CategoryLocal

Funk defeats Myers, Nellis in Nashville District Attorney Democratic primary

Incumbent Davidson County District Attorney Glenn Funk defeated Sara Beth Myers and P. Danielle Nellis in the May 3 Democratic primary for that position. Funk received 43.4% of the vote, while Sara Beth Myers and P. Danielle Nellis received 40% and 16.6%, respectively. No Republicans filed to run in the Republican primary, leaving Funk without a challenger in the Aug. 4 general election. 

Funk was elected to an eight-year term in 2014. If he wins in the general election, his term will last through 2030. 

During the campaign, Funk said he was “the only candidate in this race that has a record to run on, and I’m proud of the record that I’ve run on.” Funk said his record included prosecuting domestic violence cases and offering better support for victims, declining to prosecute cases involving small amounts of marijuana, and declining to enforce a state law he said restricts abortion. 

Myers, who worked as a prosecutor in the U.S. Department of Justice, campaigned on crime prevention, civil rights advances, and restorative justice. Nellis, who clerked for a Nashville judge and worked as an assistant district attorney in Funk’s office, campaigned on criminal justice reform and public safety. Myers and Nellis ran on changing the criminal justice system and stopping what they said had been a rise in crime. 

Myers and Nellis criticized Funk for how he handled the prosecution of Andrew Delke in a case that received national attention. Delke was a Nashville police officer who, on July 26, 2018, shot Daniel Hambrick, a Black man, during a traffic stop. Funk charged Delke with criminal homicide, making Delke the first Nashville police officer to be charged with an on-duty murder. Shortly before the case was set to go to trial, Delke pleaded guilty to voluntary manslaughter in return for a reduced sentence. Funk said he accepted the plea deal because he did not believe he could get a conviction in a trial. Nellis said she would have taken the case to trial, while Myers said Funk mishandled the entire case.

Nashville, Tennessee’s largest city, is the county seat of Davidson County, Tennessee.



Hall Pass: Your Ticket to Understanding School Board Politics, Edition #11

Welcome to Hall Pass. This newsletter keeps you plugged into the conversations driving school board politics and governance. Each week, we bring you a roundup of the latest on school board elections, along with sharp commentary and research from across the political spectrum on the issues confronting school boards in the country’s 14,000 school districts. We’ll also bring you the latest on school board elections and recall efforts, including candidate filing deadlines and election results.

In today’s edition, you’ll find:

  • On the issues: The debate over social-emotional learning in public schools  
  • School board filing deadlines, election results, and recall certifications
  • California Superintendent of Public Instruction primary election preview
  • Candidate Connection survey

Reply to this email to share reactions or story ideas!

On the issues

In this section, we curate reporting, analysis, and commentary on the issues school board members deliberate when they set out to offer the best education possible in their district.

The debate over social-emotional learning in public schools: 

Social-emotional learning (SEL) refers to an educational method that promotes the development of social and emotional skills through school curricula. According to the National Conference of State Legislatures (NCSL), social-emotional learning “refers to a wide range of skills, attitudes, and behaviors that can affect student success in school and life,” including “critical thinking, emotion management, conflict resolution, decision making, teamwork.” How SEL is used varies.

Below, Jane Robbins at The Federalist writes that SEL deemphasizes the cultivation of knowledge and allows teachers to influence students to adopt attitudes and beliefs that are consistent with political correctness. Robbins says SEL promotes the idea that equality is racist and forces students to adopt anti-racist ideology, which she says identifies white children as oppressors. 

Sandra Washburn with the Center on Education and Lifelong Learning at Indiana University writes that SEL can help equip students with social and emotional skills that improve educational, relational, and mental health outcomes. Washburn says SEL promotes equity, which she says is a goal of education generally. 

How ‘Socio-Emotional Learning’ Became Another Vehicle For Anti-White Racism In Schools | Jane Robbins, The Federalist

“Parents normally send their children to school (or park them at the computer for pretend school) to learn academic disciplines, including English, math, science, and history. But in most public and some private schools, more and more time is being redirected from academic instruction to ‘social-emotional learning’ (SEL)—the cultivation not of knowledge but of the ‘correct’ attitudes, beliefs, opinions, and behaviors. … To some extent, socio-emotional learning has always been a vehicle for introducing leftist propaganda in the classroom. … Until now, CASEL downplayed the leftist slant of socio-emotional learning, presenting schools and parents instead with a sanitized picture of teaching children compassion and responsibility. But in the era of Black Lives Matter, the mask is off.”

Op-Ed: SEL offers academic and emotional gains. Banning it is about politics not education | Sandra Washburn, Indy Star

“SEL is the process though which individuals develop knowledge and utilize skills in order to: establish a positive identity; manage emotions; understand and emphasize [sic] with others; create and maintain healthy relationships; set and achieve goals; and make just and caring decisions. … The main objection to CASEL appears to be their vision that SEL is a tool to leverage equity, as if leveraging equity is a dastardly deed. Isn’t education itself a lever for equity? … Attending to the emotional well-being of our young people is imperative for schools as well as for families. It is not an either/or proposition, but a collective responsibility. Social Emotional Learning is our best primary prevention for suicide and mental health struggles.”

School board update: filing deadlines, election results, and recall certifications

Ballotpedia has historically covered school board elections in about 500 of the country’s largest districts. We’re gradually expanding the number we cover with our eye on all of the roughly 14,000 districts with elected school boards.

Election results from the past week

Districts in Tennessee held primary elections on May 3. Click on each district to see election results. General elections are scheduled for Aug. 4.  

States with school board filing deadlines in the next 30 days   

May 16

The filing deadline is for primary elections in Florida that will occur on Aug. 23. 

Upcoming school board elections

Districts in Texas are holding general elections on May 7. Districts in Nebraska are holding primary and general elections on May 10. Districts in North Carolina are holding primary and general elections on May 17. Districts in Georgia are holding primary and general elections on May 24.

Click the links below to learn more about elections in each election.

Texas 

Click here to learn about each of the races in the 47 districts within our coverage holding elections on May 7.

Nebraska

We’re covering the following school board elections in Nebraska on May 10.

North Carolina

We’re covering the following school board elections on May 17.

Georgia

We’re covering the following school board elections in Georgia on May 24. 

School board candidates per seat up for election

For the 353 school board races we are covering whose filing deadlines have passed, an average of 2.43 candidates are running for each seat.

