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Ballotpedia’s Weekly Presidential News Briefing: Feb. 1-7, 2020

Ballotpedia's Weekly Presidential News Briefing
Every weekday, Ballotpedia tracks the news, events, and results of the 2020 presidential election.

Here’s the latest from the campaign trail.        
Notable Quotes of the Week

“This fiasco means the end of the caucuses as a significant American political event. The rest of the country was already losing patience with Iowa anyway and this cooks Iowa’s goose. Frankly, it should. The real winner tonight was Donald Trump, who got to watch his opponents wallow in a mess. A lot of good Democratic candidates and people who fought their hearts out here for…nothing.”

– David YepsenThe Des Moines Register political reporter

“Here’s the real wakeup call for Democrats, coming out of Iowa: We can’t put our heads in the sand and ignore the middling turnout, in a time of bonafide historic upheaval.

If Democrats don’t put together an unprecedented get-out-the-vote effort in 2020, far exceeding anything from the past, we are setting ourselves up for failure. “

– Jeff BiggersSalon

Week in Review

No clear Democratic winner in Iowa, Buttigieg and Sanders lead

The Associated Press announced on Thursday it would not call a winner in the Democratic Iowa caucuses because of irregularities in the caucus process.

The uncertainty in Iowa began on caucus night when the Iowa Democratic Party delayed releasing results because of inconsistencies and technical issues.

Communications director Mandy McClure said in a statement, “We found inconsistencies in the reporting of three sets of results. In addition to the tech systems being used to tabulate results, we are also using photos of results and a paper trail to validate that all results match and ensure that we have confidence and accuracy in the numbers we report. This is simply a reporting issue, the app did not go down and this is not a hack or an intrusion. The underlying data and paper trail is sound and will simply take time to further report the results.”

The first batch of results were released on Tuesday. As of Friday morning, results from more than 99 percent of precincts have been released showing Pete Buttigieg leading Bernie Sanders in state delegate equivalents by 0.1%, and Sanders leading Buttigieg in the final vote count by 2,631 votes.

Democratic National Committee Chairman Tom Perez also called for a recanvass of the Iowa results. He tweeted, “In light of the problems that have emerged in the implementation of the delegate selection plan and in order to assure public confidence in the results, I am calling on the Iowa Democratic Party to immediately begin a recanvass.”

The candidates had until 12 p.m. CT on Friday to formally request a recanvass or recount.

Trump wins Republican caucuses in Iowa, Weld receives one delegate

Donald Trump won the Republican Iowa caucuses with 97.1% of the vote and 39 of the state’s delegates. Bill Weld, who received 1.3% of the vote, also won one delegate.

Senate acquits Trump of abuse of power, obstruction of Congress

On Wednesday, the Senate acquitted Donald Trump of abuse of power by a vote of 52-48 and obstruction of Congress by a vote of 53-47.

Sen. Mitt Romney (R-Utah) was the only Republican to vote guilty on the abuse of power charge, becoming the first senator in U.S. history to vote to convict a president from his own party in an impeachment trial. The vote on obstruction of Congress ran along party lines.

Seven Democrats qualify for New Hampshire primary debate

Joe BidenPete ButtigiegAmy KlobucharBernie SandersTom SteyerElizabeth Warren, and Andrew Yang are participating in the eighth presidential primary debate in Manchester, New Hampshire, on Friday.

Linsey Davis, David Muir, George Stephanopoulos, Adam Sexton, and Monica Hernandez will moderate the debate, which takes place at St. Anselm College at 8:00 p.m. ET.

Walsh ends presidential campaign

Joe Walsh ended his presidential campaign on Friday. He tweeted, “I’m suspending my campaign, but our fight against the Cult of Trump is just getting started. I’m committed to doing everything I can to defeat Trump and his enablers this November. I can’t do it alone.”

Campaigns refocus campaign strategy, staff after Iowa caucuses

The Joe Biden campaign canceled about $150,000 in television spending in South Carolina, moving those funds to ad buys in Nevada, instead.

The Bernie Sanders campaign announced it will increase staffing in Super Tuesday states and spend $5.5 million on television and digital ad buys in 10 states.

Andrew Yang fired dozens of staff members from his campaign, Politico reported Thursday, including senior-level positions like national political director and national policy director. This was part of a previously planned restructuring after Iowa, campaign manager Zach Graumann said.

Want more? Find the daily details here:

Poll Spotlight

Staff Spotlight

Bob Paduchik is a Republican staffer with experience as a political strategist in Ohio. He previously worked on Trump’s 2016 presidential campaign. Paduchik graduated from the University of Akron with a bachelor’s degree in political science and government in 1989.

Previous campaign work:

  • 2016 Donald Trump presidential campaign, Ohio state director
  • 2010 Rob Portman (R-Ohio) U.S. Senate campaign, campaign manager
  • 2004 George W. Bush presidential campaign, Ohio campaign manager
  • 2000 George W. Bush presidential campaign, executive director

Other experience:

  • 2016-present: Agincourt Consultants, LLC, president
  • 2017-2019: Republican National Committee, co-chairman
  • 2011-2015: American Coalition for Clean Coal Electricity
    • 2013-2015: Chief of staff
    • 2011-2013: Senior vice president of state affairs and outreach
  • 2006-2009: DCI Group, vice president of client services
  • 2003-2006: Agincourt Consultants, LLC, founder and president
  • 2001-2003: U.S. Department of Energy, deputy assistant secretary for intergovernmental affairs
  • 1999-2000: Office of Gov. Bob Taft (R-Ohio), director of constituent affairs

What We’re Reading

Flashback: February 3-7, 2016

  • February 3, 2016: Rand Paul and Rick Santorum ended their presidential campaigns following the Iowa caucuses.
  • February 4, 2016: The Washington Post reported that Ben Carson was cutting more than 50 staff positions.
  • February 5, 2016: Former NAACP President Ben Jealous endorsed Bernie Sanders.
  • February 6, 2016: Jeb Bush, Ben Carson, Chris Christie, Ted Cruz, John Kasich, Marco Rubio, and Donald Trump debated in New Hampshire.
  • February 7, 2016: Hillary Clinton visited Flint, Michigan, to discuss the clean water crisis in the city.

Trivia

Which of the following Democrats won the narrowest Iowa caucus victory in party history?

Click here to learn more.



