CategoryState

California statewide filing deadline is December 6

The filing deadline to run for elected office in California is on December 6, 2019. In California, prospective candidates may file for the following offices:
 
? U.S. House
? State Senate
? State Assembly
? Ballotpedia is also covering local elections in the following areas:
  • 12 counties
  • 17 cities
  • 94 school districts
 
The California Secretary of State will release the official candidate list on December 26. The primary is scheduled for March 3, and the general election is scheduled for November 3, 2020.
 
California’s statewide filing deadline is the fourth to take place in the 2020 election cycle. The next statewide filing deadline is on December 9 in Texas.
 
California has a Democratic state government trifecta. A trifecta exists when one political party simultaneously holds the governor’s office and majorities in both state legislative chambers.
 
 


Texas statewide filing deadline passes on December 9

The major-party filing deadline to run for elected office in Texas is on December 9, 2019. Independent candidates must submit their declaration of intent to run on the same date, but the final filing deadline for independent candidates is June 25, 2020. In Texas, prospective candidates may file for the following offices:
 
  • U.S. Senate
  • U.S. House
  • Texas Railroad Commissioner
  • Texas State Board of Education
  • Texas State Senate
  • Texas House of Representatives
  • Texas Supreme Court
  • Texas Court of Criminal Appeals
  • Texas Court of Appeals
  • Ballotpedia is also covering multiple municipal and school board elections in Texas in 2020.
 
The primary is scheduled for March 3, and the general election is scheduled for November 3, 2020.
 
Texas’s statewide filing deadline is the fifth to take place in the 2020 election cycle. The next statewide filing deadline is on December 18 in Ohio.
 
Texas has a Republican state government trifecta. A trifecta exists when one political party simultaneously holds the governor’s office and majorities in both state legislative chambers.
 


Special election runoff held in Georgia House district

A special general election runoff was held for District 152 of the Georgia House of Representatives on December 3, 2019. Bill Yearta (R) won the special election with 3,419 votes and defeated Jim Quinn (R).
 
The general election was held on November 5, 2019. The filing deadline passed on September 18, 2019.
 
The special election was called after Ed Rynders (R) resigned his seat on September 5, 2019, citing health concerns. Rynders served from 2003 to 2019.
 
Republicans now have a 104-75 majority in the Georgia House of Representatives with one vacancy. Georgia has a Republican state government trifecta. A trifecta exists when one political party simultaneously holds the governor’s office and majorities in both state legislative chambers.
 
As of December, 77 state legislative special elections have been scheduled or held in 24 states this year. Eleven special elections have been scheduled for 2020 in five states. Between 2011 and 2018, an average of 77 special elections took place each year.
 


Michigan House recall effort rejected due to typo

The Michigan Bureau of Elections announced on November 29 that it had rejected a recall effort targeting state Rep. Larry Inman (R) due to a typo. In the original petition language approved in July 2019, the group had described one of Inman’s charges as “Attempted extortion under color of official right.” The word “right” was omitted from the signed petitions submitted in November 2019.
 
In a letter to the recall organizers, Director of Elections Sally Williams wrote, “While the omission of one word may seem inconsequential and the rejection of a recall petition on such grounds as excessively technical and harsh, the recall statute does not authorize the bureau to excuse differences between the reasons for recall approved by the board and those printed on the recall petitions.”
 
Recall organizer Kaitlin Flynn said that supporters are “in shock and deeply disappointed” and that the recall group was evaluating all of its options. Recall supporters had submitted 13,991 signatures on November 22, which was more than the 12,201 signatures needed to force a recall election.
 
According to the petition language, recall supporters tried to recall Inman due to his indictment on three felony counts and missing more than 80 votes during the 2019 legislative session. Federal prosecutors charged Inman with extortion, lying to the FBI, and lying to investigators about texts soliciting contributions. His trial is expected to begin on December 3. In August 2019, the state House passed a resolution by a 98-8 vote urging him to resign.
 
In September 2019, Inman responded to the recall petition by saying, “I can’t really measure the public and their wishes, but people right now that I [run] into in Traverse City, in the grocery store and gas stations, they all shake my hand and give me words of encouragement.” Inman was elected to District 104 in the state House in 2014. He was re-elected in 2018 with 50.4% of the vote. His seat is on the ballot in 2020 for a two-year term.
 
Since 2011, 85 recall petitions have been filed against state lawmakers. Nine recalls were successful, nine were defeated at the ballot, 64 did not go to a vote, and three are still ongoing. California state Sen. Josh Newman (D) was recalled in 2018. Two Colorado state senators were successfully recalled in 2013.
 
Michigan is under a divided government. A state government trifecta exists when one political party simultaneously holds the governor’s office and both state legislative chambers. Republicans control the state Senate by a 22-16 margin and the state House by a 58-51 margin with one vacancy. Democrat Gretchen Whitmer was elected to the governor’s office in 2018.
 


North Carolina court allows remedial U.S. House map to stand for 2020, opens candidate filing period

On December 2, 2019, a three-judge panel of North Carolina’s state superior court ruled unanimously that U.S. House elections in 2020 will take place under a remedial map adopted last month by state lawmakers. The court had earlier ruled that the original map constituted a partisan gerrymander in violation of state law. The court also ordered that the candidate filing period open immediately, having previously delayed the filing period pending consideration of the remedial map and the objections to it.
 