California Superintendent of Public Instruction primary election preview

This year, seven states, including California, are holding elections for state superintendent of schools. California’s Superintendent of Public Instruction primary election is June 7. Let’s take a look at that race.

California uses a top-two primary system in which all candidates, regardless of party, appear on the same ballot.  The top two vote-getters advance to the Nov. 8 general election. The superintendent oversees the California Department of Education and executes the California Board of Education’s policies. The superintendent also manages the operational side of the school system. 

Seven candidates are on the primary ballot: incumbent Tony Thurmond, Marco Amaral, Joseph Campbell, Lance Christensen, Jim Gibson, Ainye Long, and George Yang

Thurmond, a former California Assembly member, was elected California Superintendent of Public Instruction in 2018. Thurmond defeated Marshall Tuck 50.9% to 49.1%.

In its 2022 election guide, The Bakersfield Californian said “The focus of this race will be on educational achievement issues, including parental choice,” and said Christensen would “most effectively advance the debate.” 

Christensen, a former California Senate legislative consultant, is the Vice President of Education Policy & Government Affairs at the California Policy Center, an educational non-profit. The group says it is “working for the prosperity of all Californians by eliminating public-sector barriers to freedom.”  

In his campaign announcement, Christensen said, “Where was Tony Thurmond during the shutdowns? He should have been fighting the governor every day. I would have been in front of the press daily, pushing back and encouraging individual School District Superintendents to push back on the shutdowns.” Christensen completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey and listed the following three key campaign messages: 

  • “Lance is committed to adding parents into the education equation. 
  • Reorient all decision-making in the office and department towards the goal of what’s good for the kids and parents and commit to performing a “Kids First” audit of the Education Code. 
  • Protect the rights and autonomy of charter schools, private schools and home schools.

The California Republican Party and U.S. Rep. Tom McClintock (R-Calif.) have endorsed Christensen. 

Thurmond is running on providing more resources to support student mental health, closing pandemic-driven learning gaps, and free universal preschool. On his campaign website, Thurmond said he has “kept his promise from four years ago to prioritize public education with record investments in our school system.” The California Democratic Party, the California Federation of Teachers, Gov. Gavin Newsom (D) have endorsed Thurmond.

The 2018 election was the most expensive race for the California Superintendent of Public Instruction on record, with satellite spendingincluding by teachers unions, who backed Thurmond, and charter school supporters, who backed Tuck—reaching more than $50,000,000. According to the San Francisco Chronicle’s Dan Walters wrote the election was “a battle between two Democrats but one that encapsulates the political war over California education that has been raging for years between the education establishment, particularly the California Teachers Association, and an ‘Equity Coalition’ of civil rights groups and Tuck’s fellow reform advocates.”

Arizona, Georgia, Idaho, Oklahoma, South Carolina, and Wyoming are also holding elections for superintendent of schools in 2022. The position of superintendent is a state executive office that exists in all 50 states. The superintendent is elected in 12 states and appointed in 38. Read more about the office here.  

Take our Candidate Connection survey to reach voters in your district

Everyone deserves to know their candidates. However, we know it can be hard for voters to find information about their candidates, especially for local offices such as school boards. That’s why we created Candidate Connection—a survey designed to help candidates tell voters about their campaigns, their issues, and so much more. 

In the 2020 election cycle, 4,745 candidates completed the survey. 

If you’re a school board candidate or incumbent, click here to take the survey.

The survey contains over 30 questions, and you can choose the ones you feel will best represent your views to voters. If you complete the survey, a box with your answers will display on your Ballotpedia profile. Your responses will also populate the information that appears in our mobile app, My Vote Ballotpedia.

And if you’re not running for school board, but there is an election in your community this year, share the link with the candidates and urge them to take the survey!



Three candidates are running in the May 3 Democratic primary for Nashville District Attorney

Three candidates are running in the May 3 Democratic primary for Davidson County District Attorney: incumbent Glenn Funk, Sara Beth Myers, and P. Danielle Nellis. Funk was elected to an eight-year term in 2014.

Nashville, Tennessee’s largest city, is the county seat of Davidson County.

Funk has said he is “the only candidate in this race that has a record to run on, and I’m proud of the record that I’ve run on.” Myers and Nellis have run on changing the criminal justice system and stopping what they say has been a rise in crime. Myers has said, “[t]he DA’s office has to change and be proactive instead of reactive.” Nellis has said, “[w]e have not seen sufficient change in the last eight years to justify another eight.”

Myers and Nellis have criticized Funk for how he handled the prosecution of Andrew Delke in a case that received national attention. Delke was a Nashville police officer who, on July 26, 2018, shot Daniel Hambrick, a Black man, during a traffic stop. Funk charged Delke with criminal homicide, making Delke the first Nashville police officer to be charged with an on-duty murder. Shortly before the case was set to go to trial, Delke pleaded guilty to voluntary manslaughter in return for a reduced sentence. Funk said he accepted the plea deal because he did not believe he could get a conviction in a trial. Nellis said she would have taken the case to trial, while Myers said Funk mishandled the entire case.

Funk said he’s helped “restore public confidence in the criminal justice system by effectively prosecuting violent crime while focusing on treatment and rehabilitation for low-level, nonviolent offenders.” Funk said his record includes prosecuting domestic violence cases and offering better support for victims, declining to prosecute cases involving small amounts of marijuana, and declining to enforce a state law he said restricts abortion.

Myers, who worked as a prosecutor in the U.S. Department of Justice, has campaigned on crime prevention, civil rights advances, and restorative justice. Myers proposes breaking the district attorney’s office “into precincts and assign[ing] assistant DAs to precincts so that they get to know the communities that they’re serving.”

Nellis, who clerked for a Nashville judge and worked as an assistant district attorney in Funk’s office, has campaigned on criminal justice reform and public safety. Nellis’ campaign released a 15-page policy handbook that includes policies like expanding pre-trial services, diversity, equity, and inclusion training for prosecutors, and creating what Nellis calls neighborhood courts. Nellis said: “We know that most criminal behavior is trauma response. So how are we addressing whatever the underlying trauma is, including poverty, which has been studied and determined to be a traumatic experience? How are we addressing that as a community and the way you do that?”

No Republicans filed in the Republican primary.



Hall Pass: Your Ticket to Understanding School Board Politics, Edition #10

Welcome to Hall Pass. This newsletter keeps you plugged into the conversations driving school board politics and governance. Each week, we bring you a roundup of the latest on school board elections, along with sharp commentary and research from across the political spectrum on the issues confronting school boards in the country’s 14,000 school districts. We’ll also bring you the latest on school board elections and recall efforts, including candidate filing deadlines and election results.

