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NYC votes on RCV tomorrow

On Nov. 5, voters in New York City will decide on a city charter amendment (Question 1) that would establish ranked-choice voting (RCV) for municipal primary and special elections beginning in 2021. If approved, New York City will be the largest city in the nation to use RCV for local elections.

How would Question 1 change the city’s election process? 

  • Question 1 would implement ranked-choice voting in primary and special elections for mayor, public advocate, comptroller, borough president, and city council members. It would allow voters to rank up to five candidates, including a write-in candidate, in order of preference.
  • Question 1 would extend the duration of time between vacancies and the special elections held to fill them from 45 or 60 days, depending on the office, to 80 days. This provision applies to the municipal offices named above. 
  • Question 1 would also amend the timeline for city council redistricting.

How are these elections currently conducted? A combination of plurality and run-off voting is currently used in primary elections for the offices of mayor, comptroller, and public advocate. In the primaries for these offices, if one candidate fails to receive more than 40 percent of the vote, a run-off is held between the top two candidates. Plurality voting is used in all general and special elections and primary elections for non-citywide offices. 

What is ranked-choice voting (RCV)? In a ranked-choice voting (RCV) system, voters rank candidates by preference on their ballots. If a candidate wins a majority of first-choice votes, he or she is declared the winner. If no candidate wins a majority of first-choice votes, the candidate with the fewest first-choice votes is eliminated. First-choice votes cast for the eliminated candidate are removed, lifting the second-choice candidates indicated on those ballots to first-choice status. Under Question 1, these eliminations would be continued until a candidate has won a majority of votes.  

What municipalities use RCV in 2019? The following cities either have used or will use RCV for the first time as part of their 2019 election cycles: Eastpointe, Michigan; Las Cruces, New Mexico; Payton, Utah; St. Louis Park, Minnesota; and Vineyard, Utah.
How many jurisdictions have adopted RCV? To date, 21 jurisdictions (20 municipalities and one state, Maine) have adopted RCV and have either begun using it or are scheduled to begin using it in a coming election cycle. Another seven jurisdictions (six municipalities one state, Utah) have adopted legislation providing for the prospective use of RCV, although none mandate its use. On the map below, states shaded in blue and gold contain jurisdictions that have adopted RCV as part of their election processes. For states shaded in yellow, municipalities either have implemented or will implement RCV this year. For states shaded in blue, municipalities have adopted but have not yet implemented RCV.

Ranked-choice voting map



Bold Justice: SCOTUS hears six cases this week

We SCOTUS so you don’t have to

Arguments

The Supreme Court will hear arguments in six cases this week. Click here to read more about SCOTUS’ current term.

In its October 2018 term, SCOTUS heard arguments in 69 cases. Click here to read more about SCOTUS’ previous term.

Click the links below to read more about the specific cases SCOTUS will hear this week:

November 4

  • In Barton v. Barr, Andre Barton, a Jamaican national, entered the U.S. in 1989 and became a lawful permanent resident in 1992. In 1996, Barton was convicted of several criminal charges. In 2007 and 2008, he was convicted of additional criminal charges. The U.S. Department of Homeland Security charged Barton as removable.

    Barton challenged the charges for removal under 8 U.S.C. § 1229b(a), which allows the U.S. attorney general to cancel the removal of a lawful permanent resident if the individual “has resided in the United States continuously for 7 years after having been admitted in any status.” The continuous residence requirement is subject to a “stop-time” rule, which ends the accrual of continuous residence when the individual commits a crime and renders them “inadmissible” under § 1182(a)(2).

    The U.S. government argued Barton’s crimes made him “inadmissible” under § 1182(a)(2). Barton argued that as an already-admitted lawful permanent resident, he could not be rendered inadmissible. An immigration judge ruled in favor of the government. On appeal, the Board of Immigration Appeals agreed with the immigration judge. On further appeal, the 11th Circuit upheld the immigration judge and the Board of Immigration Appeals’ rulings.

    The issue: Whether a lawfully admitted permanent resident who is not seeking admission to the United States can be “render[ed] … inadmissible” for the purposes of the stop-time rule, 8 U.S.C. § 1229b(d)(l).
     

  • In Kansas v. Glover, a Douglas County police officer stopped Charles Glover on suspicion of driving without a valid license. The officer did not witness any traffic violations. Glover was charged with driving as a habitual violator. Glover moved to suppress evidence from the stop, arguing the officer violated Glover’s Fourth Amendment rights. The state district court agreed, dismissing the case. On appeal, the Kansas Court of Appeals reversed the district court’s ruling. Glover petitioned the Kansas Supreme Court for review. The state Supreme Court affirmed the district court’s ruling, dismissing the case.

    The issue: Whether, for purposes of an investigative stop under the Fourth Amendment, it is reasonable for an officer to suspect that the registered owner of a vehicle is the one driving the vehicle absent any information to the contrary.

November 5

  • In CITGO Asphalt Refining Co. v. Frescati Shipping Co., Ltd., an abandoned anchor in the Delaware River pierced the hull of the Athos I, an oil tanker, causing nearly 264,000 gallons of crude oil to spill into the river. The cost of cleanup was $143 million. Frescati, the shipowner, paid for the cleanup effort and was later reimbursed for $88 million by the U.S. federal government. Frescati and the U.S. sued CITGO, the intended oil recipient, for a portion of the costs.
    A U.S. district judge found CITGO was not liable to pay for the cleanup effort. On appeal, the 3rd Circuit affirmed in part, vacated in part, and remanded the case. On remand, the district court held CITGO was liable to Frescati for breach of contract, holding Frescati was a beneficiary of CITGO’s safe berth warranty. On appeal a second time, the 3rd Circuit affirmed in part the district court’s judgment in favor of the U.S. regarding CITGO’s breach of contract liability.

    The issue: Whether under federal maritime law a safe berth clause in a voyage charter contract is a guarantee of a ship’s safety, as the 3rd Circuit and the 2nd Circuit have held, or a duty of due diligence, as the 5th Circuit has held.

  • In Allen v. Cooper, Frederick Allen, a videographer retained to document the salvaging of the state-owned ship, Queen Anne’s Revenge, sued North Carolina for copyright infringement. Allen also asked the court to declare unconstitutional N.C. Gen. Stat. § 121–25(b), making public records of photos, videos, recordings, and other documentary materials of a shipwreck. Allen claimed the law was passed in bad faith. The Eastern District of North Carolina held the state was not protected from immunity under the Copyright Remedy Clarification Act. On appeal, the 4th Circuit reversed and remanded the district court’s ruling.

