Tagwyoming

Stories about Wyoming

Two Wyoming Supreme Court justices seek retention in November

Wyoming Supreme Court Justices Lynne Boomgaarden and Kari Gray are standing for retention election on November 3, 2020. Both Boomgaarden and Gray were appointed by former Wyoming Governor Matt Mead (R).

Mead appointed all five of the justices currently on the court.

The governor appoints the five justices of the Wyoming Supreme Court with the assistance of a judicial nominating commission where neither the governor nor the Wyoming State Bar Association has majority control. The Wyoming Judicial Nominating Commission is made up of seven members: three lawyers (elected from the active membership of the Wyoming State Bar), three non-lawyer members (appointed by the governor), and is chaired by the chief justice of the supreme court.

New justices must face a retention election during the next general election after they serve at least one year on the bench. Justices then stand for retention every eight years. Since 2008, justices facing retention elections have won 98% of the time. In Wyoming, there has not been a single justice that lost retention during this same time frame.

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Voters decide state legislative races in three states

Alaska, Florida, and Wyoming held statewide primaries on August 18, 2020. Candidates competed to advance to the general election scheduled for November 3.

There were 265 state legislative seats up for election, including 45 state Senate seats, and 220 state House seats.

The following information was current as of August 20. At that time, some races were still too close to call.

Across the three states, 206 incumbents filed for re-election to the 265 seats. Preliminary results indicate at least nine incumbents were defeated.

In the state Senate elections, 33 incumbents filed for 45 seats. At least two did not advance to the general election. In the state House elections, 173 incumbents competed for re-election to 220 seats. At least seven were defeated.

The next statewide primary will be held on September 1 in Massachusetts.

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Voters in Alaska, Florida, and Wyoming decide August 18 congressional primaries

Congressional primary elections for two U.S. Senate seats and 29 U.S. House seats were held in Alaska, Florida, and Wyoming on August 18, 2020. Candidates competed to advance to the general election scheduled for November 3, 2020.

Alaska

One U.S. Senate seat and the sole at-large U.S. House seat were on the ballot in Alaska. The incumbents in both races filed for re-election. Sen. Daniel S. Sullivan (R) was unopposed and advanced to the general election. Rep. Don Young (R) faced challengers in the primary. He advanced to the general election.

Florida

All 27 U.S. House seats in Florida were on the ballot. Twenty-five incumbents—13 Democrats and 12 Republicans—filed for re-election. Fifteen incumbents were unopposed and advanced automatically. Ten remaining incumbents faced challengers in the primary. One incumbent lost his bid for re-election, Rep. Ross Spano (R-15). Rep. Ted Yoho (R-3) did not file for re-election, and Rep. Francis Rooney (R-19) withdrew prior to the election. As of August 19, 2020, the results for the 3rd Congressional District Democratic primary and the 7th Congressional District Republican primary were too close to call.

Wyoming

One U.S. Senate seat and the one at-large U.S. House seat were on the ballot in Wyoming. Sen. Mike Enzi (R) did not file for re-election to the U.S. Senate. Rep. Liz Cheney (R) filed for re-election to the U.S. House. Cheney faced one challenger in the primary and advanced to the general election.

Entering the 2020 election, Alaska’s U.S. congressional delegation has two Republican senators and one Republican representative. Florida has two Republican senators, 14 Republican representatives, and 13 Democratic representatives. Wyoming has two Republican senators and one Republican representative. The U.S. Senate has 45 Democrats, 53 Republicans, and two independents who caucus with the Democratic Party. Only 33 out of 100 Senate seats are up for regular election, and two seats are up for special election. A majority in the chamber requires 51 seats. The U.S. House has 232 Democrats, 198 Republicans, one Libertarian, and four vacancies. All 435 seats are up for election. A majority in the chamber requires 218 seats.

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Cynthia Lummis wins the Wyoming Senate Republican primary

Cynthia Lummis defeated nine other candidates in the Republican primary for the United States Senate seat from Wyoming. The Associated Press called the race on election night with 9% of precincts reporting. Lummis led with 57.1% of the vote, followed most closely by Robert Short with 17.5%.

