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Heart of the Primaries 2020, Democrats-Issue 21 (June 3, 2020)

This week: Key June 2 primary results, Andrew Yang endorses Perelman in FL-23, and Jennifer Carroll Foy launches 2021 campaign for governor of Virginia.

On the news

Where do Democratic and progressive pundits and commentators disagree? Each week, we bring you excerpts that highlight differing views.

On property destruction in protests

“People are going out again, all over the United States. But it’s not to celebrate a vaccine or a debt jubilee. The first national connecting event coming out of lockdown is mass protest against police violence after the lynching of George Floyd, and the state’s attempt at suppressing it. The coronavirus—which disproportionately is killing Black Americans—drove us inside. Policing—which also disproportionately is killing Black Americans—is drawing us back out. Almost overnight, the streets have gone from largely empty—though the rate of police killings remained mostly unchanged—to filled with thousands of masked people, often being gassed or beaten. The conditions before, during and after the lockdown are part of a continuum in America—a miserable nation maintained by policing. …

As any military tactician or social justice organizer can tell you, direct action gets the goods. The destruction of a police precinct is not only a tactically reasonable response to the crisis of policing, it is a quintessentially American response, and a predictable one. The uprising we’ve seen this week is speaking to the American police state in its own language, up to and including the use of fireworks to mark a battle victory. Property destruction for social change is as American as the Boston Tea Party and the Stonewall Riots. And before he unconvincingly qualified a statement so violent Twitter put it behind a warning screen, the president saying he would order shots fired to protect property—that’s as American as the MOVE bombing and apple pie.”

Steven W. Thrasher, Slate, May 30, 2020

“There are folks who romanticize riots, at least when the destruction happens to someone else’s property. But fighting fire with fire will only burn the whole house down. Or, as the rapper Killer Mike said in an emotional press conference with the Mayor of Atlanta: ‘it is your duty not to burn your own house down for anger with an enemy.’

Few living Americans have more moral authority when it comes to confronting the forces of racial oppression than Rep. John Lewis, who was almost killed by Alabama troopers while peacefully protesting on the Edmund Pettus Bridge 55 years ago. On Saturday, he again reminded us of the discipline that is required to ultimately triumph over injustice, stating: ‘I know your pain, your rage, your sense of despair and hopelessness. Justice has, indeed, been denied for far too long. Rioting, looting, and burning is not the way. Organize. Demonstrate. Sit-in. Stand-up. Vote. Be constructive, not destructive.’

Every word of this is true. We must confront the deep legacy of bigotry that leads too many black and brown and immigrant lives to be treated with callous disregard and sometimes become the victims of pure hate. But the answer does not lie in demonizing all police officers or indiscriminately destroying property. That will only spur a backlash and lead some to see moral equivalence between the two sides in the larger struggle between right and wrong. The riots in the late 1960s only succeeded in burning out inner cities and electing Richard Nixon on the back of his Southern strategy.”

John Avlon, CNN, May 31, 2020

June 2 elections review

 

  • U.S. Senate, Iowa: Theresa Greenfield defeated Michael Franken, Kimberly Graham, and Eddie Mauro to win the Democratic primary for U.S. Senate in Iowa. Greenfield received 47.8% of the vote to Franken’s 25.0%, Graham’s 15.0%, and Mauro’s 11.0%. Greenfield will face first-term Sen. Joni Ernst (R) in the general election.

 

 

  • Indiana’s 1st Congressional District: Frank Mrvan (D) defeated 14 other candidates to win the Democratic nomination in Indiana’s 1st Congressional District. Mrvan received 34.1% of the vote with 80% of precincts reporting. The only other candidate to win more than 10% of the vote was Thomas McDermott with 29.3%. This was the first open primary for the seat since 1932. Retiring incumbent Pete Visclosky (D) has held the seat since the 1984 election. Mrvan will face Mark Leyva (R) in the general election. Election forecasters rate the seat “Safe Democratic”.

 

 

  • Montana’s At-Large Congressional District: Kathleen Williams (D) defeated state Rep. Tom Winter (D-96) to win the Democratic nomination for Montana’s at-large U.S. House seat for the second election cycle in a row. Williams received 89.6% of the vote to Winter’s 10.4% with 79% of precincts reporting. Williams lost the 2018 general election to Greg Gianforte (R), 50.9% to 46.2%, which was the seat’s narrowest margin of victory since 2000. Gianforte is running for governor. Williams will face state Auditor Matt Rosendale (R) in the November general election. The national branches of both major parties are targeting the seat.

 

 

  • New Mexico’s 3rd Congressional District: Teresa Leger Fernandez (D) defeated Valerie Plame (D), state Rep. Joseph Sanchez (D-40), and four other candidates to win the Democratic nomination for New Mexico’s 3rd Congressional District. Fernandez received 41.8% of the vote with 70% of precincts reporting. Plame received 22.9% and Sanchez 13.7%. Fernandez received endorsements from U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.), U.S. Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y.), and groups like the Working Families Party and EMILY’s List. Outgoing Rep. Ben Ray Luján (D-03) was first elected in 2008 and never received less than 55% of the vote running for re-election.

 

 

  • Pennsylvania’s 1st Congressional District: Christina Finello (D) defeated Skyler Hurwitz to win the Democratic nomination in Pennsylvania’s 1st Congressional District. Finello received 77.4% of the vote to Hurwitz’s 22.6% with 99% of precincts reporting. Incumbent Brian Fitzpatrick (R) is one of the two House Republicans running for re-election in a district Hillary Clinton (D) carried in 2016. Finello will face the winner of the Republican primary—either Fitzpatrick or challenger Andy Meehan (R)—in the general election.

 

 

  • Montana gubernatorial: Lt. Gov. Mike Cooney (D) defeated Whitney Williams (D) to win the Democratic gubernatorial nomination in Montana. Cooney received 55.1% of the vote to Williams’ 44.9% with 79% of precincts reporting. Cooney will face U.S. Rep. Greg Gianforte (R), who won the GOP nomination for the second election cycle in a row. The 2012 and 2016 gubernatorial elections were decided by margins of 1.6 and 3.9 percentage points, respectively.

 

 

  • New Mexico State Senate: All 42 New Mexico State Senate seats are up for election this year. There were 13 contested Democratic primaries, 10 of which had an incumbent running. As of 8:15 a.m. Mountain Time on June 3, the Associated Press had reported that at least two incumbents—Richard Martinez (D-05) and Gabriel Ramos (D-28)—had been defeated. In the 2016 elections, there were eight contested Democratic primaries, four of which involved incumbents. All four incumbents won their primaries that year.

 

 

  • Baltimore Mayor: As of 10:30 a.m. Eastern Time on June 3, this race remained too close to call. Former Mayor Sheila Dixon (D) led with 30.2% of the vote, followed by City Council President Brandon Scott (D) with 24.4%, former U.S. Under Secretary of the Treasury Mary Miller (D) with 17.1%, and former state Deputy Attorney General Thiru Vignarajah (D) with 12.2%. Incumbent Jack Young (D) received 7.2% of the vote, followed by 19 other candidates. The winner of the Democratic primary is favored to win the general election.

 

U.S. Congress

Yang endorses Perelman in FL-23

Former Democratic presidential candidate Andrew Yang endorsed Jen Perelman in Florida’s 23rd Congressional District primary. Perelman faces incumbent Debbie Wasserman Schultz.

Yang said, “Jen Perelman is first and foremost an activist. She was born and raised in Florida where she attended marches and protests with her parents growing up. Today, she uses her law degree to protect voting rights, defend women’s reproductive health, and help people navigate the criminal justice system—all pro bono.”

Schultz was first elected in 2004. She was re-elected in 2018 with 59% of the vote to Joe Kaufman’s (R) 36%. In her most recent contested primary in 2016, she defeated Tim Canova 57% to 43%. Schultz served as Democratic National Committee chairwoman from 2011 to 2016. She resigned as chair after WikiLeaks published emails indicating that party officials favored Hillary Clinton’s presidential primary campaign over Bernie Sanders’.

Perelman said, “It’s time for our representatives to stop putting the interests of corporations and wealthy CEOs before their constituents.” She supports Medicare for All and a Green New Deal. She says her campaign doesn’t take money from corporate interests. In addition to Yang, Perelman’s list of endorsers includes Brand New Congress, Our Revolution Broward, and former Democratic presidential candidate Marianne Williamson. 

Schultz’s campaign website says she is “a true progressive champion who will fight for South Florida families.” She says she passed legislation to make swimming pools safer, support federal child exploitation interdiction efforts, and make it easier for women who conceived a child by rape to terminate parental rights of the rapist. Schultz’s endorsers include Giffords: Courage to Fight Gun Violence, the Sierra Club, and Planned Parenthood Action Fund.

The primary is Aug. 18.

Jones releases first TV ad in NY-17

Mondaire Jones released his first TV ad in New York’s 17th Congressional District primary. The ad says he’s the only candidate who supports Medicare for All and who has endorsements from leading progressives, such as Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.). It highlights his background working in the Justice Department during the Obama administration and attending Harvard Law School. 

Incumbent Nita Lowey, who was first elected in 1998, isn’t seeking re-election. Six candidates are running in the June 23 primary. In addition to Jones, they are:

  • David Buchwald, a member of the state Assembly since 2013. Eight local Democratic committees have endorsed him. 
  • David Carlucci, a member of the state Senate since 2011. Carlucci was part of the eight-member Independent Democratic Conference in the state Senate until April 2018. (The group caucused with Republicans from 2013 to 2018, giving them an effective majority even when Democrats held a numerical majority.)
  • Asha Castleberry-Hernandez, a college professor and Army veteran
  • Evelyn Farkas, former deputy assistant secretary of defense during the Obama administration
  • Allison Fine, former chairwoman of the national board of NARAL Pro-Choice America Foundation and founder of Innovation Network, Inc., an evaluation and research firm that works with nonprofits
  • Adam Schleifer, former assistant U.S. attorney

Catherine Parker ended her primary bid last week but will still appear on the ballot.

As of March 31, Schleifer led in fundraising with $2.3 million, including $1.7 million in self-funding. Farkas was second with $925,000 and Jones third with $831,000.

State executives

Final pre-primary campaign finance report shows Stephen Smith leading West Virginia gubernatorial candidates in fundraising

According to campaign finance reports filed on May 29, Stephen Smith leads the Democratic gubernatorial field in fundraising.

The reports showed Smith raised $920,000. Ben Salango raised $720,000, and Ron Stollings banked $250,000. Two other candidates reported raising less than $3,000.

A Triton Polling & Research survey released May 28 found Salango at 30% and Smith at 27% support, respectively. Ron Stollings followed with 10% support, while 29% of voters were undecided. The poll had a margin of error of 6.4 percentage points.

The Stollings campaign criticized the survey, calling it “an unscientific poll with a high margin of error [that] only counts voters with landline phones. The poll misses everyone who uses a cell phone, which is everyone.”

Salango, a member of the Kanawha County Commission, is backed by Sen. Joe Manchin (D), former Gov. Gaston Caperton (D), and the state AFL-CIO. Smith’s backers include Planned Parenthood Votes! South Atlantic.

The June 9 primary is open to registered Democrats and unaffiliated voters only. Democrats have won every West Virginia gubernatorial election since 2000.