    The issue (from Oyez): Whether Congress validly abrogated state sovereign immunity via the Copyright Remedy Clarification Act, which allows authors of original expression to sue states who infringe their federal copyrights?
     

November 6

  • In County of Maui, Hawaii v. Hawaii Wildlife Fund, Maui County, Hawaii, owns and operates four wells acting as the county’s primary means of liquid waste disposal into groundwater and the Pacific Ocean. The Clean Water Act (CWA) prohibits the discharge of pollutants from point sources unless a party obtains an exemption from the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System. A point source is “any discernible, confined and discrete conveyance, including but not limited to any … well … from which pollutants are or may be discharged.”

    The Hawaii Wildlife Fund sued Maui County for violating the CWA by discharging waste without a permit. The District of Hawaii agreed. On appeal, the 9th Circuit affirmed the district court’s judgment.

    The issue: Whether the CWA requires a permit when pollutants originate from a point source but are conveyed to navigable waters by a nonpoint source, such as groundwater.
     

  • In Retirement Plan Committee of IBM v. Jander, Larry Jander invested in IBM’s retirement plan. After IBM sold its microelectronics business at a loss and shares fell, Jander alleged the IBM retirement plan committee violated their fiduciary duty of prudence to the pensioner under the Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA). The Southern District of New York dismissed Jander’s claim. On appeal, the 2nd Circuit reversed and remanded the case. The retirement committee petitioned the U.S. Supreme Court to hear the case, arguing the 2nd Circuit “subverted [a] pleading standard” established in Fifth Third Bancorp v. Dudenhoeffer.

    In Fifth Third, SCOTUS unanimously held that to state a claim under the ERISA, a plaintiff must “plausibly allege[] that a prudent fiduciary … could not have concluded that [an alternative action] would do more harm than good to the fund.”

    The issue: Whether Fifth Third Bancorp v. Dudenhoeffer’s “more harm than good” pleading standard can be satisfied by generalized allegations that the harm of an inevitable disclosure of an alleged fraud generally increases over time.

New cases on the docket

SCOTUS added four cases to the docket since our October 14 edition:

New cases on the docket
According to SCOTUSblog, the minimum distribution pace “reflects the number of petitions that must be granted to fill the court’s docket for oral argument while giving the litigants in each case a complete or near-complete briefing schedule.”

Upcoming SCOTUS dates

Here are the upcoming dates of interest in November:

  • November 4: 
    • SCOTUS will hear arguments in two cases.
    • SCOTUS will release orders.
  • November 5: SCOTUS will hear arguments in two cases.
  • November 6: SCOTUS will hear arguments in two cases.
  • November 8: SCOTUS will conference. A conference is a private meeting of the justices.

SCOTUS Trivia

As of publication, which state is the point of origination for three SCOTUS cases—more than any other state—this term?

  1. Alabama
  2. Hawaii
  3. Kansas
  4. New York

Choose an answer to find out!

Federal Cout Action

Confirmations

The Senate has confirmed five nominees since our October 14 issue. 

The Senate has confirmed 157 of President Trump’s judicial nominees—110 district court judges, 43 appeals court judges, two Court of International Trade judges, and two Supreme Court justices—since January 2017.

Nominations

President Trump has announced two new Article III nominees since our October 14 edition.

The president has announced 226 Article III judicial nominations since taking office Jan. 20, 2017. The president named 69 judicial nominees in 2017 and 92 in 2018. For more information on the president’s judicial nominees, click here.

Vacancies

The federal judiciary currently has 103 vacancies. As of publication, there were 48 pending nominations.

According to the Administrative Office of U.S. Courts, an additional 18 judges have announced their intention to leave active judicial status during Trump’s first term.

For more information on judicial vacancies during Trump’s first term, click here.

Committee action

The Senate Judiciary Committee reported 13 new nominees out of committee since our October 14 edition.

  • David Barlow, nominee for the U.S. District Court for the District of Utah.
  • John Kness, nominee for the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Illinois.
  • R. Austin Huffaker, nominee to the U.S. District Court for the Middle District of Alabama.
  • Lee Rudofsky, nominee to the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Arkansas.
  • Justin Walker, nominee to the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Kentucky (since confirmed).
  • Danielle Hunsaker, nominee to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit.
  • William Nardini, nominee to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 2nd Circuit.
  • Karen Marston, nominee to the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania.
  • Anuraag Singhal, nominee to the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Florida.
  • Jodi Dishman, nominee to the u.S. District Court for the Western District of Oklahoma.
  • Richard Myers II, nominee to the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of North Carolina.
  • Sarah Pitlyk, nominee to the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Missouri.
  • Daniel Traynor, nominee to the U.S. District Court for the District of North Dakota.

Do you love judicial nomination, confirmation, and vacancy information? We figured you might. Our monthly Federal Vacancy Count, published at the start of each month, monitors all the faces and places moving in, moving out, and moving on in the federal judiciary. Click here for our most current count.

Need a daily fix of judicial nomination, confirmation, and vacancy information? Click here for continuing updates on the status of all federal judicial nominees.

Or, if you prefer, we also maintain a list of individuals President Trump has nominated.

A Court In The Spotlight

In each issue of Bold Justice, we highlight a federal court you should know more about. Right now, we’re taking a closer look at the 94 U.S. District Courts. The district courts are the general trial courts of the U.S. federal court system.

There is at least one judicial district for each state, and one each for Puerto Rico and the District of Columbia.  

In this edition, we’re placing a spotlight on the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York. The Southern District of New York has original jurisdiction over cases filed in the following counties:

  • New York County
  • Bronx County
  • Westchester County
  • Putnam County
  • Rockland County
  • Orange County
  • Dutchess County
  • Sullivan County

The court shares geographic jurisdiction over New York City with the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of New York. The Southern District is one of the most influential and active federal district courts in the United States, largely because of its jurisdiction over New York’s major financial centers.

Decisions of the court may be appealed to the 2nd Circuit Court of Appeals.

The Southern District of New York has 28 authorized judgeships. There are currently six vacancies. The breakdown of current active judges by appointing president is:

  • Barack Obama (D): 15 judges
  • George W. Bush (R): Three judges
  • Bill Clinton (D): Four judges


Biden launches $4 million Iowa ad campaign

 Ballotpedia's Daily Presidential News Briefing

November 1, 2019: Joe Biden is airing new ads in Iowa focused on his Scranton upbringing. The House passed a resolution Thursday establishing procedures for the impeachment inquiry into Donald Trump.
        

