Tagcampaign finance

Six party committees surpassed $1 billion in cumulative fundraising for 2022 election cycle in March

Six party committees raised a combined $1 billion in the first fifteen months of the 2022 election cycle. In March, the committees raised $99 million, according to recent filings with the Federal Election Commission. Here’s a closer look at March’s fundraising numbers:

In March, the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee (DCCC) reported its highest monthly fundraising numbers of the cycle, raising $21.3 million and spending $7.4 million. The National Republican Congressional Committee (NRCC) reported its highest monthly disbursements of the cycle in March, spending $9.7 million and raising $19.4 million. So far in the 2022 election cycle, the DCCC leads in fundraising with $198.7 million to the NRCC’s $180.9 million. At this point in the 2020 cycle, the DCCC had raised $168.4 million and the NRCC had raised $124.5 million.

The Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee (DSCC) raised $12.5 million and spent $6.7 million in March, while the National Republican Senatorial Committee (NRSC) raised $13.3 million and spent $10.8 million. So far in the 2022 election cycle, the NRSC has outraised the DSCC with $147.8 million in receipts to the DSCC’s $129.4 million. At this point in the 2020 election cycle, the NRSC led in cumulative fundraising with $98.0 million to the DSCC’s $91.3 million. 

Between the national committees, the Republican National Committee (RNC) raised and spent more than the Democratic National Committee (DNC) in March. The RNC raised $17.6 million and spent $18.2 million, while the DNC raised $14.6 million and spent $10.3 million. So far in the 2022 election cycle, the RNC has raised $205.6 million to the DNC’s $186.6 million. At this time in the 2020 election cycle, the RNC led in fundraising by a larger margin, with $318.6 million in cumulative receipts to the DNC’s $146.7 million.

This election cycle, the RNC, NRSC, and NRCC have raised 3.7% more than the  DNC, DSCC, and DCCC ($534.4 million to $514.8 million). The Republican committees’ fundraising advantage was also at 3.7% last month.

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U.S. Senate candidates who’ve raised the most so far

The most recent campaign finance reports for federal candidates were due Jan. 31. Georgia’s Raphael Warnock (D) has raised the most of all U.S. Senate candidates this cycle at $54 million. Warnock defeated incumbent Kelly Loeffler (R) in the special Senate election on Jan. 5, 2021. 

The list of 10 Senate candidates who’ve raised the most includes: 

  • 9 incumbents and 1 non-incumbent 
  • 6 Democrats and 4 Republicans
  • 2 candidates from different parties running for the same seat (Florida) 
  • 6 candidates in 5 battleground states (Arizona, Florida, Georgia, New Hampshire, and Nevada)

In most cases, the reports cover from Jan. 1, 2017, to Dec. 31, 2021. Warnock’s report covers from Dec. 17, 2020, to Dec. 31 of last year. Kelly’s and Demings’ reports cover from Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 2021. Kelly won a special election and assumed office in December 2020. Demings is the one non-incumbent Senate candidate in the list of top 10 fundraisers. Demings is also the one candidate in a primary that is currently on Ballotpedia’s primary battleground list.

Overall, Democratic Senate candidates have raised $305 million and Republican candidates, $300 million so far.

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Democrats raised 78 percent more than Republicans in seven flipped Virginia House seats

Elections for all 100 seats in the Virginia House of Delegates took place on November 2, 2021. Democrats lost their majority in the chamber. Republicans regained their majority, winning 52 seats to Democrats’ 48 seats. Seven seats changed party hands as a result of the elections this year. In those seats, Democrats raised $12.3 million and Republicans raised $5.4 million between Jan. 1, 2020, and Nov. 25, 2021.

In all of these districts, the Democratic candidate raised more money than the Republican candidate. The district with the largest difference in fundraising was District 91 (166 percent) and the district with the smallest difference in fundraising was District 12 (48 percent).

Heading into the election, Democrats held 55 seats and Republicans held 45 seats. There were 93 districts with both a Democratic and Republican candidate on the ballot. This was the first election cycle since 1999 with Democrats defending a majority in the chamber.

Fundraising in seats that changed party hands

District 12 – $2,751,364.52

Incumbent Chris Hurst (D) raised $1,703,629 and Jason Ballard (R) raised $1,047,735.

Ballard received 55.2 percent of the vote and Hurst received 44.4 percent. 

District 28 – $3,542,970.39

Incumbent Joshua Cole (D) raised $2,430,940 and Tara Durant (R) raised $1,112,030.