Jennifer Carroll Foy launches campaign for governor of Virginia

Virginia state Del. Jennifer Carroll Foy (D) kicked off her campaign for governor of Virginia on May 27. Foy has represented House District 2, a coastal district that includes the Marine Corps’ Quantico Base, since 2017.

In her campaign kickoff video, Foy said she was running because “We are still being told no. No to affordable health care. No to criminal justice reform. No to a clean and safe environment. No to common sense gun safety legislation.”

Foy is the first Democrat to kick off her campaign. Other figures who have indicated they were considering a run include Lt. Gov. Justin Fairfax (D), state Attorney General Mark Herring (D), and former Gov. Terry McAuliffe (D). 

Virginia is the only state to prohibit governors from serving consecutive terms, meaning incumbent Ralph Northam (D) cannot run for re-election.

Virginia will elect its next governor on Nov. 2, 2021. Virginia is currently a Democratic trifecta, where a Democrat is governor and Democrats hold majorities in both chambers of the General Assembly.

Legislatures

Washington District 37 Democrats and retiring incumbent endorse competing candidates

On May 19, Washington’s 37th Legislative District Democrats endorsed Kirsten Harris-Talley (D) in the seven-way primary for Legislative District 37, Position 2. This endorsement comes after retiring state Rep. Eric Pettigrew (D-37-2) endorsed Andrea Caupain (D). Pettigrew’s retirement leaves the District 37-2 seat open for the first time since 2002.

Harris-Talley is the interim executive director at NARAL Pro-Choice Washington. She previously was an at-large member of the Seattle City Council for two months in 2017. The council appointed her to the seat following Tim Burgess’ resignation. She described herself as an “activist working shoulder to shoulder with community in Seattle … for over 20 years for racial, gender, and economic justice.”

Caupain has been the C.E.O. of Byrd Barr Place, a community advocacy organization, since 2008. She was appointed to the Washington State Commission on African American Affairs in 2018. Caupain said, “I have worked on behalf of Communities of Color and working-class families to make a positive change on issues of racial and social equality.”

Both Harris-Talley and Caupain could advance to the general election. Washington has a top-two primary system. All candidates, regardless of partisan affiliation, compete in a single primary with the top two vote-getters advancing to the general election. In District 37-2, there are five Democrats, one Republican, and one Progressive Party member competing in the top-two primary. The other Democrats in the primary include Chukundi Salisbury, a Seattle Parks and Recreation manager, Andy Goeres, a corporate financial consultant, and Robert Redwine. The remaining two candidates are Stephen Richter (R) and Kathy Woodward (P).

Progressive organization endorses challenger to incumbent Washington District 5 senator

On May 27, Fuse Washington issued a sole endorsement for Ingrid Anderson (D) in the Legislative District 5 Senate race. The group describes itself as “the state’s largest progressive organization,” and said that it is designed “to give ordinary people a strong voice in politics.” Anderson is challenging incumbent state Senator Mark Mullet (D) for the District 5 seat. 

Anderson and Mullet are the only two candidates in the election, which means both will progress to the general election in Washington’s top-two primary system. Organizations like Fuse Washington and others have opted to endorse only one of the two candidates, highlighting an ideological divide. 

Anderson is a psychiatric nurse. In addition to Fuse Washington, she received sole endorsements from the Washington Conservation Voters, the Washington State Labor Council, and the Working Families Party.

Mullet is a restaurant owner with a background in international finance. He was first elected in 2012 and won re-election in 2016. He received sole endorsements from the Washington Fire Chiefs, Washington State Realtors, and the Washington State Patrol Troopers Association. 

This is the first time Mullet will face a Democrat in the primary and general election. During his 2012 and 2016 campaigns, Mullet was the lone Democrat versus a Republican candidate.

Power players

“The LGBTQ+ Equality Caucus serves as a resource for Members of Congress, their staff, and the public on LGBTQ+ issues at the federal level. The Caucus works toward the extension of equal rights, the repeal of discriminatory laws, the elimination of hate-motivated violence, and the improved health and well-being for all regardless of sexual orientation or gender identity and expression.” – Congressional LGBTQ+ Equality Caucus website

Founded in 2008 by U.S. Sen. Tammy Baldwin (D-Wis.) and former U.S. Rep. Barney Frank (D-Mass.), the Congressional LGBTQ+ Equality Caucus says it is “strongly committed to achieving the full enjoyment of human rights for LGBTQ+ people in the U.S. and around the world.” To view the members of the LGBTQ+ Equality Caucus, click here.

The LGBTQ+ Equality Caucus is affiliated with Equality PAC, a political action committee that says it is “dedicated to bringing nearer the full legal and societal equality of LGBT people and creating a federal legislative environment conducive to that goal.” The group says it supports “openly LGBT candidates running for federal office, as well as members of the Congressional LGBT Equality Caucus who are facing tough re-election challenges.” Equality PAC designates its endorsed candidates as Allies for Equality and LGBTQ Leaders



Trump, RNC say Republican nomination will not be held in North Carolina

Ballotpedia's Daily Presidential News Briefing
June 3, 2020: Biden and Trump won presidential primaries in seven states and Washington, D.C. on Tuesday. The Republican National Committee said it would not hold the nomination portion of the Republican National Convention in North Carolina.

Ballotpedia is monitoring changes made to election dates and procedures in response to the coronavirus pandemic. blank    blankblank   


Presidential Facebook ads, 2019-2020 (May 24-30, 2020)

Notable Quote of the Day

“President Donald Trump has realized that these riots have become a national-level threat to the safety and security of the American people. They are kicking at the load-bearing walls of our society. Trump knows it’s time for action. …

We must end the riots now. That means a willingness for police to use force against those who break the law and refuse to comply with lawful arrests.

To be clear: Trump is not advocating for peaceful protesters to be harassed or harmed. But there’s a clear distinction — morally and legally — between ‘protester’ and looter or rioter. That so many of the people choose to conflate these terms is evidence of their dishonesty and cowardice in this tense moment.”

– Buck Sexton, USA Today

Election Updates

  • Joe Biden and Donald Trump won primaries in Indiana, Maryland, Montana, New Mexico, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Dakota, and Washington, D.C., on Tuesday. Biden won an estimated 337 pledged delegates in those races and Bernie Sanders won six, with most races partially reporting. This brought Biden to 1,903 out of the 1,991 delegates needed to secure the nomination, according to the Associated Press.

  • Biden gave a speech in Philadelphia on Tuesday. He said, “I won’t traffic in fear and division. I won’t fan the flames of hate. I’ll seek to heal the racial wounds that have long plagued our country, not use them for political gain. I’ll do my job and I’ll take responsibility — I won’t blame others”

  • Former Democratic presidential candidate Julián Castro endorsed Biden. Castro previously endorsed Elizabeth Warren.

  • The Hill reported that a group of former George W. Bush administration officials created a super PAC called “43 Alumni For Biden.”

  • Trump tweeted, “Had long planned to have the Republican National Convention in Charlotte, North Carolina, a place I love. Now, @NC_Governor Roy Cooper and his representatives refuse to guarantee that we can have use of the Spectrum Arena – Spend millions of dollars, have everybody arrive, and … then tell them they will not be able to gain entry. Governor Cooper is still in Shelter-In-Place Mode, and not allowing us to occupy the arena as originally anticipated and promised. Would have showcased beautiful North Carolina to the World, and brought in hundreds of … millions of dollars, and jobs, for the State. Because of @NC_Governor, we are now forced to seek another State to host the 2020 Republican National Convention.”

  • A statement from the Republican National Committee said, “Due to the directive from the governor that our convention cannot go on as planned as required by our rules, the celebration of the president’s acceptance of the Republican nomination will be held in another city. … Should the governor allow more than 10 people in a room, we still hope to conduct the official business of the convention in Charlotte.”

Flashback: June 3, 2016

Trump criticized Hillary Clinton at a campaign rally in San Jose, California. He said, “Anything Obama wants, she’s going forward with. … Because you know why? She doesn’t want to go to jail. That’s why.”

Click here to learn more.



Documenting America’s Path to Recovery: June 2, 2020

Each day, we:

  • Track the status of reopening in all 50 states.
  • Compare the status of one industry or activity across the country.
  • Provide in-depth summaries of the latest reopening plans.
  • Give you the latest stories on other reopening plans and ideas.

Want to know what happened yesterday? Click here.

We’re covering elections for 1,011 offices in 12 states and Washington, D.C. on June 2. Here’s how you can follow the results.

  • View election results on Ballotpedia.
  • Subscribe to The Heart of the Primaries and receive key primary results in your inbox.
  • Register for our free results webinar, happening June 4 at noon eastern.

The next two days

What is reopening in the next two days? Which stay-at-home orders will expire?

June 3

  • New York (Democratic trifecta): On June 1, Gov. Andrew Cuomo (D) announced that the Capital region is expected to enter Phase 2 of Cuomo’s reopening plan “NY Forward” on June 3. Western New York entered Phase 2 on June 2. Read more about New York’s reopening in today’s Featured Plan.

June 4

  • Michigan (divided government): On June 1, Gov. Gretchen Whitmer (D) issued an executive order allowing retail stores to reopen statewide on June 4. For stores with less than 50,000 square feet of customer floor place, capacity will be limited to 25%. For larger stores, the number of customers cannot exceed four per 1,000 square feet of customer floor space. Whitmer also lifted the state’s stay-at-home order effective immediately and moved the entire state into Phase 4 of its reopening plan. The stay-at-home order had been set to expire on June 12.

Since our last edition

Have any states opened? For a continually updated article on reopening status in all 50 states, click here. For our last edition, click here.

  • Colorado (Democratic trifecta): Gov. Jared Polis (D) signed an order he called “Safer at Home and in the Vast, Great Outdoors.” The order allows vulnerable Colorado residents to leave their homes for outside recreation as long as they wear face coverings and practice social distancing. The order also allows short-term rentals, playgrounds, and swimming pools to reopen. Personal care services may begin operating at 50% capacity on June 4 and child care facilities can begin operating at full capacity on that date. The order is set to last until July 1.
  • Louisiana (divided government): On June 1, Gov. John Bel Edwards (D) announced the state would move into Phase 2 of its reopening plan, effective June 5. In Phase 2, the following businesses will be allowed to reopen at 50% capacity: restaurants and coffee shops; shopping malls; gyms and fitness centers; barbershops and nail salons; movie theaters; racetracks (without spectators); museums, zoos, and aquariums; bars and breweries with food permits; massage and spa businesses; tattoo parlors; esthetician services; pool halls, bowling alleys, and skating rinks; event centers and wedding venues; and outdoor playgrounds and play centers. Phase 2 will last at least 21 days. Edwards said he would sign the executive order formalizing the changes before June 4.
  • Maine (Democratic trifecta): Maine entered the second phase of its reopening plan on June 1. The following businesses and activities were allowed to reopen or resume: retail stores; dine-in service at restaurants (outdoor service only in York, Cumberland, and Androscoggin counties); community buildings; day camps and summer recreation programs; state park campgrounds; coastal state parks; community sports; lodging; and tanning salons. The limit on social gatherings was raised from 10 to 50 people.
  • Massachusetts (divided government): On June 1, Gov. Charlie Baker (R) issued an executive order outlining which businesses would be permitted to reopen in phases 2, 3, and 4 of the state’s reopening plan. Although Baker did not fix a date for the start of Phase 2, he authorized businesses to allow employees to return to work in preparation for Phase 2. In Phase 2, the following businesses will be allowed to reopen: retail stores; restaurants; hotels, motels, and other lodging; amateur sports programs; professional sports practice and training programs; personal services; non-athletic instructional classes for youths; driving and flight schools; outdoor historical spaces; funeral homes; warehouses and distribution centers; golf facilities; outdoor recreation facilities; post-secondary schools; day camps; and public libraries.
  • New Hampshire (divided government): As part of Gov. Chris Sununu’s (R) “Stay-at-Home 2.0” order, the following businesses and activities were permitted to resume on June 1: gyms and fitness centers (50% occupancy), personal services such as nail salons (50% occupancy), and some beaches (for transitory activities like walking and running only).
  • West Virginia (Republican trifecta): At a press conference on June 1, Gov. Jim Justice (R) announced the state had entered Week 6 of the reopening plan and the outlined next steps. More businesses, like casinos and movie theaters, will reopen on June 5.
  • Hawaii (Democratic trifecta): Gov. David Ige (D) announced the 14-day self-quarantine requirement for inter-island travelers will be lifted starting June 16. Restrictions on out-of-state travel will remain in effect.