Each Friday, we highlight a presidential candidate’s key campaign staffer.

Daily Presidential News Briefing - Staffer Spotlight - Tim Hogan

Tim Hogan is a Democratic staffer and spokesman with experience in the early caucus state of Nevada. Hogan has worked as a congressional staffer for both Klobuchar and fellow 2020 presidential candidate Tulsi Gabbard (D). He graduated from the University of Minnesota with a degree in political science and government in 2008.

Previous campaign work:

  • 2016 Hillary Clinton (D) presidential campaign, rapid response spokesman and primary/caucus communications director for Nevada, Arizona, and Kentucky
  • 2012 Steven Horsford (D-Nev.) U.S. House campaign, press secretary
  • 2011 Kate Marshall (D-Nev.) U.S. House campaign, press secretary
  • 2010 Nevada State Senate elections, Democratic caucus campaign manager

Other experience:

  • 2017-2019: The Hub Project, national press secretary
  • 2015: Office of Rep. Tulsi Gabbard (D-Hawaii), senior communications advisor
  • 2013-2015: Office of Rep. Steven Horsford (D-Nev.), deputy chief of staff and communications director
  • 2011-2012: The Culinary Academy of Las Vegas, digital director
  • 2010-2011: Nevada State Senate, Democratic caucus communications director
  • 2010: Earth Day Network, press assistant and outreach coordinator
  • 2009-2010: Office of Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-Minn.), press intern?

Notable Quote of the Day

“CNN’s Harry Enten earlier this week said something pretty reasonable: ‘Seems well within the bounds of possibilities that Sanders, Warren, Buttigieg or Biden win IA and NH. All could finish fourth in both too. Crazy.’

My response? Any of them could finish as badly as seventh in Iowa. … Again, there’s a long history of dramatic late movement in Iowa and a consensus among pollsters that surveys for the caucuses are unusually challenging. So much so that the real surprise would be if things stayed stable until the end. After all, it’s not just the four current polling leaders who could wind up doing well. Harris wouldn’t be the first candidate to surge, collapse and then fully recover. Senator Amy Klobuchar is on something of a minor upswing; no one knows how many voters might jump to her if she moves up enough to look like one of the leaders. The same goes for Senator Cory Booker, who hasn’t had any recent polling success, but (like Klobuchar) has enough support from party actors that if he somehow starts moving he could attract serious resources, which would boost his polling, which would attract more resources, and so on.”

– Jonathan Bernstein, Bloomberg 

Democrats

Republicans

  • The Minnesota Republican Party sent a letter to the secretary of state listing its “determination of candidates” for the presidential primary ballot next March; only Donald Trump was listed.
  • The House passed a resolution Thursday establishing procedures for the impeachment inquiry into Trump, marking the first impeachment-related congressional vote. The 232-196 vote ran along party lines with no Republicans supporting the measure and two Democrats opposing it.
  • In an op-ed for USA TodayJoe Walsh wrote about Trump calling Never Trump Republicans “human scum” and compared it to Hillary Clinton calling some Trump supporters a “basket of deplorables” in 2016.

What We’re Reading

Flashback: November 1, 2015

Ben Carson spoke about religion and creationism during a campaign event at one of Nashville’s largest churches.



Kentucky voters to elect governor

The Daily Brew
Welcome to the Friday, Nov. 1, Brew. Here’s what’s in store for you as you start your day:

  1. Spending exceeds $20 million in Kentucky gubernatorial race
  2. Uber, Lyft, and DoorDash file California ballot initiative to define their drivers as independent contractors and enact labor policies
  3. Meet the San Francisco DA candidates participating in our new Candidate Conversations portal

Spending exceeds $20 million in Kentucky gubernatorial race

Kentuckians head to the polls Nov. 5 to vote in the gubernatorial election between incumbent Gov. Matt Bevin (R), state Attorney General Andy Beshear (D), and John Hicks (L). 

This race will decide the state’s trifecta status until at least the 2020 state legislative elections. Republicans will maintain their trifecta control of the state with a Bevin win. A Beshear or Hicks victory will result in neither party having trifecta control. Before Bevin’s 2015 victory, Democrats held the governorship for 16 of the previous 20 years.

The campaigns have taken to the airwaves in force. Between Bevin, Beshear, and groups affiliated with the Republican Governors Association and Democratic Governors Association, ad spending has broken $20 million. In the last week alone, they have accounted for $5 million in spending.

Both The Cook Political Report and Inside Elections rate the race as a Toss-Up, while Larry J. Sabato’s Crystal Ball rates it as Lean Republican. Polling has been inconclusive, with polls that show either of the two candidates ahead or both in a tie.

Learn more blank   



Uber, Lyft, and DoorDash file California ballot initiative to define their drivers as independent contractors and enact labor policies

Representatives of DoorDash, Lyft, and Uber filed a ballot initiative in California for the Nov. 3, 2020 election in response to the passage of Assembly Bill 5 (AB 5), which provides a three-factor test to determine whether a driver is an independent contractor or employee.

The ballot measure would override AB 5 and define app-based drivers as independent contractors and not employees or agents.

DoorDash, Lyft, and Uber have each contributed $30 million into campaign accounts to fund the ballot initiative campaign. Brandon Castillo, a representative for the campaign supporting the initiative, said, “We’re going to spend what it takes to win. It’s been widely reported that three of the companies already shifted $90 million, but we’re still in the early phases. The bottom line is: We’re committed to passing this.”

The ballot measure would also enact labor and wage policies specific to app-based drivers and companies, including a net earnings floor based on 120 percent of the state’s or municipality’s minimum wage and 30 cents per mile; a limitation on the hours a driver is permitted to work during a 24-hour period; health care subsidies; occupational accident insurance; and accidental death insurance.

The proposal would require the companies to develop anti-discrimination and sexual harassment policies. The proposed net earnings floor and health care subsidies would be based on a worker’s engaged time, which is defined as the time between accepting a customer request and completing the request.

Assemblywoman Lorena Gonzalez (D-80), who introduced AB 5, criticized the concept of engaged time, saying, “Their wage floor suggests if If I’m a cashier, I’m only paid while there’s a customer in my line, not when I’m waiting for the next customer.” She also said the benefits of being considered an employee outweigh what the initiative would provide to app-based drivers.

