potentially put on the ballot in 2022, proponents needed to submit 324,516 valid signatures.

Citizens of Washington may initiate legislation as either a direct state statute—called Initiative to the People (ITP) in Washington—or indirect state statute—called Initiative to the Legislature (ITL) in Washington. In Washington, citizens also have the power to repeal legislation via veto referendum. Citizens may not initiate constitutional amendments.

A total of 133 ITLs were filed by nine sponsors. None of the campaigns submitted signatures by the deadline. The filed initiatives concerned a range of topics including taxes, prohibiting mandatory vaccinations, emergency powers of the governor, and healthcare.

If campaigns submit enough valid signatures for an ITL, the initiative goes before the Washington Legislature at the next regular legislative session in January. The legislature must take one of three actions.

1. The legislature can adopt the initiative as proposed, in which case it becomes law without a vote of the people.

2. The legislature can reject or refuse to act on the proposed initiative, in which case the initiative must be placed on the ballot at the next state general election.

3. The legislature can approve an alternative to the proposed initiative, in which case both the original proposal and the legislature’s alternative must be placed on the ballot at the next state general election.

Thirty-four Initiatives to the Legislature have been on the ballot since the first ITL in 1916; 18 were approved. The most recent ITL, Initiative 976, was on the ballot in 2019. It was approved but later invalidated by the Washington State Supreme Court.

Besides Initiatives to the Legislature, Washington citizens may sign petitions for Initiatives to the People. These initiatives are direct initiatives, meaning that if enough valid signatures are collected, election officials place the measure directly on the next general election ballot for a vote. Initiatives to the People (ITP) may be filed targeting the 2022 ballot with a signature due date of July 8, 2022.

The number of required signatures for 2022 Initiatives to the People and veto referendums is based on the number of votes cast for gubernatorial candidates in 2020. To qualify an ITP or ITL for the 2022 ballot, 324,516 valid signatures are required. For veto referendums, signatures must be filed with the secretary of state within 90 days after the adjournment of the legislative session at which the targeted legislation was passed. To qualify a veto referendum for the 2022 ballot, 162,258 valid signatures are required.

A total of 66 measures appeared on the statewide ballot in Washington during even years between 2000 and 2021. Of the 66 measures, 54.55% (36) were approved and 45.45% (30) were defeated.

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Redistricting timeline update: South Carolina legislature announces special sessions, Washington Supreme Court assumes redistricting authority

Here’s a summary of recent redistricting updates from South Carolina and Washington.

South Carolina: On Nov. 18, 2021, Senate President Harvey Peeler (R) said senators will meet on Dec. 6 at 1 p.m. in a special session to address redistricting. House Speaker Jay Lucas (R) also announced a special session for the South Carolina House beginning Dec. 1. 

Washington: After the Washington State Redistricting Commission missed its Nov. 15, 2021, deadline, authority to create new districts passed to the Washington Supreme Court. According to Article II, Section 43 of the Washington Constitution, the court has until April 30 to complete new district maps.



Seattle votes on Sawant recall Dec. 7

On Dec. 7, Seattle voters will decide whether to recall District 3 City Councilmember Kshama Sawant. 

Recall petitioners allege three grounds for recall against Sawant: misusing city funds for electioneering purposes, disregarding regulations related to COVID-19, and misusing her official position. Sawant responded that the recall effort was politically motivated and asked a state superior court to dismiss the recall petition. The Washington Supreme Court ultimately ruled the recall could go forward.

Sawant supporters collected signatures for the recall in an effort to get it on the Nov. 2 ballot. The official recall campaign submitted signatures on Sept. 8, and the recall was scheduled for Dec. 7.

As of Nov. 2, the Kshama Solidarity campaign had raised $798,422 to the Recall Sawant campaign’s $684,191.

Sawant is a member of the Socialist Alternative Party and upon her election in 2013 was the first socialist elected to Seattle city government in 97 years.

This is one of 12 city council recall efforts we’ve tracked in the 100 largest cities in 2021. Six of those efforts were in four California cities (Los Angeles, Riverside, Anaheim, and San Diego). Three were in Anchorage, Alaska. The other two were in Kansas City, Missouri, and Austin, Texas. Five efforts did not go to a vote, five are underway, and two were defeated. 