In today’s edition, you’ll find:

  • On the issues: State takeovers  
  • School board filing deadlines, election results, and recall certifications
  • Education on the Supreme Court docket: a look at Kennedy v. Bremerton School District
  • Candidate Connection survey

Reply to this email to share reactions or story ideas!

On the issues: The debate over the need for a state takeover of Boston Public Schools

In this section, we curate reporting, analysis, and commentary on the issues school board members deliberate when they set out to offer the best education possible in their district. 

State governments sometimes assume—or attempt to assume—control over local school districts when a district is not meeting certain requirements. 

In Massachusetts, the state may place a district in receivership (the term for when someone else is made responsible for an entity) if the state Board of Elementary and Secondary Education classifies a district as chronically underperforming. Chronically underperforming districts rank in the bottom 10% in the state based on standardized test scores and do not show signs of improvement. The state also considers factors like graduation and dropout rates before classifying eligible districts as chronically underperforming. For more information on chronically underperforming school district classifications, click here

Leaders in Massachusetts are debating whether the state should place the Boston Public School District in the chronically underperforming category and under state receivership.

Below, Dan French, president of the board of Citizens for Public Schools, writes that even though Boston public schools do not perform well, state receivership would make the situation worse. French says the district is not failing as badly as critics claim, and he says leadership is moving in the right direction.

Jim Stergios, executive director for the Pioneer Institute, and Charles Chieppo, a senior fellow at the same organization, write that the Boston Public School District is failing students and is incapable of reversing course on its own. They say the state needs to appoint a receiver-superintendent who can quickly make significant changes to improve the public school system.

State receivership wrong step for Boston schools | Dan French, Commonwealth Magazine

“Boston Public Schools are doing better than critics claim. Steady progress has been made on several fronts. Since a low of 58 percent in 2007, the graduation rate has steadily increased to 79 percent in 2021. The percent of 9th graders passing all courses, correlated to on-time graduation and college enrollment, has steadily increased to 81.5 percent in 2020. While MCAS scores are lower than desired, student growth percentiles in English language arts and math hover around the state average. These gains have occurred while the district has become more diverse with students who need more resources to learn successfully. Since 2008, English learners have grown by 60 percent. Since 2015, high needs students have increased by 13 percent and economically disadvantaged students have increased by 44 percent. Just under half (48 percent) of all students speak a first language other than English.”

Time for the State to Take Over Boston Public Schools | Jim Stergios and Charles Chieppo, Real Clear Policy

“A 2020 state review of BPS understandably gained little traction, as it was released on a Friday afternoon in March amid the initial wave of COVID-19 lockdowns. But it merits close attention in the wake of recent developments. The report is devastating. The size of the achievement gap between Black and White students widened and the performance of Latinos trails even further behind. More than 30 percent of the system’s students attend schools ranked in the bottom 10 percent statewide, and the state found no clear, consistent strategy for improving those schools. All this despite the fact that the district spends approximately $22,000 per student annually, according to data from the Boston Municipal Research Bureau. … Sadly, all this is nothing new for longtime observers of the BPS. In 2004-05, the state Office of Educational Quality and Accountability (EQA) published a highly critical 200-page report on BPS that identified many of the same systemic failures outlined in the 2020 report.”

School board update: filing deadlines, election results, and recall certifications

Ballotpedia has historically covered school board elections in about 500 of the country’s largest districts. We’re gradually expanding the number we cover with our eye on all of the roughly 14,000 districts with elected school boards.

States with school board filing deadlines in the next 30 days   

April 27

The filing deadline is for an election that will occur on May 17.

May 16

The filing deadline is for primary elections in Florida that will occur on Aug. 23. 

Upcoming school board elections

Districts in Tennessee are holding primary elections on May 3. Districts in Texas are holding general elections on May 7

Click the links below to learn more about elections in each election.

New Jersey

Tennessee 

Texas 

  • Click here to learn about each of the races in the 47 districts within our coverage holding elections on May 7.

School board candidates per seat up for election

For the 339 school board races we are covering whose filing deadlines have passed, an average of 2.42 candidates are running for each seat.

Education on the Supreme Court docket: a look at Kennedy v. Bremerton School District

On April 25, the U.S. Supreme Court heard oral arguments in Kennedy v. Bremerton School District. The case concerns a high school football coach, Joseph Kennedy, who was placed on administrative leave for praying on field at the end of every game. At issue: religious expression at a public school and the Constitution’s establishment clause.

Summary: Joseph Kennedy was an assistant high school football coach with Bremerton School District (BSD) in Bremerton, Wash., from 2008 to 2015. At the end of football games, Kennedy would kneel at the 50 yard line and say a prayer. At first, Kennedy kneeled and prayed alone. Several games into his first season as a coach, some players asked if they could join him. Over time, Kennedy began giving motivational speeches that included prayer and religious content. According to Kennedy, he never required nor asked any student to pray or participate in any religious activity. 

The school district told Kennedy his actions violated school board policy and required him to stop so as not to risk violating the Constitution’s Establishment Clause. Kennedy said he would not comply. The school district offered to accommodate Kennedy’s prayers by allowing him access to a private location in the school or athletic facilities, but Kennedy declined the offers and prayed on the field again after two more games. Kennedy was placed on administrative leave. Kennedy sued the school in U.S. district court for violating his right to free speech. The court ruled that the school district suspended Kennedy solely to avoid violating the establishment clause. The Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals upheld the judgment. 

Click here to read a more detailed summary of the case’s background.

Timeline

  • April 25, 2022: The U.S. Supreme Court heard oral argument.
  • January 14, 2022: The U.S. Supreme Court agreed to hear the case.
  • September 14, 2021: Joseph Kennedy appealed to the U.S. Supreme Court.
  • March 18, 2021: The United States Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit affirmed the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Washington’s ruling.

The Kennedy legal team presented two questions to the court: 

  1. Whether a public-school employee who says a brief, quiet prayer by himself while at school and visible to students is engaged in government speech that lacks any First Amendment protection.
  2. Whether, assuming that such religious expression is private and protected by the Free Speech and Free Exercise Clauses, the Establishment Clause nevertheless compels public schools to prohibit it.