Durant received 51.0 percent of the vote and Cole received 48.8 percent. 

District 63 – $1,776,979.15

Incumbent Lashrecse Aird (D) raised $1,509,705 and Kim Taylor (R) raised $267,273.

Taylor received 51.1 percent of the vote and Aird received 48.8 percent. 

District 75 – $2,417,257.41

Incumbent Roz Tyler (D) raised $1,514,495 and H. Otto Wachsmann Jr. (R) raised $902,762.

Wachsmann received 52.6 percent of the vote and Tyler received 47.3 percent. 

District 83 – $3,099,477.32

Incumbent Nancy Guy (D) raised $2,175,443 and Tim Anderson (R) raised $924,034.

Anderson received 51.3 percent of the vote and Guy received 48.7 percent. 

District 85 – $3,365,580.81

Incumbent Alex Askew (D) raised $2,310,631 and Karen Greenhalgh (R) raised $1,054,949.

Greenhalgh received 50.2 percent of the vote and Askew received 49.7 percent. 

District 91 – $716,551.91

Incumbent Martha Mugler (D) raised $654,344, Aijalon Cordoza (R) raised $60,330, and Charles West (L) raised $1,877.

Cordoza received 49.4 percent of the vote and Mugler received 49.0 percent. 

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Virginia candidate political action committees (candidate PACs) submitted to the Virginia Department of Elections. It includes fundraising activity between Jan. 1, 2020, and Nov. 25, 2021. Candidate PACs represent individuals who have run for state or local office at any point, including past and present officeholders. This article does not include non-candidate PACs.

This article was published in partnership with Transparency USA. Click here to learn more about that partnership.



Democrats outraise Republicans by 125% in Virginia state legislative races

New campaign finance filings for Virginia state legislative races showed that Democrats led Republicans in fundraising through the election cycle. Between January 1, 2020, and November 25, 2021, Democratic candidates outraised Republican candidates by 125 percent.

Heading into the general elections, 103 Democratic candidates raised $56.39 million compared to $25.11 million raised by 103 Republicans.

In the Democratic party, the top fundraisers in the most recent reporting period were:

In the Republican party, the top fundraisers in the most recent reporting period were:

The candidates who raised the most money were incumbent Wendy Gooditis (D) in House District 10 ($3,085,894), incumbent Joshua Cole (D) in House District 28 ($2,430,940), and incumbent Jerrauld Jones (D) in House District 89 ($2,377,726).

State legislative general elections were held on November 2, 2021. In some cases, party nominees may have been chosen earlier.

Democrats entered the election with a 21-19 majority in the Virginia State Senate and a 55-45 majority in the Virginia State House. No elections took place in the Senate. In the House, Republicans won seven seats to gain a 52-48 majority.

Campaign finance requirements govern how much money candidates may receive from individuals and organizations, how much and how often they must report those contributions, and how much individuals, organizations, and political parties may contribute to campaigns. All campaign financial transactions must be made through the candidate’s committee. Campaign committees are required to file regular campaign finance disclosure reports with the Virginia Department of Elections.

This article was published in partnership with Transparency USA. Click here to learn more about that partnership.



Major party campaign committees raise $63 million in October

Six party committees have raised a combined $662 million over the first ten months of the 2022 election cycle. In October, the committees raised $63 million, according to recent filings with the Federal Election Commission.

The Republican National Committee (RNC) raised and spent more than the Democratic National Committee (DNC) in October. The RNC raised $13.8 million and spent $16.5 million, while the DNC raised $11.5 million and spent $13.0 million. So far in the 2022 election cycle, the RNC has raised 2.7% more than the DNC ($136.7 million to $133.0 million).

At this time in the 2020 election cycle, the RNC led the DNC in fundraising by a larger 89.0% margin ($194.0 million to $74.5 million).

The National Republican Senatorial Committee (NRSC) raised $9.0 million and spent $7.1 million in October, while the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee (DSCC) raised $7.0 million and spent $4.5 million. The NRSC has raised 13.8% more than the DSCC so far in the 2022 election cycle ($85.2 million to $74.2 million). October was the seventh consecutive month where the NRCC outraised the DSCC.

The House committees raised more than their Senate counterparts last month, with the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee (DCCC) raising $11.7 million and spending $6.8 million and the National Republican Congressional Committee (NRCC) raising $9.8 million and spending $7.1 million. So far in the 2022 election cycle, the DCCC has raised 2.8% more than the NRCC ($118.2 million to $114.8 million). This was the fourth consecutive month where the DCCC outraised the NRCC.