Since Ballotpedia began tracking recalls in 2008, we have not tracked a successful recall of a city council member in Washington.



Seattle mayoral, city council races decided

Bruce Harrell won the election for mayor of Seattle, Washington, on Nov. 2. Incumbent Teresa Mosqueda was re-elected to at-large city council position 8, and Sara Nelson won the at-large position 9 council seat.

The following results were reported as of Nov. 4. Mail ballots were still being counted.

  • Bruce Harrell: 62%/Lorena González: 38%
  • Teresa Mosqueda: 56%/Kenneth Wilson: 44%
  • Sara Nelson: 57%/Nikkita Oliver: 43%

Harrell, a former city council president, ran against current Council President Lorena González. González currently holds the position 9 council seat. Mayor Jenny Durkan did not run for re-election.

In the council races, Mosqueda ran against bridge structural engineer Kenneth Wilson, and Nelson ran against attorney Nikkita Oliver. 

Harrell and Nelson both had backing from the National Association of Realtors Fund, the Seattle Fire Fighters Union, and The Seattle Times in their races.

Mosqueda had endorsed González and Oliver in their races. The Washington Working Families Party endorsed all three. The Progressive Voter Guide, presented by the organization Fuse Washington, recommended the three as well.

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Meet the 2021 Forks mayoral candidates

The city of Forks, in Clallam County, Wash., is holding municipal elections on Nov. 2, 2021. The mayor’s office is one of those seats up for election. The mayor serves a four-year term alongside five city council members.

Candidates submitted statements to the Washington Secretary of State when they filed a Declaration of Candidacy for use in the Voter’s Pamphlet. Responses are republished here. They have not been altered in any way.

Forks Mayor

Tim Fletcher (incumbent): “I am a WestEnd original. My family’s homestead still stands in the Hoh River Valley and I am also a tribal elder, which helps to find a clearer path to make our community more inclusive.

I will continue to work with new and established businesses to keep our city business friendly and find ways to bring back and keep timber related jobs.

I will continue to encourage the building of housing for workers that need short/long term places to live. This could be new homes for families of all sizes or working couples just starting out that need a basic starter home.

And with the community’s continued support, I will work for the future of Forks when it comes to making decisions about our community’s infrastructure as we plan for the growth of Forks.”

To read Fletcher’s full statement, click here.

Steve Wright: “I’m a 35 year old disabled Native American veteran. I served in the US Army and US Air Force, I graduated from Evergreen State College with a degree in agrobiology and grant writing. I am a nature conservationist and agrobiologist; you can usually find me in the forest foraging for mushrooms, fishing, or farming with my children. I studied agrobiology extensively. I practice sustainable agriculture and offer assistance to anyone wanting to farm sustainably.

I am a medical patient. I use cannabis to alleviate my pain from service-connected injuries, and nausea from PTSD. I believe in protecting patients and legalizing psilocybin mushrooms for mental health treatments.

I believe political parties facilitate the consolidation of power and aide in shielding their members from criticism. I believe there is no fixing the two-party dominant system, and joining a political party would contribute to the problem. I believe candidates should stand on their own in publicly funded elections.

I believe we deserve healthcare without restriction and debt, college without debt, an infrastructure that is sustainable and ecologically safe, equitable justice, and an economy that works for everyone.”

To read Wright’s full statement, click here.

Clallam County is holding municipal elections in its three cities—Port Angeles, Sequim, and Forks— in 2021. Twenty-six offices are up for election in those cities. Click here to read more about those elections.



Meet the 2021 Sequim City Council candidates

Sequim, in Clallam County, Wash., is holding municipal elections on Nov. 2, 2021. Five city council seats are up for election this year. In total, the Sequim City Council is composed of seven members who serve four-year terms.

Candidates submitted statements to the Washington Secretary of State when they filed a Declaration of Candidacy for use in the Voter’s Pamphlet. Responses are republished here. They have not been altered in any way.

Sequim City Council Position No. 2

Sarah Kincaid (incumbent): “As a Sequim resident for 21 years, I understand our community and its needs. I care deeply about the future of Sequim because my history here gives me a “citizen’s” voice from the people, for the people. As a city councilwoman I voted to support small businesses and families by using rainy day funds during COVID, and ‘no’ to utility rate increases in 2021.