According to SCOTUSblog’s Amy Howe:

“Kennedy and the school district disagree not only about the legal issues and their implications, but also about many of the facts, including exactly why Kennedy lost his job. Kennedy says he was fired for briefly and privately praying at midfield; Laser and the school district counter that he was suspended for ‘refusing to stop holding public prayers at the 50-yard line,’ which created both pressure for students to join him and ‘genuine safety concerns for students on the fields because of the spectacle that ensued from his media outreach on praying.’”

The Court is expected to issue a ruling on the case late this spring or early in the summer.

Lubbock Independent School District general election survey responses

Today, we’re highlighting survey responses from the upcoming May 7 Lubbock Independent School District general elections in Texas. Three seats are up for election. 

First up is Angelina Mojica, who is a candidate for the Lubbock Independent School District school board At-Large seat. Mojica, the only candidate to complete our survey, is one of three candidates in the race.  Incumbent Beth Bridges and Brian Carr are also running. 

Next is Bethany Luna, a candidate for Lubbock Independent School District school board District 4 seat. Luna, who was the only candidate in the race to complete our survey, is running against incumbent Ryan Curry

Here’s how Mojica responded to the question “What areas of public policy are you personally passionate about?”

“My public policy that I am most passionate about is transparency in communication, advocacy for teachers, students, and parents, and networking of community resources. I would like to see more efficient methods of communication when giving information from top down.

I would like to advocate for the connection of community and schools to help initiate community support through the collaboration of resources for all Lubbock school districts. I would like to see the support of teachers, students, and parents through the resources provided helping mitigate stressors that will enable teachers to focus on their intended goal which is to provide a well balanced education.

Thus, I offer accessibility by ensuring that I will be available to LISD constituents and stakeholders by engaging in a routine schedule of communication that is in location and time most conducive to those we serve.”

Click here to read the rest of Mojica’s answers. 

Here’s how Luna responded to the question “What areas of public policy are you personally passionate about?”

“I want to ensure equitable access across each school. I want more community engagement with parents, businesses, and universities. I am passionate about reducing redundant testing and success of teachers based on student performance measures. I want to ensure that our teachers have adequate support and we are being intentional to see each person as an individual and not only a statistic. That being said, I understand the business aspect and the importance of increasing student attendance and numbers within our district.”

Click here to read the rest of Luna’s answers. 

If you’re a school board candidate or incumbent, click here to take the survey. The survey contains over 30 questions, and you can choose the ones you feel will best represent your views to voters. If you complete the survey, a box with your answers will display on your Ballotpedia profile. Your responses will also populate the information that appears in our mobile app, My Vote Ballotpedia.

If you’re not running for school board but there is an election in your community this year, share the link with the candidates and urge them to take the survey!



Voters in Little Rock to decide measure to reduce an ad valorem tax for the Central Arkansas Library System

Voters in Little Rock will decide on a ballot measure that would reduce the existing capital-improvement millage from 1.8 to 1.3 mills on May 24. This would equate to $130 per $100,000 of assessed property value. The existing limit is a combination of two separate ad valorem taxes each at 0.9 mills. The measure would combine the taxes into one rate of 1.3 mills. The measure also provides that the revenue from the tax be dedicated to a future issuance of bonds not to exceed $42 million for capital improvements to the Central Arkansas Library System. A simple majority is required for the tax to pass.

The Little Rock Board of Directors voted to refer the tax measure to the ballot on March 1, 2022.

Last November, voters approved with 71% of the vote an increase to the operational millage rate for the library system from 3.5 mills to 3.8 mills. The operational millage is separate from the ad valorem tax.

In Arkansas, all polls are open from 7:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. on Election Day. The deadline to register to vote in the election is April 24.

In 2022, Ballotpedia is covering local measures that appear on the ballot for voters within the top 100 largest cities in the U.S. and all state capitals, including those outside of the top 100 largest cities.

Additional reading:



Hall Pass: Your Ticket to Understanding School Board Politics, Edition #9

Welcome to Hall Pass. This newsletter keeps you plugged into the conversations driving school board politics and governance. Each week, we bring you a roundup of the latest on school board elections, along with sharp commentary and research from across the political spectrum on the issues confronting school boards in the country’s 14,000 school districts. We’ll also bring you the latest on school board elections and recall efforts, including candidate filing deadlines and election results.

In today’s edition, you’ll find:

  • On the issues: What rule changes is the federal government proposing for charter schools? 
  • School board filing deadlines, election results, and recall certifications
  • Responses to trends in public education curriculum development
  • Candidate Connection survey

Reply to this email to share reactions or story ideas!

On the issues

In this section, we curate reporting, analysis, and commentary on the issues school board members deliberate when they set out to offer the best education possible in their district.

What rule changes is the federal government proposing for charter schools?

On March 14, the U.S. Department of Education (DoE) released proposed changes to the federal Charter School Programs (CSP), which provides grants to charter schools. Among other things, the proposed changes would prohibit federal grants from going to charter school organizations that rely on for-profit companies to run their schools. Federal grants are currently restricted to nonprofit charter school organizations.

Below, Jeff Bryant, lead fellow of The Progressive Magazine’s Public Schools Advocate project, writes that President Joe Biden’s (D) proposed changes to federal charter school funding regulations would improve the program’s efficiency. Bryant says conservatives who oppose the regulations are carrying water for charter school lobbyists, who haven’t demonstrated the proposed regulations will negatively affect growth.

The Wall Street Journal Editorial Board wrote that the Biden Administration’s proposed charter school regulations would benefit teachers’ unions at the expense of students. The board says the new restrictions would discourage charter schools from applying for federal grants and limit school choice.

Biden Takes Aim at Wasteful Spending on Charter Schools | Jeff Bryant, The Progressive Magazine

“President Joe Biden is taking steps to ensure that federal education funding will not be squandered on unneeded, mismanaged schools and the operators wanting to profit off of taxpayers. But these efforts are being opposed by the powerful charter school lobby, which has enjoyed a privileged status in the U.S. Department of Education, granting charter operators exclusive access to an annually renewable grant program established under the government’s Charter School Program, or CSP. … Given that the number-one reason charters close is due to financial problems—typically caused by a school’s inability to enroll enough students—it makes sense that any effort to grow charters should be based on some analysis that shows the school will be viable. Because poor management is the second-most frequent cause of charter school closures, partnering charters with the expertise of local educators can provide helpful oversight. … Charter school industry lobbyists have responded to these proposals with a campaign of hyperbolic misinformation.”

