Tagohio

Stories about Ohio

The top fundraisers among Ohio statewide elected offices

Campaign finance requirements govern how much money candidates may receive from individuals and organizations, how often they must report those contributions, and how much individuals, organizations, and political entities may contribute to campaigns.

While campaign finance is not the only factor in electoral outcomes, successful fundraising can provide a candidate with advantages during a campaign. Fundraising can also indicate party momentum.

This article lists top fundraisers among Ohio statewide officeholders and candidates, overall and by party. It is based on campaign finance reports that officeholders in and candidates for statewide elected offices submitted to the Ohio Secretary of State. It includes activity between Jan. 1, 2022, and June 30, 2022.

Statewide political positions are typically offices in the executive and judicial branches of government rather than the legislative, and they most often represent all citizens in the state, rather than those in a particular district.

Top Ohio statewide fundraisers by party

The top fundraisers among Ohio statewide officeholders and candidates are shown below. Individuals are presented with the office that they are on the ballot for in 2022, if applicable. If no office is indicated, the person was an incumbent and was not on the ballot in 2022.

In the Democratic Party, the top fundraisers in the most recent semiannual reporting period were:

  • Nan Whaley (Governor) – $2,551,511
  • John Cranley (Governor) – $1,049,059
  • Jeff Crossman (Attorney General) – $154,801
  • Chelsea Clark (Secretary of State) – $134,320
  • Scott Schertzer (Treasurer) – $123,121

In the Republican Party, the top fundraisers in the most recent semiannual reporting period were:

  • Richard Michael DeWine (Governor) – $6,162,696
  • Frank LaRose (Secretary of State) – $1,065,643
  • Dave Yost (Attorney General) – $659,546
  • Keith Faber (Auditor of State) – $592,566
  • Robert Sprague (Treasurer) – $346,894

Fundraising totals

Overall, Democratic officeholders and candidates raised $4.1 million in this period. Republican officeholders and candidates raised $9.3 million. Combined, all statewide officeholders and candidates in the Jan. 1, 2022, through June 30, 2022, filing period raised $13.6 million.

The five largest Democratic fundraisers were responsible for 98 percent of all Democratic statewide officeholder and candidate fundraising. The five largest Republican fundraisers were responsible for 95 percent of all Republican statewide officeholder and candidate fundraising.

The table below provides additional data from the campaign finance reports from the top 10 fundraisers during this period.

TOP 10 FUNDRAISERS – Ohio STATEWIDE OFFICEHOLDERS AND CANDIDATES (Jan. 1, 2022, through June 30, 2022)
Name Party Affiliation Office Sought Raised Spent
Governor Richard Michael DeWine Republican Party Governor $6,162,696 $5,974,359
Nan Whaley Democratic Party Governor $2,551,511 $2,693,526
Secretary of State Frank LaRose Republican Party Secretary of State $1,065,643 $436,869
John Cranley Democratic Party Governor $1,049,059 $2,446,921
Attorney General Dave Yost Republican Party Attorney General $659,546 $72,202
Auditor Keith Faber Republican Party Auditor of State $592,566 $43,539
Treasurer Robert Sprague Republican Party Treasurer $346,894 $80,110
Joe Blystone Republican Party Governor $205,162 $223,126
Jim Renacci Republican Party Governor $179,225 $4,042,113
Representative Jeff Crossman Democratic Party Attorney General $154,801 $48,322

Campaign finance reporting periods

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that candidate PACs submitted to the Ohio Secretary of State. Candidate PACs represent individuals who have run for state or local office at any point, including past and present officeholders. This article does not include non-candidate PACs. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Report Name Report Due Date
2021 Annual 1/31/2022
2022 Pre-Primary 4/21/2022
2022 Post-Primary 6/10/2022
2022 Semiannual 7/29/2022
2022 Pre-General 10/27/2022
2022 Post-General 12/16/2022

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



$58,235 spent with USPS from Ohio campaign accounts

In Ohio, state-level candidates and PACs have spent $58,235 from their campaign accounts on services from the United States Postal Service in the 2022 election cycle so far. USPS received 0.1 percent of all $71.4 million in reported expenditures

According to Ohio Secretary of State reports, here are the top candidates and PACs that have spent campaign funds with USPS between Jan. 1, 2021, and Jun. 3, 2022.