At this point in the 2020 election cycle, the NRSC also led the DSCC in fundraising by 8.8%($54.4 million to $49.8 million). The DCCC also led the NRCC in total fundraising by 38.4% ($101.3 million to $70.4 million).

So far in the 2022 election cycle, the RNC, NRSC, and NRCC have raised 3.4% more than the  DNC, DSCC, and DCCC ($336.7 million to $325.4 million). The Republican committees’ fundraising advantage is up from 3.0% last month.

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Three of the five Virginia House races with the most fundraising resulted in partisan control changes

Elections for all 100 seats in the Virginia House of Delegates took place on November 2, 2021. Democrats lost their majority in the chamber. Republicans regained their majority, winning 52 seats to Democrats’ 48 seats. Three of the seats that changed party hands were among the five districts with the most fundraising in the 2021 election cycle.

Heading into the election, Democrats held 55 seats and Republicans held 45 seats. There were 93 districts with both a Democratic and Republican candidate on the ballot. This was the first election cycle since 1999 with Democrats defending a majority in the chamber.

Five most expensive general elections

DistrictMoney RaisedPre-Election ControlPost-Election Control
District 10$4,372,000.60DemocraticDemocratic
District 85$2,938,036.50DemocraticRepublican
District 83$2,768,861.30DemocraticRepublican
District 28$2,686,629.06DemocraticRepublican
District 73$2,573,085.71DemocraticDemocratic

#1 District 10 – $4,372,000.60

Incumbent Wendy Gooditis (D) raised $2,876,678.21 while Nick Clemente (R) raised $1,495,322.39.

Gooditis won re-election. She received 50.9 percent of the vote and Clemente received 48.9 percent.

In 2019, candidates in this district raised $2,633,438 and Gooditis won 52.3 percent to 47.6 percent.

#2 District 85 – $2,938,036.50

Incumbent Alex Askew (D) raised $2,123,593.11 while Karen Greenhalgh (R) raised $814,443.39.

Greenhalgh defeated Askew. She received 50.2 percent of the vote and Askew received 49.8 percent.

In 2019, candidates in this district raised $2,193,470 and Askew won 51.6 percent to 48.2 percent.

#3 District 83 – $2,768,861.30

Incumbent Nancy Guy (D) raised $2,041,767.36 while Tim Anderson (R) raised $727,093.94.

Anderson defeated Guy. He received 51.3 percent of the vote and Guy received 48.7 percent.

In 2019, candidates in this district raised $2,467,095 and Guy won 50.0 percent to 49.8 percent.

#4 District 28 – $2,686,629.06

Incumbent Joshua Cole (D) raised $1,742,132.53 while Tara Durant (R) raised $944,496.53.

Durant defeated Cole. She received 51.0 percent of the vote and Cole received 48.8 percent.

In 2019, candidates in this district raised $2,265,794 and Cole won 51.8 percent to 47.8 percent.

#5 District 73 – $2,573,085.71

Incumbent Rodney Willett (D) raised $1,757,744.82 while Mary Margaret Kastelberg (R) raised $815,340.89.

Willett won re-election. He received 51.9 percent of the vote and Kastelberg received 48.0 percent.

In 2019, candidates in this district raised $2,332,478 and Willett won 52.2 percent to 47.7 percent.

Fundraising in all contested elections

Across Virginia in the 2021 election cycle, the average amount raised for a general election featuring more than one candidate was $725,238. The map below shades the Virginia House districts based on the amount of money raised in that district.

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Virginia candidate political action committees (candidate PACs) submitted to the Virginia Department of Elections. It includes fundraising activity between Jan. 1, 2020, and Oct. 21, 2021. Candidate PACs represent individuals who have run for state or local office at any point, including past and present officeholders. This article does not include non-candidate PACs.

This article was published in partnership with Transparency USA. Click here to learn more about that partnership.



Fundraising in top five Virginia House races exceed $15.3 million

Elections for all 100 seats in the Virginia House of Delegates are taking place on November 2, 2021. Democrats hold 55 seats and Republicans hold 45 seats. There are 93 districts with both a Democratic and Republican candidate on the ballot. This is the first election cycle since 1999 with Democrats defending a majority in the chamber.