A Case of Charter School Sabotage | The Editorial Board, Wall Street Journal

“The Biden Administration is deep in the tank for the teachers unions, and it is proving it again by imposing new rules to sabotage a modest $440 million grant program for charter schools.

The 28-year-old federal Charter Schools Program helps pay for charter start-up expenses such as technology and staff. The funds go chiefly to state agencies, which award the money to charters, and to nonprofit charter management organizations. The federal Department of Education recently proposed new rules that would discourage charters from even applying for grants—which may be the goal. … States and local school districts are the main regulators and funders of charters, which are public schools. But the Administration is trying to leverage federal dollars to limit school choice and prop up failing union-run schools that received an incredible $200 billion in Covid relief since 2020. After unions spent two pandemic years keeping public schools closed, while many charters and most private schools stayed open, this is an educational and moral disgrace.”

School board update: filing deadlines, election results, and recall certifications

Ballotpedia has historically covered school board elections in about 500 of the country’s largest districts. We’re gradually expanding the number we cover with our eye on all of the roughly 14,000 districts with elected school boards.

Election results from the past week

On April 19, Newark Public Schools in New Jersey held a general election for three seats on the Newark Public Schools Board of Education. The board consists of nine at-large members elected to three-year terms.

According to the Essex County Clerk’s Office, 80/95 precincts were reporting as of the last update on April 19. The three top vote-getters are bolded below. Results are preliminary. 

  • Crystal Williams: 23.14%
  • A’Dorian Murray-Thomas (incumbent): 22.78%
  • Daniel Gonzales (incumbent): 22.03%
  • Thomas Luna: 9.68%
  • Maggie Freeman: 9.14%
  • Phillip Wilson: 7.18%
  • Allison K. James-Frison: 6.04%`

States with school board filing deadlines in the next 30 days   

April 27

The filing deadline is for an election that will occur on May 17.

May 16

The filing deadline is for primary elections in Florida that will occur on Aug. 23. 

Upcoming school board elections

Districts in Tennessee are holding primary elections on May 3. Districts in Texas are holding general elections on May 7

Click the links below to learn more about elections in each election.

New Jersey

Tennessee 

Texas 

  • Click here to learn about each of the races in the 47 districts within our coverage holding elections on May 7

School board candidates per seat up for election

For the 305 school board races we are covering whose filing deadlines have passed, an average of 2.37 candidates are running for each seat.

Tracking responses to trends in public education curriculum development

In school districts nationwide, parents, teachers, elected officials and others are debating what gets taught in public schools. 

Federal, state, and local officials have introduced legislation addressing sex education and gender issues, critical race theory (CRT) and related issues, the removal of content from school curriculum, and curriculum transparency. We’ve tracked those responses here

Here’s are two examples of the kinds of stories we’re tracking:

Placentia-Yorba Linda School District votes to bar critical race theory from classrooms

On April 15, the trustees of the Placentia-Yorba Linda Unified School District in California voted 3-2 to pass a resolution prohibiting the teaching of critical race theory in schools. 

The resolution states that the school district “supports efforts in education to promote equity, respect, diversity; celebrate the contributions of all; and encourage culturally relevant and inclusive teaching practices, but will not allow the use of Critical Race Theory as a framework to guide such efforts.”

School board member Leandra Blades voted in favor of the resolution, saying, “I do believe in teaching kids to think critically. But there are so many classes … there are so many things you could teach your kids at home. If you really are passionate about these subjects, then teach them.”

Jonathan Friedman, director of free expression and education at the literary advocacy group PEN America, said the proposal is “misguided and dangerous” in an open letter to the school district trustees. “By shutting off students from even being exposed to a particular academic framework analyzing race and racism, ideological bans like the one proposed by this Resolution essentially guarantee that these students will be worse-equipped to engage in societal conversations about race and racism in their lives,” Friedman wrote.

Merrimack Valley School District voters defeat petition to ban Critical Race Theory

On March 4, voters in the Merrimack Valley School District, in New Hampshire, defeated a measure to ban the teaching of Critical Race Theory during the District’s annual meeting.   

Voters were asked to vote on the following question: “ARTICLE VIII. Shall the School District prohibit the teaching or propagation of topics such as Critical Race Theory or any of its derivative philosophies, defined as any program that instructs that the United States, the State of New Hampshire, or any New Hampshire resident is inherently racist or intolerant, and direct the school’s curriculum to avoid any such discriminatory educational practices and modules? Further, shall the school board members, district administrators, and faculty be responsible and accountable for enforcing state law and this warrant to protect students from discriminatory educational practices and modules?”

A resident successfully circulated a petition to get the measure on the ballot.

According to the Concord Monitor’s Josh Morrill, “Many of the Merrimack Valley meeting-goers were in agreement that an outright ban was unnecessary, as Critical Race Theory is not currently part of the school district’s curriculum. However, they added trust needs to be given to teachers, who should be given the freedom to use their skills and training to prompt critical thinking within the curriculum.”

Morrill wrote, “The article was overwhelmingly voted down.”

Nebraska’s State Board of Education primary election survey responses

Today, we’re highlighting survey responses from the May 10 primary election for Nebraska State Board of Education District 7. Three candidates—incumbent Robin Stevens, Pat Moore, and Elizabeth Tegtmeier—are running in the primary. Stevens ran unopposed in 2018. 

Challengers Moore and Tegtmeier completed our Candidate Connection survey. 

Here’s how Moore responded to the question “What areas of public policy are you personally passionate about?”

“I am conservative not only in finances, but in my Christian beliefs. I have worked against Comprehensive Sex Education since the 1990’s. I joined with other parents in 1996 and then chaired the board that created Faith Christian School of Kearney.

I see Critical Race Theory (CRT) as an offshoot of Critical Theory which seeks to designate some as oppressors and others as the oppressed. In its current form CRT is divisive and racist, and its concepts need to be removed from education in Nebraska and the US. Tax money for the education of Nebraska’s students should follow the students, possibly including vouchers, charter and private schools, as well as home schoolers. I am pro-life and care what happens to the children and youth of Nebraska in today’s culture.”

Click here to read the rest of Moore’s answers. 

Here’s how Tegtmeier responded to the question “What areas of public policy are you personally passionate about?”

“I am passionate about providing our students and teachers with a learning environment that allows children to learn and develop in ways that will benefit the students in the future and are aligned with the values and direction of the parents. Education should equip our children with valuable thinking and evaluating skills (how to think rather than merely tell our students what to think).”