Top 10 Ohio candidates and PACs spending money with USPS

Of the $58,235 spent with USPS, 57 percent came from these 10 campaign accounts.

Top Campaign Expenditures with USPS (1/1/2021 – 6/3/2022)

RankTotal Paid to USPSNameAccount Type
1.$6,851.00Frank LaroseCandidate Committee
2.$6,058.70Liberty Township Professional Fire Fighters Iaff Local 3754 Fire PACNon-Candidate Committee
3.$5,551.40John CranleyCandidate Committee
4.$3,308.19Ohio Chamber of Commerce PACNon-Candidate Committee
5.$2,430.00Jacob LargerCandidate Committee
6.$2,028.15Nan WhaleyCandidate Committee
7.$1,985.00Emilia SykesCandidate Committee
8.$1,733.50Allison RussoCandidate Committee
9.$1,644.98Jessica MirandaCandidate Committee
10.$1,589.00Franklin County Democratic Party Restricted FundNon-Candidate Committee

Campaign expenditures with USPS in eight states

Here is how spending with USPS in Ohio compares to other states with the most recent report data available from Transparency USA for the 2021-2022 election cycle:

Comparison of total spent with USPS, by state

RankStateExpenditures with USPSTotal Reported Expeditures% of Total ExpendituresAvailable Reporting Period
1California$15,081,328$1,226,617,6541.23%1/1/2021 – 5/21/2022
2Pennsylvania$2,783,385$520,342,0530.53%1/1/2021 – 6/16/2022
3Texas$2,296,493$558,195,683.200.41%1/1/2021 – 6/30/2022
4Michigan$516,804$164,128,118.560.31%1/1/2021 – 7/20/2022
5Wisconsin$359,986$84,579,752.310.43%1/1/2021 – 6/30/2022
6North Carolina$275,000$57,297,691.780.48%1/1/2021 – 6/30/2022
7Indiana$118,005$34,302,447.740.34%1/1/2021 – 6/30/2022
8Ohio$58,235$71,355,093.800.08%1/1/2021 – 6/3/2022

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Ohio PACs submitted to the Ohio Secretary of State. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Name of ReportReporting PeriodDeadline
2021 Annual1/1/21 – 12/31/221/31/2022
2022 Pre-Primary1/1/22 – 4/13/224/21/2022
2022 Post-Primary1/1/22 -6/3/226/10/2022
2022 Semiannual1/1/22 – 6/30/227/29/2022
2022 Pre-General1/1/22 – 10/19/2210/27/2022
2022 Post- General1/1/22 – 12/9/2212/16/2022
2022 Annual1/1/22 – 12/31/221/31/2022

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



Ohio Supreme Court overturns state’s congressional district boundaries; map to still be used for 2022 elections

The Ohio Supreme Court ruled 4-3 on July 19, 2022, that the congressional district boundaries that the Ohio Redistricting Commission adopted on March 2 were unconstitutional. Since the state’s 2022 primary elections were held on May 3 using the overturned districts, this year’s congressional elections will take place using the existing boundaries.

The state supreme court directed the Ohio General Assembly to pass a compliant plan within 30 days. If the general assembly fails to do so, the court ordered the redistricting commission to then adopt a plan within 30 days. The state would use that map for its 2024 congressional elections.

Since the boundaries that the redistricting commission adopted in March 2022 did not receive support from any commission members of the minority party, it would have been in effect for only four years. Under the constitutional amendment establishing the redistricting commission that voters approved in 2018, the commission was required to enact a new map after the 2024 elections.

Justices Maureen O’Connor, Michael Donnelly, and Melody Stewart signed the state supreme court’s majority opinion with Justice Jennifer Brunner filing a concurring opinion. Justices Sharon Kennedy, Pat DeWine, and Pat Fischer wrote or joined dissenting opinions.

The court’s opinion said, “Petitioners have satisfied their burden by showing beyond a reasonable doubt that the March 2 plan unduly favors the Republican Party in violation of Article XIX, Section 1(C)(3)(a) of the Ohio Constitution. Comparative analyses and other metrics show that the March 2 plan allocates voters in ways that unnecessarily favor the Republican Party by packing Democratic voters into a few dense Democratic-leaning districts, thereby increasing the Republican vote share of the remaining districts. As a result, districts that would otherwise be strongly Democratic-leaning are now competitive or Republican-leaning districts.”

