Tagmunicipal elections

Filing deadline approaches for Miami municipal election

The filing deadline to run for elected office in Miami is on Sept. 18. Prospective candidates may file for mayor and two seats on the five-seat city commission.

The general election is scheduled for Nov. 2. If no candidate earns more than 50% of the vote, a runoff election will be held Nov. 16.

Miami is the second-largest city in Florida and the 44th-largest city in the U.S. by population.

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Early voting in Boston is Sept. 4-10

Early in-person voting for Boston’s Sept. 14 primary elections begins Sept. 4 and runs through Sept. 10. The city is holding elections for mayor and all 13 city council seats—four elected citywide and nine elected by district. The two candidates who receive the most primary votes in each race will advance to the Nov. 2 general election. The 17 candidates running for the city’s four at-large council seats will all compete in one race, and the top eight candidates will advance.

Four of the seven mayoral candidates are current city councilors, including the acting mayor. Kim Janey, who represents District 7, became acting mayor after former Mayor Marty Walsh joined President Joe Biden’s (D) Cabinet as secretary of labor. Councilors Andrea Campbell (District 4), Annissa Essaibi George (at-large), and Michelle Wu (at-large) are also running for mayor. 

The Boston Globe‘s Laura Crimaldi wrote, “Although census figures show about 65 percent of city residents identify as people of color, the upcoming election will be the first in Boston history that won’t result in a white man becoming mayor.” Each of the above candidates has argued that her personal experience and record best equips her to lead the city.

With the four mayoral candidates and an additional councilor not seeking re-election, around 40% of city council seats are open.

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Seattle city attorney candidates’ platforms highlight divide over issues of crime, public safety

In the November 2, 2021, general election for city attorney of Seattle, Washington, Nicole Thomas-Kennedy leads Ann Davison in total fundraising and both candidates have gained endorsements since they advanced from the primary election on August 3, 2021. In that race, Thomas-Kennedy received 36.4% of the vote and Davison received 32.7%, ousting three-term incumbent Pete Holmes, who received 30.6% of the vote and conceded before results were certified.

As of the most recent filings reported by the Seattle Ethics and Elections Commission on August 30, Thomas-Kennedy has raised $206,965, while Davison has raised $63,336. Seattle newspapers The Stranger and The Urbanist have endorsed Thomas-Kennedy, along with Former Seattle Mayor Mike McGinn (D), Washington’s 32nd, 34th, and 46th District Democrats, and the Seattle Transit Rider’s Union. Davison received endorsements from The Seattle Times, Former King County Prosecutor Chris Bayley, Former Gov. Dan Evans (R), and the Concerned Taxpayers of Washington.

Crosscut, a nonprofit Seattle news site, said the race “will be one of clear contrasts and highlights just how divided the city is over issues of crime, public safety and criminal justice.” Davison, who ran as a Republican for lieutenant governor of Washington in 2020, said she was a moderate Democrat who ran as a Republican because “some parts of the Democratic Party in Seattle didn’t have room anymore for a pragmatist like me, with liberal values, wanting to make our city a better place.” She said Thomas-Kennedy “advocates the most extreme viewpoints: defund the police and abolish the city’s criminal justice system” and “believes such an approach would magically make crime disappear.” Davison said she would “build upon and offer alternative, non-criminal solutions, and interventions with measurable outcomes for those willing to seek help for their underlying problems,” but “there also must be accountability for actions that hurt other people.”

Thomas-Kennedy said “policing and prison do not meet their alleged goals” but instead accomplish “what they were actually designed to do: control and disappear the poor, the disabled, and BIPOC.” She said she would “address the root causes of poverty, homelessness, and despair” with a platform that includes ending prosecutions for drug crimes, defunding the Seattle Police Department, decriminalizing sex work, and ending homeless sweeps. Thomas-Kennedy said, “Every year the City Attorney chooses to prosecute petty offenses born out of poverty, addiction and disability. These prosecutions are destabilizing, ineffective, and cost the City millions each year. We must dismantle this wasteful system of criminal punishment.”

In Seattle, the city attorney heads the city’s Law Department and supervises all litigation in which the city is involved. The city attorney supervises a team of assistant city attorneys who provide legal advice and assistance to the City’s management and prosecute violations of City ordinances.

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Aug. 30 marks the filing deadline for Jersey City mayor and council

The filing deadline to run for elected office in Jersey City in New Jersey is on Aug. 30. Prospective candidates may file for Jersey City mayor and nine city council seats. All six districts of the city council are up for election as well as the two at large seats and council president. 

The general election is scheduled for Nov. 2. If necessary, a runoff election is scheduled for Dec. 7. 

Jersey City is the second-largest city in New Jersey and the 73rd-largest city in the U.S. by population.

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Birmingham, Ala., holds municipal general election

Birmingham, Ala., held a municipal general election on Aug. 24. Candidates ran in nonpartisan elections for mayor and all nine seats on the city council. The filing deadline to run passed on July 10.

Voters re-elected Mayor Randall L. Woodfin to a second term. He defeated seven other candidates in the nonpartisan mayoral race, earning 64.3% of the vote.

