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Stories about Washington

All candidates for Washington State Senate District 35 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Washington State Senate District 35  —  Julianne Gale (D) and Drew MacEwen (R) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office.

Eighty-eight of the country’s 99 state legislative chambers will hold regularly scheduled elections in 2022. The Democratic Party controls both chambers of Washington’s state legislature. Washington is one of 14 states with a Democratic trifecta.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What areas of public policy are you personally passionate about?   

Gale:

“Creating an Economy That Works for Everyone • Addressing the Climate Crisis by Sensibly Transitioning to a Livable Future • Respecting Tribal Sovereignty • Championing Our Public Schools • Accessible & Affordable Healthcare • Gun Safety • Safe & Affordable Housing”

MacEwen:           

“As a senior member of the House Appropriations committee I am very concerned about our state having sustainable budgets. With that we can ensure we have a strong economy, well funded K12 education, and proper funding for public safety.”

Click on candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

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All candidates for Washington House of Representatives District 8-Position 2 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Washington House of Representatives District 8-Position 2  —  April Connors (D) and Joe Cotta (R) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office.

Eighty-eight of the country’s 99 state legislative chambers will hold regularly scheduled elections in 2022. The Democratic Party controls both chambers of Washington’s state legislature. Washington is one of 14 states with a Democratic trifecta.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office?   

Connors:

  • “Better Schools. We need an advocate in Olympia who will fight for both children and parents. As a past PTO officer April has the experience and grit to defend our kids and put families back in the driver’s seat.”
  • “Reliable Energy & Good Jobs The Tri-Cities is a world leader in clean, renewable energy – from nuclear to hydroelectric we’re leading the way to energy independence.”
  • “Expanded Housing The Tri-Cities has not been immune to the statewide housing crisis. While Seattle politicians raise taxes and fight over regulations, their urban policies only exacerbate our problems in the Tri-Cities.”

Cotta:           

  • “I am running to restore individual liberties. Our religious, medical, election, educational and 2nd amendment liberties are all under attack.”
  • “I believe in reinstating trust to our law enforcement officers. The ‘Use of force’ and ‘pursuit’ laws have had a devastating effect on our safety.”
  • “Our farmers and other business owners want and deserve a level playing field. Over regulation from the government is crippling our farms and businesses. We need and must provide foreign and domestic policies that encourage free market principles, to allow the hard work of farming and other businesses to be rewarded.”

Click on candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

Additional reading:



All candidates for Washington House of Representatives District 36-Position 1 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Washington House of Representatives District 36-Position 1  —  Jeff Manson (D) and Julia Reed (D) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office.

Eighty-eight of the country’s 99 state legislative chambers will hold regularly scheduled elections in 2022. The Democratic Party controls both chambers of Washington’s state legislature. Washington is one of 14 states with a Democratic trifecta.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office?

Manson:               

  • “Housing Affordability: Many of our neighbors can no longer afford to live in their homes, so they move out of the city, or onto our streets. To ease supply constraints, we need tens of thousands of additional housing units built in the region over the next decade. I will support smart density legislation, prioritizing transit-oriented development.”
  • “Environmental and Climate Justice: We live in one of the most naturally beautiful regions of the world, yet our glaciers are melting and our summers days are choked with smoke from forest fires.”
  • “Keeping our Communities Safe: Crime is increasing nationwide, including in our neighborhoods. Keeping our streets, homes, and small businesses safe requires a multi-pronged approach.”

Reed:           

  • “Increasing housing affordability and availability: The future viability of our city and economy rests on increasing housing affordability and housing availability in Washington, where we have the fewest number of housing units per household of any state in the nation.” 
  • “Building community climate resiliency: As we work to reverse climate change, we need to help communities cope with these weather impacts today, which disproportionately impact people of color and low income people.”
  • “Education and Workforce: We must fully fund K-12 education, including ensuring robust pathways to postsecondary credentials for all students.”

Click on candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

Additional reading:



All candidates for Washington House of Representatives District 35-Position 2 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Washington House of Representatives District 35-Position 2  — Sandy Kaiser (D) and Travis Couture (R) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office.

Eighty-eight of the country’s 99 state legislative chambers will hold regularly scheduled elections in 2022. The Democratic Party controls both chambers of Washington’s state legislature. Washington is one of 14 states with a Democratic trifecta.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office?                

Kaiser:           

  • “I believe in hard work, love of family, community and country and making sure that everyone in our rural district has the same opportunities for success as in other parts of western Washington.”
  • “We need to create better conditions for local business to thrive and grow, create more family-wage jobs, improve our schools and expand rural broadband.”
  • “It’s critically important that we fund our local sheriffs and first-responders, so they can be there in an hour of need.”