This article lists the five most expensive contested general elections this cycle, ranked by contributions. An earlier version of this article, based on reported data through Aug. 31, 2021, reported the average amount raised for a general election featuring more than one candidate as $394,827.38. In the last two months, the reported donation average climbed by $330,410. Of the districts included in the previous list, only District 10 remains in the top five as of the Oct. 21, 2021 reports. 

Five most expensive general elections

#1 District 10 – $4,372,000.60

Incumbent Wendy Gooditis (D) raised $2,876,678.21 while Nick Clemente (R) raised $1,495,322.39.

The Democratic candidate won 52-48 in the 2019 general election.

#2 District 85 – $2,938,036.50

Incumbent Alex Askew (D) raised $2,123,593.11 while Karen Greenhalgh (R) raised $814,443.39.

The Democratic candidate won 52-48 in the 2019 general election.

#3 District 83 – $2,768,861.30

Incumbent Nancy Guy (D) raised $2,041,767.36 while Tim Anderson (R) raised $727,093.94.

The Democratic candidate won 50.0-49.8  in the 2019 general election.

#4 District 28 – $2,686,629.06

Incumbent Joshua Cole (D) raised $1,742,132.53 while Tara Durant (R) raised $944,496.53.

The Democratic candidate won 52-48 in the 2019 general election.

#5 District 73 – $2,573,085.71

Incumbent Rodney Willett (D) raised $1,757,744.82 while Mary Margaret Kastelberg (R) raised $815,340.89.

The Democratic candidate won 52-48 in the 2019 general election.

Fundraising in all contested elections

Across Virginia in the 2021 election cycle, the average amount raised for a general election featuring more than one candidate was $725,238. The map below shades the Virginia House districts based on the amount of money raised in that district.

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Virginia candidate political action committees (candidate PACs) submitted to the Virginia Department of Elections. It includes fundraising activity between Jan. 1, 2020, and Oct. 21, 2021. Candidate PACs represent individuals who have run for state or local office at any point, including past and present officeholders. This article does not include non-candidate PACs.

This article was published in partnership with Transparency USA. Click here to learn more about that partnership.



Democrats outraise Republicans by 143% in Virginia state legislative races

New campaign finance filings for Virginia state legislative races show Democrats leading Republicans in fundraising. Between January 1, 2020, and October 21, 2021, Democratic candidates outraised Republican candidates by 143 percent.

Heading into the general elections, 103 Democratic candidates raised $51.87 million compared to $21.38 million raised by 103 Republicans.

In the Democratic party, the top fundraisers in the most recent reporting period were:

In the Republican party, the top fundraisers in the most recent reporting period were:

The candidates who raised the most money were incumbent Wendy Gooditis (D) in House District 10 ($2,876,678), incumbent Jerrauld Jones (D) in House District 89 ($2,377,726), and incumbent Alex Askew (D) in House District 85 ($2,123,593).

State legislative general elections are held on November 2, 2021. Primary elections took place on June 8, 2021. In some cases, party nominees may have been chosen earlier.

Democrats have a 21-19 majority in the Virginia State Senate and a 55-45 majority in the Virginia State House.

Campaign finance requirements govern how much money candidates may receive from individuals and organizations, how much and how often they must report those contributions, and how much individuals, organizations, and political parties may contribute to campaigns. All campaign financial transactions must be made through the candidate’s committee. Campaign committees are required to file regular campaign finance disclosure reports with the Virginia Department of Elections.

This article was published in partnership with Transparency USA. Click here to learn more about that partnership.



Three of 10 Virginia House districts with the closest 2019 margins have decreased fundraising this cycle

Elections for all 100 seats in the Virginia House of Delegates are taking place on November 2, 2021. Democrats hold 55 seats and Republicans hold 45 seats. This is the first election cycle since 1999 with Democrats defending a majority in the chamber.

In this article, we’ll look at the 10 closest contests from 2019 and see how the fundraising compares between election cycles. Two of these 10 races resulted in the seat changing partisan hands from Republicans to Democrats (Districts 28 and 83) last cycle.

Ten closest elections in 2019

Of the 10 closest races from the 2019 election cycle, there was an even split between Democratic and Republican victories. Candidates in these districts raised a total of $5.9 million in fundraising at this point in 2019. This cycle, candidates in those same districts have raised a total of $6.8 million.

Across the 100 districts in 2021, candidates in each district have raised on average $393,362. Eight of the 10 districts with the closest 2019 margins have raised more than that on average. The two to not meet that average are both districts held by Republicans.

