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Roneka Matheny

Roneka Matheny is a staff writer at Ballotpedia. Contact us at editor@ballotpedia.org.

Davis defeated Collins in Illinois’ 7th Congressional District on June 28, 2022

Incumbent Danny K. Davis, Kina Collins, and Denarvis Mendenhall ran in the Democratic primary for Illinois’ 7th Congressional District on June 28, 2022. Davis, who has represented the district in Congress since 1997, won the primary with 52.3% of the vote. Collins received 45.3% of the vote, and Mendenhall received 2.4%.

Davis focused his campaign on familiarity with the district’s voters, saying, “This is my community…This is my home. This is my life.” Davis’ campaign yard signs read, “Re-elect Danny Davis. He’s someone you know,” and his campaign website highlighted his congressional voting record and seniority on congressional committees and caucuses. Collins’ campaign did not draw a contrast with Davis on policy but said Collins would provide the district with a fresh voice in Washington. Collins emphasized the fact that Davis has represented the district since she was in kindergarten and said that it was time for a change. She said, “I’m not just running to be the congresswoman in the Illinois 7th, but to talk about a vision for the Democratic Party, which includes young people, people of color, women, and those who do not come from traditional political backgrounds.” Collins’ campaign raised more money than Davis’, according to reports from the Federal Election Commission. Analysts described this primary race as a bellwether for generational tensions within the Democratic Party.

Prior to serving in Congress, Davis served on the Chicago City Council for 11 years as alderman of the 29th Ward. He also served on the Cook County Board of Commissioners from 1990 to 1996. He was elected to the U.S. House to represent Illinois’ 7th Congressional District in 1996. Davis served on the U.S. House Ways and Means Committee and was a member of the Congressional Black Caucus and the Progressive Caucus. Davis’ re-election was endorsed by President Joe Biden (D), Illinois Governor J.B. Pritzker (D), Illinois Senators Tammy Duckworth (D) and Dick Durbin (D), and Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot.

Collins became a protest organizer in the wake of the Chicago police shooting of Laquan McDonald in 2014 and founded the Chicago Neighborhood Alliance, a group describing its goal as to help end gun violence through civic engagement, in 2017. Collins lost to Davis in Illinois’ 7th Congressional District’s 2020 Democratic primary. She also served on the transition team and task force for gun violence prevention under President Joe Biden (D). Collins’ campaign was endorsed by several aldermen in the 7th District and the national political organizations Indivisible, Justice Democrats, and National Organization for Women.

Before the primary, the Cook Political Report, Sabato’s Crystal Ball, and Inside Elections all rated Illinois’ 7th Congressional District as a solid/safe Democratic seat, meaning that as the winner of the Democratic primary, Davis is very likely to win the general election as well.



Incumbent Michael Guest defeated Michael Cassidy in Mississippi’s 3rd District Republican Party primary runoff

Incumbent Michael Guest (R) defeated Michael Cassidy (R) in the Republican Party primary runoff in Mississippi’s 3rd Congressional District on June 28, 2022. Guest, who has represented this district in Congress since 2019, won with 67.4% of the vote while Cassidy received 32.6%. In the first round of the primary on June 7, Cassidy received 47.5% of the vote to Guest’s 46.9%.

Guest is a member of the U.S. House Homeland Security, Transportation, and Ethics Committees. He served as the district attorney for Rankin and Madison counties in Mississippi before his election to Congress. The Guest campaign highlighted his political experience and what they described as his conservative voting record in Congress. After the June 7 primary, Guest said, “I’ll be working to earn your vote because we need PROVEN, conservative leadership with a real record of fighting for our values—that’s the difference in the runoff election!”

Cassidy is a military veteran who said that he was running for Congress to continue serving his country. After the June 7, 2022, primary, Cassidy said “This is the first step in replacing our current congressman with someone who better represents [our] conservative Mississippi values.” According to Cassidy, “We need more people in Congress that will truly fight for the American people, and Michael Guest is quite simply not equipped for that challenge. He may be a decent man but he has proven to be ineffective at his job, and we need people who know how to fight in Congress.”