I advocate cutting red tape and reducing fees, helping Sequim become more business-friendly, reaching out to bring more small- to medium size businesses offering more employment opportunities for our citizens, while maintaining our “small town” atmosphere.

I understand and promote the need for enhanced medical care and a 24/7 emergency clinic.

I am married with two grown children and 3 grandchildren.

Our lives are greatly influenced by local government. We need to pay attention to it and elect individuals who will truly represent us. I believe government should be transparent and accountable. In these challenging times, we need to spend less, not more, to keep more money in the pockets of the people. I promise to continue to do just that, and I ask for your vote.”

To read Kincaid’s full statement, click here.

Kathy Downer: “As a councilwoman I served as the liaison to the Traffic, Alternative Transportation, Storm Water, and Brick Streets. I was a member of Main Street. ( for downtown businesses).

My husband retired as a small businessman, and we traveled across the country to live in beautiful Sequim. Three out of four of our adult children settled here with us and appreciate all of the outdoor activities Sequim has to offer.

I was in the Sequim City wide Christmas Choir in 2019, and I volunteer at Trinity United Methodist Church.

Local politics matter. We need a council made up of people dedicated to transparency, and accessibility. They need to  represent all of the citizens of Sequim, and not just the people who voted for them. 

I feel that my background will make me a good council member on the Sequim City Council.”

To read Downer’s full statement, click here.

Sequim City Council Position No. 3

Mike Pence (incumbent): “I’ve served on the Sequim City Council for a year-plus, and it has been very productive in restoring city government to the people of Sequim. We have made progress in addressing affordable housing and public safety. We have changed the zoning downtown to encourage multi-unit housing development. We’ve also navigated much needed improvements to Fir Street and we even enacted water and sewer rate reductions for low-income people.

My hands-on experience in government management and processes have greatly benefited the council. Priorities for my next term include: a satellite 24/7 emergency room; encouraging cost effective housing by reducing building fees so it is more feasible for development to occur; reducing regulations and fees to encourage businesses to locate in Sequim; supporting Police, Fire and EMS due to increases in homelessness and the upcoming opening of the Medically Assisted Treatment clinic.

With your support, we can continue the progress we all have worked so hard for in Sequim. It is time for Sequim to have common sense leadership combined with a professional background. I have the experience and passion to see our town thrive.

Let’s continue having Sequim be a great place to live.”

To read Pence’s full statement, click here.

Vicki L. Lowe: “I am a lifelong resident of Sequim, having worked and raised my children here. The role of the city government is to represent every city resident. I feel my perspective will add a voice not currently heard on our City Council. As a council member, I want to ensure that issues, goals, and priorities are thoughtfully understood, ensuring that decisions made consider both public interest and impact. It is also vital for the City Government to build ties to and connections with other organizations in Clallam County to serve the needs of our citizens. City Councilors need to act as innovators, role models, conduits for information exchange, and “positive disruptors.” Problem solving happens when we listen to hear each other and come to reasonable solutions.

Sequim Citizens should have a choice for who represents them. My life and work experience here in Sequim, my connection to people in the community who might not feel represented will help me bring another perspective to the table. I want to serve my community, please vote for me for Sequim City Council Position #3.”

To read Lowe’s full statement, click here.

Sequim City Council Position No. 4

Rachel Anderson (incumbent): “In my work on city council, I have seen what our challenges are, and I want to keep working on them. My main concerns are workforce housing, small business sustainability, and mental health advocacy. I also have high expectations for integrity and transparency in government. By listening to each other and exploring issues, we’ll find much to agree about, and we’ll find better solutions that work for more people.

I am honored that the council appointed me. As a young, low-income parent, I bring a unique perspective to the council. My work as a volunteer and on boards of non-profits, like OlyCAP, has prepared me for this service, and I am digging in. I am passionate about this work and I’ve shown my dedication to service. Growing up in Sequim, I had challenges at home and the schools and community gave me the support I needed. Now, I’m ready to give back to the community that has given me so much.

I am asking for your vote so that I can keep serving you. It’s time for us to come together to make Sequim better. For more information, visit https://rachelandersonfors.wixsite.com/rachelforsequim.”

To read Anderson’s full statement, click here.