Seven candidates qualify for New Hampshire debate Friday night

Ballotpedia's Daily Presidential News Briefing
February 7, 2020: Joe Biden, Pete Buttigieg, Amy Klobuchar, Bernie Sanders, Tom Steyer, Elizabeth Warren, and Andrew Yang are participating in the eighth presidential primary debate on Friday night. Joe Walsh ended his presidential campaign on Friday.        

Each Friday, we highlight a presidential candidate’s key campaign staffer.

Daily Presidential News Briefing, Staffer Spotlight - Bob Paduchik

Bob Paduchik is a Republican staffer with experience as a political strategist in Ohio. He previously worked on Trump’s 2016 presidential campaign. Paduchik graduated from the University of Akron with a bachelor’s degree in political science and government in 1989.

Previous campaign work:

  • 2016 Donald Trump presidential campaign, Ohio state director
  • 2010 Rob Portman (R-Ohio) U.S. Senate campaign, campaign manager
  • 2004 George W. Bush presidential campaign, Ohio campaign manager
  • 2000 George W. Bush presidential campaign, executive director

Other experience:

  • 2016-present: Agincourt Consultants, LLC, president
  • 2017-2019: Republican National Committee, co-chairman
  • 2011-2015: American Coalition for Clean Coal Electricity
    • 2013-2015: Chief of staff
    • 2011-2013: Senior vice president of state affairs and outreach
  • 2006-2009: DCI Group, vice president of client services
  • 2003-2006: Agincourt Consultants, LLC, founder and president
  • 2001-2003: U.S. Department of Energy, deputy assistant secretary for intergovernmental affairs
  • 1999-2000: Office of Gov. Bob Taft (R-Ohio), director of constituent affairs

Notable Quote of the Day

“If we counted at the moment the polls closed, we would disenfranchise people. It’s simple as that. And if we expect to have a count within four or five hours after the polls close, we need a much more sophisticated and, quite frankly, expensive infrastructure to make that even remotely possible.”

– Kathleen Hale, director of the Institute for Election Administration Research and Practice at Auburn University

Iowa Caucus

  • With more than 99 percent of precincts in Iowa reporting, Pete Buttigieg leads Bernie Sanders in state delegate equivalents by 0.1%, and Sanders leads Buttigieg in the final vote count by more than 2,600 votes.
  • In a statement on Thursday, the Sanders campaign declared victory and submitted a list of discrepancies in the state delegate equivalent calculations. Senior adviser Jeff Weaver said, “We also feel confident that the discrepancies we’re providing tonight, in addition to those widely identified in the national media, mean that the SDE count will never be known with any kind of certainty. Given the rules changes we fought for that required the release of the popular vote count, SDEs are now an antiquated and meaningless metric for deciding the winner of the Iowa caucus.”
  • Democratic National Committee Chairman Tom Perez called for a recanvass of the Iowa results. He tweeted, “In light of the problems that have emerged in the implementation of the delegate selection plan and in order to assure public confidence in the results, I am calling on the Iowa Democratic Party to immediately begin a recanvass.”
  • The candidates have until 12 p.m. CT on Friday to formally request a recanvass or recount.

Democrats

  • Joe BidenPete ButtigiegAmy KlobucharBernie SandersTom SteyerElizabeth Warren, and Andrew Yang are participating in the eighth presidential primary debate in Manchester, New Hampshire, on Friday. Linsey Davis, David Muir, George Stephanopoulos, Adam Sexton, and Monica Hernandez will moderate the debate, which takes place at St. Anselm College at 8:00 p.m. ET.
  • The New York Times surveyed the presidential candidates on foreign policy, including  Israel, North Korea, cyberweapons, and the use of military force.
  • Michael BennetButtigiegKlobucharDeval PatrickSteyerWarren, and Yang will speak Saturday at the Our Rights, Our Courts presidential forum.
  • The Biden campaign canceled about $150,000 in television spending in South Carolina, moving those funds to ad buys in Nevada, instead.
  • Rep. Mikie Sherrill (N.J.) endorsed Michael Bloomberg on Thursday. Richard Spencer, who served as acting defense secretary under the Trump administration in 2019, will endorse Bloomberg on Friday. Bloomberg also wrote an op-ed in The New York Times titled “Fixing Inequality Is My Priority.”
  • Indianapolis Mayor Joe Hogsett and Rep. Andy Kim (N.J.) endorsed Buttigieg on Thursday.
  • Tulsi Gabbard will hold town halls in New Hampshire this week with stops in Somersworth, Rochester, Portsmouth, and Concord.
  • The Sanders campaign announced it will increase staffing in Super Tuesday states and spend $5.5 million on television and digital ad buys in 10 states.
  • Warren responded on Thursday to a report that six women of color left her campaign in Nevada because of a toxic work culture. “I believe these women completely and without reservation and I apologize that they have had a bad experience on this campaign,” she said.
  • Yang fired dozens of staff members from his campaign, Politico reported Thursday, including senior-level positions like national political director and national policy director. This was part of a previously planned restructuring after Iowa, campaign manager Zach Graumann said.

Republicans

What We’re Reading

Flashback: February 7, 2016

Hillary Clinton visited Flint, Michigan, to discuss the clean water crisis in the city.

Click here to learn more.



24 pledged delegates at stake in New Hampshire Democratic primary

Ballotpedia's Daily Presidential News Briefing
February 11, 2020: The New Hampshire Democratic and Republican presidential primaries take place Tuesday. Donald Trump held a campaign rally in Manchester, New Hampshire, on Monday. blank    blankblank


 Poll Spotlight

Presidential poll highlights, 2019-2020 (Emerson College • New Hampshire • February 8-9, 2020)

Presidential poll highlights, 2019-2020 (Suffolk University • New Hampshire • February 8-9, 2020)

Notable Quote of the Day

“Iowa, for all its problems counting its caucus results, also failed in its traditional role of winnowing the presidential field. For the first time since 2004, nobody dropped out after Iowa, sending the full field of Democratic candidates from that state on to New Hampshire. Now Granite State voters will be left with the responsibility of informing candidates which of them won’t go on — if only they’ll listen.”

– Reid J. Epstein and Adriana Ramic, The New York Times

New Hampshire Primary

New Hampshire celebrates its centennial anniversary of holding the first-in-the-nation presidential primary this year. Fifty Democratic and Republican candidates are on the ballot in the primary election on Tuesday. In the Democratic primary, 24 pledged delegates are at stake. On the Republican side, 22 delegates are available.

