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Ohio senate president raises $874,464 this election cycle

According to campaign finance reports filed with the Ohio Secretary of State, Ohio State Sen. Matt Huffman has raised $874,464 and spent $530,188 between Jan. 1, 2021, and Jun. 3, 2022. Huffman currently serves as the president of the state senate.

Huffman is a member of the Republican Party and assumed office in 2017. In Ohio, the president of the senate is a state senator elected to the role by the members of the chamber.The primary job of a state senate president is to preside over legislative sessions and ensure that members of the chamber abide by procedural rules. Huffman’s current term ends in 2024.

Huffman’s reported campaign finance activity, by quarter (2017-2021)

Source: Transparency USA

Contributions to Huffman

Of the $874,464 already reported in the 2022 election cycle, $153,926 came from the top 10 donors.

Top Donors to Huffman (1/1/2021 – 6/3/2022)

RankTotal AmountDonor NameDonor Type
1.$27,408.82Susan B and James A Haslam IIIINDIVIDUAL
2.$26,000.00Dina and Ronald WilheimINDIVIDUAL
3.$13,704.41Affiliated Construction Trades Ohio Foundation PCEENTITY
4.$13,704.41James W JohnsonINDIVIDUAL
5.$13,704.41Jim JordanENTITY
6.$13,704.41Whitney Haslam JohnsonINDIVIDUAL
7.$13,700.00Ohio Credit Union Legislative Action CommitteeENTITY
8.$11,500.00Nisource Inc PACENTITY
9.$10,500.00Ohio Oil and Gas Producers FundENTITY
10.$10,000.00Ohio Health Care Assoc PACENTITY

Expenditures by Huffman

Huffman reported $530,188 in expenditures, with $510,410 going to the 10 payees topping this list. 

Top Expenditures by Huffman (1/1/2021 – 6/3/2022)

RankTotal AmountPayee NamePayee Type
1.$470,000.00Republican Senate Campaign Committee (Rscc)ENTITY
2.$15,671.39Shawnee Country ClubENTITY
3.$8,114.45Winterset CPA Group IncENTITY
4.$3,153.56Old City PrimeENTITY
5.$2,621.00Kerschner Consulting LtdENTITY
6.$2,537.23Queen City ClubENTITY
7.$2,500.00AepENTITY
8.$2,372.10AnedotENTITY
9.$1,745.56Ebee PrintingENTITY
10.$1,694.50Hey Hey Bar & GrillENTITY

How donations to Huffman compare to the equivalent role in other states

A number of factors, including whether the position holder is the lieutenant governor or a state senator, can influence donor activity. Here is how Huffman compares to the 10 other senate presidents with campaign finance data available from Transparency USA in 2022:

Across the U.S., 30 senate presidents are members of the Republican Party and 19 are members of the Democratic Party, with one vacancy. The lieutenant governor serves as the president of the senate in 25 states. In other states, the president of the senate is a state senator chosen by the members of the chamber. 

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Ohio PACs submitted to the Ohio Secretary of State. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Report NameReport Due Date
2021 Annual1/31/2022
2022 Pre-Primary4/21/2022
2022 Post-Primary6/10/2022
2022 Semiannual7/29/2022
2022 Pre-General10/27/2022
2022 Post-General12/16/2022

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



$22.1 million raised in the race for Ohio governor

The general election for Governor of Ohio will take place on Nov. 7, 2022. In total, candidates running for Ohio governor have raised $22.1 million and spent $19.6 million between Jan. 1, 2021, and Jun. 3, 2022.

Here’s the breakdown for the five candidates who are still in the running:

Active Gubernatorial Candidates’ Campaign Finance, 1/1/2021- 6/3/2022

CandidatePartyContributionsExpenditures
Richard Michael DeWine (Incumbent)Republican$12,309,442.69$6,800,936.06
Nan WhaleyDemocratic$4,545,363.45$4,035,743.54
F. Patrick CunnaneIndependent$0.00$0.00
Niel PetersenIndependent$24,812.75$23,965.23
Tim Grady (Write-In)Independent$0.00$0.00

The remaining $5.2 million raised in the race for Ohio governor went to candidates who did not advance to the general election or have withdrawn.