District2019 MoV2019 fundraising2021 fundraising
District 73D+4.5$561,022.58$928,158.74
District 83*D+0.12$636,073.31$913,555.09
District 28*D+4.1$499,073.22$855,925.61
District 85D+3.4$541,561.69$808,842.06
District 84R+2.4$445,833.90$794,113.10
District 27R+0.62$607,977.43$666,440.06
District 75D+2.1$108,441.91$632,729.37
District 66R+4.6$1,648,306.55$561,708.31
District 100R+3.9$436,818.66$385,646.85
District 81R+4.4$376,179.83$210,370.06

*Districts that changed partisan hands in 2019

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Virginia candidate political action committees (candidate PACs) submitted to the Virginia Department of Elections. It includes fundraising activity between Jan. 1, 2020, and Aug. 31, 2021, as well as Jan. 1, 2018, and Aug. 31, 2019. Candidate PACs represent individuals who have run for state or local office at any point, including past and present officeholders. This article does not include non-candidate PACs.

This article was published in partnership with Transparency USA. Click here to learn more about that partnership.



Democratic candidates in Virginia House have raised 57 percent more than last cycle; Republicans raised 19 percent less

Elections for all 100 seats in the Virginia House of Delegates are taking place on November 2, 2021. Democrats hold 55 seats and Republicans hold 45 seats. In 2019, Democrats gained control of the chamber from Republicans by picking up six seats when Republicans had held a 51-49 majority. As a result, 2021 is the first election cycle since 1999 with Democrats defending a majority in the chamber.

In the 2021 election cycle, Democratic candidates have raised a combined $28.5 million to Republicans’ $10.9 million. In the 2019 cycle, Democratic candidates raised $15.8 million at this point while Republicans raised $13.1 million. In this article, we’ll look at select campaign finance data points and how they compare to the 2019 election cycle. 

Total money raised

Between Jan. 1, 2020, and Aug. 31, 2021, Democratic candidates have raised 57 percent more money than in the previous election cycle, while Republican candidates have raised 19 percent less money. The chart below compares the total funds raised by candidates of each political party through Aug. 31 of each election cycle in 2021 and 2019.

Five districts with the most fundraising

In the 2021 election cycle, the five districts with the most fundraising exceeded $1 million each. In the 2019 election cycle, only two districts had fundraising totaling more than $1 million at this point in time.

Most expensive races  (1/1/2020 – 8/31/2021)Most expensive races  (1/1/2018 – 8/31/2019)
DistrictFunds raisedDistrictFunds raised
District 89$2,357,862.70District 40$1,725,113.52
District 11$2,109,943.85District 66$1,648,306.55
District 10$1,427,115.04District 10$954,747.49
District 41$1,353,323.67District 94$912,502.83
District 40$1,100,583.90District 76$871,691.62

Top ten fundraisers

In the 2021 election cycle, two candidates have raised more than $2 million each. In the 2019 election cycle, no candidate had raised more than $1.2 million at this point in time.

Top fundraisers (1/1/2020 – 8/31/2021)Top fundraisers  (1/1/2018 – 8/31/2019)
NameFunds raisedNameFunds raised
Jerrauld Jones (D)$2,330,658.71Kirk Cox (R)$1,177,816.49
S. Rasoul (D)$2,069,106.10Tim Hugo (R)$1,101,445.44
Eileen Filler-Corn (D)$1,353,025.49Chris Jones (R)$721,063.34
Charniele Herring (D)$952,894.37Dan Helmer (D)$623,668.08
Elizabeth Guzman (D)$918,627.01Nick Freitas (R)$544,907.56
Luke Torian (D)$799,546.66Danica Roem (D)$527,411.77
Dan Helmer (D)$751,851.02Carrie Coyner (R)$525,967.66
Candi King (D)$723,276.37Eileen Filler-Corn (D)$518,929.00
Wendy Gooditis (D)$713,788.18Randall Minchew (R)$513,943.89
Nick Clemente (R)$713,326.86Shelly Simonds (D)$505,487.60

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Virginia candidate political action committees (candidate PACs) submitted to the Virginia Department of Elections. It includes fundraising activity between Jan. 1, 2020, and Aug. 31, 2021, as well as Jan. 1, 2018, and Aug. 31, 2019. Candidate PACs represent individuals who have run for state or local office at any point, including past and present officeholders. This article does not include non-candidate PACs.

This article was published in partnership with Transparency USA. Click here to learn more about that partnership.