Daryl Ness: “My wife and I love Sequim, especially the people. Since my retirement, I am hoping to put my business experience to good use. My experience in managing large budgets with multiple work groups has provided me an edge in large project success. I enjoy building teams to accomplish the goals we set and have experience in measuring progress to affirm direction.

I worked for the Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railroad as a conductor/switchman/yardmaster for 13 years. Later, I was in management for 24 years. I started as a management first line supervisor with BNSF. After working 12 different management positions, I retired as General Manager of the Northwest Division in Seattle, which manages Washington, Oregon, Idaho and parts of Canada. After retiring from BNSF Railroad, I was Chief Operating Officer for Peninsula Terminal Railroad in Portland for four years, retiring in 2019.

I have a great deal to contribute to the City of Sequim and the surrounding area. I am ready to serve Sequim’s citizens in elective office.

I love sports. I am a member of the Sequim Picklers (pickleball), belong to Cedars at Dungeness Golf Course and also play senior softball.”

To read Ness’ full statement, click here.

Sequim City Council Position No. 5

Brandon Janisse (incumbent): “For over 20 years I have been a Sequim citizen, with a few of those years, serving in the United States Army. For the past 4 years I have been fighting on behalf of Sequim’s families, as a Councilman. I am proud of the many accomplishments we have achieved together; however, there is still work to be done. I am running for re-election to continue my fight in delivering good paying jobs, affordable housing and transparent government. Currently the city council is majority appointed and experience matters. I am a husband, father and a devoted servant to my constituents. I put in 20-30 hours a week as a city councilor and my door is always open. I have testified before the state legislator and work hard on behalf of Sequim citizens each day. I achieved my Advanced Certificate of Municipal Leadership from ACW and will continue to seek out learning and growth opportunities. I currently or have served on the Planning Commission, Clallam Transit Board, the Finance Committee and the Lodging Tax Advisory Committee. Service to my community is my passion. I am proud of my record while serving you and would be honored to earn your vote.”

To read Janisse’s full statement, click here.

Patrick Day: “Experience matters. I joined the military right out of high school, eventually becoming an Explosive Ordinance Disposal Expert serving in the Gulf War. Following a hiatus working for the Brinks Armored Car service, I returned to public service as a Peace Officer for the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation serving 27 years. I became active in the California Correctional Peace Officer Association, our state and local union. I am currently an elected trustee for the CCPOA Health and Welfare Benefit Trust.

I have acquired many skills in problem-solving, crisis management, and conflict resolution from my years of public service and union activities. Together, they have given me great wisdom and experience in dealing with people issues and finding resolution to those issues. I wish to employ those skills by continuing my life of service to the people of Sequim.

I believe our police, fire and all city workers should be fully supported. All city business must be conducted in an efficient and transparent manner. I will work hard to help grow Sequim in a manner that ensures this beautiful city is free and safe from big city problems so this city stays beautiful for all citizens and guests.”

To read Day’s full statement, click here.

Sequim City Council Position No. 6

Keith A. Larkin: “My previous experience of public service in wildfire fighting and prevention, have prepared me well to serve the people of Sequim by seeking solutions that represent their will in all matters that come before the Council. I have held critical leadership positions with substantial budgetary authority, including Chief Administrator of a 110-man inmate Conservation Camp with a $10M budget; and Fire Chief, Fresno County with a $30M budget. My final posting as Senior Executive – Deputy Chief Northern Region which spanned 22 counties and 12 executive managers required collaboration with state and local agencies from diverse disciplines and interests including Emergency Management, Public Safety, Tribal Leadership, Community Groups, Military, Transportation, Utilities and Support Services. I seek open and diverse communications to reach effective decisions that reflect the will of the citizens. I vow to proactively collaborate with my fellow councilors, seek information from the community, be well educated on the issues and to serve with the highest level of integrity.

My priorities in office are: public safety first; encourage manageable growth including affordable housing, good stewardship of the taxpayer’s dollars, cultivate small businesses, enhance the development of our youth, maintain our small-town appeal, and promote tourism to our City.”

To read Larkin’s full statement, click here.

Lowell Rathbun: “I have lived in the Pacific Northwest for 25 years, 4 of them in Sequim. I was originally drawn to learn more about the Sequim city government during the controversy over the tribal Healing Clinic. I discovered that a city was happening here, and I wanted to help.