Guest voted along with 34 other House Republicans to create a bipartisan commission to investigate the events of January 6, 2021. Cassidy mentioned this vote when he challenged Guest to a debate after the June 7 primary: “I am calling on Mr. Guest to give the voters the opportunity to see us debate and so he can be held accountable for voting for the Democrats’ January 6th Commission.” Guest’s campaign responded saying, “Congressman Guest did not vote for Nancy Pelosi’s Select Committee on January 6th that’s currently in the news…He voted against the Select Committee because he knew it would lead to the witch hunt we are seeing now…[Cassidy] has spent a personal fortune to mislead the people of Mississippi about Congressman Guest’s conservative, Christian character.”

Before the primaries, the Cook Political Report, Sabato’s Crystal Ball, and Inside Elections all rated Mississippi’s 3rd Congressional District as a solid/safe Republican seat. 



Guest faces Cassidy in Republican primary runoff in Mississippi’s 3rd District on June 28, 2022

Incumbent Michael Guest (R) and Michael Cassidy (R) are running in a Republican Party primary runoff in Mississippi’s 3rd Congressional District on June 28, 2022, to determine which Republican candidate will run in the district’s general election on Nov. 8, 2022. Guest has represented this district in Congress since 2019.

In the June 7 primary, Cassidy received 47.5% of the vote, and Guest received 46.9%. In Mississippi, a candidate must receive over 50% of the vote to advance directly to the general election. Since no candidate received a majority of votes on June 7, Guest and Cassidy advanced to the June 28 primary runoff.

Guest has represented Mississippi’s 3rd Congressional District for two terms. He is a member of congressional committees dealing with homeland security, transportation, and ethics. He served as the district attorney for Rankin and Madison counties before being elected to Congress. Guest’s campaign says he has more political experience and has a conservative voting record in Congress. After the June 7 Republican primary, Guest thanked his supporters and said, “It appears we are headed to a runoff on 6/28. I’ll be working to earn your vote because we need PROVEN, conservative leadership with a real record of fighting for our values—that’s the difference in the runoff election!”

Cassidy is a political newcomer and military veteran who said that he is running for Congress to continue serving his country. Cassidy’s campaign says he is more conservative politically than Guest. After the June 7 primary, Cassidy said he was, “grateful to the people of Mississippi’s 3rd Congressional District for giving me the most votes…This is the first step in replacing our current congressman with someone who better represents [our] conservative Mississippi values.”

Guest voted along with thirty-four other House Republicans to create a bipartisan commission to investigate the events of Jan. 6, 2021. According to the New York Times, “the decision to buck their party and former President Donald J. Trump has imperiled several Republicans in their primaries this year” despite the fact that the House’s proposal later failed in the Senate.

Cassidy mentioned this vote when he challenged Guest to a debate after the June 7, 2022, primary: “I am calling on Mr. Guest to give the voters the opportunity to see us debate and so he can be held accountable for voting for the Democrats’ January 6th Commission.”

Guest’s campaign responded saying, “Congressman Guest did not vote for Nancy Pelosi’s Select Committee on January 6th that’s currently in the news…He voted against the Select Committee because he knew it would lead to the witch hunt we are seeing now…[Cassidy] has spent a personal fortune to mislead the people of Mississippi about Congressman Guest’s conservative, Christian character.”

Before the primaries, the Cook Political Report, Sabato’s Crystal Ball, and Inside Elections all rated Mississippi’s 3rd Congressional District as a solid/safe Republican seat. This means that the winner of this Republican primary runoff is very likely to win the general election as well.



Strong wins Republican primary runoff in Alabama’s 5th Congressional District

Dale Strong defeated Casey Wardynski in the Republican primary runoff election for Alabama’s 5th Congressional District on June 21, 2022. Strong received 63.4% of the vote and Wardynski received 36.6%. Strong will face Kathy Warner-Stanton (D) in the general election on Nov. 8, 2022.

U.S. Rep. Mo Brooks (R), first elected in 2010, ran for the U.S. Senate rather than seeking re-election, creating an open seat. Brooks did not make an endorsement in this race.

Strong served as the chairman of the Madison County Commission in 2022 and has held this position since 2012. He was a volunteer firefighter and emergency medical technician (EMT) in the Monrovia area. Strong described himself as “a pro-life Christian who will stand up for the unborn and fight for our Christian values.” He said, “These values are under attack today by those who want to control what we read on social media and what our children are taught in school.”

