Author

Kate Carsella

Primary results certified in Seattle races

In Washington state, vote totals for Seattle and King County’s nonpartisan primaries were certified on August 20. The primaries were held on August 6, but the state uses a vote-by-mail system that delayed when the results would be counted and finalized.
 
The primaries included seven of Seattle’s nine city council seats, two of nine King County Council seats, and two of five Port of Seattle Commission positions. The general election is scheduled for November 5, 2019.
 
Here are the results of the Seattle City Council primaries:
 
District 1: Incumbent Lisa Herbold, first elected in 2015, advanced to the general election with 50.6% of the vote. Attorney Phil Tavel advanced with 32.3%.
District 2: Community organizer Tammy Morales and Seattle Police Department crime prevention coordinator Mark Solomon advanced to the general election with 50.1% and 23.2% of the vote, respectively. Incumbent and council president Bruce Harrell did not file to run for re-election.
District 3: Incumbent Kshama Sawant, first elected in 2013, advanced to the general election with 36.7% of the vote, as did Capitol Hill Chamber of Commerce director Egan Orion, who received 21.5% of the vote.
District 4: Alex Pedersen, who previously worked as a legislative aide for former councilmember Tim Burgess, and journalist Shaun Scott advanced to the general election with 40.4% and 23.3% of the vote, respectively. Incumbent Abel Pacheco did not file to run for a full term on the council.
District 5: Incumbent Debora Juarez, first elected in 2015, advanced to the general election with 45.1% of the vote, and attorney Ann Davison Sattler advanced with 26.7% of the vote.
District 6: Dan Strauss, policy advisor to councilmember Sally Bagshaw, advanced to the general with 34.1% of the vote, and former councilmember Heidi Wills advanced with 21.2%. Incumbent Mike O’Brien did not file to run for re-election.
District 7: Assistant City Attorney Andrew Lewis advanced to the general with 31.7% of the vote, as did former Police Chief Jim Pugel with 24.8% of the vote. Incumbent Sally Bagshaw did not file to run for re-election.
 
Here are the results of the other four primaries:
 
King County Council District 2: Incumbent Larry Gossett, last elected in 2015, advanced to the general election with 36.7% of the vote, as did Girmay Zahilay with 56.1% of the vote.
King County Council District 8: Incumbent Joe McDermott, last elected in 2015, advanced with 83.9% of the vote, along with Michael Robert Neher, with 11.0%.
Port of Seattle Commission Position 2: Sam Cho advanced to the general with 31.1% of the vote, and Grant Degginger advanced with 24.5%. Incumbent Courtney Gregoire did not file to run for re-election.
Port of Seattle Commission Position 5: Incumbent Fred Felleman, last elected in 2015, advanced to the general with 72.4% of the vote, as did Garth Jacobson with 20.0% of the vote.
 
Primaries were canceled for two King County Council seats, assessor, elections director, superior court judgeships, and special district races since two or fewer candidates filed to run per position.
 
Seattle is the largest city in Washington state and the 22nd-largest city in the U.S. by population. King County had a population of 2,149,970 in 2013, according to the United States Census Bureau.
 
 


Trump announces intent to nominate law professor to federal court

On August 14, 2019, President Donald Trump (R) announced his intent to nominate Richard Myers II to a seat on the United States District Court for the Eastern District of North Carolina. Myers was nominated to succeed Judge Malcolm Howard, who assumed senior status on December 31, 2005. There is one current vacancy out of the court’s four judicial positions.
 
The United States District Court for the Eastern District of North Carolina has three active Article III judges:
• Chief Judge Terrence Boyle – nominated by President Ronald Reagan (R)
• Louise Flanagan – nominated by President George W. Bush (R)
• James Dever – nominated by President George W. Bush (R)
 
The court’s two judges on senior status are:
• Malcolm Howard – nominated by President Ronald Reagan (R)
• Earl Britt – nominated by President Jimmy Carter (D)
 
The United States District Court for the Eastern District of North Carolina is one of 94 United States district courts. When decisions of the court are appealed, they are appealed to the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals based in downtown Richmond, Virginia.
 


Judge receives federal court commission

On August 6, 2019, Judge Brian Buescher received commission for the United States District Court for the District of Nebraska.
 
Buescher was nominated to the court by President Donald Trump (R) on November 13, 2018, to succeed Judge Laurie Smith Camp, who assumed senior status with the court on December 1, 2018.
 
Due to the 115th Congress’ sine die adjournment on January 3, 2019, the Senate returned Buescher’s nomination to the president. Buescher, along with 50 other judicial nominees, was re-nominated by President Trump on January 23, 2019.
 
Following nomination by the president, a federal judge nominee completes a questionnaire that is reviewed by the Senate Judiciary Committee. The committee then holds a hearing to question the nominee regarding their judicial philosophy and their previous opinions and rulings. The committee also sends the nominee’s home state senators a blue slip, permitting them to show their approval or disapproval of the nominee.
 
After the hearing, the committee votes to approve or return the nominee. If approved, the full Senate votes on the nominee. If returned, the president may renominate the person. If the nomination is confirmed by the Senate, the individual receives commission to serve as a federal judge for a life term. If the nomination is not confirmed, the individual does not become a judge.
 
Buescher was confirmed by the U.S. Senate on July 24, 2019, by a vote of 51-40.
 
The United States District Court for the District of Nebraska has three active Article III judges including Buescher. The other two current judges are:
• Chief Judge John Gerrard – nominated by President Barack Obama (D)
• Robert F. Rossiter, Jr. – nominated by President Barack Obama (D)
 
The court’s four judges on senior status are:
• Laura Smith Camp – nominated by President George W. Bush (R)
• Joseph Bataillon – nominated by President Bill Clinton (D)
• Lyle Strom – nominated by President Ronald Reagan (R)
• Richard Kopf – nominated by President George H.W. Bush (R)
 
The U.S. District Court for the District of Nebraska is one of 94 U.S. district courts, the general trial courts for the U.S. federal court system where both civil and criminal cases are filed. The main courthouse is located in Omaha.
 


Katz wins Democratic primary for Queens District Attorney after manual recount

On July 29, Queens Borough President Melinda Katz was announced as the winner of the Democratic primary for the Queens County District Attorney position in New York following a manual recount. The primary took place on June 25, 2019. Attorney Daniel Kogan ran unopposed in the Republican primary. The general election for the open seat will take place on November 5, 2019.
 
On election night, public defender Tiffany Cabán appeared to have the most votes in the Democratic primary. After the mail-in ballots were counted, Katz appeared to have the most votes. Ultimately, Katz was declared the winner with 38.9% of the vote, leading Cabán by 60 votes; Cabán garnered 38.8% of the vote, according to the New York Board of Elections’ certified results.
 
Prior to the vote certification, the Cabán campaign filed a lawsuit challenging the results and alleging that several ballots were improperly invalidated. A hearing before the New York Supreme Court has been set for August 6, 2019.
 
The District Attorney seat was vacated when Queens District Attorney Richard Brown (D) died in May 2019. He was first elected in 1991.
 


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