Three small towns continued the tradition of opening polls at midnight on Tuesday. The earliest of early returns: Michael Bloomberg won Dixville Notch with two write-in votes, and Amy Klobuchar won Hart’s Location with six votes and Millsfield with two votes.

Democrats

Republicans

  • Donald Trump held a rally in Manchester, New Hampshire, on Monday night. He called on independents to vote in the Democratic primary for the weakest candidate.

  • Bill Weld is hosting a primary night party in Manchester, New Hampshire, on Tuesday.


Special guest analysis

Jim Ellis is a 35-year political veteran who now analyzes election data for major corporations, associations, and legislative advocacy firms. He is president of EllisInsight, LLC. We invited him to share analysis on the state of Texas in the 2020 election.

While Hawkeye State voters attended meetings in 1,765 precincts and submitted their first- and second-round ballots as instructed, the Iowa Democratic Party (IDP) organizers experienced a major reporting system breakdown that delayed counting and verification for a period of days. At the end of the week, the IDP was able to release vote totals even though Democratic National Committee Chairman Tom Perez was publicly calling for them to recount every ballot because of what he claimed were potential tabulation errors.

Former South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg is being credited with the win because he scored a razor-thin 26.2 to 26.1% edge in State Delegate Equivalents even though Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) recorded 6,103 more votes than Buttigieg on the first ballot and 2,568 more on the second, or vote alignment, round. The quirk in the rules—which, much like the Electoral College, weighs larger population areas with a greater delegate composition—allowed the media to crown Buttigieg the winner, but it is Sanders who actually attracted the greater number of votes.

In the Iowa system, the caucus attendees vote for president, but in doing so they elect delegates to the Iowa Democratic Convention, which will be held June 13. At that time, the elected delegates will assign the state’s 41 Democratic National Convention delegates. The initial projection suggests that Buttigieg will receive 14 national delegates, Sanders 12, Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) 8, former Vice President Joe Biden 6, and Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-Minn.) one.

What we do know is that the five candidates advancing into New Hampshire with Iowa delegates are very much alive to compete for the nomination. On the outside, former New York City Michael Bloomberg appears as the sixth candidate with the financial ability to compete to the end, but it’s unclear as to whether he can amass anything close to a majority within the state delegate counts.

Perhaps the luckiest candidate in the Iowa field is Mr. Biden. His fourth-place finish with half the votes Sanders garnered was highly disappointing and well below expectations.  With the Iowa vote now lacking credibility, however, he can escape, to a degree, from what would otherwise have been a potentially major momentum setback. A rebound in New Hampshire and then Nevada is now a must for his campaign.

The Iowa result, after more than a year of campaigning for these candidates, is anticlimactic and now endangers the state from continuing to have a prominent nomination position in future elections. Tonight’s New Hampshire primary could produce an equally tight finish. Considering the Iowa debacle, it looks like the campaign will now begin in earnest in the Granite State.

Flashback: February 11, 2016

The Congressional Black Caucus PAC endorsed Hillary Clinton.blank

Click here to learn more.



First 2020 vacancy count

Welcome to the February 10 edition of Bold Justice, Ballotpedia’s newsletter about the Supreme Court of the United States (SCOTUS) and other judicial happenings around the U.S. Happy (early) Valentine’s Day from Ballotpedia! Share the love and the information! Follow us on Twitter or subscribe to the Daily Brew.

We #SCOTUS so you don't have to

Arguments

The Supreme Court justices are on winter recess until February 21. Click here to read more about SCOTUS’ current term.

Today, we’re highlighting an upcoming case that concerns the Constitution’s separation of powers doctrine—Seila Law v. Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. The case is scheduled for argument on March 3 and came on a writ of certiorari to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit.

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) issued a civil investigative demand to the California-based firm Seila Law, which refused to comply with the demand. The CFPB petitioned the U.S. District Court for the Central District of California, asking the court to enforce compliance. Seila Law challenged the petition, arguing the CFPB violated the Constitution’s separation of powers doctrine. The district court rejected Seila Law’s argument and ordered it to comply. Seila Law appealed to the 9th Circuit, which affirmed the district court’s order.

Seila Law petitioned the U.S. Supreme Court for review. The firm presented the following questions:

  1. Does the vesting of substantial executive authority in the CFPB violate the separation of powers?
  1. If the CFPB is found unconstitutional on the basis of the separation of powers, can 12 U.S.C. §5491(c)(3) be severed from the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act?

The Dodd-Frank Act created the CFPB in 2010. 12 U.S.C. §5491(c)(3) of the Act established one agency director, a presidential appointee subject to Senate confirmation. The director serves a five-year term, and can be removed only for cause—”inefficiency, neglect of duty, or malfeasance in office.”

Opinions

Between 2007 and 2018, SCOTUS issued opinions in 850 cases, averaging between 70 and 90 cases per year. Below is a table listing the four opinions issued by the court so far this term:

Of the 74 opinions SCOTUS issued in its 2018-2019 term, it reversed 47, or 63.5%, of lower court rulings—a 7 percentage percent decline from its 2017-2018 termClick here to read more about SCOTUS’ 2018-2019 term.

Between 2007 and 2019, SCOTUS issued opinions in 924 cases. Of those, it reversed a lower court decision 650 times (70.3 percent) while affirming a lower court decision 266 times (28.8 percent).

Click here for more information on SCOTUS reversal rates. Ballotpedia will release this term’s reversal rates in summer 2020!

Upcoming SCOTUS dates

Here are the court’s upcoming dates of interest in February:

  • February 21: SCOTUS will conference. A conference is a private meeting of the justices.
  • February 24: 
    • SCOTUS will release orders.
    • SCOTUS will hear arguments in two cases.
  • February 25: SCOTUS will hear arguments in one case.
  • February 26: SCOTUS will hear arguments in one case.
  • February 28: SCOTUS will conference.

The Federal Vacancy Count

The Federal Vacancy Count tracks vacancies, nominations, and confirmations to all United States Article III federal courts in a one-month period. This month’s edition includes nominations, confirmations, and vacancies from January 3 to February 3.

Highlights

  • Vacancies: There have been three new judicial vacancies since the December 2019 report. As of February 3, 75 (or 8.6 percent) of 870 active Article III judicial positions on the courts covered in this report were vacant.

    Including the United States Court of Federal Claims and the United States territorial courts, 81 of 890 active federal judicial positions are vacant.

  • Nominations: There was one new nomination since the December 2019 report.
  • Confirmations: There have not been any new confirmations since the December 2019 report.