Wardynski served as the assistant secretary of the Army for manpower and reserve affairs under former President Donald Trump (R) from 2019 to 2020. He also served as the superintendent of Huntsville city schools from 2011 to 2016. Wardynski described himself as “a proud, pro-Trump conservative Republican who answered the call when President Trump asked me to be his Assistant Secretary of the Army.” He said, “I am committed to advancing the America First Agenda. I am not afraid to take on The Swamp and the special interests who fought President Trump at every turn. I will fight Joe Biden when he tries to roll back the progress created under President Trump.”



Nancy Mace defeats Katie Arrington in the Republican primary for South Carolina’s 1st Congressional District on June 14, 2022

Incumbent Nancy Mace (R) defeated Katie Arrington (R) in the Republican primary for South Carolina’s 1st Congressional District on June 14, 2022, winning about 53% of the vote.

Arrington won the district’s Republican primary in 2018, defeating then-incumbent and former governor Mark Sanford (R) before losing the general election to Joe Cunningham (D). Cunningham was the first Democratic U.S. House candidate to win election in the district since 1978. Mace defeated Cunningham in 2020 and said she is better-positioned to win the general election. Former President Donald Trump (R) opposed Mace after she voted to certify the results of the 2020 presidential election. His endorsement of Arrington focused national media attention on the race.

Mace represented South Carolina’s 99th House District from 2018 to 2020. Her campaign focused on electability. Mace said, “It’s the 10th fastest growing congressional district in the country…That makes the dynamics a lot different. You’ve got to be able to win your primary but you also have to be able to win a general election…Nancy Pelosi would love nothing more than to win it back.” Mace was endorsed by former South Carolina governor Nikki Haley (R), former White House chief of staff and U.S. representative from South Carolina Mick Mulvaney (R), U.S. House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R), and others.

Arrington served as an information security officer in the U.S. Department of Defense during the Trump Administration. She also represented South Carolina’s 94th House District from 2016 to 2018. Arrington’s campaign focused on positioning her as the true conservative in the race. Arrington said, “Nancy Mace, she’s not a conservative…[she] turned her back on us, and she turned her back on President Trump.” Arrington also said that Mace, “read the room wrong; she thought this district was a moderate district, and we are not. We are conservative.” In addition to Trump, former candidate Lynz Piper-Loomis (R) withdrew from the primary and endorsed Arrington during a debate on May 20, 2022.

Arrington criticized Mace’s effort to enact federal marijuana legislation, saying, “That’s not what conservatives are concerned about right now…We’re concerned about the economy, we’re concerned about our children and we’re concerned about national security.” Arrington also criticized Mace’s stance on abortion, tweeting, “Abortion is murder. Anyone in favor of exceptions, Nancy Mace included, are complicit in the systematic killing of millions of unborn babies. I am 100% pro-life with no exceptions.” Mace stated publicly that she was a rape victim and has advocated for federal exceptions to abortion bans in cases of rape or incest.

Mace’s response to Arrington’s criticisms was twofold. She spoke about her conservative voting record in Congress and highlighted her scorecard from the conservative nonprofit The Heritage Foundation. Additionally, she spoke about working with Democrats to pass legislation and said the district was independent. Mace said, “This district is different…I don’t think it’s like the rest of the country. We march to the beat of our own drum. We want someone who’s going to be an independent voice.”

Analysts described this [primary] as a bellwether for Trump’s influence. As political science professor Gibbs Knotts said, “This is the type of district that’s going to decide who controls the House.” Before the primary, the Cook Political Report, Sabato’s Crystal Ball, and Inside Elections all rated South Carolina’s 1st Congressional District as a solid/safe Republican seat. This means that Nancy Mace, as winner of the Republican primary, is also likely to win the general election.



Strong faces Wardynski in Republican primary runoff for Alabama’s 5th Congressional District on June 21, 2022

Dale Strong and Casey Wardynski are running in the Republican primary runoff for Alabama’s 5th Congressional District on June 21, 2022. Republican Rep. Mo Brooks represented this district for more than a decade. This year, he is running for the U.S. Senate rather than seeking re-election, leaving the seat open. Brooks did not make an endorsement in this race.

Strong earned 45% of the vote in the May 24 primary, followed by Wardynski with 23%. In Alabama, a candidate must receive over 50% of the vote to advance directly to the general election. Since no candidate received a majority on May 24, the top two vote-getters (Strong and Wardynski) advanced to a June 21 runoff election.