The dissenting opinion signed by Justices Kennedy and DeWine said, “We disagree, however, with the majority’s conclusion that the March 2 plan is invalid because it violates Article XIX, Section 1(C)(3)(a) of the Ohio constitution for ‘unduly favor[ing] or disfavor[ing] a political party or its incumbents.’…Therefore, we would hold that the March 2 plan is constitutional and order its use for the 2024 primary and general elections. Because the majority does otherwise, we dissent.”

Governor Mike DeWine (R) first signed a new congressional map into law on November 20, 2021, after the state Senate voted to approve it 24-7 and the state House approved it 55-36. On January 14, the Ohio Supreme Court struck down the state’s enacted congressional map and ordered the legislature to redraw it. The Ohio Redistricting Commission approved redrawn congressional boundaries in a 5-2 vote along party lines.

Additional reading:

Ohio Supreme Court

Mike DeWine

Redistricting in Ohio



Jay Edwards raised more than any other Republican House candidate in Ohio

Ohio Republican candidates and officeholders have raised $33.4 million during the 2022 election cycle. Among state House candidates and officeholders, Jay Edwards has raised more than any other Republican.

Edwards represents Ohio House District 94 and is running for re-election in 2022. Edwards raised $430,101 and spent $68,023 between Jan. 1, 2021, and Jun. 6, 2022. According to Ohio Secretary of State reports, the following individual donors and PACs gave the most money to Edwards.

Top 10 Donors to Edwards, (1/1/2021 – 6/3/2022)

Of the $430,101 in reported donations, $152,512 came from these 10 donors.

Total DonationsNameType
$27,408.00Thomas T GeorgeINDIVIDUAL
$15,500.00Ohio State Association of Plumbers and Pipefitters PCEENTITY
$13,704.00Thomas RastinINDIVIDUAL
$13,700.00Brian ColleranINDIVIDUAL
$13,700.00Carol TurniINDIVIDUAL
$13,700.00Daniel J ParkerINDIVIDUAL
$13,700.00David RastokaINDIVIDUAL
$13,700.00Frederick KeithINDIVIDUAL
$13,700.00Gretchen ColleranINDIVIDUAL
$13,700.00Jennifer MillerINDIVIDUAL

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Ohio candidate PACs submitted to the Ohio Secretary of State. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

See updates to Edwards’ campaign finance data after the next reports are available.

Ohio ReportsReport Due Date
2021 Annual1/31/2022
2022 Pre-Primary4/21/2022
2022 Post-Primary6/10/2022
2022 Semiannual7/29/2022
2022 Pre-General10/27/2022
2022 Post-General12/16/2022

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



Contested state legislative primaries in Ohio increase from 2020

Ohio has 56 contested state legislative primaries this year, 24% of the total number of possible primaries, and 40% more that the 40 contested primaries in 2020.

A primary is contested when more candidates file to run than there are nominations available, meaning at least one candidate must lose.

Of the 56 contested primaries, there are 23 for Democrats and 33 for Republicans. For Democrats, this is up from 17 in 2020, a 35% increase. For Republicans, the number increased 43% from 23 in 2020.

Twenty-six primaries feature an incumbent: eight Democrats and 18 Republicans. This represents 30% of all incumbents who filed for re-election, the highest rate of incumbents in contested primaries compared of the preceding five election cycles.

Overall, 261 major party candidates—120 Democrats and 141 Republicans—filed to run. All of the state’s 99 House districts and 17 of the 33 Senate districts are holding elections this year.

Thirty-one of those districts are open, guaranteeing that at least 23% of the state legislature will be represented by newcomers next year.

Ohio has had a Republican trifecta since 2010 when the party won control of the governorship and state House. Republicans currently hold a 25-8 majority in the Senate and a 64-35 majority in the House.

Ohio’s state legislative primaries are scheduled for August 2, the 11th statewide primary date of the 2022 state legislative election cycle, and the state’s second statewide primary this year. Voters previously decided state executive and congressional primaries on May 3, with state legislative primaries delayed due to litigation regarding redistricting.