How did this start? On September 27, 2019, opponents of North Carolina’s congressional district plan filed suit in state superior court, alleging that the district map enacted by the state legislature in 2016 constituted a partisan gerrymander in violation of state law. The plaintiffs asked that the court bar the state from using the maps in the 2020 election cycle.
 
On October 28, 2019, the court granted this request, enjoining further application of the 2016 maps. In its order, the court wrote, “The loss to Plaintiffs’ fundamental rights guaranteed by the North Carolina Constitution will undoubtedly be irreparable if congressional elections are allowed to proceed under the 2016 congressional districts.”
 
The court did not issue a full decision on the merits, stating that “disruptions to the election process need not occur, nor may an expedited schedule for summary judgment or trial even be needed, should the General Assembly, on its own initiative, act immediately and with all due haste to enact new congressional districts.” The same three-judge panel, comprising Judges Paul C. Ridgeway, Joseph N. Crosswhite, and Alma L. Hinton, struck down the state’s legislative district plan on similar grounds on September 3, 2019.
 
On November 14, 2019, the state House approved the remedial map (HB1029) by a vote of 55-46 .The vote split along party lines, with all Republicans voting in favor of the bill and all Democrats voting against it. The state Senate approved the bill on November 15, 2019, by a vote of 24-17, also along party lines.
 
What were the reactions to the remedial map? Democrats opposed the remedial plan and announced their intention to challenge it in court. Eric Holder, former U.S. Attorney General and chair of the National Democratic Redistricting Committee, said, “The congressional map passed by Republicans in the North Carolina legislature simply replaces one partisan gerrymander with a new one. This new map fails to respond to the court’s order by continuing to split communities of interest, packing voters in urban areas, and manipulating the district lines to provide Republicans with an unfair partisan advantage.”
 
Meanwhile, Republican Representative Patrick McHenry dismissed these criticisms: “Eric Holder and (former President) Barack Obama have raised a lot of money for this outcome, and they’ve pursued a really aggressive legal strategy for their partisan outcomes, and right now they’re calling it partisan gerrymandering, but what they’re seeking is partisan gerrymandering for the left. We basically have a Wild West of redistricting. This will be the fourth map in six cycles, and I think that is so confusing for voters and has a major negative impact on voters.”
 
What comes next? In 2020, all 13 of North Carolina’s seats in the U.S. House will be up for election. Heading into 2020, Republicans hold 10 of those seats, and Democrats hold the remaining three. In the wake of the court’s Dec. 2 order confirming the implementation of the remedial map in 2020, Kyle Kondik, managing editor of Sabato’s Crystal Ball, said via Twitter, “Not going to officially make NC House ratings changes until we know the new map is final, but here’s what’s tenatively coming: NC-2: Likely R to Safe D; NC-6: Safe R to Safe D; NC-8: Safe R to Likely R; NC-13: Likely R to Safe R. Ratings changes suggest a two-seat D net gain.”
 


Minnesota House of Representatives District 30A and 60A special elections

Two new state legislative special elections have been added to our list. The special elections are for the District 30A and 60A seats in the Minnesota House of Representatives on February 4, 2020. The primary for the District 30A seat is on January 14, and the primary for the District 60A seat is on January 21. The filing deadlines are on December 10, 2019.



December 2 filing deadline for established parties in Illinois

The ballot access deadline for established party candidates in Illinois is December 2, 2019. The state’s primary is scheduled for March 17, 2020, and the general election is November 3, 2020. Offices on the ballot include U.S. Senate, all 18 U.S. House seats, 20 of the 59 state Senate seats, all 118 state House seats, four state Supreme Court seats, 10 intermediate appellate court seats, and local offices.
 
According to the Cook County Clerk’s office, an established political party is a party “which at the last election received more than 5% of the entire vote cast in the district or political subdivision.”
 
Other Illinois statewide ballot access deadlines for the November general election are scheduled in 2020. Judges with seats up for retention election must file a Declaration of Judicial Candidacy by May 3, 2020. Independent and new party candidates for regular election have a filing deadline on June 22. Additionally, write-in candidates must file their intent 61 days before an election, meaning they have until January 16 to file their intent for the primary and until September 3 for the general.
 
The Illinois filing deadline is the third statewide filing deadline for the 2020 general elections. It was preceded by Alabama on November 8 and by Arkansas on November 12. The next statewide filing deadline is in California on December 6.
 
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Two Republicans running in Georgia House runoff

A special election runoff is scheduled to take place on December 3 in District 152 of the Georgia House of Representatives. Jim Quinn (R) and Bill Yearta (R) are competing in the runoff election; they both advanced from the November 5 general election after defeating Mary Egler (D) and Tyler Johnson (R). The runoff election was called since no general election candidate received more than 50 percent of the overall vote.
 
The seat became vacant after Ed Rynders (R) resigned on September 5, 2019, citing health concerns. Rynders had represented the district since 2003. He was re-elected to the seat in 2018 with 74% of the vote.
 
Heading into the election, Republicans have a 104-75 majority in the Georgia state House with one vacancy. Georgia has a Republican state government trifecta. A trifecta exists when one political party simultaneously holds the governor’s office and majorities in both state legislative chambers.
 
As of November, 77 state legislative special elections have been scheduled or held in 24 states this year. Six special elections have been scheduled for 2020 in five states. Between 2011 and 2018, an average of 77 special elections took place each year.