Click here to read the rest of Tegtmeier’s answers. 

If you’re a school board candidate or incumbent, click here to take the survey. The survey contains over 30 questions, and you can choose the ones you feel will best represent your views to voters. If you complete the survey, a box with your answers will display on your Ballotpedia profile. Your responses will also populate the information that appears in our mobile app, My Vote Ballotpedia.

If you’re not running for school board but there is an election in your community this year, share the link with the candidates and urge them to take the survey!



Guilford County voters in North Carolina to decide on sales tax increase and school bond measure on May 17

The Guilford County Board of Commissioners is asking voters to approve a 0.25% local sales tax increase and a $1.7 billion school bond measure at the May 17 primary election.

One measure would authorize the county to issue $1.7 billion in bonds for constructing new schools, improving and expanding existing schools, and school equipment. The other measure asks voters to approve a 0.25% (one-quarter cent) sales tax increase to fund school construction and bond debt repayment. Sales and use taxes in Guilford County do not apply to gasoline or grocery items.

The Board of Commissioners also stated in the resolution that, should the quarter-cent tax increase be approved, the county would lower the county’s property tax rate to an amount equal to sales and use tax revenues (a minimum of 0.3 cents) when adopting the 2023 budget.

County Commissioners Chairman Melvin ‘Skip’ Alston said, “The proposed sales tax is expected to generate about $20 million in revenues annually. Although the recent revaluation raised property taxes for most property owners, this resolution would allow them to save money on their property tax bill if they support the one-quarter cent sales tax. Our goal is to soften the burden for the property owners. The one-quarter cent sales tax, which is paid by everyone regardless if they are renters or tourists, will help generate revenues to help to cover our $2 billion in school needs. This is one way the property owners can vote themselves a tax decrease …this school bond and quarter cent sales and use tax is about putting our children first, not just about buildings. The condition of our schools have a direct impact on our kids’ ability to learn.”

The Guilford County bond website stated, “A 2019 independent study funded jointly by the county’s board of commissioners and school board found that district schools were, in some cases, literally falling apart. The average GCS school was built more than a half-century ago and more than 50% of schools were rated as being in either poor or unsatisfactory condition. Guilford County Schools currently has more than $2 billion in facility needs, including more than $800 million in deferred maintenance. Across 12.5 million square feet of facilities – including 126 schools, 300 buildings, and nearly 3,000 acres of land – GCS historically has received less than $0.50 per square foot for maintenance and upkeep of those facilities each year from general operating funds.”

Bond proceeds were designed to fund:

  • over $363 million in critical safety and technology upgrades at all schools;
  • construction of three new schools;
  • rebuilding of 18 existing schools;
  • full renovation of 13 schools; and
  • repairs to schools with failing roofs, heat, air conditioning, and plumbing.

Voters in Guilford County approved a $300 million school bond measure in November 2020 by a vote of 69.74% in favor to 30.53% against. At the same election, voters rejected a quarter-cent sales and use tax increase by a vote of 33.07% in favor to 66.93% against.

In 2022, Ballotpedia is covering local measures that appear on the ballot for voters within the top 100 largest cities in the U.S. and all state capitals, including those outside of the top 100 largest cities. Ballotpedia is also covering a selection of notable police-related and election-related measures outside of the top 100 largest cities. Ballotpedia is also covering all local measures in California and all statewide ballot measures.



Hall Pass: Your Ticket to Understanding School Board Politics – Edition 8

Welcome to Hall Pass. This newsletter keeps you plugged into the conversations driving school board politics and governance. Each week, we bring you a roundup of the latest on school board elections, along with sharp commentary and research from across the political spectrum on the issues confronting school boards in the country’s 14,000 school districts. We’ll also bring you the latest on school board elections and recall efforts, including candidate filing deadlines and election results.

In today’s edition, you’ll find:

  • On the issues: The debate over government-funded lunches in public schools
  • School board filing deadlines, election results, and recall certifications
  • Education on the ballot
  • Candidate Connection survey

Reply to this email to share reactions or story ideas!

On the issues: The debate over government-funded lunches in public schools 

In this section, we curate reporting, analysis, and commentary on the issues school board members deliberate when they set out to offer the best education possible in their district.

On March 31, Sens. Debbie Stabenow (D-Mich.) and Lisa Murkowski (R–Alaska) introduced the Support Kids Not Red Tape Act of 2022. The bill would extend for one year U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) waivers issued during the pandemic allowing public schools to provide free meals to all children. Congress did not extend the waivers in the most recent budget bill. 

Below, Richard E. Besser, president and CEO of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF), and Jamie Bussel, a senior program officer, write that universal school lunches would improve the health of children, reduce food insecurity, and undo the effects of systematic racism. 

Max Eden, research fellow at the American Enterprise Institute, writes that the expanded school lunch program could affect childrens’ perception of the family as their primary provider. Eden also says agriculture lobbyists influence school lunch menus, so the food is not as healthy as proponents think. 

School meals should remain free for all children — today and always | Richard E. Besser and Jamie Bussel, The Hill

“But the value of good nutrition to children, families and schools is long-term and profound. Universal school meals should be permanent. Our nation has a history of addressing shortfalls during periods of crisis, only to let them reaccumulate once the dust has settled. If we take that path with universal school meals, we will be repeating that predictable cycle. Ending this support would say a lot — none of it favorable — about how we prioritize the needs of children and families in America, and in particular, our commitment to undoing the damage caused by structural racism and discrimination against children and families of color. … [T]oday, universal school meals are merely a temporary band-aid on a gaping wound. Whether they become a permanent fixture of our nation’s efforts to end childhood poverty and hunger, improve children’s health and help children reach their full potential and thrive is up to us. There is no better or more important time to make the right choice.”

There’s No Free Lunch | Max Eden, AEI

“There is a strong case for having the government provide food to children whose parents can’t afford to feed them adequately, but that’s not the question at hand. The question is whether the government should feed children whose parents can afford it. … The children [who received free lunches in Ohio] had to contemplate the state as provider, rather than reflecting on how the love and labor of parents brought food to their plate. That experience shapes a child’s moral worldview, with human consequences that evade econometric analysis. Since the government, not the family, is already providing the education, the food may seem like a minor detail. But as the religions recognize, it carries significant meaning. … Progressives eager to expand school lunches, breakfasts, and dinners may be disappointed to discover that even after all the heavily touted efforts to make school lunches more local and nutritious, what gets served in school cafeterias remains heavily influenced by Big Agriculture and its lobbyists.”