Vacancy count for February 3, 2020

A breakdown of the vacancies at each level can be found in the table below. For a more detailed look at the vacancies on the federal courts, click here.

*Though the United States territorial courts are named as district courts, they are not Article III courts. They are created in accordance with the power granted under Article IV of the U.S. Constitution. Click here for more information.

New vacancies

Three judges left active status, creating Article III vacancies. As Article III judicial positions, they must be filled by a nomination from the president. Nominations are subject to Senate confirmation.

The following chart tracks the number of vacancies on the United States Court of Appeals from the inauguration of President Donald Trump (R) to February 3.

The following map displays federal district court vacancies as of February 3.

New nominations

President Trump announced one new nomination since the December 2019 report.

  • Drew Tipton, to the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Texas.

The president has announced 239 Article III judicial nominations since taking office January 20, 2017. The president named 69 judicial nominees in 2017, 92 in 2018, and 77 in 2019. For more information on the president’s judicial nominees, click here.

New confirmations

Between January 3 and February 3, 2020, the Senate did not confirm any of the president’s nominees to Article III courts.

Since January 2017, the Senate has confirmed 187 of President Trump’s judicial nominees—133 district court judges, 50 appeals court judges, two Court of International Trade judges, and two Supreme Court justices.

Need a daily fix of judicial nomination, confirmation, and vacancy information? Click here for continuing updates on the status of all federal judicial nominees.

Or, if you prefer, we also maintain a list of individuals President Trump has nominated.

Looking ahead

We’ll be back February 24 with a new edition of Bold Justice. 

Click here to learn more.



Iowa Dems project 14 national delegates for Buttigieg, 12 for Sanders

Ballotpedia's Daily Presidential News Briefing
February 10, 2020: With 100% of precincts reporting, the Iowa Democratic Party projected the national delegate counts for each candidate. Seven Democratic presidential candidates debated Friday night in Manchester, New Hampshire. blank    blankblank   


Since 1976, how many presidential candidates have won the New Hampshire primary and their party’s nomination after losing the Iowa caucuses?

Notable Quote of the Day

“Bernie Sanders was battered in Iowa with more than $800,000 in TV attack ads that labeled him a socialist and argued he couldn’t beat President Trump.

Here in New Hampshire, the opposite has happened: The airwaves are free of anti-Sanders spots in the days before the first-in-the-nation-primary, and he’s watching the moderates shank each other.”

– Holly Otterbein and Stephanie Murray, Politico

Debate Night

Seven Democratic presidential candidates debated Friday night in Manchester, New Hampshire: Joe BidenPete ButtigiegAmy KlobucharBernie SandersTom SteyerElizabeth Warren, and Andrew Yang.

The candidates discussed electability, healthcare, impeachment, foreign policy, drug policy, gun policy, the Supreme Court, race, and climate change. Sanders had the most speaking time at 20.1 minutes. Yang spoke the least at 8.1 minutes.

For highlights from the debate for each candidate, click here.

Iowa Caucus Results

With 100% of precincts reporting, the Iowa Democratic Party projected Pete Buttigieg will win 14 national delegates, Bernie Sanders 12, Elizabeth Warren 8, Joe Biden 6, and  Amy Klobuchar 1.

The Sanders campaign announced on Sunday that it would request a partial recanvass of the caucus results before the extended deadline on Monday.

Democrats

  • Michael Bennet is holding town halls in New London and Manchester, New Hampshire, on Monday.

  • Joe Biden released a digital ad on Saturday comparing his and Pete Buttigieg’s political experience. He is holding a GOTV event in Manchester, New Hampshire, on Monday.

  • Rep. Haley Stevens (Mich.) endorsed Michael Bloomberg on Saturday. He is airing two new anti-Trump ads, “Bring Presidential Back” and “Nice Try.” The Bloomberg campaign also opened five field offices in Minnesota, where there are 45 staffers across the state.

  • Pete Buttigieg will campaign at Plymouth State University and hold GOTV rallies in Milford and Exeter, New Hampshire, on Monday.

  • Tulsi Gabbard will campaign in Manchester, New Hampshire, on Monday. She launched a petition on Sunday calling for the resignation of Democratic National Committee Chairman Tom Perez following the Iowa caucus reporting issues.

  • Former Rep. and 2020 presidential candidate Joe Sestak endorsed Amy Klobuchar on Friday. Klobuchar’s campaign reported raising $2 million in less than 24 hours after the New Hampshire debate.

  • Deval Patrick will speak at New England College and the Coalition Against Sexual & Domestic Violence Forum in New Hampshire on Monday.

  • Bernie Sanders is holding events throughout New Hampshire on Monday, including a concert rally with Rep. Alexandria Oscasio-Cortez.

  • Tom Steyer campaigned in South Carolina on Sunday, where he called for increasing the hourly minimum wage to $22.

  • Elizabeth Warren is holding a GOTV event in Rochester and a town hall in Portsmouth, New Hampshire, on Monday.

  • Andrew Yang will speak at town halls across New Hampshire on Monday. In the evening, he will hold rallies in Derry and Keene State.

Republicans

Flashback: February 10, 2016

Carly Fiorina and Chris Christie suspended their presidential campaigns after finishing outside of the top five candidates in the New Hampshire Republican primary.blank

Click here to learn more.



Virginia House of Delegates approves bill establishing collective bargaining rights for public-sector workers

On Feb. 6, the Virginia House of Delegates approved HB582, a bill establishing collective bargaining rights for public-sector workers at both the state and local levels. Nationwide, three states – Virginia, North Carolina, and South Carolina – currently prohibit collective bargaining on the part of public-sector workers.

What specifically does the bill propose? HB582 would make the following changes to the state’s public-sector labor laws:

  • Repeals the current prohibition against collective bargaining by public-sector workers.
  • Establishes the Public Employee Relations Board to designate bargaining units and provide for certification and decertification elections for unions.
  • Requires employers and unions certified as exclusive bargaining representatives “to meet at reasonable times to negotiate in good faith with respect to wages, hours, and other terms and conditions of employment.”
  • Repeals a 2013 law stipulating that, in certification and decertification elections, “the right of an individual employee to vote by secret ballot is a fundamental right that shall be guaranteed from infringement.”

How did the House vote, and what comes next? The House voted 54-45 to approve HB582, with one member not voting. All but one Democrat, Del. Dawn Adams, voted in favor of the bill. All Republicans voted against it.