Update on stay-at-home orders

Forty-three states issued orders directing residents to stay home except for essential activities and the closure or curtailment of businesses each state deemed nonessential. Seven states did not.

As of June 2, stay-at-home orders have ended in 35 states. Eighteen of those states have Republican governors and 17 have Democratic governors (including Wisconsin, where the state Supreme Court invalidated the stay-at-home order). Of the eight states with active stay-at-home orders, seven have Democratic governors and one has a Republican governor.

Here’s which stay-at-home orders have expired, and when the rest are scheduled to expire.

Tracking regulations: Retail

All 50 states began to reopen in some way. Here, we give the status of one industry or activity across the states. Today’s question: in which states are retail shops open to customers, and in which states are they limited to curbside or delivery service?

Retail shops are open to customers (in at least some regions) in 48 states. New Jersey and Massachusetts allow curbside or delivery only.

  • Massachusetts (divided government): Retail businesses were allowed to reopen with remote ordering and curbside delivery services beginning May 25. Each phase of reopening in Massachusetts is expected to last for three weeks, so the status of retail in the state could change on June 15.
  • New Jersey (Democratic trifecta): Retail businesses were allowed to reopen for curbside pickup and delivery services beginning May 18. Gov. Phil Murphy (D) has already announced that retail businesses will be allowed to reopen to in-store customers with limited capacity on June 15.

This is an in-depth summary of one of the latest reopening plans. Is there a plan you’d like us to feature? Reply to this email and let us know. Click a state below to read a previous Featured Plan.

Previous featured plans

Alabama Florida Maryland New Hampshire South Carolina
Arizona Georgia Massachusetts New Mexico Tennessee
California Illinois Michigan Ohio Texas
Colorado Indiana Montana Oklahoma Virginia
Delaware Maine Nevada Pennsylvania Washington

On April 26, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo (D) unveiled a reopening plan for the state, under which businesses would be allowed to reopen or resume operations on a phased, regional basis. Once a region has recorded 14 days of declining hospitalizations, it can begin reopening. Each phase would last at least two weeks, allowing officials to monitor the effects of reopening on hospitalization and infection rates.

Cuomo said the first phase of reopening would include construction and manufacturing companies with low risks of workplace infection. Subsequent phases would allow more businesses to reopen, with lower-risk businesses given priority.

On May 4, Cuomo released further guidelines on New York’s phased reopening. He identified seven criteria for determining whether a region could begin reopening:

  1. A region must experience a 14-day decline in total net hospitalizations on a three-day rolling average. Alternatively, a region with relatively few COVID-19 cases cannot exceed 15 net new hospitalizations on a three-day rolling average.
  2. A region must experience a 14-day decline in deaths on a three-day rolling average. If a region has relatively few COVID-19 cases, it must see five or fewer new deaths on a three-day rolling average.
  3. A region must have fewer than two new COVID-19 patients admitted to hospitals per 100,000 residents per day on a three-day rolling average.
  4. A region must have at least 30% of its total hospital beds available.
  5. A region must have at least 30% of its ICU beds available.
  6. A region must have the capacity to run 30 diagnostic tests for every 1,000 residents per month.
  7. A region must have a baseline of 30 contact tracers for every 100,000 residents.

Cuomo said, “Rather than starting and stopping, you’d rather have a controlled start, so you don’t have to stop, right? And that’s what you learn from the other countries. You reopen too fast, then you have to stop, and nobody wants to have gone through all of this and then start just to stop again. Well, how does that happen? First of all, it’s not going to happen statewide. This state has different regions which are in much different situations than other regions in this state. And rather than wait for the whole state to be ready, reopen on a regional basis. If upstate has to wait for downstate to be ready, they’re going to be waiting a long time.”

For the purposes of the reopening plan, New York is divided into the following regions. As of June 1, all regions but New York City had met all seven of the reopening criteria. To access a map of the state’s regions, click here.

  • Capital Region
  • Central New York
  • Finger Lakes
  • Long Island
  • Mid-Hudson
  • Mohawk Valley
  • New York City
  • North Country
  • Southern Tier
  • Western New York

Context

  • On March 20, Cuomo issued New York’s initial statewide stay-at-home order. It did not have a fixed expiration date. On April 16, he extended the order through May 15. Cuomo subsequently further extended the order in those regions that haven’t met the reopening criteria, first through June 13, and then through June 27.
  • As of June 1, New York had 371,711 confirmed COVID-19 cases and 23,959 related fatalities. New York’s estimated population as of July 2019 was 19.5 million. For every 100,000 residents, the state had 1,910.8 confirmed cases and 123.2 fatalities.
  • New York is a Democratic trifecta, with a Democratic governor and Democratic majorities in both chambers of the state legislature.

Plan details

General guidelines for individuals

Individuals are required to wear face coverings when they are in public and within six feet of others. Individuals must also wear face coverings in any public or private transportation carrier or for-hire vehicle.

Effective May 21, religious gatherings of up to 10 people were permitted statewide. Drive-in and parking-lot services were also allowed effective May 21.

Phase 1

The following businesses are allowed to reopen during Phase 1 (click an industry name for detailed guidelines):

The following regions have been cleared for Phase 1:

  • Capital Region (effective May 20)
  • Central New York (effective May 15)
  • Finger Lakes (effective May 15)
  • Long Island (effective May 27)
  • Mid-Hudson (effective May 26)
  • Mohawk Valley (effective May 15)
  • North Country (effective May 15)
  • Southern Tier (effective May 15)
  • Western New York (effective May 19)

Phase 2

The following businesses are allowed to reopen during Phase 2, all at 50% occupancy (click an industry name for detailed guidelines):

The following regions have been cleared for Phase 2:

  • Capital Region (expected to enter Phase 2 on June 3)
  • Central New York (effective May 29)
  • Finger Lakes (effective May 29)
  • Mohawk Valley (effective May 29)
  • North Country (effective May 29)
  • Southern Tier (effective May 29)
  • Western New York (effective June 2)

Phase 3

The state has not released industry-specific guidelines for Phase 3 reopening. No region has been cleared for Phase 3 reopening.

Phase 4

The state has not released industry-specific guidelines for Phase 4 reopening. No region has been cleared for Phase 4 reopening.

New York City

On May 29, Cuomo announced that New York City was expected to enter Phase 1 on June 8.

Reactions

  • Tioga County Legislature Chairwoman Martha Sauerbrey said, “I think it’s a mixed bag of emotions, because I do hear from people who are fearful and cautious, and I know businesses need to open and want to open, but we want them to be careful. There’s no covering up the fact that this has been challenging, so we have to do everything we can to get them back up and running.”
  • Denis Nash, an epidemiologist, said the following at the time of Cuomo’s May 4 reopening announcement: “So, right now, New York has been, I think, pretty successful at reducing community transmission through the stay at home order. By the time it’s lifted, it should be very, very low. And so we’re kind of back to a place where we were early on in the epidemic and then a testing and a contact-tracing strategy becomes more feasible.”
  • On May 29, Nick Langworthy, chairman of the Republican Party of New York, issued a statement opposing Cuomo’s decision not to advance some regions to Phase 2: “It’s time for Andrew Cuomo to stop playing games with people’s livelihoods. The Governor’s capricious, arbitrary and punitive behavior has gone too far. These regions worked incredibly hard to meet the metrics he laid out and changing the goal posts at the 11th hour is unacceptable. We don’t need a group of international so-called experts or a power-hungry governor dictating our freedoms. Enough is enough.”
  • Rensselaer County Executive Steve McLaughlin said, “If we’ve got to test 30 per 1,000 residents, that’s 4,800 Rensselaer County residents every single month. Quite honestly, I don’t think the demand is there. I mean, am I supposed to test the same people over and over again? If he requires hospitals to stay 30 percent empty, there’s not a hospital that I know of that will not go bankrupt this year. At our peak in Rensselaer County there were 20 people hospitalized. I currently have six, one in the ICU, and our economy is at a complete standstill.”

Find out more in today’s Number of the Day→

Additional activity

In this section, we feature examples of activities by other federal, state, and local governments and influencers relevant to recovering from the pandemic.

  • On June 1, Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Wolf (D) issued an executive order extending the absentee ballot receipt deadline for the June 2 primary to 5:00 p.m. on June 9 (with a postmark deadline of June 2) in Allegheny, Dauphin, Delaware, Erie, Montgomery, and Philadelphia counties.
  • The National Park Service announced plans to reopen two national monuments in New Mexico, El Malpais National Monument, and El Morro National Monument. El Malpais could reopen for access to trailheads on June 1, though the Visitor Center will remain closed. El Morro will tentatively reopen in mid-June on a Wednesday through Sunday schedule for trails and camping.
  • Hollywood Studios submitted an industry reopening plan titled “Proposed Health and Safety Guidelines for Motion Picture, Television, and Streaming Productions During the COVID-19 Pandemic” to California Gov. Gavin Newsom (D) and New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo (D) on June 1. The plan includes testing and social distancing measures, as well as special considerations such as avoiding live audiences and on-location filming as much as possible.
  • Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine (R) announced he intends to reopen schools for in-person instruction this fall. DeWine said the state is still working to develop health guidelines for schools and that districts would be given the flexibility to determine their start date.


Biden visits A.M.E. church to meet with black leaders

 

Ballotpedia's Daily Presidential News Briefing
June 2, 2020: Biden visited Bethel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Wilmington, Del., to meet with black leaders. Trump spoke about protests following the death of George Floyd before walking to St. John’s Episcopal Church.

Ballotpedia is monitoring changes made to election dates and procedures in response to the coronavirus pandemic.        

Notable Quote of the Day

“Moreover, it’s important for us to understand which levels of government have the biggest impact on our criminal justice system and police practices. When we think about politics, a lot of us focus only on the presidency and the federal government. And yes, we should be fighting to make sure that we have a president, a Congress, a U.S. Justice Department, and a federal judiciary that actually recognize the ongoing, corrosive role that racism plays in our society and want to do something about it. But the elected officials who matter most in reforming police departments and the criminal justice system work at the state and local levels.