The campaign Protect App-Based Drivers & Services stated, “If rideshare and delivery drivers are forced to be classified as employees with set shifts, it could significantly limit the availability and affordability of these on-demand services that benefit consumers, small businesses and our economy. In addition, current law for independent contractors denies companies the ability to provide many workplace protections, such as guaranteed hourly earnings and benefits. State law also makes it difficult for rideshare and delivery service companies to implement many customer and public safety protections.”

The next step for the campaign is to receive ballot language from state Attorney General Xavier Becerra (D). He is expected to release petition language on Jan. 2, 2020, which would allow the campaign to begin collecting the 623,212 valid signatures needed to make the ballot. The deadline for signature verification is June 25, 2020. The recommended deadline to file signature petitions for verification using a random sample is April 21.

Meet the San Francisco DA candidates participating in our new Candidate Conversations portal

For the last year, Ballotpedia has been talking to voters, candidates, and other nonprofits about how we can help voters get to know their candidates as people.

I’ve seen the frustration many voters have with the debate and town hall processes. I’ve read emails from many readers saying you don’t know enough about your candidates.

To help address these issues, Ballotpedia is launching a new project—Candidate Conversations.

We’ve worked with EnCiv to develop an online video portal where candidates can answer questions, and you can watch those answers, anytime, for free, to learn more about your candidates. Think of it as speed research before you head to the polls. 

Candidate Conversations

We are excited to announce our two 2019 submissions from Chesa Boudin and Leif Dautch who are running in the four-person San Francisco district attorney’s race on Nov. 5. 

This non-partisan race has attracted national attention, including endorsements from presidential candidates Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) and Kamala Harris (D-Calif.), who served as district attorney of San Francisco between 2004 and 2011.

Stay tuned for more conversations like this.

Watch the conversation


What's the tea?

Yesterday was Halloween and our What’s the Tea? questions over the past several weeks have asked about various aspects of civic participation. To have a little fun, I figured I’d ask you—our Brew readers—about your holiday participation.

How many trick-or-treaters did you give candy out to on Halloween?


 

 



Ballotpedia’s Weekly Presidential News Briefing: October 28-November 1, 2019

 Ballotpedia's Weekly Presidential News Briefing

Every weekday, Ballotpedia tracks the events that matter in the 2020 presidential election. 

Now, we’re bringing you the highlights from our daily briefings in a weekly format so you can stay up-to-date on the 2020 election with one weekly email.

Here’s the latest from the campaign trail.

Candidates by the Number

There are 12 new candidates running since last week, including one Republican and one Libertarian. In total, 916 individuals are currently filed with the FEC to run for president.

Notable Quotes of the Week

“Democrats have declined most sharply in rural America, but it’s ‘Regional Metros’ that should concern the party most in 2020.

Not only do these smaller cities and suburbs make up an outsize share of the vote in key states — compared with both rural and ‘Global Metro’ areas — but Democrats still have plenty of room to fall from Clinton’s 45 percent share in 2016. If Democrats can maintain altitude in the ‘Regional Metros,’ their gains since 2016 in ‘Global Metros’ should be enough to overtake Trump and reoccupy Air Force One. If they can’t, Trump could very well win re-election while losing the popular vote again.

For now, Democratic presidential primary candidates are drawing enthusiastic crowds to rallies in places like New York, Seattle, Austin and San Francisco. But to beat Trump, Democrats will need to ask themselves which candidates’ proposals will fly in Erie, Saginaw and Green Bay.”

– David Wasserman, NBC News

“Recent data show manufacturing jobs are disappearing across Pennsylvania, Michigan and Ohio, states critical to Trump’s reelection chances. On Tuesday, Murray Energy, a major mining firm with close ties to the president, became the latest of many coal companies to file for bankruptcy this year, rattling communities across Ohio, West Virginia and Kentucky. The news followed recent layoffs at a prominent steel manufacturer in northeastern Ohio and General Motors’ final decision this fall to shutter its massive plant at Lordstown, Ohio.

The turmoil in the manufacturing and mining sectors threatens to undermine Trump’s claim to a booming economy — the bedrock of his and his Republican allies’ campaign strategy — in places where it matters most. While Trump’s economy is benefiting high-tech manufacturing and energy sectors in other regions, the manufacturing slump across the Rust Belt may test whether Trump can retain his appeal to blue-collar workers without having fully delivered on his promise to fatten their bank accounts.”

– Josh Boak and John Seewer, Associated Press

Week in Review

Major moves for Trump this week

Donald Trump announced Oct. 27 that ISIS leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi had been killed during a military raid in northwest Syria. He highlighted the event in a campaign ad that aired during the final night of the World Series on Wednesday.

Trump also headlined a fundraiser this week in Washington, D.C., that raised $13 million for Take Back the House 2020, a joint fundraising committee benefiting House Republicans.

On Thursday, the House approved a resolution establishing procedures for the impeachment inquiry into Trump, marking the first impeachment-related congressional vote. The 232-196 vote ran along party lines with no Republicans supporting the measure and two Democrats opposing it.

Staff changes in Biden and Harris camps

Joe Biden announced this week that Molly Ritner, the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee’s former political director, will serve as his director of Super Tuesday states. Super Tuesday will take place on Mar. 3, 2020.

Jessica Meijía and John Laadt will work as Biden’s state directors in California and Massachusetts, respectively.

Kamala Harris is restructuring her campaign, sending more staffers to Iowa and reducing staff at her Baltimore headquarters. Her campaign manager, Juan Rodriguez, is also reducing his salary. 

Biden, Yang, and Williamson launch ad campaigns

Joe Biden released new ads in Iowa focused on his Scranton upbringing, which will air on broadcast and digital media channels as part of a $4 million campaign. 

Marianne Williamson launched her first television ad on Wednesday in South Carolina. The ad focuses on her reparations proposal.

Andrew Yang also released his first television ad in the early primary states. The ad focuses on children with special needs and healthcare and is part of a six-figure digital ad campaign.

Buttigieg is fourth candidate to qualify for December debate

Pete Buttigieg gained his fourth and final poll to qualify for the Democratic presidential primary debate on Dec. 19. He joins Joe BidenElizabeth Warren, and Bernie Sanders.

Four candidates have reached the fundraising threshold of 200,000 donors or more: Kamala HarrisAmy KlobucharBeto O’Rourke, and Andrew Yang. Harris needs one more qualifying poll to make the debate stage, Klobuchar and Yang need three each, and O’Rourke needs four.

Candidates have until Dec. 12 to reach the polling and fundraising thresholds.