Strong is the chairman of the Madison County Commission and has held this position since 2012. He is a volunteer firefighter and emergency medical technician (EMT) in the Monrovia area. Strong describes himself as “a pro-life Christian who will stand up for the unborn and fight for our Christian values.” He says, “These values are under attack today by those who want to control what we read on social media and what our children are taught in school.” Strong was the first candidate to enter this primary race and has held the lead in polling and fundraising throughout the race.

Wardynski served as the assistant secretary of the Army for manpower and reserve affairs under former President Donald Trump (R) from 2019 to 2020. He also served as the superintendent of Huntsville city schools from 2011 to 2016. Wardynski describes himself as “a proud, pro-Trump conservative Republican who answered the call when President Trump asked me to be his Assistant Secretary of the Army.” He says, “I am committed to advancing the America First Agenda. I am not afraid to take on The Swamp and the special interests who fought President Trump at every turn. I will fight Joe Biden when he tries to roll back the progress created under President Trump.”

Major race ratings outlets rate the general election in Alabama’s 5th Congressional District solid/safe Republican, meaning the winner of the runoff is all but certain to win the general election.



Davis and Collins run in Democratic primary for U.S. House in Illinois’ 7th District

Incumbent Danny K. Davis (D), Kina Collins (D), and Denarvis Mendenhall (D) are running in the Democratic primary for Illinois’ 7th Congressional District on June 28, 2022. Davis has represented the district in Congress since 1997. Davis and Collins have received the most media attention and funding in this race.

Prior to serving in Congress, Davis served on the Chicago City Council for eleven years as alderman of the 29th Ward. He also served on the Cook County Board of Commissioners from 1990 to 1996. He was elected to the U.S. House to represent Illinois’ 7th Congressional District in 1996 and still holds this office. While in Congress, Davis serves on the U.S. House Ways and Means Committee and is a member of the Congressional Black Caucus and the Progressive Caucus. Davis’ reelection has been endorsed by the governor of Illinois, both U.S. senators from the state, the mayor of Chicago, and others.

Collins became a protest organizer in the wake of the police shooting of Laquan McDonald and founded the Chicago Neighborhood Alliance in 2017 to help end gun violence through civic engagement. Collins ran unsuccessfully in the 7th District’s 2020 Democratic primary. She has also served on the transition team and task force for gun violence prevention under President Joe Biden (D). Collins’ campaign has been endorsed by several alderman in the 7th district and the national political organizations Indivisible, Justice Democrats, and the National Organization for Women.

Davis has focused his campaign on familiarity with the district’s voters, saying “This is my community…This is my home. This is my life.” Davis’ campaign yard signs read, “Re-elect Danny Davis. He’s someone you know,” and his campaign website highlights his congressional voting record and seniority on congressional committees and caucuses.

Despite agreeing with Davis on most political issues, Collins’ campaign has focused on providing the district with a fresh voice in Washington. Collins emphasizes the fact that Davis has represented the district since she was in kindergarten and says that it is time for a change. She says, “ I’m not just running to be the congresswoman in the Illinois 7th, but to talk about a vision for the Democratic Party, which includes young people, people of color, women, and those who do not come from traditional political backgrounds.” Analysts have described this primary race as a bellwether for generational tensions within the Democratic Party.

Before the primary, the Cook Political Report, Sabato’s Crystal Ball, and Inside Elections all rated Illinois’ 7th Congressional District as a solid/safe Democratic seat. This means that the winner of the Democratic primary is also likely to win the general election.



Mace faces Arrington in Republican primary for South Carolina’s 1st Congressional District on June 14, 2022

Incumbent Nancy Mace (R) and Katie Arrington (R) are running in the Republican primary for South Carolina’s 1st Congressional District on June 14, 2022.

Arrington won the district’s Republican primary in 2018, defeating incumbent and former governor Mark Sanford (R) before losing the general election to Joe Cunningham (D). Cunningham was the first Democratic U.S. House candidate to win election in the district since 1978. Mace defeated Cunningham in 2020 and says she is best-positioned to win the general election. However, former President Donald Trump (R) is targeting Mace (along with several other congressional Republicans) for voting to certify the results of the 2020 presidential election. His endorsement of Arrington has focused national media attention on the race.