Total fundraising in nine gubernatorial races in the 2022 election cycle

A number of factors, including whether an incumbent officeholder is running for re-election and number of candidates in a race, can influence donor activity. Here is how total fundraising by all candidates for Ohio governor compares to the eight other gubernatorial races with campaign finance data available from Transparency USA for the 2022 election cycle:

RankStateTotal DonationsTotal CandidatesActive CandidatesElection StageAvailable Reporting Period
1Florida$106,753,1151210Primary Election1/1/2021 – 3/31/2022
2Texas$72,717,055245General Election1/1/2021 – 5/14/2022
3Pennsylvania$55,727,674205General Election1/1/2021 – 6/16/2022
4Arizona$24,376,8841512Primary Election1/1/2021 – 3/31/2022
5Ohio$22,113,46895General Election1/1/2021 – 6/3/2022
6Michigan$20,716,429167Primary Election1/1/2021 – 4/20/2022
7California$13,997,678322General Election1/1/2021 – 5/21/2022
8Wisconsin$13,933,407109Primary Election1/1/2021 – 3/13/2022
9Minnesota$8,263,0721411Primary Election1/1/2021 – 3/30/2022

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Ohio candidate PACs submitted to the Ohio Secretary of State. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Report NameReport Due Date*
2021 Annual1/31/2022
2022 Pre-Primary4/21/2022
2022 Post-Primary6/10/2022
2022 Semiannual7/29/2022
2022 Pre-General10/27/2022
2022 Post-General12/16/2022
*Some Ohio report dates are subject to change due to rescheduled elections

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



Ohio attorney general raises $2.03 million this election cycle

According to the most recent campaign finance reports filed with the Ohio Secretary of State, Ohio Attorney General Dave Yost has raised $2.03 million and spent $211,002 between Jan. 1, 2021, and Jun. 3, 2022. Yost is currently ranked fifth in state-level donations in the 2022 election cycle.

Yost is a member of the Republican Party and assumed office in 2019. In Ohio, the attorney general is an elected position. The primary job of a state attorney general is to serve as chief legal adviser to the agencies and legislative organs that make up his or her state’s government, in addition to the citizens residing within the state. Yost is running for re-election in 2022.

Yost’s reported campaign finance activity, by quarter (2017-2022)

Source: Transparency USA

Contributions to Yost

Of the $1.03 million already reported in the 2022 election cycle, 50.66 percent came from the top 10 donors.

Top Donors to Yost (1/1/2021 – 6/3/2022)

RankTotal AmountDonor NameDonor Type
1.$717,863.84Ohio Republican State Central & Executive Committee State Candidate FundENTITY
2.$198,051.05Ohio Republican PACENTITY
3.$18,700.00Keating Muething & Klekamp PACENTITY
4.$13,980.31Mary FergusonINDIVIDUAL
5.$13,750.00Summit County Republican Central Committee State Candidate FundENTITY
6.$13,704.41Lee SchearINDIVIDUAL
7.$13,700.00Audrey RatnerINDIVIDUAL
8.$13,700.00Drew DimaccioINDIVIDUAL
9.$13,700.00Jason S LucarelliINDIVIDUAL
10.$13,000.00Gary W JamesINDIVIDUAL

Expenditures by Yost

Yost reported $170,948 in expenditures, with 81.02 percent going to the 10 payees topping this list. “Payees” are entities or individuals listed as the recipients of campaign expenditures, and may include vendors, campaign accounts, and transfers.

Top Expenditures by Yost (1/1/2021 – 6/3/2022)

RankTotal AmountPayee NamePayee Type
1.$92,278.13Targeted VictoryENTITY
2.$27,000.00Campaign Mail & DataENTITY
3.$17,888.75Winterset CPA Group IncENTITY
4.$7,361.38Printpro & SignsENTITY
5.$7,093.07Athletic Club of ColumbusENTITY
6.$4,512.85Apple.comENTITY
7.$4,358.12Winred Technical Services LLCENTITY
8.$3,989.37AnedotENTITY
9.$3,412.50Right Digital LLCENTITY
10.$3,054.11Verizon WirelessENTITY

How donations to Yost compare to the same office in other states

Contributions vary widely among officeholders in the same role. A number of factors, including whether the position is appointed or elected, can influence donor activity. Here is how Yost’s donations compare to the 10 other attorney generals with campaign finance data available from Transparency USA in 2022:

Across the U.S., 27 attorney generals are members of the Republican Party and 23 are members of the Democratic Party. Voters elect the attorney general in 43 states, while they are chosen by a state government organ in the other seven. In 2022, 30 states are holding elections for the position.