Couture:           

  • “Constitutional Rights – Following the Constitution is my top priority. I will always defend your rights and freedoms, and protect your liberties.”
  • “Public Safety – We need to get tough on rising crime and reverse laws that make our communities vulnerable. I respect our police and first responders, and will help them keep us safe.”
  • “Quality Education – Every child should feel safe at school, with all the resources to learn. I will oppose unfunded mandates that crush school budgets, and support policies that focus on strengthening core skills comprehension, safety, and school choice.”

Click on candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

Additional reading:



All candidates for Washington House of Representatives District 17-Position 1 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Washington House of Representatives District 17-Position 1  —Terri Niles (D) and Kevin Waters (R) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office.

Eighty-eight of the country’s 99 state legislative chambers will hold regularly scheduled elections in 2022. The Democratic Party controls both chambers of Washington’s state legislature. Washington is one of 14 states with a Democratic trifecta.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What areas of public policy are you personally passionate about?                    

Niles:           

“Our economy is foundational to other issues we sometimes view as separate. My support for a strong regional economy is rooted in investing in our communities. Jobs, healthcare, housing, championing new infrastructure, public safety and education. What may seem like huge and diverse topics can be dealt with a focus on common issues affecting them all. As a healthcare provider I know that our healthcare system is broken and we need to find real solutions. Many people living in the 17th LD do not have access to healthcare. This will be a top priority for me.”

Waters:

“I am passionate about Economic Growth and the policies that support and not hinder it. I am also passionate about Police having the proper tools and policy to be able to do their jobs. I am also passionate about energy policy and making sure we do not have a failing power grid and support our dams. We need to make sure that we can continue to supply power to all at a reasonable rate and not bloated because of policies that do not bring reasonable rates and power for all.”

Click on candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

Additional reading:



Washington school board passes new curriculum guidelines on U.S. history and race topics

The Kennewick School Board in Washington state unanimously voted to adopt a new set of curriculum guidelines on August 24, 2022, that aim to restrict teachings on U.S. history and race. 

Kennewick School Board passed a new policy, known as Policy 2340, that would prohibit teachings that the U.S. is fundamentally or systemically racist or that a group of people is inherently racist, oppressed, or victims. The policy also seeks to bar politically leaning content from being included in course curricula, including the “1619 Project” and the “Zinn Education Project.” 

In reference to Policy 2340, Kennewick School Board member Gabe Galbraith said during the school board meeting, “Anytime in politics, there’s give and take. Could this have been stronger? I think so. But we had a great discussion in June and everyone was able to voice their concerns and thoughts, and I think we were able to capture that in this policy.”

Rob Woodford, president of the Kennewick Education Association teacher union, argued critical race theory was never a part of the curriculum and that the policy would not change current teaching methods. “Educators in Kennewick have always done a great job presenting factual information to students in a professional manner, and that will continue to be the case regardless of incendiary — but, ultimately, unsubstantiated — issues, which tend to rise up and then fade away,” he said.

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Incumbent Kim Schrier (D) and Matt Larkin (R) are running in the general election for Washington’s 8th Congressional District

Incumbent Kim Schrier (D) and Matt Larkin (R) are running in the general election for Washington’s 8th Congressional District on November 8, 2022.

Schrier, a pediatrician, was first elected in 2018, winning the open seat by a margin of five percentage points. Before that election, Republicans had represented the 8th District since 1983. Schrier was re-elected in 2020 in one of 37 U.S. House races decided by five percentage points or less.

Larkin, an attorney and owner of a manufacturing business, was the 2020 Republican nominee for Washington attorney general.

Politico’s Jessica Piper wrote after the top-two primary, “The [party vote share in the primary] indicates a close race brewing this fall[.] … [Schrier, who] spent significantly on early ads boosting her standing and seeking some distance from the Biden administration, remains in a competitive position. But Republicans may be able to invest more in the race now that they have a clear candidate[.]”

Both the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee (DCCC) and the National Republican Congressional Committee (NRCC) have prioritized this election. The DCCC designated Schrier as a member of its 2022 Frontline Program, a program providing resources intended to help incumbents hold competitive seats. The NRCC included this district in its target list for 2022 and named Larkin as an “On the Radar” member of its Youngs Guns program.

Voters in the district backed Joe Biden (D) in the 2020 presidential election by a margin of seven percentage points. According to The Cook Political Report and FiveThirtyEight, the district’s partisan lean did not change after redistricting.

The outcome of this race will affect the partisan balance of the U.S. House of Representatives in the 118th Congress. All 435 seats in the House are up for election. As of August 18, 2022, Democrats hold a 220-211 advantage in the U.S. House with four vacant seats. Republicans need to gain a net of seven seats to win a majority in the chamber.