Mace represented South Carolina’s 99th House District from 2018 to 2020. Her campaign has focused on electability. Mace said, “It’s the 10th fastest growing congressional district in the country…That makes the dynamics a lot different. You’ve got to be able to win your primary but you also have to be able to win a general election…Nancy Pelosi would love nothing more than to win it back.” Mace has been endorsed by former South Carolina governor Nikki Haley (R), former White House chief of staff and U.S. House member from South Carolina Mick Mulvaney (R), U.S. House minority leader Kevin McCarthy (R), and others.

Arrington served as an information security officer in the U.S. Department of Defense during the Trump Administration. She also represented South Carolina’s 94th House District from 2016 to 2018. Arrington’s campaign has focused on positioning her as the true conservative in the race. Arrington said, “Nancy Mace, she’s not a conservative…[she] turned her back on us, and she turned her back on President Trump.” Arrington also said that Mace, “read the room wrong; she thought this district was a moderate district, and we are not. We are conservative.” In addition to Trump’s endorsement, Arrington has been endorsed by Lynz Piper-Loomis (R), a former candidate in this primary who withdrew from the race and endorsed Arrington during an official debate on May 20, 2022, and others.

Arrington has criticized Mace’s effort to enact federal marijuana legislation, saying, “That’s not what conservatives are concerned about right now…We’re concerned about the economy, we’re concerned about our children and we’re concerned about national security.” Arrington has also criticized Mace’s stance on abortion, tweeting, “Abortion is murder. Anyone in favor of exceptions, Nancy Mace included, are complicit in the systematic killing of millions of unborn babies. I am 100% pro-life with no exceptions.” Mace has stated publicly that she is a rape victim and has advocated for federal exceptions to abortion bans in cases of rape or incest.

Mace’s response to the criticism from her opponent has been twofold. She says she has a conservative voting record in Congress and highlights her scorecard from the conservative nonprofit The Heritage Foundation. Additionally, she says she has worked with Democrats to pass legislation and tried to explain the district’s independence. Mace said, “This district is different…I don’t think it’s like the rest of the country. We march to the beat of our own drum. We want someone who’s going to be an independent voice.”

Analysts have described this primary race as a bellwether for Trump’s influence. As political science professor Gibbs Knotts explained, “This is the type of district that’s going to decide who controls the House.” Before the primary, the Cook Political Report, Sabato’s Crystal Ball, and Inside Elections all rated South Carolina’s 1st Congressional District as a solid/safe Republican seat. This means that the winner of the Republican primary is also likely to win the general election.



Dale Strong and Casey Wardynski advance to runoff in Alabama’s 5th District Republican primary

Dale Strong and Casey Wardynski advanced to a June 21, 2022, runoff from the May 24 Republican Party primary in Alabama’s 5th Congressional District. Six candidates ran in the Republican primary. Republican Rep. Mo Brooks represented this district for more than a decade. In 2022, he ran for the U.S. Senate rather than seeking re-election, creating an open seat. Brooks did not make an endorsement in this race.

According to the primary election results, Strong earned 45% of the vote, followed by Wardynski with 23%, John Roberts with 14%, and Paul Sanford with 11%. In Alabama, a candidate must receive over 50% of the vote to advance directly to the general election.

Strong served as the chairman of the Madison County Commission in 2022 and has held this position since 2012. He was a volunteer firefighter and emergency medical technician (EMT) in the Monrovia area. Strong described himself as “a pro-life Christian who will stand up for the unborn and fight for our Christian values.” He said, “These values are under attack today by those who want to control what we read on social media and what our children are taught in school.” Strong was the first candidate to enter the primary race and held the lead in polling and fundraising in the weeks before the election.

Wardynski served as the Assistant Secretary of the Army for Manpower and Reserve Affairs under former President Donald Trump (R) from 2019 to 2020. He also served as the superintendent of Huntsville city schools from 2011 to 2016. Wardynski described himself as “a proud, pro-Trump conservative Republican who answered the call when President Trump asked me to be his Assistant Secretary of the Army” and said, “I am committed to advancing the America First Agenda. I am not afraid to take on The Swamp and the special interests who fought President Trump at every turn. I will fight Joe Biden when he tries to roll back the progress created under President Trump.”

Before the primary, the Cook Political Report, Sabato’s Crystal Ball, and Inside Elections all rated Alabama’s 5th Congressional District as a solid/safe Republican seat.