The bill now goes to the Virginia State Senate, where Democrats hold a 21-19 majority. If the Senate approves the bill, it will then go to Governor Ralph Northam (D) for his action.

What are the reactions?

  • Del. Elizabeth Guzman (D), the bill’s chief sponsor, said, “Workers in every locality in every corner of the commonwealth should have the freedom to collectively bargain. As one of only three states to ban public sector collective bargaining, Virginia is far behind the curve of history. It’s past time to give our teachers, firefighters, and other public service workers a voice so that they can advocate for the communities they serve.”
  • Jim Livingston, president of the Virginia Education Association (an affiliate of the National Education Association), said, “Students benefit when teachers and other school professionals have a voice to advocate for students and public schools. In other states with collective bargaining, educators and school districts have negotiated agreements that lowered class sizes, provided for extra resources for students, and addressed school health and safety issues. Collective bargaining is good for students, good for educators, good for schools, and good for Virginia communities.”
  • Mark Mix, president of the National Right to Work Legal Defense Foundation, opposed the bill, saying, “Under such a monopoly bargaining regime, individual workers are prohibited from even discussing basic workplace issues with their employer without triggering an unfair labor practice claim. And if that weren’t already bad enough, the bill would give union agents free reign to impose forced representation on workers through the coercive and abuse-prone ‘card check’ process where union organizers can bully or mislead workers into signing cards that are then used as ‘votes’ for unionization.”
  • Jacob Huebert, an attorney for the plaintiff in Janus v. AFSCME, said provisions of the bill would conflict with Janus: “The bill would give unions the exclusive responsibility to receive and maintain authorizations for union dues deductions from employees’ paychecks as well as employees’ requests to cancel or change their dues authorizations. … That is insufficient to comply with Janus’s affirmative consent requirement.”

What we’ve been reading

The big picture

Number of relevant bills by state

We are currently tracking 79 pieces of legislation dealing with public-sector employee union policy. On the map below, a darker shade of green indicates a greater number of relevant bills. Click here for a complete list of all the bills we’re tracking.

Union Station map February 7, 2020.png

Number of relevant bills by current legislative status

Union Station status chart February 7, 2020.png

Number of relevant bills by partisan status of sponsor(s)

Union Station partisan chart February 7, 2020.png

Recent legislative actions

Below is a complete list of relevant legislative actions taken since our last issue. Bills are listed in alphabetical order, first by state then by bill number.

  • Kansas SB361: This bill would permit public employees to rescind dues deduction authorizations at any time.
    • Introduced Feb. 4 and referred to Senate Commerce Committee Feb. 6.
    • Sponsored by Senate Assessment and Taxation Committee.
  • Maine LD900: This bill authorizes certain classes of public-sector employees to strike.
    • Hearing scheduled Feb. 5.
    • Democratic sponsors.
  • Maryland HB163: This bill would prohibit employers from requiring employees to join, remain members of, or pay dues to a union as a condition of employment.
    • Hearing scheduled Feb. 4.
    • Republican sponsors.
  • Maryland SB658: This bill would grant collective bargaining rights to graduate assistants in the University of Maryland system, Morgan State University, and St. Mary’s College.
    • Introduced Feb. 3 and referred to Senate Finance Committee Feb. 4.
    • Democratic sponsors.
  • Missouri HB2341: This bill would require public employees to provide annual written or electronic authorization for payroll deductions of union dues.
    • Second reading Feb. 3.
    • Republican sponsors.
  • New Hampshire HB1290: This bill would require the state public employee labor relations board to permit employees to vote by mail in certification elections.
    • House Labor, Industrial, and Rehabilitative Services Committee executive sessions scheduled Feb. 5.
    • Bipartisan sponsors.
  • New Hampshire HB1399: This bill would allow a bargaining unit to request certification of its union/representative.
    • House Labor, Industrial, and Rehabilitative Services Committee executive sessions scheduled Feb. 5.
    • Democratic sponsors.
  • New Hampshire HB1554: This bill would provide for changes to public employee voting in certification elections.
    • House Labor, Industrial, and Rehabilitative Services Committee executive sessions scheduled Feb. 5.
    • Republican sponsors.
  • New Jersey S1202: This bill would require public employers to grant either unpaid or paid leave to employees who are elected or appointed as union officers.
    • Introduced and referred to Senate State Government, Wagering, Tourism, and Historic Preservation Committee Feb. 3.
    • Democratic sponsors.
  • New Mexico SB110: This bill would make various amendments to the state’s public-sector labor relations laws.
    • Reported favorably by Senate Public Affairs Committee Feb. 3.
    • Democratic sponsors.
  • Oklahoma SB1480: This bill would authorize school employees to negotiate independently with their employers.
    • Introduced Feb. 3.
    • Republican sponsors.
  • Oklahoma SB1716: This bill would require elections to certify school employee unions.
    • Introduced Feb. 3.
    • Republican sponsors.
  • Oklahoma SB1724: This bill would require written authorization for school employees to deduct union dues and political contributions from their paychecks.
    • Introduced Feb. 3.
    • Republican sponsors.
  • Virginia HB582: This bill would repeal the existing prohibition against collective bargaining by public employees.
    • House approved Feb. 6.
    • Democratic sponsors.
  • Virginia SB1022: This bill would repeal the existing prohibition against collective bargaining by public employees.
    • Senate Commerce and Labor Committee hearing scheduled Feb. 3.
    • Democratic sponsors.
  • Virginia SB939: This bill would permit local governments to recognize unions as bargaining agents for public-sector workers.
    • Senate Finance and Appropriations Committee hearing scheduled Feb. 6.
    • Democratic sponsors.
  • Washington HB2017: This bill would establish collective bargaining rights for administrative law judges.
    • Referred to House Rules Committee Feb. 4.
    • Democratic sponsors.
  • Washington SB6224: This bill would establish collective bargaining rights for administrative law judges.
    • Senate Ways and Means Committee hearing scheduled Feb. 3.
    • Democratic sponsors.


Trump acquitted of abuse of power, obstruction of Congress

Ballotpedia's Daily Presidential News Briefing
February 6, 2020: Donald Trump was acquitted by the U.S. Senate of two charges. Bernie Sanders raised $25 million in January.        

Notable Quote of the Day

“Here’s the real wakeup call for Democrats, coming out of Iowa: We can’t put our heads in the sand and ignore the middling turnout, in a time of bonafide historic upheaval.