It’s mayors and county executives that appoint most police chiefs and negotiate collective bargaining agreements with police unions. It’s district attorneys and state’s attorneys that decide whether or not to investigate and ultimately charge those involved in police misconduct. Those are all elected positions.”

– Barack Obama, Medium 

Election Updates

  • Joe Biden visited Bethel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Wilmington, Del., to meet with black leaders. Biden said, “Hate just hides. It doesn’t go away, and when you have somebody in power who breathes oxygen into the hate under the rocks, it comes out from under the rocks.”
  • Biden held a virtual roundtable with Mayors Lori Lightfoot (Chicago), Keisha Lance Bottoms (Atlanta), Eric Garcetti (Los Angeles), and Melvin Carter (St. Paul).
  • Donald Trump spoke about protests following the death of George Floyd before law enforcement cleared an area outside the White House and Trump walked to St. John’s Episcopal Church. Trump said, “… we cannot allow the righteous cries and peaceful protesters to be drowned out by an angry mob.  The biggest victims of the rioting are peace-loving citizens in our poorest communities, and as their President, I will fight to keep them safe.  I will fight to protect you.  I am your President of law and order, and an ally of all peaceful protesters.”
  • Trump held a teleconference with U.S. governors.

What We’re Reading

Flashback: June 2, 2016

Hillary Clinton spoke about national security at an event in San Diego, California. She said of Trump, “He is not just unprepared – he is temperamentally unfit to hold an office that requires knowledge, stability and immense responsibility.”



Documenting America’s Path to Recovery: June 1, 2020

Each day, we:

  • Track the status of reopening in all 50 states.
  • Compare the status of one industry or activity across the country.
  • Provide in-depth summaries of the latest reopening plans.
  • Give you the latest stories on other reopening plans and ideas. 

Want to know what happened Friday? Click here.



The next two days

What is reopening in the next two days? Which stay-at-home orders will expire?

  • Louisiana (divided government): Gov. John Bel Edwards (D) was scheduled to hold a media briefing at 2:30 p.m. local time, June 1. He is expected to make an announcement on the prospect of further reopenings. We will have more details in Tuesday’s edition. 
  • Massachusetts (divided government): Gov. Charlie Baker (R) is expected to issue an executive order on June 1 outlining which business sectors will be allowed to resume operations in each phase of the state’s reopening. We will have more details in Tuesday’s edition. Baker said a decision on the start date for Phase 2 would come on June 6. 


Since our last edition

Have any states opened? For a continually updated article on reopening status in all 50 states, click here. For our last edition, click here.

  • Arkansas (Republican trifecta): The Arkansas Department of Health announced that community and school-sponsored team sports could resume beginning June 1. Bands are allowed to resume marching activities without wind instruments. College athletics are not included in this reopening.

  • Arizona (Republican trifecta): The Department of Education released its 36-page “Roadmap for Reopening Schools.” The document covers four different scenarios: in-person instruction from the beginning of the year, some students distance learning and some students learning in-person at the start of the year, all students distance learning at the start of the year, and intermittent distance learning throughout the year, depending on local conditions.

  • Delaware (Democratic trifecta): The state’s stay-at-home order expired on May 31. The order first took effect on March 24. Delaware was the 16th state to enact a stay-at-home order and was the 31st state to end its stay-at-home order (along with others that ended on May 31).

  • Hawaii (Democratic trifecta): The state entered the Act with Care phase of reopening. On June 1, Hawaii and Maui counties are opening personal care services (like salons and barbershops) and dine-in services at restaurants. Hawaii County also began opening places of worship. The state’s stay-at-home order expired on May 31, making it the 31st state to end a stay-at-home order (along with others that ended on May 31).
  • Idaho (Republican trifecta): The state moved into its third phase of reopening on May 30. Phase Three allows non-essential travel and gatherings of up to 50 people. Businesses like bars and movie theaters can reopen. Larger venues like nightclubs and stadiums remain closed.
  • Mississippi (Republican trifecta): Gov. Tate Reeves’ (R) Safe Return order took effect on June 1. The order allows all travel to resume. It also permits indoor gatherings of up to 20 people and outdoor gatherings of up to 50 people. If social distancing is possible, indoor gatherings of up to 50 and outdoor gatherings of up to 100 are allowed. Ballparks, theaters, libraries, and museums can also begin opening.
  • Iowa (Republican trifecta): On June 1, outdoor performance venues, casinos, bowling alleys, amusement parks, skating rinks, skate parks, and outdoor playgrounds are allowed to reopen at 50% capacity. Summer school activities, including baseball and softball, are also allowed to resume.
  • Kentucky (divided government): On June 1, the following businesses are allowed to reopen: auctions (33% capacity), auto/dirt track racing, aquatic centers, bowling alleys, fishing tournaments, fitness centers (33% capacity), state park lodges, movie theaters (33% capacity), and the Salato Wildlife Education Center.
  • Maine (Democratic trifecta): On May 31, Gov. Janet Mills (D) issued an executive order easing the original stay-at-home order “to the extent that people may access the increased business and personal activities that are being reopened.” The order says “persons who are over age 60 or who have a medically compromised condition are strongly urged to limit their movement and activities that expose them to persons other than immediate household members, and to avoid large gatherings, especially those occurring indoors or in otherwise confined settings.” The limit on social gatherings increased from 10 to 50 people.
  • Michigan (divided government): On June 1, Gov. Gretchen Whitmer (D) announced that the state’s stay-at-home order was lifted effective immediately. Whitmer said groups of 100 or less would be allowed to gather outdoors. The order was previously scheduled to expire on June 12. Whitmer also said that retailers would be able to reopen June 4, with bars and restaurants following on June 8.
  • Minnesota (divided government): Restaurants and bars are allowed to offer limited outdoor seating starting, up to 50 people, on June 1. Salons and barbershops are also permitted to reopen on June 1 at 25% capacity.
  • Missouri (Republican trifecta): Casinos are permitted to reopen on June 1.
  • Montana (divided government): Montana started the second phase of reopening on June 1. Phase Two allows restaurants, bars, breweries, distilleries, casinos, gyms, and pools to operate at 75% capacity if they maintain the physical distancing and sanitation protocols established in Phase One. Other venues like concert halls and bowling alleys can operate with reduced capacity under distancing guidelines. In Phase Two, residents are asked to avoid gatherings of more than 50 people unless social distancing can be maintained. Visitors to the state will not have to self-quarantine for 14 days.
  • Nebraska (Republican trifecta): Eighty-nine of Nebraska’s 93 counties entered Phase II of the reopening plan on June 1. Bars and strip clubs were permitted to reopen at 50 percent capacity, with tables spaced six feet apart, and required patrons to maintain six feet of distance from entertainers. Games, such as darts and pool, remain prohibited. Gatherings of up to 25 or 25 percent capacity (excluding staff) for indoor or outdoor attractions, such as arenas, fairgrounds, libraries, or any other confined indoor or outdoor space are allowed in Phase II. For larger venues, attendance is limited to 3,000, even if that number is less than 25 percent occupancy. Weddings and funerals also resumed, but are limited to no more than 25 people or 50 percent occupancy, excluding staff. Parades, carnivals, midways, dances, and beer gardens are prohibited through June 30. People who traveled internationally are encouraged to self-quarantine for 14 days. The new phase allows limited, noncontact sports, such as baseball and softball, to resume practices, with games being allowed to resume on June 18. Basketball, tackle football, soccer, and wrestling remain prohibited.
  • New Hampshire (divided government): On May 29, Gov. Chris Sununu (R) extended his “Stay-at-Home 2.0” order through at least June 15. As part of the extension, Sununu announced that driver’s education classes could restart, and places of worship could reopen on May 29 with limitations. Beginning on June 5, hotels and lodging may reopen with restrictions, and day camps will be allowed to resume on June 22. Gyms and fitness centers will follow, no date has been given for when they can reopen.
  • New Jersey (Democratic trifecta): Gov. Phil Murphy (D) announced the state will be ready to enter phase 2 of Murphy’s “The Road Back” plan on June 15. That day, outdoor dining and limited in-person retail may resume. On June 22, limited personal services such as barbershops and salons can resume.
  • New Mexico (Democratic trifecta): Secretary of the New Mexico Health Department Kathyleen M. Kunkle issued a new public health order extending the state’s stay-at-home order through June 30. While the order allows some businesses to reopen, it says that “all New Mexicans should be staying in their homes for all but the most essential activities and services.” The following businesses are permitted to reopen on June 1: in-restaurant dining (50 percent capacity), gyms and fitness centers (50 percent capacity), indoor malls (25 percent capacity), personal services such as barbershops and salons (25 percent occupancy), drive-in theaters, and hotels (50 percent capacity). The new order also lifted the requirement that anyone entering New Mexico through an airport self-quarantine for 14 days. Nine state parks were permitted to open for day use on May 30 and five more were allowed to open on June 1.
  • New York (Democratic trifecta): Gov. Andrew Cuomo (D) announced on June 1 that New York City was on track to begin reopening on June 8. He also announced that two regions, Western New York and Capital, are expected to move into Phase 2 of his reopening plan in the coming days. On May 31, Cuomo announced that dentists could reopen on June 1.
  • North Dakota (Republican trifecta): On May 29, officials in North Dakota announced that the state moved from “moderate risk” to “low risk” under Gov. Doug Burgum (R)’s “ND Smart Restart” plan. In this stage, “schools and businesses can reopen, and much of normal life can begin to resume. However, some physical distancing measures and limitations on gatherings will still be recommended to prevent transmission from accelerating again.” High-risk individuals are encouraged to limit their time spent in the community. In the “low risk” stage, employers are urged to develop flexible work environments, comply with social distancing measures, increase sanitation measures, and monitor employees for symptoms. Capacity for dine-in service at restaurants and bars is capped at 75 percent occupancy, and gaming and blackjack can resume with social distancing measures. Gatherings are limited to 75 percent occupancy for facilities, with a maximum of 500 people allowed.
  • Ohio (Republican trifecta): The following businesses and activities can resume on June 1: banquet halls and catering centers (with a maximum of 300 guests and social distancing), and daycare centers (with reduced staff-to-child ratios and handwashing requirements). On May 29, Ohio State Health Director Dr. Amy Acton issued two orders. One order continues the ban on mass gatherings in the state through July 1, and the other lifts restrictions on alcohol sales to non-residents in six counties near the Pennsylvania border: Ashtabula, Belmont, Columbiana, Jefferson, Mahoning, and Trumbull.
  • Oklahoma (Republican trifecta): Oklahoma is moving into Phase 3 of Gov. Kevin Stitt’s (R) “Open Up and Recover Safely” plan on June 1. The following changes go into effect: church and school summer camps may reopen, businesses may resume unrestricted staffing at worksites with social distancing and sanitation measures, and businesses that were operating by appointment only may accept walk-ins. Under Phase 3, visits to hospitals can resume, with limitations such as one representative per patient and social distancing. Visits to senior care facilities are still prohibited.
  • Oregon (Democratic trifecta): Gov. Kate Brown (D) announced the criteria that counties will need to meet to enter Phase 2 of reopening. Official guidance is not available regarding the industries and activities that will be able to resume in the second phase.
  • Rhode Island (Democratic trifecta): The state is moving into the second phase of reopening on June 1. Phase Two allows personal service businesses (such as barbershops and salons), gyms, indoor dine-in services, indoor malls, and some outdoor entertainment activities to reopen. It also lifts the state’s travel restrictions and permits gatherings of up to 15 people.
  • Texas (Republican trifecta): Fans can attend outdoor professional sporting events at 25% of a venue’s capacity beginning May 31. Leagues will need to receive approval from the Texas Department of State Health Services before holding events with spectators. Day and overnight youth camps, as well as youth sports, were also permitted to begin operating that day.
  • Vermont (divided government): The limit on social gatherings increased from 10 to 25 on June 1. Several close contact businesses, including fitness centers, nail salons, and tattoo parlors, can reopen at 25% capacity. Libraries, galleries, museums, and theaters reopen at 25% capacity, as well.
  • Washington (Democratic trifecta): The state’s stay-at-home order expired on May 31. Gov. Jay Inslee (D) signed a new “Safe Start – Stay Healthy’’ proclamation that transitions the reopening plan to a fully county-by-county approach. This gives counties more flexibility to move through the four phases of the reopening plan. Counties that remain in Phase One have the option to apply for and enter a modified Phase One plan, which allows the county to adopt some Phase Two activities. It was the 31st state to end a stay-at-home order (along with others that expired on May 31).