Voters re-elected incumbents in six out of eight districts where an incumbent was running, with one race remaining too close to call as of Aug 25. In District 4, incumbent William Parker and challenger J.T. Moore will face each other in a general runoff election after no candidate in the race earned more than 50% of the vote. The general runoff will take place on Oct. 5.

Carol Clarke won the sole open seat on the council in District 8 with 51.7% of the vote, defeating seven other candidates.

The City Council District 1 race was canceled after incumbent Clinton Woods was the sole candidate who filed to run. 

Birmingham is the largest city in Alabama by population and the 99th-largest city in the U.S. 

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Voters in Birmingham to decide mayoral and city council elections on Aug. 24

The city of Birmingham, Ala., is holding a nonpartisan general election for mayor and city council on Aug. 24. If no candidate receives a majority of the vote, the two candidates with the most votes will advance to the runoff election scheduled for Oct. 5.

In the mayoral race, incumbent Randall L. Woodfin is facing opposition from seven candidates. Former Birmingham Mayor William A. Bell, Cerissa Brown, Napoleon Gonzalez, Philemon Hill, Lashunda Scales, Darryl Williams, and Chris Woods are running against Woodfin in the election. In the 2017 mayoral election, Woodfin defeated Bell with 59% of the vote to become the city’s mayor.

All nine seats on the city council are up for election in 2021. Since District 1 incumbent Clinton Woods was the only candidate to file for that seat, the race was canceled. Woods was re-elected to the city council without appearing on the ballot.

  • District 2: Incumbent Hunter Williams, Lawrence Conaway, Kimberly Jeanty, and Don Scott will face off in the general election. Williams was elected to the city council in 2017 with 71% of the vote.
  • District 3: Incumbent Valerie Abbott will face off against Joseph Casper Baker III, Wil Jones, and Alice Speake in the general election. Abbott has served on the city council since 2001 and was re-elected in 2017 with 65% of the vote.
  • District 4: Incumbent William Parker, Gwendolyn Cook Webb, Scottie McClaney, J.T. Moore, and Qunelius Pettway will face off in the general election. Parker has served on the city council since 2013 and was re-elected in 2017 with 74% of the vote.
  • District 5: Incumbent Darrell O’Quinn, Richard Franklin, Hiram Rahim, Erica Robbins, and Roshanique Taylor are facing off in the election. O’Quinn was elected to the city council in 2017 with 52% of the vote.
  • District 6: Incumbent Crystal Smitherman, Keith Aaron, and Keith Williams are running in the general election. Smitherman was appointed to the city council in March 2019 and was elected to the city council in a 2019 special election with 52% of the vote.
  • District 7: Incumbent Wardine Alexander, La’Toya Lee, Lonnie Malone, and Don Stone are facing off in the general election. Alexander was appointed to the city council in October 2018 and was elected to the city council in a 2019 special election with 54% of the vote.
  • District 8: Carol Clarke, Barbara Files-Kennedy, Lynette Peters, Celida Soto, Adlai Trone, Harry Turner, Denise Webber-Jenkins, and Wanda Wright are running in the election. Incumbent Steven W. Hoyt did not file for re-election.
  • District 9: Incumbent John Hilliard, Eric Hall, David Russell, and LaTonya Tate are facing off in the election. Hilliard was elected to the city council in 2017 with 51% of the vote.

Birmingham is the largest city in Alabama and the 99th-largest city in the U.S. by population. It had an estimated population of 209,403 in 2019, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. In 2021, Ballotpedia is covering municipal elections in 21 counties and 68 cities, including 40 mayoral elections.

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Municipal primary approaches in St. Petersburg, Fla.

Image of a red sign with the words "Polling Place" a pointing arrow.

The municipal primary election in St. Petersburg, Fla., is on Aug. 24. Candidates are competing to advance to the general election scheduled for Nov. 2. The filing deadline to run passed on June 18.

Nine candidates filed to run in the nonpartisan mayoral race. Incumbent Rick Kriseman did not file to run for re-election.

Candidates also filed to run for five seats on the eight-seat city council. City council districts 1, 4, and 8 are holding primary elections in which more than two candidates are on the ballot. In Districts 2 and 6, the primary was canceled after only two candidates filed to run in each race.

St. Petersburg is the fifth-largest city in Florida and the 77th-largest city in the U.S. by population.



Port Angeles, Forks city council candidates advance to the general election

Ten city council candidates running for five seats in the cities of Port Angeles and Forks, in Clallam County, Wa., advanced to the Nov. 2 general election. The primary was Aug. 3.

Clallam County, on Washington’s Olympic Peninsula, has the nation’s longest unbroken record of voting for the winning presidential candidate, going back to 1980. Since 1920, voters in the county backed the winning presidential candidate in every election except 1968 and 1976.

Washington uses a top-two primary system, in which all candidates are listed on the same ballot and the top two vote-getters advance to the general election. In total, 15 city council candidates appeared on the primary ballot. In Clallam County, nonpartisan elections skip the primary and appear only on the general election ballot when fewer than three candidates file for the election or the office is a cemetery or parks and recreation district.