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Ohio PACs submitted to the Ohio Secretary of State. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Report NameReport Due Date*
2021 Annual1/31/2022
2022 Pre-Primary4/21/2022
2022 Post-Primary*6/10/2022
2022 Semiannual7/29/2022
2022 Pre-General10/27/2022
2022 Post-General12/16/2022

*Some 2022 Ohio report dates may be subject to change due to rescheduled elections.This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



Ohio Republican candidates have raised $19.9 million more than Democrats

In Ohio, state-level candidates have raised $39.6 million between Jan. 1, 2021, and Apr. 13, 2022. Democratic candidates have raised $9.5 million and Republican candidates spent $29.4 million. 

Ohio Campaign Finance Snapshot (1/1/2021 – 4/13/2022)

Top 10 Democratic candidates, by donations (1/1/2021 – 4/13/2022)

In the 2022 election cycle, 172 state-level Democrats have filed campaign finance reports with the Ohio Secretary of State. Here are the 10 Democratic candidates who have raised the most.

RankDemocratic CandidateTotal Raised
1.Nan Whaley$3,531,073.83
2.John Cranley$2,824,497.42
3.Jennifer Brunner$448,125.61
4.Nickie Antonio$218,170.00
5.David Leland$179,218.00
6.Jeffrey Crossman$122,484.45
7.Terri Jamison$117,556.60
8.Chelsea Clark$101,963.84
9.Casey Weinstein$95,998.60
10.Kenny Yuko$86,812.06

Top 10 Republican candidates, by donations (1/1/2021 – 4/13/2022)

During the same time period, 197 Republicans have filed campaign finance reports with the Ohio Secretary of State. These are the 10 Republican candidates with the highest reported donations for the 2022 election cycle so far.

RankRepublican CandidateTotal Raised
1.Richard Michael DeWine$1,821,025.53
2.David Yost$1,747,724.80
3.Frank Larose$1,304,721.56
4.James Renacci$1,087,477.19
5.Keith Faber$874,463.51
6.Matthew Huffman$805,991.33
7.Joe Blystone$797,883.92
8.Sharon Kennedy$547,764.28
9.Robert Sprague$538,627.83
10.Pat DeWine$430,101.34

In some states, officeholders may accept donations to their campaign accounts when they are not up for election. Those donations are included in candidate campaign finance numbers.

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Ohio candidate PACs submitted to the Ohio Secretary of State. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Report NameReport Due Date
2021 Annual1/31/2022
2022 Pre-Primary4/21/2022
2022 Post-Primary6/10/2022
2022 Semiannual7/29/2022
2022 Pre-General10/27/2022
2022 Post-General12/16/2022

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



A constitutional amendment on bail changes headed to Ohio ballot

On June 1, the Ohio State Senate voted to place a constitutional amendment regarding bail changes on the general election ballot this November. The Senate voted 25-7 for the amendment after it passed the House on May 25, with a vote of 63-33.

The measure, if passed, would change bail policy in Ohio, specifically by requiring courts to weigh certain factors when setting bail amounts and conditions.

The measure would add this language to the Ohio Constitution regarding bail: “When determining the amount of bail, the court shall consider public safety, including the seriousness of the offense, and a person’s criminal record, the likelihood a person will return to court, and any other factor the general assembly may prescribe.”

To amend the constitution in Ohio, a 60 percent vote in each legislative chamber during one legislative session is required. After the amendment passes both chambers, it goes to the voters for approval.

The Senate voted down party lines, with the Senate Republicans supporting the amendment and Senate Democrats opposing the amendment. Sen. Theresa Gavarone (R-2) stated that “Ohioans care about public safety, and I have no doubt that they will overwhelmingly support this amendment.”

State Sen. Cecil Thomas (D-9) spoke in opposition to the amendment. “Good prosecutors in Ohio already know how to keep dangerous suspects in jail pending trial,” he stated, “They request a detention hearing and present evidence about the risk to public safety. This ensures that before denying a person who is still considered innocent their freedom, due process rights must be respected and enforced. A judge can also decide to hold a defendant without bail.”

Ohio voters will vote on this amendment, along with another, on the November 8 ballot this year. This is the second constitutional amendment placed on the Ohio general election ballot. Currently, there are two total measures on the ballot. The other measure, if passed, would amend the Ohio constitution to prohibit noncitizens from voting in local and statewide elections.

Since 1985, a total of 26 legislatively referred constitutional amendments have been approved by voters in Ohio, and four amendments have been defeated.

Additional reading:



Citizenship voting requirement amendment on the ballot for Ohio voters

On Wednesday, June 1, the Ohio State Senate voted unanimously to pass House Joint Resolution 4 (HJR4), placing it on the general election ballot for voters this November. It is the first measure to qualify for the Nov. 8 ballot in Ohio.

The measure would amend three sections of the Ohio Constitution—Section 1 of Article V, Section 3 of Article X, and Section 3 of Article XVIII. The language in Section 1, Article V would be changed from “Every citizen of the United States … is entitled to vote in all elections”, to “Only a citizen of the United States … is entitled to vote in all elections”.  

This measure would prohibit non-citizens from voting in Ohio statewide or local elections.

HJR4 was first introduced on May 17, 2022, and was sponsored by Rep. Jay Edwards (R-94) and Rep. Bill Seitz (R-30). It passed the Ohio General Assembly a week later, on May 25, 2022. 

“This is about the integrity of our elections,” Edwards said in a statement after HJR4 passed the Assembly, “Citizenship matters. We are being proactive to ensure our election laws are clear and unambiguous. I believe this is an issue most Ohioans, regardless of party affiliation, will support.”

Previously, the council of the Village of Yellow Springs, Ohio, passed a charter amendment to allow all residents who are at least 16 years old to vote in local elections, as well as allowing non-U.S. citizens to be eligible to vote. Ohio Secretary of State Frank LaRose issued an order stating that non-citizens in the Village of Yellow Springs could not vote or register to vote.

Democrats and Republicans in the Ohio State Senate unanimously voted for the amendment to pass, while in the General Assembly, the vote was 68-28. All 28 ‘no’ votes were from Democratic assembly members, while 5 Democrats and 63 Republicans voted for the measure.

Secretary LaRose released the following statement after the Senate vote. “To reiterate, Ohio elections are only for Ohio citizens,” he stated, “The right to vote is sacrosanct and fundamental to what citizenship means in America and is why so many immigrate from around the world to the U.S., wait their turn in line, and go through the laborious citizenship process so they too can participate in this hallmark of democracy.”

Gary Daniels, Chief Lobbyist for the ACLU of Ohio, opposes the measure. “It is clear this latest effort has nothing to do with policy and everything to do with politics,” he stated, “Ohio law is explicit with regard to voter eligibility and citizenship, making HJR 4 and SJR 6 and the rush to put this matter on the ballot 100% unnecessary.”

This amendment joins three other voting-related ballot measures in other states certified for 2022 elections—in Alabama, Arizona, and Connecticut. The policies of these measures range from voter ID requirements for in-person and mail-in voting, such as the currently certified Arizona measure, or policies to authorize early voting, which is what a certified Connecticut measure would do.

In Ohio, a total of 26 legislatively referred constitutional amendments have been approved by voters, while 4 amendments have been defeated, since 1985.

Additional reading:



Federal court enacts legislative maps for Ohio’s 2022 elections

A ruling issued by the United States Court of Appeals for the 6th Circuit took effect on May 28, ordering the enactment of state legislative maps for Ohio’s 2022 elections and setting the legislative primary date for August 2, 2022. The Ohio Redistricting Commission approved the maps selected by the court in February 2022. The court ruled on April 20 and said the maps would take effect if state court proceedings had not produced an alternative by May 28.

The Ohio Redistricting Commission initially approved a set of legislative maps in a 5-2 vote along party lines on September 16, 2021. The Ohio Supreme Court struck down those maps in a 4-3 decision on January 12, 2022, and ordered the commission to redraw them. Since then, the state supreme court has rejected four sets of maps submitted by the commission, including the February maps enacted by the federal court. The commission initially approved those maps on February 24 in a 4-3 vote and approved them a second time on May 5 in a 4-3 vote. State Auditor Keith Faber (R) joined the two Democratic members of the commission in voting against the maps. The state supreme court rejected both submissions. 

The state court proceedings are ongoing, with another deadline for revised maps set for June 3. The federal ruling applies to the maps for 2022 elections, meaning the state court proceedings may produce maps for subsequent legislative elections.

As of May 28, 49 states have adopted new state legislative maps, making Montana the final state to have not adopted legislative maps for the 2022 elections. As of May 28, 2012, 46 states had enacted legislative redistricting plans after the 2010 census.

Nationwide, states have completed legislative redistricting for 1,923 of 1,972 state Senate seats (97.5%) and 5,313 of 5,411 state House seats (98.2%).

Additional reading:



Ohio Republican candidates have spent $5.77 million more than Democrats

In Ohio, state-level candidates spent $22.68 million between Jan. 1, 2021, and Apr. 13, 2022. Democratic candidates spent $8.30 million and Republican candidates spent $14.07 million. 

Ohio Campaign Finance Snapshot (1/1/2021 – 4/13/2022)

Source: Transparency USA

Top 10 Democratic candidates, by expenditures (1/1/2021 – 4/13/2022)

In the 2022 election cycle, 174 state-level Democrats have filed campaign finance reports with the Ohio Secretary of State. Here are the 10 Democratic candidates who have spent the most.

RankDemocratic CandidateTotal Spent
1.Nan Whaley$3,452,969.04
2.John Cranley$2,704,725.04
3.David Leland$220,874.66
4.Jennifer Brunner$144,346.93
5.Emilia Sykes$100,849.21
6.Sean O’Brien$88,804.66
7.Nickie Antonio$88,738.48
8.Teresa Fedor$86,822.83
9.Kristin Boggs$83,352.73
10.Chelsea Clark$76,697.16

Top 10 Republican candidates, by expenditures (1/1/2021 – 4/13/2022)

During the same time period, 196 Republicans have filed campaign finance reports with the Ohio Secretary of State. These are the 10 Republican candidates with the highest reported expenditures for the 2022 election cycle so far.

RankRepublican CandidateTotal Spent
1.Richard Michael DeWine$3,683,457.38
2.James Renacci$2,914,514.13
3.Frank Larose$581,071.55
4.Joe Blystone$542,256.20
5.Matthew Huffman$530,188.08
6.Matthew Dolan$224,496.21
7.Robert McColley$208,957.50
8.Jay Hottinger$203,691.19
9.David Yost$196,235.79
10.Sharon Kennedy$196,183.13

In some states, officeholders may make expenditures from their campaign accounts when they are not up for election. Those expenditures are included in candidate campaign finance numbers.

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Ohio candidate PACs submitted to the Ohio Secretary of State. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Report NameReport Due Date
2021 Annual1/31/2022
2022 Pre-Primary4/21/2022
2022 Post-Primary6/10/2022
2022 Semiannual7/29/2022
2022 Pre-General10/27/2022
2022 Post-General12/16/2022

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



Facebook was paid $19,924 from Ohio campaign accounts; other states reported millions

In Ohio, state-level candidates and PACs have spent $19,924 from their campaign accounts on services from Facebook in the 2022 election cycle so far. Facebook received 0.03 percent of all reported expenditures. 

According to reports filed with the Ohio Secretary of State between Jan. 1, 2021, and Apr. 13, 2022, here are the top candidates and PACs that have spent campaign funds with Facebook.

Top 10 Ohio campaigns spending money with Facebook

Of the $19,924 spent with Facebook, 90.95 percent came from these 10 campaign accounts.

Top Campaign Expenditures with Facebook (1/1/2021 – 4/13/2022)

RankTotal Paid to FacebookNameAccount Type
1.$9,505.17Joe BlystoneCandidate PAC
2.$2,864.63Casey WeinsteinCandidate PAC
3.$2,249.82Phillip RobinsonCandidate PAC
4.$866.91The MatriotsNon-candidate PAC
5.$594.61Christian JohnsonCandidate PAC
6.$532.83Juanita BrentCandidate PAC
7.$458.88Gary ClickCandidate PAC
8.$378.03Theresa GavaroneCandidate PAC
9.$350.00Pickaway County Patriot AllianceNon-candidate PAC
10.$319.14Summit County Democratic Party Executive Committee Restricted FundNon-candidate PAC

Campaign expenditures with Facebook in 12 states

Campaign expenditures vary widely. Here is how spending with Facebook in Ohio compares to 12 other states with data available from Transparency USA for the most recent election cycle:

Comparison of total campaign finance expenditures with Facebook, by state

RankStateTotal Paid to FacebookReporting Period
1California$5,290,7451/1/2021- 4/23/2022
2Virginia$4,486,8631/1/2020-12/31/2021*
3Texas$2,675,2761/1/2021 – 5/14/2022
4Michigan$194,1801/1/2021 – 4/20/2022
5Minnesota$166,0721/1/2021 – 3/31/2022
6Arizona123,1541/1/2021 – 3/31/2022
7Pennsylvania$106,5131/1/2021 – 3/9/2022
8Wisconsin$101,9781/1/2021 – 3/21/2022
9North Carolina$78,9601/1/2021 – 4/30/2022
10Florida$38,5421/1/2021 – 3/31/202
11Indiana$29,5341/1/2021 – 4/8/2022
12Ohio$19,9241/1/2021 – 4/13/2022
*Virginia’s two-year election cycles end in an odd-numbered year. The first available reports for Virginia’s 2023 election cycle are due Jul. 17, 2022.