I believe it is important to help restore trust between Sequim’s citizens and their elected officials. Lately the city has lost its exceptionally qualified city manager under circumstances that remain unexplained. As result, there has been a loss of trust between the public and our city council. Being open about my intentions, listening to you, the voter, and responding honestly will be a good beginning in restoring trust on our council. It is crucial that we maintain a firewall between politics and the day-to-day management of Sequim.

Good government is about helping people. It is urgent for Sequim to find effective solutions to the acute problem of available and affordable workforce housing. Increasing human services, especially to our homeless population, and providing broadband service to all our citizens are examples of how Sequim can help people. Assisting the viability of small businesses, increasing local prosperity helps everyone.”

To read Rathbun’s full statement, click here.

Clallam County is holding municipal elections in its three cities—Port Angeles, Sequim, and Forks— in 2021. Twenty-six offices are up for election in those cities. Click here to read more about those elections.



Meet the 2021 Forks City Council candidates

Forks, in Clallam County, Wash., is holding municipal elections on Nov. 2, 2021. Two city council seats are up for election this year. In total, the Sequim City Council is composed of five members and a mayor who serve four-year terms.

Candidates submitted statements to the Washington Secretary of State when they filed a Declaration of Candidacy for use in the Voter’s Pamphlet. Responses are republished here. They have not been altered in any way.

Forks City Council Position No. 2

Clinton W. Wood: “I grew up in this community enjoying our beautiful natural resources. After serving our country I moved back, met my wife and we started a family. I feel truly blessed for having been raised in such a close-knit community and can’t think of a better place to raise a family. I am proud to be a member of this community and would be honored to serve Forks.

My position as the Director of Facilities at Forks Community Hospital has given me many opportunities to work with the city, county, and state. I ensure that Forks Community Hospital is compliant with regulations such as building codes, life safety codes, Revised Codes of Washington State (RCW) and Washington Administrative Codes (WAC). I have also been involved with multiple Community Development Block Grants that have benefitted our community. I have conducted many environmental reviews under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA). As the Director of Facilities, I oversee a budget of 3 million dollars. I believe with my background and experience I would be an asset as a member of the Forks City Council.

With your vote, I look forward to serving this community.”

To read Wood’s full statement, click here.

Josef Echeita: “My name is Josef Echeita and I am running for Forks City Council Position 2. I was raised in Forks and graduated from Forks High School in 2006. I moved back to Forks in in 2011 and have started to raise my own children here.

I had a great experience growing up in the city of Forks. I have made the choice to raise my kids here in Forks because I believe that this city is still the best place to raise a family. I want to work to keep Forks a place that is desirable to live. I believe this will be done through a continued positive relationship with local law enforcement and promoting programs targeting positive youth activities.

A vote for Josef Echeita for City Council is a vote for a candidate that believes in this town and knows what it is capable of. Please feel free to reach out to me with questions or concerns through Facebook (search @echeitaforcouncil or go to facebook.com/echeitaforcouncil) or via email at josefecheita@gmail.com

To read Echeita’s full statement, click here.

Forks City Council Position No. 3

Joe Soha (incumbent) did not submit a candidate statement to the Washington Secretary of State.

Sarah Holmes: “Sarah Holmes is an Independent Progressive Conservative. She is an advocate for justice, individual freedoms, ethical governing, and unbiased politics. Sarah will strive to ensure that the residents of Forks are heard and that the decisions of their government are the collective decisions of its people.

Sarah is a mother of four, with children attending school in Forks. She’s the daughter of a family-operated business owner in Clallam County, and understands the importance of family, education, and a locally based economy. Growing up in rural towns in Washington State, she is a first-hand witness to economic disparities which are a primary cause for divide, and in so understands the need for a community-oriented government that functions well for all its citizens.

To keep Forks strong moving forward, it will be imperative to continually address topics which are relevant to the community and with respect to the future of our community, and to do so with integrity.”

To read Holmes’ full statement, click here.

Clallam County is holding municipal elections in its three cities—Port Angeles, Sequim, and Forks— in 2021. Twenty-six offices are up for election in those cities. Click here to read more about those elections.