If Democrats don’t put together an unprecedented get-out-the-vote effort in 2020, far exceeding anything from the past, we are setting ourselves up for failure. “

– Jeff Biggers, Salon

Iowa Caucus Results

The Iowa Democratic Party has released results from 97 percent of precincts. Pete Buttigieg leads Bernie Sanders by 0.1% in state delegate equivalents, while Sanders tops the final raw vote.

Democrats

Republicans

What We’re Reading

Flashback: February 6, 2016

Jeb Bush, Ben Carson, Chris Christie, Ted Cruz, John Kasich, Marco Rubio, and Donald Trump debated in New Hampshire.

Click here to learn more.



Partial Iowa returns show Buttigieg, Sanders leading

Ballotpedia's Daily Presidential News Briefing
February 5, 2020: The Iowa Democratic Party released its first results from the caucuses on Tuesday. Tulsi Gabbard is holding a protest in New Hampshire outside of the venue where a series of CNN town halls will be recorded.         

Presidential Facebook ads, 2019-2020 (January 27-February 2, 2020)

Notable Quote of the Day

“Enter the biggest winner of this week. Not Trump, who seems incapable of just leaving a good news cycle well enough alone. And not Joe Biden, even though he got to skip giving a pep talk to sad-faced Iowa campaign workers and declare, ‘On to New Hampshire!’ And certainly not Mayor Pete, who may or may not have won the caucuses Monday night, but will never have the chance to come barreling out of the once-important state with a win under his belt and history in the books.

The real winner this week is former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg, who has been lying in the tall grass of the later states, seeding each with money, TV and staff, waiting for the day Democrats take a look at their options and say, ‘Is this the best we can do?’ That day seems to be coming faster than anyone anticipated.”

– Patricia Murphy, Roll Call

Iowa Caucus Results

The Iowa Democratic Party released its first results from the caucuses in two batches on Tuesday following quality control issues. With 71 percent of precincts reporting, Pete Buttigieg

leads in state delegate equivalents and Bernie Sanders tops the final raw vote.

Democrats

  • Michael BennetAmy KlobucharBernie Sanders, and Elizabeth Warren will be in Washington, D.C., on Wednesday for the final vote in the impeachment trial.
  • BennetPete ButtigiegKlobucharDeval PatrickAndrew Yang, and Tom Steyer are speaking at the Youth Climate and Clean Energy Town Hall in New Hampshire on Wednesday.
  • Arkansas House Minority Leader Fredrick Love endorsed Joe Biden on Tuesday. Unite the Country, a super PAC backing Biden, announced on Tuesday that it is launching a $900,000 television and digital ad campaign in New Hampshire.
  • Michael Bloomberg began airing a new ad called “The Real State of the Union” on Tuesday ahead of the president’s address. It will run nationally on MSNBC, FOX, CNN, and other platforms. Rhode Island Gov. Gina Raimondo endorsed Bloomberg on Wednesday.
  • Tulsi Gabbard is holding a protest in New Hampshire on Wednesday outside of the venue where a series of eight CNN town halls will be recorded. Gabbard said she did not receive an explanation for why she was not invited to the event.

Republicans

  • In his State of the Union address on Tuesday night, Donald Trump discussed the USMCA trade agreement, economy, Democratic Party, and assasination of Iranian commander Qasem Soleimani.
  • In a series of tweetsJoe Walsh said on Tuesday that he did not believe Trump could be defeated in the Republican primary and that a new political party or movement needed to form for conservatives.
  • Bill Weld will attend the Youth Climate and Clean Energy Town Hall in New Hampshire on Wednesday.

What We’re Reading

Flashback: February 5, 2016

Former NAACP President Ben Jealous endorsed Bernie Sanders.

Click here to learn more.



Democratic Iowa caucus results delayed for quality control checks

Ballotpedia's Daily Presidential News Briefing
February 4, 2020: The Iowa Democratic Party announced that caucus results are delayed due to quality control issues. Donald Trump is delivering the State of the Union address on Tuesday night.        

Presidential poll highlights, 2019-2020 (UMass Lowell • New Hampshire • January 28-31, 2020)

Presidential poll highlights, 2019-2020 (Emerson College • New Hampshire • January 31-February 2, 2020)

Notable Quote of the Day

“This fiasco means the end of the caucuses as a significant American political event. The rest of the country was already losing patience with Iowa anyway and this cooks Iowa’s goose. Frankly, it should. The real winner tonight was Donald Trump, who got to watch his opponents wallow in a mess. A lot of good Democratic candidates and people who fought their hearts out here for…nothing.”

– David Yepsen, The Des Moines Register political reporter

Iowa Caucus Results

The Iowa Democratic Party has not yet released the caucus results. The state party announced the delay was due to quality control issues.

Communications director Mandy McClure said in a statement, “We found inconsistencies in the reporting of three sets of results. In addition to the tech systems being used to tabulate results, we are also using photos of results and a paper trail to validate that all results match and ensure that we have confidence and accuracy in the numbers we report. This is simply a reporting issue, the app did not go down and this is not a hack or an intrusion. The underlying data and paper trail is sound and will simply take time to further report the results.”

The following Republican results were based on 99 percent of precincts reporting. Donald Trump won the caucuses and has been allocated at least 38 of the 40 delegates.

Democrats

Republicans

What We’re Reading

Flashback: February 4, 2016

The Washington Post reported that Ben Carson was cutting more than 50 staff positions.

Click here to learn more.



Heart of the Primaries 2020, Republicans-Issue 4 (February 5, 2020)

This week: Doug Collins enters special Senate election in GA, Feenstra leads IA-04 GOP field in fundraising, and retiring TX Speaker donates to seven incumbents

Click here to follow developments on the Democratic side. Have a tip or see something we missed? Email us at cory@ballotpedia.org. And please share this newsletter with your colleagues!

On the news

Where do Republican and conservative pundits and commentators disagree? Each week, we bring you excerpts that highlight differing views.

“Trump is not making the effort [to visit Iowa] because he is afraid of his two hapless Republican challengers, former Rep. Joe Walsh and former Massachusetts Gov. Bill Weld. …

Still, Trump has something to prove. Given his success in the 2016 GOP race, it is easy to forget that he started out by losing the Iowa caucuses to Ted Cruz. So he wants to make up for that. But more importantly, he wants to cement Iowans’ support for his reelection. Plus, he wants to take advantage of the increased intensity of support among Republicans who believe Trump has been treated unfairly by Democrats in Washington.”