Lummis served as Wyoming’s U.S. House Representative from 2009 to 2017. On August 13, President Trump endorsed her in a tweet, writing, “Cynthia is Strongly for our Military, our Vets, and protection of the Second Amendment. She will be a great Senator, and has my Complete and Total Endorsement!”

The general election has been rated by independent outlets as Solid Republican. Incumbent Mike Enzi (R) announced last year he would not run for another term. He defeated Charlie Hardy in 2014 by 55 percentage points.


Three states to hold primary elections on August 18

Image of a red sign with the words "Polling Place" a pointing arrow.

Primary elections for state legislative chambers in Alaska, Florida, and Wyoming are on August 18, 2020.

In Alaska, the filing deadline to run passed on June 1. Candidates are running in elections for the following offices:
• 10 seats in the Alaska State Senate—100% of incumbents filed for re-election, leaving no open seats.

• 40 seats in the Alaska House of Representatives—four (10%) of the seats are open, while incumbents filed for re-election to 36 seats (90%).

In Florida, the filing deadline to run passed on June 12. Candidates are running in elections for the following offices:
• 20 seats in the Florida State Senate—eight (40%) of the seats are open, while incumbents filed for re-election to 12 seats (60%).

• 120 seats in the Florida House of Representatives—31 (26%) of the seats are open, while incumbents filed for re-election to 89 seats (74%).

In Wyoming, the filing deadline to run passed on May 29. Candidates are running in elections for the following offices:
• 15 seats in the Wyoming State Senate—four (27%) of the seats are open, while incumbents filed for re-election to 11 seats (73%).

• 60 seats in the Wyoming House of Representatives—11 (18%) of the seats are open, while incumbents filed for re-election to 49 seats (82%).

Candidates are competing to advance to the general election scheduled for November 3, 2020.

These primaries will be the 43rd through the 45th to take place in the 2020 election cycle. The next statewide primary will be held on September 1 in Massachusetts.

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Three states to hold congressional primaries on August 18

On August 18, Alaska, Florida, and Wyoming are holding statewide primaries. Between these three states, 31 congressional seats are up for election, and three of those seats are open, meaning the incumbent did not run for re-election.

Alaska has one U.S. Senate seat and one at-large U.S. House seat up for election. Incumbent Sen. Daniel Sullivan (R) is running for re-election to his Class II Senate seat and is uncontested in the August 18 Republican primary. Four candidates are on the ballot in the Democratic and Independence Parties primary for the seat; the winner will advance to the November general election. Incumbent Rep. Don Young (R) is running for re-election to Alaska’s at-large House seat, and he will face two challengers in the Republican primary. Three candidates are running in the Democratic and Independence Parties primary for the seat.

Florida does not have a U.S. Senate seat up for election in 2020. All 27 of the state’s U.S. House seats are up for election, and 25 of the 27 congressional incumbents filed for re-election. District 3 Rep. Ted Yoho (R) and District 19 Rep. Francis Rooney (R) are the two incumbents who did not file to run. Three Democrats and 10 Republicans are on the primary ballot for Yoho’s District 3 seat, and two Democrats and nine Republicans are on the primary ballot for Rooney’s District 19 seat.

Wyoming is holding elections for one U.S. Senate seat and one at-large U.S. House seat. A field of six Democrats and 10 Republicans are competing in the August 18 primaries for retiring incumbent Mike Enzi’s (R) open Class II Senate seat. The winner of each primary will advance to the November general election. Incumbent Rep. Liz Cheney (R) faces one challenger in the Republican primary for Wyoming’s at-large House seat. Three candidates are on the ballot in the Democratic primary to advance to the general election.

These primaries are the 43rd through the 45th primaries to take place in the 2020 election cycle. The next statewide primary will be held on September 1 in Massachusetts.

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O’Hearn appointed to Wyoming House of Representatives

Natrona County commissioners appointed Kevin O’Hearn (R) to the Wyoming House of Representatives on July 28 to fill the seat vacated when Carl “Bunky” Loucks (R) resigned in early July. O’Hearn was sworn into office on July 30. He will represent District 59 in the chamber for the remainder of Loucks’ unexpired term, which is set to end on January 3, 2021.

O’Hearn’s professional experience includes working as the building inspector and assistant town manager for Mills, Wyoming. Several commissioners cited his tenure in local government as their motivation for the appointment.

O’Hearn had already filed to run for Loucks’ seat this year and will face David Carpenter and Leah Juarez in the Republican primary on August 18. Loucks, who did not file to run for re-election, said he resigned to focus on running his business. No candidates filed to run in the district’s Democratic primary.

In 40 of the 60 races for the Wyoming House of Representatives occurring this year, no candidates filed in the Democratic primary. No candidates filed for the Republican primary in just five of the 60 districts.

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Loucks resigns from Wyoming House of Representatives

Carl “Bunky” Loucks (R) resigned from the Wyoming House of Representatives on July 6, citing a need to focus on his small business due to the economic impact of the COVID-19 pandemic. He is not running for re-election this year.

Loucks was first elected to represent District 59 in the chamber in 2010. Three Republican candidates–David Carpenter, Leah Juarez, and Kevin O’Hearn–are running for the seat in the August 18 primary. No candidates filed for the Democratic primary.

All 60 seats in the Wyoming House of Representatives are up for election this year. In 40 of the 60 races, no candidates filed in the Democratic primary. No candidates filed for the Republican primary in just five of the 60 districts. Wyoming has had a Republican state government trifecta in 18 of the last 29 years, with a Republican majority in both chambers of the state legislature every year since 1992.

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Candidate filing period for state executive and legislative races ends in Vermont and Wyoming

The filing deadlines to run for state-level offices in Vermont and Wyoming have passed. Vermont’s deadline was on May 28, and Wyoming’s deadline was on May 29.

In Vermont, prospective candidates filed for the following state offices:
• Governor
• Lieutenant Governor
• Secretary of State
• Auditor
• Attorney General
• Treasurer
• Vermont State Senate (30 seats)
• Vermont House of Representatives (150 seats)

In Wyoming, prospective candidates filed for the following state legislative offices:
• Wyoming State Senate (15 seats)
• Wyoming House of Representatives (60 seats)

Wyoming is also holding retention elections for two state Supreme Court justices on November 3, 2020.

Vermont’s primary is scheduled for August 11, and Wyoming’s primary is scheduled for August 18. The general elections in both states are scheduled for November 3, 2020.

Vermont’s statewide filing deadline was the 39th and Wyoming’s deadline was the 40th to take place in the 2020 election cycle. The next statewide filing deadlines are on June 1 in Alaska, Kansas, and Wisconsin.

Wyoming has a Republican state government trifecta. A trifecta exists when one political party simultaneously holds the governor’s office and majorities in both state legislative chambers. Vermont has a divided government where no party holds a trifecta.

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Filing period ends for congressional offices in Vermont, Wyoming

The major-party filing deadlines to run for elected office in Vermont and Wyoming passed on May 28 and May 29.

Candidates in Vermont filed for the state’s At-Large Congressional District seat.

Candidates in Wyoming filed for the following offices:
  • U.S. Senate (one seat)
  • Wyoming’s At-Large Congressional District (one seat)

U.S. Senate incumbent Mike Enzi (R) announced on May 4, 2019, that he would retire in the fall of 2020.

The primary in Vermont is scheduled for August 11, and the primary in Wyoming is scheduled for August 18. The general election in both states is scheduled for November 3, 2020.

Vermont and Wyoming’s major-party congressional filing deadlines were the 39th and 40th to take place in the 2020 election cycle. The next major-party congressional filing deadlines are on June 1 in Alaska, Kansas, and Wisconsin.

Entering the 2020 election, the Democratic Party holds the At-Large Congressional District seat from Vermont, and the Republican Party holds the U.S. Senate and At-Large Congressional District seats from Wyoming.

The U.S. Senate has 45 Democrats, 53 Republicans, and two independents who caucus with the Democratic Party. Only 33 out of 100 Senate seats are up for election. A majority in the chamber requires 51 seats. The U.S. House has 233 Democrats, 196 Republicans, and one Libertarian. All 435 seats are up for election. A majority in the chamber requires 218 seats.

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