Meet the 2021 Port Angeles City Council candidates

Port Angeles, in Clallam County, Wash., is holding municipal elections on Nov. 2, 2021. Four city council seats are up for election this year. In total, the Port Angeles City Council is composed of seven members who serve four-year terms.

Candidates submitted statements to the Washington Secretary of State when they filed a declaration of candidacy. Responses, which appear in the Washington Voter’s Pamphlet are republished here. They have not been altered in any way.

Port Angeles City Council Position No. 1

LaTrisha Suggs (incumbent): “I have lived in Port Angeles most of my life. I am from here. My mom, grandmother, great grandmother, and ancestors have lived here since time immemorial. I seek your support to continue serving this great community. I have three fabulous kids and two grandsons.

As a council member I supported expanding key programs like Rediscovery, Paramedicine, reinstated code enforcement, maintained flat utility rates, balanced budget, provided $790,000 in rental, mortgage and utility assistance to customers impacted financially by the pandemic. I supported efforts, saving the city millions by refinancing water and wastewater bonds, supported suspending interest and late fees on utility accounts, and waived parking and business improvement area fees.The next four years will require focus and stability to maintain a healthy City budget, support solutions to vexing issues and engaging leadership that strengthens our community partnerships, and work towards building new relationships. Areas of critical importance include affordable housing, homelessness, code updates, commercial district enhancement, build staffing capacity, building high-performing relationships, and working with partners to advocate for solutions that will help the childcare crisis, which was in crisis mode prior to the pandemic. The vision is to move towards solutions that work for our community.”

To read Suggs’ full statement, click here.

Adam Garcia: “Port Angeles has been my home since 1992, when I started 3rd grade at Jefferson Elementary. I grew up here, played in the parks here, I went to school here, met my wonderful wife here, and have chosen to raise my children here. The truth is that Port Angeles has changed, and not for the better. Crime, poverty, and drug use have grown out of control.

The tasks laid before the City Council and Staff are not easy, but they must be met with a balance of fiscal responsibility and compassion for every member of our city. It is going to take time to make the big changes that are required for our city to prosper, but that doesn’t mean that we should ignore the problems in the present. We must come together and make common sense decisions that begin to address the issues at hand. We must insure that our community is safe, we need to work on our streets and infrastructure while remaining fiscally sound.

Let’s move Port Angeles in the right direction so that our children can experience the safe and beautiful Port Angeles we all remember.”

To read Garcia’s full statement, click here.

Port Angeles City Council Position No. 2

Mike French (incumbent): “Port Angeles has been my lifelong home, and I intend to work tirelessly to make it the best it can be. My vision is to provide a safe and healthy environment for all, including a robust economy, good roads, affordable housing and utilities, and a thriving business community. I’ve been an elected representative on the City Council for four years, and we’ve made considerable progress on these and other issues. We’ve engaged the Chamber of Commerce in our Capital Facility Plan and contracted with them to develop a collaborative strategic plan for our downtown. We’ve passed citywide zoning reforms and tax incentives to encourage affordable housing development. We’ve partnered with local institutions like Peninsula Housing Authority and the Olympic Peninsula Community Clinic to move our unhoused population into secure permanent housing. We’ve reduced the burden on local law enforcement by pairing social workers with police officers, finding productive solutions to difficult situations on the street.

There is still considerable work to do; our City continues to face a variety of challenges. I am committed to facing these challenges and devoting the time and effort required to serve the citizens of Port Angeles, and I ask for your vote. Thank you.”

To read French’s full statement, click here.

John Madden: “People are frustrated with their Government. People are feeling forgotten. It is time to involve the public in their Government at a new level. I hope to invite open conversations with the Citizens of Port Angeles in a variety of settings, including a monthly meet and greet at a local coffee shop. I am passionate about addressing the day-to-day challenges that face Port Angeles small businesses struggling to make sense of the ever changing political landscape. 

2020 was a confusing time in our County. Our awareness of the issues that divide us must be met with constructive and restorative energies. Small businesses have more similarities than differences, and there needs to be a constructive thread drawn around them to strengthen the fabric of our City.

As a former President of both a local Kiwanis Club and Lions Club, I have the experience in leadership, with community service as core. 

I believe that leadership is found in service to others. 