Jaime Herrera Beutler becomes 12th U.S. House member to lose a primary election this year

On August 15, 2022, media outlets called the top-two primary for Washington’s 3rd Congressional District. Marie Gluesenkamp Pérez (D) and Joe Kent (R) advanced with 31.0% and 22.8% of the vote, respectively. Incumbent Jaime Herrera Beutler (R) finished third with 22.2%.

Herrera Beutler is the 12th member of the U.S. House to lose an election this cycle. With more primaries and all general elections remaining, 2022 is now even with the 2016 election cycle for the number of incumbent losses. In the past five election cycles, 2018 saw the most incumbent losses (34), followed by 2012 (27).

Herrera Beutler was one of 10 Republican representatives to vote in favor of impeaching then-President Donald Trump (R) on January 13, 2021. In a statement the day before the vote, Herrera Beutler said she would vote to impeach Trump because he “incited a riot intended to halt the peaceful transfer of power from one administration to the next. That riot led to five deaths.” Herrera Beutler was publicly rebuked by the Washington Republican Party and censured by the Clark County Republican Party.

Kent identified himself as an America First candidate, a term often associated with the platform of Trump and candidates who say they support Trump’s agenda. Kent said that he got into elected politics because of the January 2021 impeachment vote. Trump endorsed Kent on July 26, 2022. During a virtual campaign event, Trump said, “[Herrera Beutler] voted for the radical Democrats second impeachment hoax where the Republicans stood up tall for me but she didn’t.”

Washington uses a top-two primary system, in which all candidates appear on the same ballot, for congressional and state-level elections. The top two vote-getters move on to the general election, regardless of their party affiliation. 



Both candidates in the election for Washington’s 3rd Congressional district complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Washington’s 3rd Congressional District —Marie Gluesenkamp Pérez (D) and Joe Kent (R)—completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office.

The outcome of this race will affect the partisan balance of the U.S. House of Representatives in the 118th Congress. All 435 seats in the House are up for election. As of August 10, Democrats hold a 220-210 advantage in the U.S. House with five vacant seats. Washington’s current congressional delegation consists of 7 Democrats and 3 Republicans.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What do you perceive to be the United States’ greatest challenges as a nation over the next decade?

Gluesenkamp Pérez:

“Money in politics. Love of money is the root of all evil and we cannot address our biggest threats like climate change or a disappearing middle class without having political leaders who are honest dealers that put the interest of their constituents above high-dollar donors.”

Kent:

“We have to break away from the failed economic policies and national security strategies that have only benefited the ruling class and China. We must fully audit the 2020 Presidential Election to restore the American people’s faith in our democratic system. We have to return critical industries and manufacturing back to America, restore energy independence, and end our wasteful post 9/11 wars.”

Click on candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Want to see Candidate Connection continue to grow in future elections? Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

Additional reading:



33% of Washington state legislative incumbents face contested top-two primaries

Thirty-one of the 95 Washington state legislators who filed for re-election—22 Democrats and nine Republicans—will face contested primaries on Aug. 2. This represents 33% of incumbents who filed for re-election, lower than in 2020 but a higher rate than other recent election cycles.

Washington is one of three states holding top-two state legislative primaries this year. Under this system, all candidates appear on the same primary ballot regardless of their party affiliation and the top-two vote-getters advance to the general election.

Under this system, a primary is contested when more than two candidates file to run in the same district, at which point at least one candidate is guaranteed to lose.

Historically, however, incumbents tend to advance to the general election in Washington.

Between 2014 and 2020, 127 incumbents faced contested primaries in the state, four of whom—two Democrats and two Republicans—lost. This gives incumbents a primary win rate of 98%.

Twenty-seven incumbents are not seeking re-election this year, an increase compared to previous election cycles. This represents 18% of all seats in the Washington State Legislature.

Washington does not have term limits, meaning each of these incumbents either chose to retire or seek some other office.

Overall, 292 candidates filed to run in Washington’s top-two state legislative primaries this year: 126 Democrats, 142 Republicans, and 24 independent or minor party candidates.

All 98 House seats are up for election along with 24 of the state’s 49 Senate seats.

Washington has had a Democratic trifecta since 2017 when the party won control of the Senate in a special election. Democrats currently hold a 57-41 majority in the House and a 29-20 majority in the Senate.

Washington’s state legislative primaries are scheduled for Aug. 2, the 10th statewide primary date of the 2022 state legislative election cycle.

Additional reading:

Washington House of Representatives elections, 2022

Washington State Senate elections, 2022