Trump primary opponents debate, likely to be left off the ballot in Minnesota

Politicon hosted a Republican debate with Mark SanfordJoe Walsh, and Bill Weld in Nashville, where they discussed impeachment and the future of the party. The Republican National Committee did not sanction the debate.

In Minnesota, the state parties decide which candidates make the presidential primary ballot. The Minnesota Republican Party sent a letter to the secretary of state listing its “determination of candidates” for the presidential primary ballot next March; only Donald Trump was listed.

Twitter rejects political advertising

Twitter announced Wednesday that it will no longer accept political advertising on its platform beginning Nov. 22.

Want more? Find the daily details here:

Poll Spotlight

Staff Spotlight

Tim Hogan is a Democratic staffer and spokesman with experience in the early caucus state of Nevada. Hogan has worked as a congressional staffer for both Klobuchar and fellow 2020 presidential candidate Tulsi Gabbard (D). He graduated from the University of Minnesota with a degree in political science and government in 2008.

Previous campaign work:

  • 2016 Hillary Clinton (D) presidential campaign, rapid response spokesman and primary/caucus communications director for Nevada, Arizona, and Kentucky
  • 2012 Steven Horsford (D-Nev.) U.S. House campaign, press secretary
  • 2011 Kate Marshall (D-Nev.) U.S. House campaign, press secretary
  • 2010 Nevada State Senate elections, Democratic caucus campaign manager

Other experience:

  • 2017-2019: The Hub Project, national press secretary
  • 2015: Office of Rep. Tulsi Gabbard (D-Hawaii), senior communications advisor
  • 2013-2015: Office of Rep. Steven Horsford (D-Nev.), deputy chief of staff and communications director
  • 2011-2012: The Culinary Academy of Las Vegas, digital director
  • 2010-2011: Nevada State Senate, Democratic caucus communications director
  • 2010: Earth Day Network, press assistant and outreach coordinator
  • 2009-2010: Office of Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-Minn.), press intern

What We’re Reading

Flashback: October 28-November 1, 2015

  • October 28, 2015: Fourteen Republicans, split into undercard and primetime debate segments, participated in the third Republican primary debate.
  • October 29, 2015: Donald Trump made his second presidential campaign visit to Nevada.
  • October 30, 2015: Hillary Clinton introduced her criminal justice platform during a rally in Atlanta.
  • October 31, 2015: Donald Trump released his platform for veterans’ healthcare and employment services.
  • November 1, 2015: Ben Carson spoke about religion and creationism during a campaign event at one of Nashville’s largest churches.

Trivia

In the 2016 presidential election, which state had the highest percentage of eligible voters cast ballots?



Our list of 2019’s Top 10 ballot measures

10 ballot measures we’re watching closely on Nov. 5 

Yesterday, our ballot measures team published its ranking of the Top 10 measures that voters will decide on Nov. 5. There are 32 statewide ballot measures across eight states. The average number of statewide measures on the ballot in odd-numbered years from 2009 through 2017 was between 30 and 31. Ballotpedia is also covering 141 local measures in jurisdictions in 17 states within the top 100 largest cities in the U.S. This includes covering all local ballot measures in California and North Carolina.

Here’s an excerpt from yesterday’s report:

Washington Referendum 88, Vote on I-1000 Affirmative Action Measure

Washington voters will be asked to approve or reject Initiative 1000—which would expressly allow the state to implement affirmative action policies without the use of preferential treatment or quotas (as defined in I-1000) in public employment, education, and contracting. Washington Initiative 200, which voters approved in 1998, prohibited public institutions in the state from discriminating or granting preferential treatment based on race, sex, color, ethnicity, or national origin in the areas of public education, public employment, and public contracting. Initiative 200 did not define preferential treatment.

Washington Initiative 976, Limits on Motor Vehicle Taxes and Fees Measure

This citizen-initiated measure would limit annual license fees for vehicles weighing under 10,000 pounds in Washington to $30, except for voter-approved charges. It would also base vehicle taxes on the Kelley Blue Book value and repeal authorization for certain regional transit authorities to impose motor vehicle excise taxes.

Colorado Proposition CC, Retain Revenue for Transportation and Education TABOR Measure

This measure would allow Colorado to retain revenue above the state spending cap to provide funding for transportation and education. Without the approval of this measure, the state would be required to refund the revenue to taxpayers under the provisions of the state’s Taxpayer’s Bill of Rights (TABOR). Since 1992—when TABOR was adopted—through 2018, Colorado voters have decided 19 ballot measures that would have increased revenue for the state, and thus, required voter approval. During that period, voters approved four measures and rejected 15. 

The other seven items on the list include three statewide and four local ballot measures in seven states. Click the link below to read about the rest of the Top 10! Subscribe to our State Ballot Measures Monthly newsletter to stay up-to-speed in realtime on all of the ballot measure news we cover.

Mississippi voters to elect new governor

Mississippi voters will decide the only open-seat gubernatorial race of 2019 as Gov. Phil Bryant (R) is prevented by term limits from seeking re-election. State Attorney General Jim Hood (D), Lt. Gov. Tate Reeves (R), Bob Hickingbottom (Constitution), and David Singletary (I) are competing to succeed Bryant. 

Hood was first elected state attorney general in 2003 and describes himself as a moderate, saying that he is a firearms owner and that he supports restrictions on abortion. Reeves—who was first elected lieutenant governor in 2011 after serving eight years as state treasurersays that he has lowered taxes while decreasing Mississippi’s debt.

Reeves defeated former state Supreme Court Chief Justice William Waller (R) in a runoff August 27 after no candidate won a majority of the vote in the Republican primary. Hood won the Democratic primary over seven other candidates. Three separate race tracking outlets have rated the race Leans Republican.

Through September 30, Reeves had spent $13.0 million on his campaign and Hood spent $3.2 million. As of that date, Reeves had $3.3 million in cash on hand to Hood’s $1.3 million. A mid-October poll conducted by Mason-Dixon Polling & Strategy had Reeves leading Hood within the margin of error—46% to 43%—with 11% of voters undecided.

Candidates running for statewide office in Mississippi must win both a majority of the statewide vote and a majority of the 122 state House districts in order to win the election outright. If no candidate does both, the state House votes to decide the winner. 

Mississippi voters will also elect all 174 members of the state legislature Nov. 5. Heading into the elections, Republicans currently hold a 74-44 majority with two independent members and two vacancies in the state House and a 31-18 majority with three vacancies in the state Senate.