I hope you will come to my Coffee Corral, if not City Council meetings, and help me shape our Community one issue at a time.”

To read Madden’s full statement, click here.

Port Angeles City Council Position No. 3

Lindsey Schromen-Wawrin (incumbent): “I was born and raised in Port Angeles. I love this place that we all call home.

I’m honored to serve the people of Port Angeles on City Council, where my skills and experience support the the Council’s core work: policy and planning to keep Port Angeles affordable for young people, working families, and elders, and improve everyone’s quality of life.

Over the last four years on City Council, we’ve revived the code enforcement program that previous Councils cut; supported our Police and Fire Departments’ proactive and cost saving intervention programs; removed regulatory barriers to affordable housing and childcare development; kept utility rates stable; and supported small businesses and distressed residents during the pandemic.

As a representative of the people of Port Angeles, I work toward creating a City that values government transparency, community dialogue, and collaboration; spends our tax dollars efficiently; fosters a local economy that works for everyone; and solves tough problems like substance abuse, affordable housing, and homelessness. This work requires all of us working together to make Port Angeles a safe place for everyone to live, work, and play.

I’d be honored to receive your vote to continue this work on your City Council. Thank you.”

To read Schromen-Wawrin’s full statement, click here.

Jena Stamper: “I am a native of Port Angeles and, having attended K- 12 schools here, I know what Port Angeles used to be and I know the untapped potential that is has. I have the vision and passion to help it return to its previous glory and beyond. A local business owner and active member of our community, I am acutely aware of the struggles and concerns that our community members are facing.

A thriving business community is essential to the long-term health of our city. Not only does the business community provide the economic foundation for our city, it supports local teams, youth programs, and many worthwhile community projects of great impact.

I want to be an advocate for our youth and invest in our parks and community events that help give our community members and youth purpose.

I want to a champion for safe streets for our citizens, support our law enforcement and help them find sustainable ways to deal with the ever-increasing homeless population, while also encouraging code and local ordinance enforcement.

I whole heartedly care about this city and want to be a true representative of the people of Port Angeles. Your vote matters.”

To read Stamper’s full statement, click here.

Port Angeles City Council Position No. 4

Kate Dexter (incumbent): “Serving on city council for these past four years has been a tremendous honor. We have accomplished a great deal as a city. There’s much yet to be achieved. I look forward to continuing this work thanks to your vote.

Under my leadership as mayor, I have worked tirelessly with my fellow council members and city staff to set appropriate and meaningful agendas, lead discussions effectively and professionally, and ensure that everyone has a chance to be heard, even during the Covid-19 pandemic and all the challenges it presented.

Notably, at the end of 2020, city council and staff succeeded in creating a balanced budget, with no increase in utility rates, and provided over $800,000 to residents and local businesses in mortgage, rent, and utility relief.

We listened to local developers and made changes to our city code to encourage market rate and affordable housing development. Thanks to strong community partnerships, we implemented and expanded the Rediscovery and Community Paramedicine programs, which are actively improving people’s lives while saving taxpayer dollars.

I’m ready to continue the progress we have made toward a more vibrant community. Thank you in advance for your vote and continued support.”

To read Dexter’s full statement, click here.

John W. Procter: “In the past eleven years that I have lived in Port Angeles, I have witnessed a decrease in police presence, deterioration of our park and recreation services, and an influx of individuals living on our streets.

Many of theses individuals are openly drunk or using drugs. They throw their heroin syringes and garbage everywhere. They use our town as their public restroom. They graffiti our buildings and destroy business fronts. This affects our community standard and tourism.

Along with this we have also noticed the sudden appearance of old motorhomes, travel trailers, and automobiles. Many are randomly abandoned. Most are not currently licensed, and many are in disrepair but are parked on our streets for long periods of time. They are often outlets for drug dealing and harbor stolen goods from our community.

Our current City Council appears to use those individuals as political pawns assisting them to continue to desecrate our community. My intention is to restore our community to a healthier standard. I would like to represent the families and businesses who prefer a cleaner and safer Port Angeles.”

To read Procter’s full statement, click here.

Clallam County is holding municipal elections in its three cities—Port Angeles, Sequim, and Forks— in 2021. Twenty-six offices are up for election in those cities. Click here to read more about those elections.