School board update: filing deadlines, election results, and recall certifications

Ballotpedia has historically covered school board elections in about 500 of the country’s largest districts. We’re gradually expanding the number we cover with our eye on all of the roughly 14,000 districts with elected school boards.

Election results from the past week

Two California school districts held special elections on April 12. Results are preliminary. 

Andy Levine won the election with 55.87% of the vote. Daniel Renteria, Russ Allen, and Andrew Fabela received 21.35%, 11.68%, and 11.09% of the vote, respectively. 

Araceli Lopez defeated Jesus Silos 62.96% to 37.04%. 

States with school board filing deadlines in the next 30 days   

April 15

The filing deadline is for primary elections that will occur on July 19.

April 27

The filing deadline is for an election that will occur on May 17.

Upcoming school board elections

Newark Public Schools in New Jersey is holding a school board general election on April 19. Districts in Tennessee are holding primary elections on May 3. Districts in Texas are holding general elections on May 7

Click the links below to learn more about elections in each election.

New Jersey

Tennessee 

Texas 

  • Click here to learn about each of the races in the 47 districts within our coverage holding elections on May 7 

School board candidates per seat up for election

For the 244 school board races we are covering whose filing deadlines have passed, an average of 2.25 candidates are running for each seat.

Education on the ballot: a look at this year’s education-related ballot measures

We’ve talked a lot about school board elections in this newsletter. Today, let’s look at the statewide education-related ballot measures voters will decide in November. 

As of April 2022, six statewide education-related ballot measures have been certified for the ballot. All six measures will be decided on Nov. 8. In 2020, eight education-related measures were certified for the ballot. Voters approved two and defeated six.

Ballot measures have been certified in the following states:

  • Arizona: In-state tuition for non-citizen residents
  • Massachusetts: Funding for education and transportation
  • Nevada: Increases a state sales tax to fund public education 
  • New Mexico: Funds early childhood education
  • Rhode Island: Amendment concerning public education and libraries
  • West Virginia: Amendment requiring the State Board of Education to submit rule and policy changes to the legislature

There are several ways ballot measures can get on the ballot. The two most common methods are citizen-initiated measures, which typically require citizens to collect a certain number of signatures, and legislatively referred measures, which require a state legislature to vote to put a measure on the ballot. Click here to read more about the different types of ballot measures. 

In a future edition of this newsletter, we’ll take a look at the proposed measures dealing with education that might still qualify for the November ballot. 

Arizona In-State Tuition for Non-Citizen Residents Measure

The ballot measure would allow non-citizen students, except those considered to be nonresident aliens under federal law, to receive in-state college tuition when a student (a) attended school in Arizona for at least two years and (b) graduated from a public school, private school, or homeschool in Arizona.

The ballot measure would repeal provisions of Proposition 300, which voters approved in 2006. Proposition 300 said non-citizens could not receive certain state-subsidized services, benefits, or financial aid or in-state tuition rates.

Path to the ballot: State Sen. Paul Boyer (R) filed the ballot measure as Senate Concurrent Resolution 1044. On March 4, 2021, the Arizona State Senate voted 17-13 to pass SCR 1044. Senate Democrats and three Republicans supported the resolution. The remaining 13 Republicans opposed the bill. The Arizona House of Representatives voted 33-27 to approve SCR 1044 on May 10, 2021. House Democrats, along with four Republicans, supported the resolution. The remaining 27 Republicans opposed the resolution.

Massachusetts Income Tax for Education and Transportation Amendment 

The measure would create an additional 4% tax on the portion of income above $1 million to fund public education, roads and bridges, and public transportation. The tax would be levied in addition to the state’s 5% flat income tax, for a total tax rate of 9% on income above $1 million. The amendment would also authorize the $1 million threshold to be indexed to the cost of living in Massachusetts using the same method used to establish federal income brackets. The tax would take effect on Jan. 1, 2023.

Path to the ballot: The Massachusetts General Court held a joint session on June 9, 2021, where they approved the amendment by a vote of 159-41. The amendment was introduced in the 2021 legislative session as Senate Bill 5. All but one Republican, Sen. Patrick O’Connor, voted against the amendment, and all but nine Democrats favored it. The sole Independent member, Rep. Susannah Whipps, voted in favor of it.

Nevada Sales Tax Increase for Public Schools Initiative

This initiative has been the subject of a lawsuit. The Clark County Education Association, which sponsored this initiative, requested to withdraw the initiative after a legislative compromise was reached. In October 2021, Secretary of State Barbara Cegavske (R) said the law did not allow her to remove the initiative from the ballot after certification. On March 9, 2022, District Court Judge James Wilson ordered Cegavske to withdraw the initiatives and not put them on the 2022 ballot. Cegavske’s office said it would appeal the decision on March 15. Read more about the lawsuit here

This initiative would increase the state’s Local School Support Tax, a sales tax, from the current 2.25% to 3.75% with revenue dedicated to public schools. Currently, the total Local School Support Tax sales and use tax rate is 2.6%. The new total Local School Support Tax would be 4.1%.

Path to the ballot: Kenny Belknap filed this initiative with the Nevada Secretary of State on January 15, 2020. In February 2020, BizPac, the political action committee of the Las Vegas Chamber of Commerce, challenged the ballot language submitted by initiative petitioners. Sponsors of the initiative filed a new version of the initiative on March 24, 2020, and reported submitting over 190,000 signatures to county election officials on November 17. On December 15, 2020, county officials verified 137,791 of the 190,192 submitted signatures for the petition, about a 72.4% validity rate. The measure was certified for the ballot after the Nevada State Legislature did not choose to vote on the indirect initiative prior to the March 12, 2021 deadline.

New Mexico Funding for Early Childhood Programs Amendment

The measure would allocate 1.25% of the five-year average of year-end market values of the money in the Land Grant Permanent Fund (LGPF) to early childhood education and public education. Sixty percent of the allocated funds would go to early childhood education, while 40% would go to public education. 

The LGPF is also known as the Permanent School Fund. Revenue in the LGPF comes from leases and royalties on non-renewable natural resources, such as oil and gas, and returns on invested capital. It was established when New Mexico became a state in 1912. 