Byron York, Washington Examiner, Feb. 3, 2020

“[Trump] easily carried [Iowa] during the last general election. His hold on the Senate majority, though marginal, likely faces little to no danger here. He will easily wipe away a small band of little-known candidates mounting primary challenges against the longest of odds to deny him the GOP nomination.

So why was the president of the United States in Des Moines on a Thursday night when he still stands trial for impeachment in Washington? Because Donald Trump had a simple message for the Democrats lining up for a chance to take him on in November: As far as he’s concerned, Iowa belongs to him.

Philip Wegmann, RealClear Politics, Jan. 31, 2020

U.S. Congress

Doug Collins enters special Senate election in GA

U.S. Rep. Doug Collins announced Jan. 29 he is running in the special election for U.S. Senate in Georgia. He joins three other Republicans—including incumbent Sen. Kelly Loeffler—four Democrats, and one independent currently running in the Nov. 3 all-party general election

Sen. Johnny Isakson resigned Dec. 31 for health reasons.

If no candidate receives a majority of the vote, a runoff between the top two will be Jan. 5, 2021.

Several media outlets reported that President Donald Trump wanted Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp (R) to appoint Collins to the Senate seat. Kemp chose Loeffler, a financial executive and co-owner of Atlanta’s WNBA team, to fill the vacancy created when Isakson retired.

Greg Bluestein at the Atlanta Journal-Constitution wrote that Kemp’s choice was part of a strategy to recapture Georgia suburbs following his 1.4-percentage-point victory over Stacey Abrams (D) in 2018. Kemp avoided a runoff in that election with 50.2% of the vote. Bluestein wrote:

Abrams came within a whisker of forcing a runoff against Kemp by blazing a blue streak across north Atlanta suburbs where Republicans once dominated. …

With Loeffler, who would be the second female U.S. senator in Georgia history, he’s trying to expand the Georgia GOP’s appeal to those moderate and independent voters who have fled the Republican fold.

National Republican Senatorial Committee executive director Kevin McLaughlin said of Collins’ entrance to the race, “All he has done is put two Senate seats, multiple House seats and Georgia’s 16 electoral votes in play.” 

Collins tweeted, “Republican voters in Georgia should choose their candidate — not one politician or a Super PAC in Washington. The time for that contest is now so we can unite well before November. Fighting ourselves and the left at the same time is a bad strategy.”

Club for Growth announced plans to spend $3 million on ads opposing Collins. Collins released a digital ad referring to the group as a “Never Trump, anti-agriculture group” and to a farm bill that he supported and the organization opposed.

After Collins and Democrat Raphael Warnock announced their candidacies last week, The Cook Political Report changed its special election rating from Likely Republican to Lean Republican:

All these dynamics — long and protracted attacks between Collins and Loeffler and the entrance of Warnock — make it clear that this race is moving up the list of GOP headaches and Democratic opportunities, giving them yet another seat in their path to a majority. With its rapidly changing demographics, Georgia is a state that will be contested at the presidential level, and also sees Republican Sen. David Perdue running for re-election. But this is the more competitive race of the two.

While the all-party special general election is not a primary, the race will be the first contest for the Senate seat in Georgia, and it is unlike most other Nov. 3 general elections in that it may not be the last. 

Satellite groups spending on Byrne in Senate primary in AL

Two groups are running ads supporting and opposing U.S. Rep. Bradley Byrne in the Senate primary in Alabama, marking an uptick in satellite spending in the race. 

Fighting for Alabama, Inc. spent $351,000 through Jan. 31 on a TV ad calling Byrne “one of President Trump’s strongest defenders.” 

Club for Growth spent $274,000 last week re-airing an ad that first ran in November opposing Byrne. The ad says, “Byrne voted three times to fund a government giveaway program that hands out billions of dollars to help big companies make more profits overseas.” 

Byrne’s campaign representatives have called the Club for Growth a pro-China group that opposed Trump’s presidency and agenda.

Byrne is one of six candidates in the March 3 primary. There will be a March 31 primary runoff if no candidate receives a majority of the primary vote. 

Other candidates include Jeff Sessions, who held the seat for 20 years before the president appointed him U.S. attorney general; former football coach Tommy Tuberville; and 2017 special Senate election candidate Roy Moore, who lost to Doug Jones (D) by 1.7 percentage points.

In two internal polls from the Sessions campaign, Sessions led with 43% and 44%—below the threshold needed to avoid a runoff— and Byrne and Tuberville were in competition for second place.

In addition to satellite spending for and against Byrne, the Senate Conservatives Fund has spent $219,000 since May 2019 on digital ads, direct mail, and more supporting state Rep. Arnold Mooney in the race.

Jones is the first Democrat to win a Senate seat in Alabama since 1992. The Republican primary winner will face him in November.

Feenstra leads IA-04 GOP field in fundraising

In Iowa’s 4th Congressional District GOP primary, year-end campaign finance reports show state Sen. Randy Feenstra starting 2020 with $489,000 in cash on hand compared to $32,000 for incumbent Rep. Steve King.

Feenstra raised $721,000 throughout 2019 to King’s $263,000.

As we reported in our January 22 issue of Heart of the Primaries, King has been in the House since 2003. His closest re-election contest came in 2018 when he defeated J.D. Scholten 50%-47%. 

Bret Richards raised $256,000, the third-most of the Republican field, and had $100,000 on hand. Currently, one candidate is running in the Democratic primary—J.D. Scholten, King’s 2018 opponent. Scholten raised $734,000 and had $540,000 on hand.

The primary is June 2, and the filing deadline is March 13. There are currently six candidates in the Republican primary.

Congressional Leadership Fund releases pro-Granger ads in TX-12

Last week, we looked at the Club for Growth PAC’s endorsement of Chris Putnam’s primary challenge to U.S. Rep. Kay Granger in Texas’ 12th District. Since then, the Congressional Leadership Fund released pro-Granger TV and radio ads highlighting Trump’s endorsement of her. The group said it spent $300,000 on the TV ad.

State executives

New Jersey gubernatorial primary begins to take shape as Ciattarelli launches campaign

Fewer state executive races take place in presidential election years than in midterm years. This year, there are 159 state executive offices on the ballot nationwide, compared to 303 offices up in 2018. Just 37 of those seats are top four offices (governor, lieutenant governor, attorney general, and secretary of state); down from 123 in 2018. In this year’s run of Heart of Primaries, our coverage of state executive races will include stories on emerging state executive candidate fields in the 2021 and 2022 elections as well as the most recent news from 2020.