Mississippi is currently one of 22 Republican state government trifectas. If Republicans maintain their legislative majorities in Tuesday’s elections, a victory for Reeves would preserve their Republican trifecta while a victory for one of the other candidates would break it. In order to gain a trifecta, Democrats would need to take the governor’s office and win majorities in both legislative chambers.

Local Roundup

At Ballotpedia, we provide election coverage of all officeholders in the nation’s 100 largest cities—including mayors, city council members, and other municipal officers. We also cover every election on the ballot in these cities, such as county officials, school board members, and local ballot measures.

There’s only a handful of days left before the polls close across the country Nov. 5. I hope you’re as excited as I am to follow these election results and learn who’ll be serving on city councils and school boards and other positions after the 2019 elections. Our team is gearing up to follow thousands of candidates. They’re resting up to be fully charged for next week. But it got me wondering – how many candidates will we watch on Tuesday?

So I checked with our data team. They ran some queries and here’s what they told me:

  • 3,529 candidates in local and county elections in 20 states;
  • 48 candidates for seats in special districts in 5 states;
  • 451 school board candidates in 16 states.

I hope you’ll visit us all next week starting Nov. 5 to track election results for those local races that matter to you!

 



$3.5 million in satellite spending for Seattle City Council races

The Daily Brew

Welcome to the Wednesday, Oct. 30, Brew. Here’s what’s in store for you as you start your day:

  1. Record-breaking satellite spending in Seattle city council elections
  2. New Jersey voters to decide 80 General Assembly seats, one special election for a state Senate seat, and local elections
  3. Delaware governor announces two supreme court nominations

Record-breaking satellite spending in Seattle city council elections

The nonpartisan elections for seven Seattle City Council seats on Nov. 5 have seen a record-breaking $3.5 million in satellite spending through Oct. 25. That’s more than four times the amount spent in 2015, the last time the seven district seats were on the ballot. 

Four council races are open. In the other three contests, incumbents Lisa Herbold (District 1), Kshama Sawant (District 3), and Debora Juarez (District 5) are seeking re-election.

The elections are occurring a year and a half after the repeal of the 2018 head tax proposal, which would have required businesses grossing at least $20 million to pay $275 per employee in order to fund housing programs for the homeless. 

The city council voted to pass the head tax 9-0 in May 2018 but then repealed it by a 7-2 vote in June 2018 after the city’s business community, including Amazon and the Seattle Metropolitan Chamber of Commerce, opposed the tax. Sawant and Position 8 At-large Councilmember Teresa Mosqueda voted against repealing the tax. Juarez and Herbold voted with five others to repeal it.

Amazon contributed $1.5 million to the Civic Alliance for a Sound Economy (CASE), the local chamber of commerce’s PAC.

CASE is among more than a dozen satellite groups spending on the council races:

  • CASE has spent $1.5 million supporting Phil Tavel, Mark Solomon, Egan Orion, Alex Pedersen, Juarez, Heidi Wills, and Jim Pugel, and opposing Herbold, Sawant, and District 4 candidate Dan Strauss.

  • Civic Alliance for a Progressive Economy (CAPE), a PAC affiliated with the labor group Working Washington, has spent $280,000. CAPE endorsed Herbold, Tammy Morales, Sawant, Shaun Scott, and Strauss.

  • Labor union UNITE HERE’s local and federal PACs have spent more than $550,000 in support of candidate Andrew Lewis (District 7). He faces Pugel.

Fifty-six candidates filed to run in the Aug. 6 primaries for the seven council seats. That was up from the 37 who ran in 2015. Ten additional candidates filed to run for the council’s two at-large seats in 2015. Those seats are next up for election in 2021. 

This is the second election in which a voter voucher program is being used to provide public funding to campaigns. Twelve of 14 general election candidates are participating in the program; Sawant and Ann Davison Sattler are not participating. Including the primaries, 42 candidates have participated, and $2.4 million from the program had gone to campaigns as of Oct. 23.

Learn more blank    blankblank   


New Jersey voters to decide 80 General Assembly seats, one special election for a state Senate seat, and local elections

Continuing our highlights of the Nov. 5 elections we’re covering nationwide, today we’re taking a look at New Jersey.

The following is a list of elections taking place in New Jersey:

  • 80 seats in the General Assembly

  • One special election for state Senate District 1

  • County register and county board of chosen freeholders in Essex County

  • County executive, county sheriff, and county surrogate in Hudson County

  • School board elections in Jersey City Public Schools

Note that this isn’t a comprehensive list of all local elections in the state, only those that Ballotpedia is covering.

New Jersey voters will also decide a legislatively referred constitutional amendment—Public Question 1. If approved, this measure would extend an existing $250 property tax deduction that would allow eligible veterans to receive the value of their property tax deduction if they reside in a continuing care retirement community. The deduction would be provided to a continuing care retirement community, which would pass the value of the deduction on to the eligible veterans who live there.

Jersey City voters will also vote on Municipal Question 1, a veto referendum concerning short-term rental property regulations and permit requirements.

October 29 is the deadline to apply for an absentee ballot by mail in New Jersey. Voters have until Nov. 4 at 3 p.m. to apply in-person for a mail-in ballot at their county clerk’s office—known as in-person absentee voting—and submit the ballot in person. The deadline to return an absentee ballot is Nov. 5 at 8 p.m.

Delaware governor announces two supreme court nominations

Late last week, Delaware Governor John Carney (D) nominated Associate Justice Collins Seitz Jr. to replace Leo Strine as the next chief justice of the Delaware Supreme Court. Carney also nominated Tamika Montgomery-Reeves to serve as a new associate justice, replacing Seitz.

Chief Justice Strine announced in July 2019 that he would retire in the fall upon the nomination, confirmation, and swearing in of his successor. 

Seitz joined the Delaware Supreme Court as an associate justice in 2015. He was appointed by Gov. Jack Markell (D). 

Montgomery-Reeves is a vice chancellor of the Delaware Court of Chancery. She was also nominated by Gov. Markell in 2015. 

The governor appoints state supreme court justices in Delaware with state Senate confirmation. A judicial nominating commission submits a list of names to the governor, who then selects an appointee. The state Senate must also confirm the appointment. 

The state Senate is holding a special session Nov. 7 to consider the nominations. Approved nominees serve for 12 years, at which point they must apply to the commission for reappointment. All five judges on the court have been appointed by Democratic governors.

The Delaware Judicial Nominating Commission was established in 1977. It is made up of 11 members—10 governor-appointed members (including at least four lawyers and at least three non-lawyers) and one member appointed by the president of the Delaware State Bar Association with the governor’s approval. The governor designates the commission’s chairperson.