The New Mexico Constitution established an annual 5% distribution from the fund, with the proceeds given to 21 designated beneficiaries. The amendment would increase the annual distribution to 6.25%. The amendment also says that if the average year-end market value for the preceding five years of the LGPF dropped to $17 billion, allocations would be halted until the fund amount increased. Between 2016 and 2020, the average year-end market value for the fund was $18 billion 

The amendment would also require Congressional approval because the LGPF was established by federal law and did not initially include early childhood education as a beneficiary.

Path to the ballot: This amendment was introduced as House Joint Resolution 1 on January 19, 2021. On February 12, 2021, the state House passed HJR 1 in a vote of 44-23 with three absent. On March 18, 2021, the state Senate passed an amended version in a vote of 26-16. The vote was along party lines, except Sen. Bill G. Tallman was the only Democrat to vote against the amendment. The state House concurred on March 19. The state House vote details listed below are from the House floor vote prior to the amendment.

Rhode Island Right to Education Amendment

This amendment would establish a “fundamental right to a public education and the duty to promote public libraries” and require that the legislature ensure the education is equitable, adequate, and meaningful for each child. It would also authorize any person or entity to sue the state if the state is not in noncompliance with the amendment.

Path to the ballot: This amendment was introduced as Senate Joint Resolution 2095 on January 25, 2022. On March 15, 2022, the state Senate passed SJR 2095 in a vote of 36-0, with two not voting.

West Virginia Legislative Approval of the State Board of Education Rules Amendment 

This amendment would change the state constitution to include a requirement that the West Virginia State Board of Education’s rules and policies must be submitted to the legislature for review and approval, amendment, or rejection according to a process determined by the legislature by law.  

The State Board of Education is a nine-member board with nine-year terms. members are gubernatorial appointees requiring Senate confirmation.  The board sets rules and policies governing the public school education system and county boards of education.

Path to the ballot: In 2022, state Rep. Paul Espinosa (R-66) introduced a constitutional amendment as House Joint Resolution 102 (HJR 102). The House passed the resolution on February 22, in a vote of 80 to 18, with two absent. On February 28, the Senate approved the measure with a technical amendment by a vote of 23 to 11, sending HJR 102 back to the House for concurrence. On March 3, the House concurred by a vote of 74 to 20, with six absent. The final votes in each chamber were largely along party lines. In the Senate, one Democrat joined 22 Republicans in support, and one Republican joined 10 Democrats in opposition. In the House, one Democrat joined all 73 voting Republicans in support, and the remaining 20 voting Democrats were opposed.

Take our Candidate Connection survey to reach voters in your district

Everyone deserves to know their candidates. However, we know it can be hard for voters to find information about their candidates, especially for local offices such as school boards. That’s why we created Candidate Connection—a survey designed to help candidates tell voters about their campaigns, their issues, and so much more. 

In the 2020 election cycle, 4,745 candidates completed the survey. 

If you’re a school board candidate or incumbent, click here to take the survey.

The survey contains over 30 questions, and you can choose the ones you feel will best represent your views to voters. If you complete the survey, a box with your answers will display on your Ballotpedia profile. Your responses will also populate the information that appears in our mobile app, My Vote Ballotpedia.

And if you’re not running for school board, but there is an election in your community this year, share the link with the candidates and urge them to take the survey!



St. Louis voters approve a capital improvements bond issue and an initiative on redistricting and elections on Tuesday

St. Louis voters approved both measures on their ballots on Tuesday. According to final election night results, 84% of voters approved Proposition 1, a $50 million bond issue, and 69% of voters approved Proposition R, a citizen initiative concerning election law, redistricting, and conflicts of interest. Proposition 1 required a two-thirds (66.67%) majority, and Proposition R required a three-fifths (60%) majority. 

Proposition 1 was referred to the ballot by the St. Louis Board of Aldermen. The measure authorized the city to issue $50 million in general obligation bonds for capital improvement projects, such as public safety facilities, correctional facilities, pedestrian and bicycle transportation facilities, streets, buildings, and bridges, neighborhood recreation centers, and firehouses.

Proposition R was placed on the ballot through a citizen initiative petition supported by the campaign Reform St. Louis. The initiative creates a redistricting commission for drawing ward boundaries. Currently, in St. Louis, the Board of Aldermen is responsible for approving the decennial redistricting maps. It also requires a public vote before a proposed change to voting methods can be adopted. The initiative also requires alderpersons to declare personal or financial conflicts of interest and abstain from voting when there are conflicts of interest.

Jami Cox, Policy Committee Chair of Reform St. Louis, said, “What’s at stake is making sure that the St Louis city government is operating in the most efficient and ethical way possible. If this proposition doesn’t pass, then we are looking at the redistricting process still being led by the people that are ultimately going to be running for the seats that they serve in and not having any hard outline processes in our city charter to reduce conflicts of interest.”

Board of Aldermen President Lewis Reed said, “There is no need to have a special election costing the taxpayers hundreds of thousands of dollars solely for a proposal that the Prop R group admits is untimely, would be challenged in court, would not put into effect what it states it will and would not take effect for 10 years.”

In 2022, Ballotpedia is covering local measures that appear on the ballot for voters within the top 100 largest cities in the U.S. and all state capitals, which include St. Louis, Kansas City, and Jefferson City. In addition to St. Louis Proposition 1 and Proposition R, Kansas City voters approved three local measures, and Jefferson City voters approved one measure on April 5.

Additional reading:



Kansas City voters approve all three measures on their April 5 ballots

The Kansas City Council referred all three measures to the April 5 ballot. According to final election night results, voters approved all three measures by over 70%.

Voters approved Question 1 by 79.5% to 20.5%. Question 1 authorized the city to issue $750 million in revenue bonds for expanding, improving, and rehabilitating the city’s sanitary sewer system.

Voters approved Question 2 by 76.6% to 23.4%. Question 2 authorized the city to renew a property tax levy of $220 per $100,000 of assessed value to provide funds for emergency medical, ambulance, hospital, and public health services for 9 years.

Voters approved Question 3 by 73.8% 26.2%. Question 3 removed 6.82 acres of vacant land from the park system. The land is located on the west side of Searcy Creek Parkway between 210 Highway and Northeast 36th Street.

In 2022, Ballotpedia is covering local measures that appear on the ballot for voters within the top 100 largest cities in the U.S. and all state capitals, which include St. Louis, Kansas City, and Jefferson City. In addition to the three questions in Kansas City, St. Louis voters approved two measures, and Jefferson City voters approved one measure on April 5.

Additional reading: