In presidential elections since 1900, one state voted for the winning candidate more than 90 percent of the time

In presidential elections between 1900 and 2016, one state voted for the winning candidate more than 90 percent of the time. And one state did so less than 50 percent of the time.
 
Ohio’s electoral votes have gone to the winning president 93 percent of the time—in 28 out of 30 general elections—since 1900. Ohio has voted in every election cycle for the winning presidential candidate since 1964. It is followed by New Mexico, which voted for the winning president 89 percent of the time, in 24 out of 27 elections (New Mexico became a state in 1912).
 
Mississippi’s electoral vote went to the winning president 47 percent of the time, in 14 of 30 elections. It is joined at the bottom of the list by Washington, D.C., which supported the winning president 43 percent of the time. D.C. began participating in presidential elections in 1964 and has voted Democratic in every presidential election. The candidate who won Washington, D.C., won the presidency in six of 14 elections since 1964.
 
Below are the five most and least accurate states (and D.C.) in presidential elections from 1900 to 2016.
 
Most accurate:
  • Ohio, 93.33% (28 out of 30 elections)
  • New Mexico, 88.89% (24 out of 27 elections)
  • Nevada, 86.67% (26 out of 30 elections)
  • Missouri, 86.67% (26 out of 30 elections)
  • Illinois, 83.33% (25 out of 30 elections)
Least accurate:
  • Washington, D.C., 42.86% (6 out of 14 elections)
  • Mississippi, 46.67% (14 out of 30 elections)
  • Alabama, 51.72% (15 out of 29 elections)
  • Georgia, 53.33% (16 out of 30 elections)
  • South Carolina, 53.33% (16 out of 30 elections)
Ballotpedia used data from the U.S. National Archives and Records Administration to show which states’ electoral votes went to the victorious presidential candidates between 1900 and 2016.
 



About the author

Amee LaTour

Amee LaTour is a staff writer at Ballotpedia and can be reached at amee.latour@ballotpedia.org

Bitnami