So far this year, there have been 19 supreme court vacancies in 13 of the 29 states where replacement justices are appointed instead of elected. Retirements caused 14 of the vacancies. Two former justices took jobs in the private sector. One vacancy occurred when a justice was elevated to chief justice of the court, and two others occurred when the justices were elevated to federal judicial positions.

 



Gabbard criticizes Clinton foreign policy in WSJ op-ed

 
Ballotpedia's Daily Presidential News Briefing

October 30, 2019: Tulsi Gabbard wrote an op-ed in The Wall Street Journal criticizing Hillary Clinton’s foreign policy. Larry Rasky registered a new pro-Joe Biden super PAC called Unite the Country.


 Presidential Facebook ads, 2019-2020 (October 20-26, 2019)

Notable Quote of the Day

“Recent data show manufacturing jobs are disappearing across Pennsylvania, Michigan and Ohio, states critical to Trump’s reelection chances. On Tuesday, Murray Energy, a major mining firm with close ties to the president, became the latest of many coal companies to file for bankruptcy this year, rattling communities across Ohio, West Virginia and Kentucky. The news followed recent layoffs at a prominent steel manufacturer in northeastern Ohio and General Motors’ final decision this fall to shutter its massive plant at Lordstown, Ohio.

The turmoil in the manufacturing and mining sectors threatens to undermine Trump’s claim to a booming economy — the bedrock of his and his Republican allies’ campaign strategy — in places where it matters most. While Trump’s economy is benefiting high-tech manufacturing and energy sectors in other regions, the manufacturing slump across the Rust Belt may test whether Trump can retain his appeal to blue-collar workers without having fully delivered on his promise to fatten their bank accounts.”

– Josh Boak and John Seewer, Associated Press

Democrats

  • Former Joe Biden campaign aide Larry Rasky registered a new super PAC called Unite the Country to support Biden’s campaign.

  • Cosmopolitan released a video interview with Cory Booker on abortion, education, healthcare, student loan debt, and climate change.

  • Pete Buttigieg will campaign in New Hampshire Wednesday and Thursday with town halls in Petersborough and Derry. He is also expected to file for the New Hampshire primary Wednesday.

  • Julián Castro will phonebank with campaign staff and volunteers Wednesday at an event in San Antonio, Texas.

  • While speaking at the 9/11 Tribute Museum in New YorkTulsi Gabbard called on Justice Department and FBI to declassify and release any documents related to any Saudi involvement in the September 11 terrorist attacks.

  • Gabbard also wrote an op-ed in The Wall Street Journal contrasting her foreign policy approach with Hillary Clinton’s.

  • Kamala Harris will campaign in Iowa Wednesday through Saturday.

  • Beto O’Rourke is attending an event Wednesday in Newtown, Connecticut, on gun violence prevention.

  • Bernie Sanders will attend a rally at Keene State College in New Hampshire on Wednesday.

  • Joe Sestak wrote an op-ed on climate change and national security in the Washington Examiner.

  • In an interview with The Orange County RegisterTom Steyer discussed the California wildfires and climate change.

  • Elizabeth Warren issued an anti-corruption policy that prohibits large corporations, banks, and market-dominant companies from hiring former senior government officials for four years. Companies that violate the ban will pay a penalty of 1 to 5 percent of net profits.

  • Marianne Williamson is launching her first television ad on Wednesday in South Carolina. The ad focuses on her reparations proposal.

  • Andrew Yang’s first ad is part of a six-figure digital ad campaign in Iowa, New Hampshire, Nevada, and South Carolina.

Republicans

  • Donald Trump headlined a fundraiser Tuesday in Washington, D.C., that raised $13 million for Take Back the House 2020, a joint fundraising committee benefiting House Republicans.

  • Bill Weld discussed abortion, climate change, and the Republican primary in the “20 Questions for 2020” series by NowThis News.

Flashback: October 30, 2015

Hillary Clinton introduced her criminal justice platform during a rally in Atlanta.blank



Previewing elections in Houston and Pennsylvania

The Daily Brew
Welcome to the Tuesday, October 29, Brew. Here’s what’s in store for you as you start your day:

  1. Twelve candidates running for Houston mayor 
  2. Pennsylvania voters to decide six statewide judges, one constitutional amendment, in addition to local races
  3. 43% of Brew readers surveyed have participated in a school board meeting

Twelve candidates running for Houston mayor 

Today is game 6 of the World Series in Houston. Today, our preview of key Nov. 5 elections focuses on the mayoral race in Houston—the fourth-largest city in the U.S. The 2013 census estimated that Houston’s population was 2.2 million with a city budget of $5.1 billion as of the 2017 fiscal year. According to the Legislative Budget Board, Texas’ state budget during the 2017 fiscal year was $209.4 billion. 

Voters will decide among 12 candidates for mayor—including incumbent Sylvester Turner—in the city’s general election. In addition, all 16 seats on the city council and the city controller. If no candidate receives more than 50% of the vote Nov. 5, the top two finishers will advance to a runoff election on December 14.

Policy debates have centered on Turner’s record during his first term, especially regarding the city’s budget and spending priorities. Turner has said his accomplishments in office include balancing the city’s budget, leading the recovery effort after Hurricane Harvey, reforming the city’s pension system, improving infrastructure, and strengthening the economy. His opponents have criticized him, saying he has not done enough to combat flooding, crime, and infrastructure deterioration.

Local media outlets have identified five major challengers to Turner—Kendall Baker, Dwight Boykins, Tony Buzbee, Bill King, and Sue Lovell. Baker, Boykins, and Lovell have criticized Turner’s budgetary opposition to Proposition B, a ballot referendum passed in 2018 requiring equal pay between firefighters and police officers. Buzbee and King both say corruption is creating inefficiency in Houston’s government.

Houston’s mayor serves as the city’s chief executive and is responsible for proposing a budget, signing legislation into law, appointing departmental directors, and overseeing the city’s day-to-day operations. He or she also presides over the city council with voting privileges. 

Although municipal elections in Houston are officially nonpartisan, Mayor Turner is a former Democratic member of the Texas House of Representatives, Baker ran as a Republican for the Texas House in 2016, Buzbee ran for the Texas House as a Democrat in 2002, and Lovell was elected as a member of the Democratic National Committee in 2000.

Currently, 62 mayors of the largest 100 cities by population are affiliated with the Democratic Party, 29 are affiliated with the Republican Party, four are independents, and five identify as nonpartisan or unaffiliated. 