Eleven city council seats are up for election in Port Angeles, Sequim, and Forks in 2021. Five city council seats appeared on primary ballots, while the other six will appear on general election ballots.

Vote totals below are current as of Aug. 12. The Clallam County Auditor’s office plans to conduct the next ballot count on Aug. 17.

In Port Angeles, the county seat, four of the seven city council positions are up for election in 2021, and all four appeared on the primary ballot.

Incumbent LaTrisha Suggs, who holds the Council Position No. 1 seat, and Adam Garcia advanced to the general election. Suggs won 47.02% of the vote, while Garcia won 41.07%. In the race for Council Position No. 2, incumbent Mike French and John Madden advanced to the general, with French winning 56.94% of the vote to Madden’s 35.67%. Council Position No. 3 Incumbent Lindsey Schromen-Wawrin advanced to the general after winning 41.48% of the vote, alongside Jena Stamper who won 37.25%. In the race for Council Position No. 4, Mayor Kate Dexter won 53.45% of the vote to John W. Procter’s 41.02%.

Port Angeles council members are elected to four-year terms. The council elects a mayor and deputy mayor from among the seven members.

In Forks, two of the five city council seats are up for election in 2021, and one of them appeared on the primary ballot.

Josef Echeita and Clinton W. Wood advanced to the general election in the City Council Position No. 2 race. Wood won 58.81% of the vote to Echeita’s 30.94%.

Forks city council members are elected for four-year terms. Voters also elect the mayor. The mayor’s office will appear on the general election ballot.  

In Sequim, five of the seven city council seats are up for election, but because only two candidates filed to run in each race, all five skipped the primary and will appear in the general election.



Update on Seattle’s mayor and council primary election results

Seattle, Washington, held top-two primary elections on Tuesday, Aug. 3. Results of the races are pending. Elections in Washington are conducted primarily by mail (ballots may also be deposited in drop boxes or returned in person). Ballots postmarked by Aug. 3 will be counted. King County Elections plans to release updated vote totals each weekday until results are certified on Aug. 17. 

Below are the top five candidates in each race as of preliminary results released Aug. 3. 

Mayoral primary

Fifteen candidates ran in this election. Incumbent Jenny Durkan did not seek re-election. 

  • Bruce Harrell – 38.2%
  • Lorena González – 28.5%
  • Colleen Echohawk – 8.3%
  • Jessyn Farrell – 7.5%
  • Arthur Langlie – 5.8%

City Council position 9

Seven candidates ran in the primary for the seat González currently holds. 

  • Sara Nelson – 42.4%
  • Nikkita Oliver – 35.0%
  • Brianna Thomas – 14.3%
  • Cory Eichner – 4.2%
  • Lindsay McHaffie – 1.8%

City Council position 8

Incumbent Teresa Mosqueda is seeking re-election. The primary featured 11 candidates. 

  • Mosqueda – 54.6%
  • Kenneth Wilson – 18.3%
  • Kate Martin – 12.5%
  • Paul Glumaz – 5.7%
  • Alexander White – 1.6%

Seattle holds elections for mayor and two at-large city council seats every four years. The seven other council seats are elected by district every four years. The last election for those seats was in 2019.



Seattle city attorney primary undecided

The nonpartisan primary election for city attorney of Seattle, Washington, was undecided as of 8:00 p.m. on August 3, 2021. Elections in Washington are conducted primarily by mail (ballots may also be deposited in drop boxes or returned in person). Ballots postmarked by Aug. 3 will be counted. King County Elections plans to release updated vote totals each weekday until results are certified on Aug. 17. 

The top two candidates will advance to the general election on Nov. 2, 2021. Ann Davison led with 34.6% of the vote followed by incumbent Pete Holmes with 32.8% and Nicole Thomas-Kennedy with 32.2%.

According to a survey conducted by Crosscut, a nonprofit news site, the top issues for voters were housing and homelessness, police and public safety, taxes and the economy, and urban planning and transportation.

The Fuse Progressive Voters Guide, which endorsed Holmes, said his priorities were “passing stronger gun laws, reducing excessive force on the part of the Seattle Police Department, vacating marijuana charges, and keeping people housed post-pandemic, among other policies.”

Davison said the city needs “balanced leadership that makes us smart on crime: proactive not reactive” and said she would “focus on improving efficiencies within division in regards to zoning” and “transform existing Mental Health Court to specialized Behavioral Health Court for cases that involve mental health, substance use disorder or dual diagnosis.”

Thomas-Kennedy ran on a platform of decriminalizing poverty, community self-determination, green infrastructure, and ending homeless sweeps. Her website said, “Every year the City Attorney chooses to prosecute petty offenses born out of poverty, addiction and disability. These prosecutions are destabilizing, ineffective, and cost the City millions each year.”

Holmes won re-election in 2017 against Scott Lindsay with 75% of the vote. In Seattle, the city attorney heads the city’s Law Department and supervises all litigation in which the city is involved. The city attorney supervises a team of assistant city attorneys who provide legal advice and assistance to the City’s management and prosecute violations of City ordinances.

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