  • Wyoming (Republican trifecta): Beginning June 1, out-of-state travelers can camp overnight at Wyoming state parks.


Update on stay-at-home orders

Forty-three states issued orders directing residents to stay home except for essential activities and the closure or curtailment of businesses each state deemed nonessential. Seven states did not.

As of June 1, stay-at-home orders have ended in 35 states. Eighteen of those states have Republican governors and 17 have Democratic governors (including Wisconsin, where the state Supreme Court invalidated the stay-at-home order). Of the eight states with active stay-at-home orders, seven have Democratic governors and one has a Republican governor.

Here’s which stay-at-home orders have expired, and when the rest are scheduled to expire.



Tracking regulations: Face covering and mask requirements

All 50 states began to reopen in some way. Here, we give the status of one industry or activity across the states. Today’s question: in which states must someone wear a face covering while out in public?


 

Featured plan: South Carolina's accelerateSC

Featured plan: South Carolina’s accelerateSC

This is an in-depth summary of one of the latest reopening plans. Is there a plan you’d like us to feature? Reply to this email and let us know. Click a state below to read a previous Featured Plan.

Alabama Florida Maryland New Hampshire Tennessee
Arizona Georgia Massachusetts New Mexico Texas
California Illinois Michigan Ohio Virginia
Colorado Indiana Montana Oklahoma Washington
Delaware Maine Nevada Pennsylvania

On April 20, South Carolina Gov. Henry McMaster (R) announced “accelerateSC,” which the governor’s office described as “a coordinated economic revitalization plan involving small and large business leaders, healthcare professionals, local government officials, and education professionals.”

The advisory team has five groups with the task of identifying “issues, solutions, and assets necessary for a phased revitalization path for South Carolina’s economy, guided by healthcare and medical data.” AccelerateSC’s final report, released May 28, contains 41 recommendations for the governor. 

The groups and their responsibilities are as follows:

  • Response: “Identify challenges related to workforce capacity, workforce re-entry, critical industries, capital requirements, regulatory issues and supply chain/logistics.”
  • Protection: “Identify protective protocols for practical implementation in workplace and public, testing and contact tracing, supply of personal protective equipment, and long-term mitigation efforts to ensure economic revitalization.”
  • Governance: “Identify challenges faced by state and local governments, educational institutions, emergency services and first responders to proceed with economic revitalization.”
  • Resources: “Identify process and appropriate metrics for disbursing federal funds and to ensure transparency of all disbursed funds in consultation with appropriate stakeholders.”
  • Information: “Create consolidated information portal and associated dissemination methods related to citizens’ inquiries associated with COVID-19.”

Since accelerateSC’s creation, McMaster has allowed businesses to reopen once the Response group released industry-specific safety guidelines. On May 11, McMaster said, “With our increased capacity for testing the people of our state, it is time to responsibly and gradually get these small businesses back up and running”

McMaster’s order closing nonessential businesses to the public allowed businesses to request an evaluation from the state Department of Commerce to determine whether they may continue to operate. 

McMaster’s nonessential business closure order and stay-at-home order said that no local ordinance, rule, or regulation may conflict with the statewide orders.

Context

  • McMaster issued an executive order closing several nonessential businesses to the public effective April 1. In another order, McMaster added retail to the nonessential businesses list effective April 6 (with curbside pickup and delivery allowed for retail). McMaster issued a stay-at-home order effective April 7, directing individuals to limit social interactions, practice social distancing according to Centers for Disease Control (CDC) guidelines, take precautions to avoid COVID-19, and limit movement outside the home except for essential activities. McMaster lifted the stay-at-home order on May 4.
  • As of May 31, South Carolina had 11,861 positive COVID-19 cases and 494 deaths. South Carolina had an estimated population of 5.1 million as of July 2019. For every 100,000 residents, the state had 230.4 COVID-19 cases and 9.6 deaths.
  • South Carolina is a Republican trifecta, with a Republican governor and Republican majorities in both chambers of the state legislature.

Guidance for individuals
The final accelerateSC report advises individuals to do the following:

  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. 
  • Cover your cough and sneezes with a tissue (that you then discard) or use the inside of your elbow. 
  • Practice social distancing – at least six feet, even when wearing a mask. 
  • Stay home if you’re sick and avoid close contact with people who are sick. 
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces daily, and more frequently if you are sick or caring for someone who is sick. 
  • Wear cloth face coverings in public settings, especially while in enclosed spaces where there are other people. 

The report also says, “At-risk populations (seniors, members of our minority communities and those with underlying medical conditions) should be particularly mindful of this guidance and should take special precautions.” 

General business guidance

  • Most businesses “must limit the number of customers allowed to enter and simultaneously occupy the premises so as not to exceed five customers per 1,000 square feet of retail space, or 20% of the occupancy limit as determined by the fire marshal, whichever is less. Businesses must not knowingly allow customers to congregate within six feet of one another, exclusive of family units.”
  • “Businesses must also implement all reasonable steps to comply with sanitation guidelines of the CDC, [South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC)] or any other state and federal public health officials.”

April 20-21
The following were allowed to reopen April 20-21.

  • Public beaches (local officials given authority to decide whether to open)
  • Retail (with social distancing requirements; capacity limited to 20% occupancy or five customers per 1,000 square feet, whichever is less; and following guidance from CDC and DHEC)

May 4

  • Restaurants could reopen for outdoor dining (tables spaced at least 8 feet apart, limit of 8 people per table, additional guidelines here)

Lifted:

  • Stay-at-home order (individuals the CDC deems at risk advised to continue limiting exposure to others)
  • Requirement for short-term rental companies to deny reservations to people from hotspots (areas the CDC identified as having extensive community spread)
  • Requirement for travelers from hotspots to self-quarantine for two weeks

May 8

May 11

  • Restaurants could reopen for dine-in services (limit to 50% fire capacity, tables spaced 6-8 feet apart, additional guidelines here)

May 18
The following could reopen with capacity limits and social distancing efforts:

  • Gyms/fitness centers (guidelines here)
  • Close-contact services—e.g., massage, barbershops, hair salons, nail salons, tattoo shops, waxing salons, tanning salons, spas (close-contact business guidelines here, cosmetology guidelines here)
  • Pools (guidance here)

May 22
The following could reopen:

  • Attraction facilities—e.g., zoos, museums, aquariums, amusement park rides, water parks (limit to 50% fire capacity for indoor spaces, keeping attractions that can’t be sanitized between users closed, additional guidelines here

May 31

  • Youth sport could resume practice, with competitive play allowed June 15 (guidelines here)

Additional site-specific guidance
AccelerateSC released guidance for some industries and sites that McMaster did not order closed:

Reactions

  • On May 12, the South Carolina Senate passed a resolution rebuking McMaster for continuing the state of emergency over two months without seeking the legislature’s permission. The resolution passed on a 17-16 vote. All 17 yes votes were from Republicans. Twelve Democrats and four Republicans voted against the resolution.
  • On April 29, state Rep. Gary Clary (R) said, “The governor is trying to gather as much information as he can from the business community, from the medical community, from the research institutions, so we can properly reopen South Carolina and do it in a logical way. … I think he certainly wants to reopen the state, just like I do. But it’s got to be so that we do it in a manner in which everybody’s protected.”
  • On April 29, Republican state Reps. Josiah Magnuson, Jonathon Hill, and Stewart Jones wrote a letter to House Speaker JayJay Lucas (R) asking him to reconvene members of the state House to vote to end McMaster’s renewed state of emergency order. They wrote, “If the ‘essential’ businesses can adopt safe practices to stop the spread of the coronavirus, then the supposedly ‘non-essential’ businesses can do so, as well. Thus, it is possible to immediately reopen all businesses while enforcing social distancing through temporary regulations.”


Find out more in today’s Number of the Day→


Additional activity

In this section, we feature examples of activities by other federal, state, and local governments and influencers relevant to recovering from the pandemic. 

  • Florida officials approved Walt Disney World’s reopening plan last week. The theme park will begin a phased reopening on July 11 with limited capacity along with sanitation and social distancing protocols.
  • Georgia’s departments of education and public health released a 10-page guidance document for the state’s school districts on reopening. The guidance is not legally binding because the state’s 180 school districts operate independently. There are several reopening options, including alternating days and a model that allows for older students to distance learn while younger students receive in-person instruction.
  • Milwaukee, Wisconsin Mayor Tom Barrett announced May 29 that the city’s restrictions on restaurants, bars, and gathering spots would remain in place until further notice. 
  • The Los Angeles County Public Health Department in California announced it will allow restaurants and hair salons to open with distancing and infection control protocols. Gov. Gavin Newsom’s (D) office approved the county’s variance request, allowing it to reopen more businesses than the statewide plan currently allows. 
  • On May 28, Charleston Southern University student Jessica Taylor filed a class-action lawsuit in the Charleston County Court of Common Pleas (South Carolina) against the university. Taylor’s complaint alleges that the university, which closed its campus effective March 18, “has not delivered the educational services, facilities, access, and opportunities that Plaintiff and the putative class contracted and paid for.” The complaint seeks “refunds of the amounts Plaintiff and putative class members are owed, prorated to the amount of time that remained in the Spring semester when classes moved online and campus services ceased being provided.” 

Click here to learn more.



Trump visits Kennedy Space Center to view rocket launch

Ballotpedia's Daily Presidential News Briefing
June 1, 2020: Trump returned to the Kennedy Space Center to view the SpaceX rocket launch on Saturday. Biden visited a protest site in Wilmington, Del., on Sunday.

Ballotpedia is monitoring changes made to election dates and procedures in response to the coronavirus pandemic. blank    blankblank   

Notable Quote of the Day

“The only real open question going into Tuesday’s eight primaries is whether Joe Biden will rack up enough votes to formally clinch the Democratic presidential nomination. That he we (sic) will win those contests is not in doubt.

The former vice president needs to win 89% of all delegates at stake to do so. That sounds easy since he’s the last candidate standing in a once-crowded primary field. But supporters of Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders have continued to urge voters to cast ballots for him so he can amass delegates and have a greater influence on the party policy platform ahead of the Democratic National Convention.

Biden has met the 89% threshold in only two contests since Super Tuesday: Mississippi (94%) and Nebraska (100%).”