Early voting throughout Texas runs from Oct. 21 through Nov. 1. All registered voters may vote at any early voting location in the county in which they are registered.

Learn more blank    blankblank   


 

Pennsylvania voters to decide six statewide judges, one constitutional amendment, in addition to local races

Pennsylvania voters will select six appellate court justices and decide a statewide constitutional amendment—in addition to local elections—Nov. 5. 

Four seats on the Pennsylvania Superior Court are up for election with two current justices facing retention elections and two open seats to be decided by partisan elections. Two Pennsylvania Commonwealth Court judges are also facing retention elections.

The Pennsylvania Superior Court reviews most of the civil and criminal cases that are appealed from the courts of common pleas in the state’s 67 counties. It consists of 15 judges who are elected to 10-year terms.  After serving an initial term, judges are then subject to a retention election. If cases at the superior court are appealed, they are heard by the Pennsylvania Supreme Court.

The current partisan composition of the Pennsylvania Superior Court is eight Republicans and six Democrats, based on official election results. One seat is vacant. One Republican and one Democratic judge are running for retention. Justice Paula Ott (R) did not file to run for re-election. 

The Pennsylvania Commonwealth Court serves as an appellate court for cases involving state and local governments or regulatory agencies, or when the case relates to certain specific subject areas. The court also has original jurisdiction over all cases involving elections and when someone files a lawsuit against the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. It consists of nine judges who are also elected to 10-year terms and who must stand for retention after his or her initial term. 

Judicial system

The current partisan composition of the Pennsylvania Commonwealth Court is seven Republicans and two Democrats. Both judges running in this year’s retention elections are Republicans.

Pennsylvania voters will also decide a legislatively referred constitutional amendment to add specific rights of crime victims—together known as Marsy’s Law—to the Pennsylvania Constitution. These provisions have been approved by voters in 12 other states. Voters will also see a variety of local measures, including one in Pittsburgh to establish a Parks Trust Fund with revenue from a property tax and two measures in Philadelphia concerning a bond issue and competitive bidding.

There are also the following local races in Pennsylvania—in addition to other elections beyond our coverage scope:

  • general elections for five of nine city council seats and the city controller in Pittsburgh;

  • general elections for mayor, all 17 seats on the city council, all three seats on the city commission, county sheriff, register of wills, six trial court judges, and one municipal judge in Philadelphia;

  • retention elections for 11 trial court judges and six municipal judges in Philadelphia;

  • general elections for 10 of 15 seats on the county council, county controller, county executive, county district attorney, county treasurer, and six magisterial district judges in Allegheny County; 

  • General elections for four of nine seats on the Pittsburgh Public Schools school board.

Pennsylvania voters wishing to cast an absentee ballot must apply by today—Oct. 29—at 5 p.m. Absentee voting is only allowed under specific conditions in Pennsylvania. 

43% of Brew readers surveyed have participated in a school board meeting

Our last four What’s the Tea? questions asked whether Brew readers have attended meetings of a school board, local government, or served on a jury. Last week’s question was slightly different—I asked how many readers have participated in a school board meeting. Although I’ve attended several meetings of my local school board, I’ve never participated during one.

Forty-three percent of respondents said that they had, whether it was asking a question or sharing an opinion during a part of the meeting where the board sought input from attendees. 

School board meeting responses


 

 



Biden hires former DCCC political director to lead Super Tuesday campaign

 

Ballotpedia's Daily Presidential News Briefing

October 29, 2019: Joe Biden announced that Molly Ritner will serve as his director of Super Tuesday states. Andrew Yang launches his first television ads in the early primary states.


In the 2016 presidential election, which state had the highest percentage of eligible voters cast ballots?

Notable Quote of the Day

“There were certain kinds of common wisdom going into California — there’s lots of Latinos, and Kamala Harris or [Los Angeles Mayor] Eric Garcetti might have a base here. Those kinds of thoughts were really prevalent, and they’ve all been really put on the back burner right now, with more of the tried, true, traditional Iowa, New Hampshire. The current narrative around the presidential race has almost forgotten that there’s a big California contest.”

– Paul Mitchell, Political Data Inc.

Democrats

  • Michael Bennet said he opposed conditioning aid to Israel to deter Israeli settlements during the J Street conference Monday.

  • Joe Biden announced that Molly Ritner, the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee’s former political director, will serve as his director of Super Tuesday states. Jessica Meijía and John Laadt will work as state directors for California and Massachusetts, respectively.

  • The Cory Booker campaign is opening an office Tuesday in Reno, Nevada.

  • Steve Bullock issued his LGBT policy plan Monday, which includes passing the Equality Act, banning conversion therapy, and providing gender-neutral passports. 

  • Pete Buttigieg said Monday that the U.S. should verify aid to Israel is not used for settlements or annexation.

  • During the J Street conference Monday, Julián Castro said he would push for a U.S. consulate in east Jerusalem and restore United Nations funding to Palestine. 

  • In an interview with The Wall Street JournalJohn Delaney criticized the state of the Democratic Party primary, which he said generates extreme partisan positions over bipartisan solutions.

  • In an interview on Axios on HBOKamala Harris discussed her electability, healthcare policy, and her prosecutorial record.

  • Beto O’Rourke released his criminal justice plan Monday, which would repeal portions of the 1994 crime bill, eliminate mandatory minimum sentencing, and invest $500 million into developing alternatives to incarceration.

  • Bernie Sanders said Monday at the J Street conference that he would leverage aid to Israel to push for foreign policy change and reallocate some military aid to humanitarian aid in the Gaza Strip. He also discussed socialism, taxes, and criminal liability for corporate executives in a CNBC interview.

  • Joe Sestak spoke with the Polk County Democrats in Iowa on Monday night.

  • Elizabeth Warren will campaign in New Hampshire on Tuesday and Wednesday.

  • Marianne Williamson will attend a fundraiser Tuesday in Charleston County, South Carolina.

  • Andrew Yang tweeted Monday he was beginning to air his first television ads in the early primary states. The ad focuses on children with special needs and healthcare.

Republicans

  • Mark SanfordJoe Walsh, and Bill Weld debated at the Forbes Under 30 Summit in Detroit on Monday. The Republican National Committee did not sanction the debate.

  • Donald Trump spoke at the International Association of Chiefs of Police annual conference in Chicago on Monday.

Flashback: October 29, 2015

Donald Trump made his second presidential campaign visit to Nevada.