While spending varies widely between states, no state on Transparency USA has reported more than 1.06 percent of total campaign expenditures on services from Facebook in the most recent cycle.

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Ohio PACs submitted to the Ohio Secretary of State. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Report NameReport Due Date
2021 Annual1/31/2022
2022 Pre-Primary4/21/2022
2022 Post-Primary6/10/2022
2022 Semiannual7/29/2022
2022 Pre-General10/27/2022
2022 Post-General12/16/2022

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



Ohio Secretary of State raises $1.75 million this election cycle

According to the most recent campaign finance reports filed with the Ohio Secretary of State’s office, Ohio Secretary of State Frank LaRose has raised $1.75 million and spent $581,072 between Jan. 1, 2021 and Apr. 13, 2022. LaRose is currently ranked fifth in state-level donations in the 2022 election cycle.

LaRose is a member of the Republican Party and assumed office in 2019. In Ohio, the secretary of state is an elected position. Duties vary by state but are generally administrative in nature and may include recordkeeping, certification of state documents, and serving as chief election official. LaRose is running for reelection in 2022.

LaRose’s reported campaign finance activity, by quarter (2017-2022)

Source: Transparency USA

Contributions to LaRose

Of the $1,747,725 already reported in the 2022 election cycle, 9.26 percent came from the top 10 donors.

Top Donors to LaRose (1/1/2021 – 4/13/2022)

RankTotal AmountDonor NameDonor Type
1.$39,116.78Orp PACENTITY
2.$15,000.00Susan B and James A Haslam IIIINDIVIDUAL
3.$13,704.41John PritzkerINDIVIDUAL
4.$13,704.41Reid Garrett HoffmanINDIVIDUAL
5.$13,700.00Adam A ThomariosINDIVIDUAL
6.$13,700.00Heather L WrightselINDIVIDUAL
7.$13,700.00Jason S LucarelliINDIVIDUAL
8.$13,700.00Thomas A LaroseINDIVIDUAL
9.$13,000.00Samuel R WaltonINDIVIDUAL
10.$12,500.00Thrive Companies PACENTITY

Expenditures by LaRose

On the expenditures side, LaRose reported $581,072, with 73.88 percent of all spending going to the 10 payees topping this list. 

Top Expenditures by LaRose (1/1/2021 – 4/13/2022)

RankTotal AmountPayee NamePayee Type
1.$100,000.00Strategic Media Placement IncENTITY
2.$84,417.28Dudley GroupENTITY
3.$70,500.00Red Brick StrategiesENTITY
4.$42,500.00Apx StrategiesENTITY
5.$35,286.67Right Digital LLCENTITY
6.$31,500.00Advictory LLCENTITY
7.$25,812.49Strategy Group for Media IncENTITY
8.$14,662.73Qwestcom Graphics IncENTITY
9.$12,615.24StripeENTITY
10.$12,000.00Fulcrum Campaign StrategiesENTITY

How donations to LaRose compare to the same office in other states

Contributions vary widely among officeholders in the same role. A number of factors, including whether the position is appointed or elected, can influence donor activity. Here is how LaRose compares to the 10 other state and commonwealth secretaries with campaign finance data available from Transparency USA in 2022:

Across the U.S., 27 secretaries of state are members of the Republican Party and 20 are members of the Democratic Party. Voters elect the secretary of state in 35 states, while they are appointed by either the governor or state legislature in the other 12. Alaska, Hawaii, and Utah do not have secretaries of state. In 2022, 27 states are holding elections for the position.

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Ohio PACs submitted to the Ohio Secretary of State. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Report NameReport Due Date
2021 Annual1/31/2022
2022 Pre-Primary4/21/2022
2022 Post-Primary6/10/2022
2022 Semiannual7/29/2022
2022 Pre-General10/27/2022
2022 Post-General12/16/2022

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.