– Will Weissert, Associated Press

Election Updates

  • Joe Biden visited a site in Wilmington, Del., on Sunday where protests had taken place following the death of George Floyd. He tweeted, “We are a nation in pain right now, but we must not allow this pain to destroy us. As President, I will help lead this conversation — and more importantly, I will listen, just as I did today visiting the site of last night’s protests in Wilmington.”

  • In a Medium post on Saturday, Biden wrote, “These last few days have laid bare that we are a nation furious at injustice. Every person of conscience can understand the rawness of the trauma people of color experience in this country, from the daily indignities to the extreme violence, like the horrific killing of George Floyd. … The act of protesting should never be allowed to overshadow the reason we protest. It should not drive people away from the just cause that protest is meant to advance.”

  • Donald Trump returned to the Kennedy Space Center to view the SpaceX rocket launch on Saturday. The launch, which was originally scheduled for Wednesday, had been postponed due to weather.

  • In his remarks at the Kennedy Space Center, Trump said, “The death of George Floyd on the streets of Minneapolis was a grave tragedy.  It should never have happened.  It has filled Americans all over the country with horror, anger, and grief. … I understand the pain that people are feeling.  We support the right of peaceful protesters, and we hear their pleas.  But what we are now seeing on the streets of our cities has nothing to do with justice or with peace.”

  • Trump tweeted, “Get tough Democrat Mayors and Governors. These people are ANARCHISTS. Call in our National Guard NOW. The World is watching and laughing at you and Sleepy Joe. Is this what America wants? NO!!!”

Flashback: June 1, 2016

The Field Poll put Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders within the poll’s margin of error in the upcoming California Democratic primary, with Clinton leading by two percentage points. Sanders said the same day, “On Tuesday, we are going to win the primary. … And we have the establishment very nervous. That’s a good thing.”blank

Click here to learn more.



New Orleans first responders not eligible for emergency pay, civil service commission rules

On May 26, the New Orleans Civil Service Commission ruled that the city’s first responders, including paramedics, fire fighters, and police officers, are not eligible for emergency pay for their work during the COVID-19 outbreak.

The city made the following statement on the commission’s decision: “Payment for our police officers and firefighters is governed by the rules of the Civil Service Commission. The Commission decided today, May 26, 2020, that the specific rule in this case (Civil Service Rule IV, Section 11.1(a)) does not apply to the current situation. That rule does not authorize ‘hazard pay;’ it provides a different ’emergency pay’ rate for essential personnel who are required to work while City offices are closed for a declared state of emergency. During this emergency situation, however, City government has remained open for business, and non-critical employees were instructed to continue working remotely if possible.”

What is the New Orleans Civil Service Commission?

The New Orleans Civil Service Commission is tasked with making policy and enforcing regulations for city personnel. The commission has five members, all of whom are appointed to six-year terms by the city council. When the commission enacts regulations or issues rulings on the implementation of those regulations, its decisions have the force of law.

What are the reactions?

Aaron Mischler, president of the New Orleans Fire Fighters Association, said, “We’re absolutely disappointed because what is the intent of the rule if not to pay the people who are working on the front lines and being exposed to these conditions? To me, that’s the nature of the rule itself.”

Donovan Livaccari, from the New Orleans Fraternal Order of Police, said, “It’s disappointing the commission didn’t see things the way that our members see it. The police officers in this city, the firemen, the EMS employees who are out there risking their safety everyday to provide to the city. We think the rules are pretty clear, in my opinion, and, I think they should follow the rules.”

What comes next?

The commission suggested other legislative bodies could appropriate funds for hazard pay: “This is the first of many conversations about emergency pay for our frontline employees. It is our goal and intention to do what is right for these employees through a thoughtful more comprehensive approach that includes an understanding of the emergency pay that may be awarded by other legislative bodies. It is important to us to understand that before making a decision of this magnitude.”

A representative for Mayor LaToya Cantrell said, “The City and our residents are deeply grateful for our front-line responders, and proud of their work. Unrelated to the issue of emergency pay, the City is currently exploring and advocating for additional funding options that may qualify under the CARES Act for our first responders, and it is our hope that this additional compensation will be approved.”

What we’ve been reading

The big picture

Number of relevant bills by state

We are currently tracking 96 pieces of legislation dealing with public-sector employee union policy. On the map below, a darker shade of green indicates a greater number of relevant bills. Click here for a complete list of all the bills we’re tracking.

Union Station map May 29, 2020.png

Number of relevant bills by current legislative status

Union Station status chart May 29, 2020.png

Number of relevant bills by partisan status of sponsor(s)

Union Station partisan chart May 29, 2020.png

Recent legislative actions

Below is a complete list of relevant legislative actions taken since our last issue.

  • California SB1173: Existing law requires public employers to provide unions with contact information for all employees within the bargaining unit. Existing law also requires that public employers provide unions with contact information for new employees within 30 days of hire. This bill would impose liability on employers who violate these provisions 3 or more times in a 12-month period.
    • Democratic sponsorship.
    • Senate Appropriations Hearing scheduled for June 1.


Documenting America’s Path to Recovery: May 29, 2020

Each day, we:

  • Track the status of reopening in all 50 states.
  • Compare the status of one industry or activity across the country.
  • Provide in-depth summaries of the latest reopening plans.
  • Give you the latest stories on other reopening plans and ideas.

Want to know what happened yesterday? Click here.

The next three days

What is reopening in the next three days? Which stay-at-home orders will expire?

May 30

  • Idaho (Republican trifecta): Gov. Brad Little (R) announced the state will move into the third phase of reopening starting May 30. Phase Three will allow non-essential travel and gatherings of up to 50 people. Bars will be able to reopen. Movie theaters, which had been scheduled to reopen in Phase 4, will also be permitted to reopen that day.

May 31

  • Maine (Democratic trifecta): Maine’s stay-at-home order is scheduled to expire on May 31. Gov. Janet Mills (D) issued the original stay-at-home order on March 31. She extended it to last through May 31 on April 28.
  • Texas (Republican trifecta): Gov. Greg Abbott (R) announced that fans can attend outdoor professional sporting events at 25% of a venue’s capacity. Leagues will need to receive approval from the Texas Department of State Health Services before holding events with spectators. The order does not apply to indoor sporting events. Effective May 29, waterparks can reopen at 25% capacity.

June 1

  • Delaware (Democratic trifecta): The state’s stay-at-home order, short-term rental ban, and out-of-state travel quarantines will be lifted on June 1. The state will begin Phase One of its reopening plan. Businesses reopening in this phase, including restaurants and retailers, will be limited to 30 percent capacity. Residents are required to wear face coverings in public. See the “Featured plan” section below for more details.
  • Georgia (Republican trifecta): Bars, night clubs, professional sports, and amateur sports will be allowed to reopen in the state beginning June 1. Gatherings of up to 25 people will be allowed.
  • Hawaii (Democratic trifecta): Hawaii and Maui counties will begin opening personal care services (like salons and barbershops) and dine-in services at restaurants starting June 1. Hawaii County will start opening places of worship on June 1 while Maui County is allowing in-person religious services starting May 29. Oahu County is beginning to reopen some types of businesses starting May 29, including barbershops, salons, and tattoo parlors.
  • Indiana (Republican trifecta): Cass, Lake, and Marion counties will be allowed to enter into the third phase of the state’s reopening plan on June 1. On May 27, Indianapolis Mayor Joe Hogsett (D) announced the city would begin a modified third-phase reopening effective June 1. Social gatherings of up to 50 people will be permitted, indoor dining can resume at 50% capacity, malls can expand to 75% capacity, gyms and fitness centers can open at 50% capacity, and personal service businesses (e.g., hair and nail salons) can resume by appointment only.
  • Iowa (Republican trifecta): Outdoor performance venues, casinos, bowling alleys, amusement parks, skating rinks, skate parks, and outdoor playgrounds will be allowed to reopen at 50% capacity on June 1. Summer school activities, including baseball and softball, will also be allowed to resume.
  • Kentucky (divided government): The following businesses will be allowed to reopen on June 1: auctions (33% capacity), auto/dirt track racing, aquatic centers, bowling alleys, fishing tournaments, fitness centers, state park lodges, movie theaters (33% capacity), and the Salato Wildlife Education Center.
  • Minnesota (divided government): Restaurants and bars will be allowed to offer limited outdoor seating on June 1 (outdoor spaces can accommodate no more than 50 people at a time). Salons and barbershops will also be permitted to reopen on June 1 at 25% capacity.
  • Mississippi (Republican trifecta): Gov. Tate Reeves’ (R) Safer At Home order will be replaced by a Safe Return order on June 1. The order will allow all travel to resume. It will also permit indoor gatherings of up to 20 people and outdoor gatherings of up to 50 people. If social distancing is possible, indoor gatherings of up to 50 and outdoor gatherings of up to 100 will be allowed. Ballparks, theaters, libraries, and museums will also begin opening June 1.
  • Montana (divided government): The state will start the second phase of reopening on June 1. Phase Two allows restaurants, bars, breweries, distilleries, casinos, gyms, and pools to operate at 75% capacity if they maintain the physical distancing and sanitation protocols established in Phase One. Other venues like concert halls and bowling alleys can operate with reduced capacity under distancing guidelines. In Phase Two, residents are asked to avoid gatherings of more than 50 people unless social distancing can be maintained. Visitors to the state will not have to complete a 14-day self-quarantine.
  • Oklahoma (Republican trifecta): Gov. Kevin Stitt (R) announced the state will enter Phase 3 of its reopening plan on June 1. Under Phase 3, businesses can resume unrestricted staffing at worksites, and businesses that had been required to operate by appointment can start accepting walk-in clients. Summer camps can reopen if they follow safety guidelines. Visitation at nursing homes and long-term care facilities will continue to be prohibited until further notice.
  • Oregon (Democratic trifecta): Gov. Kate Brown (D) announced that Washington County will enter the first phase of reopening on June 1. In Phase 1, gathering sizes are limited to 25, and restaurants and bars can open for dine-in. Retailers, malls, personal service businesses (like hairdressers and salons), and fitness centers can also reopen, contingent on their compliance with state guidelines.
  • Pennsylvania (divided government): Gov. Tom Wolf (D) announced that 16 more counties will enter the green phase of reopening and the remaining 10 red-phase counties are expected to move to yellow starting June 5. During the yellow phase, theaters and gyms remain closed, but some types of businesses, such as retail, can begin to reopen with restrictions. Bars and restaurants are limited to carry-out and delivery until June 5, when outdoor dining will be allowed in yellow counties. The green phase will allow most businesses and functions to reopen under state restrictions, including salons, barbershops, spas, casinos, theaters, malls, and gyms. Gathering limits will also be lifted in the green phase, but the state will continue to restrict large gatherings of over 250 people and visits to nursing homes and prisons.
  • Rhode Island (Democratic trifecta): Gov. Gina Raimondo (D) announced the state will move into the second phase of reopening on June 1. Phase Two will allow personal service businesses (such as barbershops and salons), gyms, indoor dine-in services, indoor malls, and some outdoor entertainment activities to reopen. It will also lift the state’s travel restrictions and allow groups of up to 15 people to gather. Raimondo said Twin River Casino will be able to open later in Phase Two.
  • Vermont (divided government): Gov. Phil Scott (R) announced that the limit on social gatherings will go up from 10 to 25 on June 1. On that day, several close contact businesses, including fitness centers, nail salons, and tattoo parlors, will be allowed to reopen at 25% capacity. Libraries, galleries, museums, and theaters will be allowed to reopen at 25% capacity, as well.

Since our last edition

Have any states opened? For a continually updated article on reopening status in all 50 states, click here. For our last edition, click here.

  • Arizona (Republican trifecta): Gov. Doug Ducey (R) announced that schools would reopen in the fall and that the state would release guidelines to schools on June 1. Schools in the state have been closed to in-person instruction since March 15.
  • Illinois (Democratic trifecta): The state’s stay-at-home order expired on May 29, making it the 30th state to end a stay-at-home order. Illinois also started the third phase of its reopening plan, which allows non-essential retailers and manufacturers to begin reopening. Restaurants can also reopen for outdoor dining and gatherings of up to 10 people are allowed.
  • Maryland (divided government): The following businesses and activities are allowed to reopen or resume on May 29: outdoor dining at restaurants and social clubs; outdoor youth sports and outdoor activities at youth day camps; drive-in movie theaters; and other outdoor activities.
  • Michigan (divided government): Nonessential medical, dental, and veterinary procedures are allowed to resume on May 29.
  • New Jersey (Democratic trifecta): Gov. Phil Murphy (D) announced that childcare centers would be able to reopen on June 15. Murphy also said outdoor, non-contact youth sports can resume starting June 22, and day camps can open on July 6.
  • New York (Democratic trifecta): Gov. Andrew Cuomo (D) extended New York’s stay-at-home order until June 27. It will only apply to regions that have not met the state’s criteria to enter Phase One of reopening. New York City is the only region that has not advanced to the first phase, but Cuomo announced the city was on track to begin reopening starting June 8. The Finger Lakes, Mohawk Valley, Southern Tier, North Country, and Central New York regions were all cleared to enter Phase Two of reopening on May 29.
  • Ohio (Republican trifecta): Gov. Mike Dewine (R) announced that assisted living facilities and intermediate care for developmental disabilities can allow outdoor visitations on June 8.
  • Virginia (Democratic trifecta): On May 29, Northern Virginia, as well as Richmond and Accomack County, moved into Phase One of the “Forward Virginia” reopening plan. Face coverings are also required in public indoor settings statewide for people 10 years and older.
  • West Virginia (Republican trifecta): Gov. Jim Justice (R) announced on May 29 that low-contact, outdoor youth sports practices can resume on June 8. Adult sports facilities, such as indoor tennis courts and outdoor basketball courts, can also reopen that day.

Update on stay-at-home orders

Forty-three states issued orders directing residents to stay home except for essential activities and the closure or curtailment of businesses each state deemed nonessential. Seven states did not.

As of May 29, stay-at-home orders have ended in 30 states. Eighteen of those states have Republican governors and 12 have Democratic governors (including Wisconsin, where the state Supreme Court invalidated the stay-at-home order). Of the 13 states with active stay-at-home orders, one has a Republican governor and 12 have Democratic governors.

Here’s which stay-at-home orders have expired, and when the rest are scheduled to expire.

Tracking industries: Hotels

All 50 states began to reopen in some way. Here, we give the status of one industry or activity across the states. Today’s question: in which states may you stay in a hotel?

This is an in-depth summary of one of the latest reopening plans. Is there a plan you’d like us to feature? Reply to this email and let us know. Click a state below to read a previous Featured Plan.

Previous featured plans

Alabama Georgia Massachusetts New Mexico Texas
Arizona Illinois Michigan Ohio Virginia
California Indiana Montana Oklahoma Washington
Colorado Maine Nevada Pennsylvania
Florida Maryland New Hampshire Tennessee

On May 15, Gov. John Carney (D) released details of Phase 1 of the state’s economic reopening, with general and industry-specific requirements for businesses allowed to reopen June 1. The state’s stay-at-home order expires on May 31.

Carney said the state will follow the White House’s guidance for determining when to begin reopening phases, including hospital capacity measures and a 14-day decline in cases. The governor’s office said it will focus on the following as restrictions are lifted:

As of May 29, the governor’s office had released details for Phase 1.

Local governments in Delaware may impose greater restrictions on businesses and individual activity than state restrictions.

Context

  • Carney modified his state of emergency declaration to order nonessential businesses‘ physical locations to close and individuals to stay home except for essential activities starting on March 24. The stay-at-home modification requires individuals to follow social distancing and sanitation guidelines in shared spaces and during outdoor activity. The orders were set to expire on May 15. Carney extended them until May 31. On May 22, Carney issued a modification effective June 1 allowing Phase 1 businesses to reopen with certain guidelines.
  • On April 25, Carney modified the state of emergency declaration to require individuals and employees to wear face coverings in certain settings. The order remains in effect until further notice.
  • As of May 28, Delaware had 9,171 positive COVID-19 cases and 345 deaths. Delaware’s estimated population as of July 2019 was 973,764. For every 100,000 residents, the state had 941.8 cases and 35.4 deaths.
  • Delaware is a Democratic trifecta, with a Democratic governor and Democratic majorities in both chambers of the state legislature.

General guidelines for businesses and individuals

Guidance for individuals

  • Cloth face coverings must be worn in accordance with the State of Emergency Order.
  • Individuals must regularly wash their hands according to Division of Public Health guidance, and must stay home when sick.
  • At all times, individuals who are not part of a household should maximize physical distance from others and remain six (6) feet apart.
  • All individuals, WHEN IN PUBLIC (e.g., parks, outdoor recreation areas, shopping areas), should maximize physical distance from others. Social settings of more than 10 people, where appropriate distancing may not be practical, must be avoided (e.g. receptions, trade shows).
  • The number of individuals in a particular location will be strictly controlled in order to make sure that safe social distancing is maintained. Some of these limits are addressed for individual industries in the industry guidance, but where it is not otherwise stated, the upper limit is 30% of fire code occupancy (excluding staff).
  • Non-essential travel should be avoided.
  • ALL VULNERABLE INDIVIDUALS should continue to shelter in place. Members of households with vulnerable residents should be aware that by returning to work or other environments where distancing is not practical, they could carry the virus back home. Precautions should be taken to isolate from vulnerable residents.

Vulnerable individuals are those over the age of 65 or those with underlying health conditions. For a list of conditions, see page 14 of the plan.

General business guidance

  • Employers should close COMMON AREAS where personnel are likely to congregate and interact, or enforce strict social distancing protocols.
  • Employees and customers have a responsibility to self-quarantine if they have a reason to expect that they may be ill or may have come into contact with COVID-19. Employees who are symptomatic must not physically return to work until cleared by DPH or their medical provider.
  • Employers are encouraged to continue to have staff work from home whenever possible. Employees who have been working from home throughout this crisis should continue working from home unless there is a substantive change to business operations in Phase 1 (e.g. a business was closed, but now it’s open).
  • All surfaces touched by customers, including doors, restrooms, and point of sale infrastructure must be disinfected using an EPA-approved disinfectant every 15 minutes to 2 hours.
  • All employees required to go to work should perform a daily health check as prescribed by the Delaware Division of Public Health.
  • All employees should wash hands regularly with soap and water throughout the work day, and in particular after any time they come into contact with a customer. Hand sanitizer should be used to supplement hand washing throughout the day. Employees must also social distance from each other while working. This can be accomplished through spacing or moving workstations, staggering shifts or other means.
  • Businesses must make hand sanitizer or handwashing stations readily available for all employees and customers.
  • Downtime should be given between shifts and after closing for thorough cleanings of an establishment at a minimum after each day.
  • Employers should post signs on how to stop the spread of COVID-19, hand hygiene, and properly wear a cloth face covering.

Phase details

Pre-Phase 1 (May 8-22)

May 8:

  • Retailers were allowed to open for curbside pickup with social distancing

May 15:

May 20:

  • Retailers could open by appointment only (“may accept two appointments per half hour and must adhere to strict social distancing and cleaning guidance from the Delaware Division of Public Health (DPH) and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.”)

May 22:

Phase 1 (June 1)

The following may reopen in Phase 1. In addition to the guidelines provided below, see additional industry-specific requirements here.

  • Arts and Culture (i.e. galleries, museums, libraries): “30% capacity; Face covering required; Strict social distancing”
  • Food and drink establishments: “30% capacity; Face covering required; Strict social distancing; Reservation-only dining; delivery and takeout available; bars closed; no self-service”
  • Retail establishments: “30% of fire code occupancy; Face covering required; Strict social distancing”
  • Malls: “30% of fire code occupancy limit; Face covering required; Strict social distancing; Food and drink facilities must follow food and drink industry guidelines”
  • Exercise facilities: “30% of fire code occupancy limit; Face covering required; Strict social distancing; Classes under 10 people allowed; Thorough cleaning and disinfecting”
  • Barbershops, hair salons, tanning salons: “30% of fire code occupancy limit; Appointment-only; Face covering required; Social distancing when feasible”
  • Realty: “Resume open houses with no more than 10 individuals; Face covering required; Social distancing; Proper disinfecting of property”
  • Casinos: “Create and submit reopening plan to State Lottery and DPH; Thorough cleaning and disinfecting; employee training; 30% of fire code occupancy limit; gaming machines must be kept at least 8 ft. apart”
  • Racetracks: “Create and submit facility specific plan to DPH and Dept. of Ag; No automobile racing in Phase 1; No fans permitted to attend races; Staff must be socially distanced”
  • Parks and recreation: “Remain open or reopen with modifications to ensure social distancing; No gatherings or events; Properly disinfect any equipment”
  • Childcare: “Must be designated as an Emergency Child Care Site; Open for employees of essential and/or reopened businesses”
  • Youth sports: “No-contact sports and physical activities for children may resume; Strict social distancing; Groups limited to 10; Coaches and staff must wear face coverings; No competitions”
  • Places of worship: See additional guidance
  • Sporting facilities (i.e., bowling alleys, martial arts and dance studios, and indoor athletic facilities) may reopen if “they can create a facility specific plan to observe the industry guidance provided herein for exercise facilities.”

Other modified or lifted restrictions on June 1 are:

Find out more in today’s Number of the Day→

Additional activity

In this section, we feature examples of activities by other federal, state, and local governments and influencers relevant to recovering from the pandemic.

  • City department leaders in Austin, Texas, announced certain city services will reopen the week of June 1. Animal Services may begin offering on-site adoption by appointment only on June 1. The Code Department will resume certain in-person services on June 1. Several pools are scheduled to open between June 1 and June 6. The Austin Public Library will begin offering curbside service June 8.
  • San Francisco, California, Mayor London Breed announced details for the city’s continued reopening. Phase 2 is set to begin on June 1 with childcare, botanical gardens, and outdoor museums allowed to open. Two more stages of Phase 2, set to begin on June 15 and July 13, will allow additional reopenings including indoor retail, dining services, and hair salons. Phase 3 is expected to begin mid-August and to include opening bars, gyms, and schools. Phase 4’s date is to be determined. Breed said the city’s stay-at-home order remains in effect indefinitely. Residents are required to wear face coverings when outside the house and within 30 feet of someone.
  • Caymus Vineyards, a winery in Napa Valley, filed a federal complaint against California Gov. Gavin Newsom (D) and state Public Health Officer Sonia Angell alleging the state’s reopening plan treats some wineries unfairly. Under California’s reopening plan, wineries may only reopen in the current phase if they serve sit-down, dine-in meals. A local ordinance in Napa County restricts food service at wineries.


Weekly Presidential News Briefing – May 29, 2020

Every weekday, Ballotpedia tracks the news, events, and results of the 2020 presidential election.

Here’s the latest from the campaign trail.

Notable Quotes of the Week

“Peter Navarro, a Trump trade and manufacturing adviser who’s a Harvard-educated economist, called the high unemployment America is currently facing ‘manufactured unemployment, which is to say that Americans are out of work not because of any underlying economic weaknesses but to save American lives. It is this observation that gives us the best chance and hope for a relatively rapid recovery as the economy reopens.’ …

The scenario would be a major long-term problem for any president. But before that reality sets in, Trump could be poised to benefit from the dramatic numbers produced during the partial rebound phase that is likely to coincide with the four months before November.

That realization has many Democrats spooked. …

[Democratic strategist Kenneth Baer said], ‘On Election Day, we Democrats need voters to ask themselves, “Are you better off than you were four years ago?” Republicans need voters to ask themselves, “Are you better off than you were four months ago?”‘”

Ryan Lizza and Daniel Lippman, Politico 

“Just about every poll we’ve seen on this issue demonstrates bipartisan support for expanding vote-by-mail systems and offering Americans safe voting options this year.

If rejecting vote-by-mail is part of a Republican strategy to win in November, it’s a short-sighted one. Old-line opposition to voting reform is only alienating GOP voters at a time when many Republican Senate candidates are lagging behind Democrats in fundraising and polling. The same Hart Research Associates poll showed that 40 percent of Republicans would react unfavorably toward a GOP senator who opposed diversifying options for voting. The data are clear: Voters of both parties don’t want their access to the ballot to be limited. My party should listen to the voters.”

Michael Steele, National Review

“The Democratic Party is pushing mail-in voting as the safest way to cast ballots amid the coronavirus pandemic. But the party is struggling to persuade a bedrock constituency: African Americans. …

During the most recent national elections, the 2018 congressional midterms, only about 11% of black voters cast their ballots by mail, according to Census figures. That’s the lowest percentage of any measured ethnic group, and it’s just under half the rate of white voters.

There are a variety of reasons. For African Americans such as Fason, striding to the polls is a powerful act, both symbolic and substantive. Some black voters fear their mail ballots might get lost or rejected. African Americans are more transient than other racial groups and have high rates of homelessness, government statistics show, major barriers to mail voting.”

John Whitesides, Reuters

Week in Review

Biden wins Hawaii’s presidential primary

Joe Biden won the Hawaii Democratic primary on Friday, May 22, with 63.2% of the vote to Bernie Sanders’ 36.8%. Biden won 16 pledged delegates to Sanders’ eight. The primary was held entirely by mail in response to the coronavirus pandemic and incorporated ranked-choice voting. Hawaii’s Republican Party announced on December 11, 2019, that it would not hold a presidential preference vote.

Libertarian Party nominates presidential ticket

The Libertarian Party selected Jo Jorgensen as its presidential nominee on Saturday, May 23, during the Libertarian National Convention. Spike Cohen was selected as the party’s vice-presidential nominee the next day.

Biden apologizes, Trump campaign attacks over comments on The Breakfast Club

Biden apologized for saying, “If you have a problem figuring out whether you’re for me or Trump, then you ain’t black,” in an interview on The Breakfast Club. He said, “I know that the comments have come off like I was taking the African American vote for granted. But nothing could be further [from] the truth.” Trump’s campaign is spending $1 million on digital ads attacking Biden over his statement.   

Trump, RNC question location of national convention

Following a series of tweets from Trump regarding the possibility of moving the Republican National Convention away from Charlotte, North Carolina, Vice President Mike Pence stated, “We all want to be in Charlotte, we love North Carolina, but having a sense now is absolutely essential because of the immense preparations that are involved and we look forward to working with Gov. Cooper, getting a swift response, and if need be moving the national convention to a state that is farther along on reopening and can say with confidence that we can gather there.”  

According to Republican National Committee chairwoman Ronna Romney McDaniel, other states have offered to host the convention. McDaniel said, “The president is right to say to the governor, you need to assure us before we lock in all these hotel rooms and we bring all of this revenue to your state that you’re going to let us have this convention. … There’s a lot of states that are calling the president right now saying, hey, why don’t you bring that revenue to our state?”

On Thursday, RNC leaders sent North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper (D) an outline of their planned safety precautions for the convention. The letter said, “If there are any additional guidelines to what is outlined above that we will be expected to meet, you need to let us know by Wednesday, June 3.” 

Coming up: Seven states and D.C. to hold presidential primaries Tuesday

Seven states and the District of Columbia are holding presidential primaries on Tuesday, June 2: Indiana, Maryland, Montana, New Mexico, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, and South Dakota. Four of the states rescheduled their primaries to June 2 in response to the coronavirus pandemic. One state—New Jersey—moved its primary from June 2 to July 7. Across the Democratic primaries, 479 pledged delegates are available to be allocated on June 2, which is 12% of all pledged delegates available. Only Super Tuesday, held on March 3, had more delegates at stake on one day. 

Want more? Find the daily details here:

Poll Spotlight

Staff Spotlight

Cole Blocker is a Republican staffer with experience in fundraising and campaign finance. Blocker graduated from Southern Methodist University with a bachelor’s degree in management science and operations research.

Previous campaign work:

  • 2016 Donald Trump presidential campaign, aide to vice chairman for finance Woody Johnson
  • 2016 Jeb Bush presidential campaign, aide to national finance chairman Woody Johnson

Other experience:

  • 2017-2019: White House Visitors Office, deputy director
  • 2015-2017: Grigsby Applegate, LLC, project consultant

What we read this week

Flashback: May 26-29, 2016

  • May 29, 2016: Trump gave a speech at the Lincoln Memorial to participants in the Memorial Day weekend Rolling Thunder motorcycle rally. He said, “When you think of the great General Patton and all our generals, they are spinning in their graves when they watch we can’t beat ISIS. … We are going to knock the hell out of them.”
  • May 28, 2016: Bernie Sanders said in an interview on Meet the Press that if Hillary Clinton won the Democratic nomination, she would need to pick a progressive running mate who could “excite working families, excite young people, bring them into the political process, create a large voter turnout.”
  • May 27, 2016: After telling Jimmy Kimmel that he would debate Sanders if ABC made a donation to charity, Trump issued the following statement: “[N]ow that I am the presumptive Republican nominee, it seems inappropriate that I would debate the second place finisher. … Therefore, as much as I want to debate Bernie Sanders – and it would be an easy payday – I will wait to debate the first place finisher in the Democratic Party, probably Crooked Hillary Clinton, or whoever it may be.”
  • May 26, 2016: In an ABC News interview following a State Department report on her use of a private email server while secretary of state, Clinton said, “This report makes clear that personal email use was the practice for other secretaries of state. … But it was still a mistake. And as I’ve said many times, if I could go back, I would do it differently. I know people have concerns about this, I understand that, but I think voters are going to be looking at the full picture of what I have to offer … and the full threat that Donald Trump offers our country.”


Biden will give keynote address at Minn. DFL convention Sunday

Ballotpedia's Daily Presidential News Briefing

May 29, 2020: Biden is scheduled to give the keynote address at Minnesota’s DFL convention on Sunday. Republican National Committee leaders asked North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper for a response on expectations for the Republican National Convention by June 3.

Ballotpedia is monitoring changes made to election dates and procedures in response to the coronavirus pandemic.

Ballotpedia's Daily Presidential News Briefing, Staffer SpotlightBallotpedia's Daily Presidential News Briefing, Staffer Spotlight - Cole Blocker

Cole Blocker is a Republican staffer with experience in fundraising and campaign finance. Blocker graduated from Southern Methodist University with a bachelor’s degree in management science and operations research.

Previous campaign work:

  • 2016 Donald Trump presidential campaign, aide to vice chairman for finance Woody Johnson
  • 2016 Jeb Bush presidential campaign, aide to national finance chairman Woody Johnson

Other experience:

  • 2017-2019: White House Visitors Office, deputy director
  • 2015-2017: Grigsby Applegate, LLC, project consultant

Notable Quotes of the Day

“Just about every poll we’ve seen on this issue demonstrates bipartisan support for expanding vote-by-mail systems and offering Americans safe voting options this year. If rejecting vote-by-mail is part of a Republican strategy to win in November, it’s a short-sighted one. Old-line opposition to voting reform is only alienating GOP voters at a time when many Republican Senate candidates are lagging behind Democrats in fundraising and polling. The same Hart Research Associates poll showed that 40 percent of Republicans would react unfavorably toward a GOP senator who opposed diversifying options for voting. The data are clear: Voters of both parties don’t want their access to the ballot to be limited. My party should listen to the voters.”

Michael SteeleNational Review

“The Democratic Party is pushing mail-in voting as the safest way to cast ballots amid the coronavirus pandemic. But the party is struggling to persuade a bedrock constituency: African Americans. … During the most recent national elections, the 2018 congressional midterms, only about 11% of black voters cast their ballots by mail, according to Census figures. That’s the lowest percentage of any measured ethnic group, and it’s just under half the rate of white voters. There are a variety of reasons. For African Americans such as Fason, striding to the polls is a powerful act, both symbolic and substantive. Some black voters fear their mail ballots might get lost or rejected. African Americans are more transient than other racial groups and have high rates of homelessness, government statistics show, major barriers to mail voting.”

John WhitesidesReuters


Election Updates

  • U.S. Sen. Tammy Duckworth (D-Ill.) and Whoopi Goldberg hosted a virtual fundraiser for Joe Biden that featured performances by musicians Sheryl Crow, Rufus Wainwright, Jimmy Buffett, Joe Walsh, and David Crosby.
  • Biden appeared in a Washington Post TikTok video skit encouraging people to wear masks.
  • Biden is scheduled to give a virtual keynote address at the Minnesota Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party’s convention on Sunday.
  • The new organization Republican Voters Against Trump is spending $10 million on an ad campaign attempting to persuade Republican voters to vote for Biden.
  • Donald Trump’s campaign manager, Brad Parscale, issued a statement on Trump’s “Executive Order on Preventing Online Censorship.” Parscale said, “We have known for a long time that social media companies have it in for conservatives in general and President Trump specifically. … Since social media companies have not appropriately self-regulated to stop the bias on their own, President Trump has stepped in to make sure Silicon Valley is held accountable for trying to manipulate the American people.”
  • The Trump Make America Great Again Committee is running digital ads on Facebook picturing Joe Biden wearing a mask in front of a Chinese flag and Trump not wearing a mask in front of an American flag.
  • Republican National Committee leaders sent North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper (D) an outline of their planned safety precautions for the Republican National Convention. The letter said, “If there are any additional guidelines to what is outlined above that we will be expected to meet, you need to let us know by Wednesday, June 3.”

What We’re Reading


Flashback: May 29, 2016

Trump gave a speech at the Lincoln Memorial to participants in the Memorial Day weekend Rolling Thunder motorcycle rally. He said, “When you think of the great General Patton and all our generals, they are spinning in their graves when they watch we can’t beat ISIS. … We are going to knock the hell out of them.”

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