This week, we turn to New Jersey, where Republicans are gearing up to try and retake the governor’s mansion in the 2021 elections. Incumbent Phil Murphy (D) was elected to succeed term-limited Gov. Chris Christie (R) in 2017 and is expected to seek re-election next year, although he has yet to formally declare. The Republican candidate field has begun to take shape this year, with former Assemblyman Jack Ciattarelli launching his campaign Jan. 21.

Ciattarelli, who served seven years in the state Assembly, was one of five Republicans who ran for the GOP nomination in 2017. Although then-Lt. Gov. Kim Guadagno defeated him in the primary, Ciattarelli won seven of New Jersey’s 21 counties and was the only candidate other than Guadagno to receive more than 10% support statewide. Ciattarelli’s early endorsers for his 2021 run include Somerset County GOP Chairman Al Gaburo and state Sen. Kip Bateman.

Other potential candidates include state GOP Chairman Doug Steinhardt, state Assembly minority leader Jon Bramnick, and 2017 candidate Joseph “Rudy” Rullo. Another potential candidate, Assemblywoman Holly Schepisi (R) confirmed to Insider NJ on Jan. 31 that she would not run in 2021.

Montana Attorney General Tim Fox picks gubernatorial running mate

Montana Attorney General Tim Fox (R) announced Wednesday that former state Rep. Jon Knokey (R) would serve as his gubernatorial running mate. Candidates for governor of Montana are required to name a running mate at the time they file for election.

Knokey was elected to his Bozeman-area state House seat in 2016, defeating incumbent Christopher Pope (D) by a margin of 0.9 percentage points. Knokey suspended his bid for re-election in August 2018, saying that he had recently accepted a job offer that would leave him without time to serve as a legislator.

Fox’s selection of Knokey leaves Rep. Greg Gianforte as the final Republican candidate who has not yet selected a running mate. State Sen. Al Olszewski is running alongside fellow state Sen. Kenneth Bogner. On the Democratic side, neither Lt. Gov. Mike Cooney nor consultant Whitney Williams has selected a running mate.

The June 2 primary is open to all voters. No Republican candidate has been elected governor in Montana since Judy Martz (R) in 2000.

Follow-up: Second Utah poll finds Huntsman and Cox leading, large segment of undecided voters

Last week, we reported on a Suffolk University/Salt Lake Tribune poll of primary voters in Utah’s gubernatorial race. That poll found former Gov. Jon Huntsman (R) apparently leading Lt. Gov. Spencer Cox (R) 26-18 with 48% of voters undecided. 

A Deseret News/Hinckley Institute poll released Thursday paints a similar picture, with Huntsman apparently leading Cox 33-25 and 25% of voters undecided. None of the other candidates received more than 5% support. The Deseret News poll also surveyed voters who said that they were not Republicans but planned to join the party ahead of the gubernatorial primary. When those voters are included, Huntsman’s apparent lead grows to 35-25, while the share of undecided voters is reduced to 23%.

Six of the seven Republican candidates took part in the first debate of the primary Friday at the Salt Lake Palace Convention Center, discussing education and economic development. The candidate filing deadline is March 19. The June 30 primary will be open to registered Republicans only.

Legislatures

Ohio GOP meeting to reconsider endorsement of candidate

On Thursday, the Ohio Republican Party will meet to reconsider its endorsement of Joe Dills in the three-way Republican primary in House District 65. In January, the party endorsed Dills against the recommendation of the House Republican Caucus, which asked it to endorse Jean Schmidt instead. Schmidt is a political ally of House Speaker Larry Householder.

Dills, Schmidt, and Dillon Blevins are running in the March 17 primary. The winner will face Alan Darnowsky (D) in the general election. The retiring incumbent, John Becker (R), received at least 66 percent of the vote in each of the last four elections. District 66 is located east of Cincinnati. Republicans hold a 61-38 majority in the House.

Retiring TX Speaker donates to seven incumbents

Texas House Speaker Dennis Bonnen (R) made donations to the campaigns of seven incumbents facing primary challengers this year. He donated $15,000 each to Dan Flynn, Chris Paddie, Geanie Morrison, Jared Patterson, Briscoe Cain, Dennis Paul, and Phil Stephenson. A spokesperson for Bonnen said the donations were given in exchange for help with passing Bonnen’s legislative priorities in last year’s session.

Bonnen announced his retirement in October 2019 after a recording was released of Bonnen telling a group he would give them media credentials in exchange for working to defeat 10 Republican incumbents in the 2020 elections. Bonnen was first elected to the House in 1996 and was elected Speaker in Jan. 2019.

Republican member of AK House coalition retires

Last week, Alaska Rep. Tammie Wilson (R) retired, creating an open race in the 3rd District. Wilson was one of eight Republicans who created a coalition majority with 15 Democrats and two independents in Feb. 2019. This meant that although Republicans had a numerical majority in the House, a Democrat was selected as Speaker. Wilson said she was leaving the legislature in order to take a job with the Alaska Office of Children’s Services.

The filing deadline in Alaska is June 1 and there are so far no declared candidates in the race. All 40 House districts are up for election in November. Republicans hold a 22-15 numerical House majority, along with one vacancy and two unaffiliated members.

Power players

“The Club for Growth is a national network of over 250,000 pro-growth, limited government Americans who share in the belief that prosperity and opportunity come from economic freedom.” – Club for Growth website

The Club for Growth is a 501(c)(4) nonprofit organization based in Washington, D.C. The organization has two political arms, the Club for Growth PAC and Club for Growth Action, a super PAC.

According to the Club for Growth website, the organization focuses on the following issues: budget and spending, education, entitlements, free trade, regulation, taxes, term limits, and tort reform. 

The Club for Growth PAC “endorses and raises money for candidates who stay true to the fundamental principles of limited government and economic freedom,” according to its website. The PAC focuses on U.S. House and Senate races. To view a list of 2020 candidate endorsements, click here.

The super PAC Club for Growth Action can raise and spend unlimited amounts of money. The group cannot contribute directly to a politician or political party, but it can spend independently to campaign for or against political figures. According to the group’s website, it “[runs] independent hard-hitting TV, radio, Internet, and direct mail campaigns in critical Senate and House races across the country.”