Additional reading:

Ohio State Senate elections, 2022

Ohio House of Representatives elections, 2022



David Leland raised more than any other Democratic House Rep. in Ohio

Ohio Democratic candidates and officeholders have raised $11.2 million during the 2022 election cycle. Among state House candidates and officeholders, David Leland has raised more than any other Democrat.

Leland is the representative for Ohio House District 22 and is running for election for judge of the Ohio Tenth District Court of Appeals in 2022. Leland raised $179,342 and spent $220,973 between Jan. 1, 2021, and Jun. 6, 2022. According to Ohio Secretary of State reports, the following individual donors and PACs gave the most money to Leland.

Top 10 Donors to Leland, (1/1/2021 – 6/3/2022)

Of the $179,342 in reported donations, $43,300 came from these 10 donors.

Total DonationsNameType
$6,100.00Kristin BoggsENTITY
$5,100.00Oapse Afscme Turnaround Ohio PACENTITY
$5,000.00Political Education Patterns Political Arm of the IuoeENTITY
$4,100.00Bingo Properties LLCENTITY
$4,100.00Bride Rose SweeneyENTITY
$4,100.00Carpenter Lipps & Leland LLPENTITY
$4,100.00North Olmsted Residents for Chris GlassburnENTITY
$4,100.00Richard BrownENTITY
$4,100.00Vorys Sater Seymour & Pease Advocates for Effective GovernmentENTITY
$2,500.00Ohio State Association of Plumbers and Pipefitters PCEENTITY

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Ohio candidate PACs submitted to the Ohio Secretary of State. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

See updates to Leland’s campaign finance data after the next reports are available.

Ohio ReportsReport Due Date
2021 Annual1/31/2022
2022 Pre-Primary4/21/2022
2022 Post-Primary6/10/2022
2022 Semiannual7/29/2022
2022 Pre-General10/27/2022
2022 Post-General12/16/2022

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



Ohio senate president raises $874,464 this election cycle

According to campaign finance reports filed with the Ohio Secretary of State, Ohio State Sen. Matt Huffman has raised $874,464 and spent $530,188 between Jan. 1, 2021, and Jun. 3, 2022. Huffman currently serves as the president of the state senate.

Huffman is a member of the Republican Party and assumed office in 2017. In Ohio, the president of the senate is a state senator elected to the role by the members of the chamber.The primary job of a state senate president is to preside over legislative sessions and ensure that members of the chamber abide by procedural rules. Huffman’s current term ends in 2024.

Huffman’s reported campaign finance activity, by quarter (2017-2021)

Source: Transparency USA

Contributions to Huffman

Of the $874,464 already reported in the 2022 election cycle, $153,926 came from the top 10 donors.

Top Donors to Huffman (1/1/2021 – 6/3/2022)

RankTotal AmountDonor NameDonor Type
1.$27,408.82Susan B and James A Haslam IIIINDIVIDUAL
2.$26,000.00Dina and Ronald WilheimINDIVIDUAL
3.$13,704.41Affiliated Construction Trades Ohio Foundation PCEENTITY
4.$13,704.41James W JohnsonINDIVIDUAL
5.$13,704.41Jim JordanENTITY
6.$13,704.41Whitney Haslam JohnsonINDIVIDUAL
7.$13,700.00Ohio Credit Union Legislative Action CommitteeENTITY
8.$11,500.00Nisource Inc PACENTITY
9.$10,500.00Ohio Oil and Gas Producers FundENTITY
10.$10,000.00Ohio Health Care Assoc PACENTITY

Expenditures by Huffman

Huffman reported $530,188 in expenditures, with $510,410 going to the 10 payees topping this list. 

Top Expenditures by Huffman (1/1/2021 – 6/3/2022)

RankTotal AmountPayee NamePayee Type
1.$470,000.00Republican Senate Campaign Committee (Rscc)ENTITY
2.$15,671.39Shawnee Country ClubENTITY
3.$8,114.45Winterset CPA Group IncENTITY
4.$3,153.56Old City PrimeENTITY
5.$2,621.00Kerschner Consulting LtdENTITY
6.$2,537.23Queen City ClubENTITY
7.$2,500.00AepENTITY
8.$2,372.10AnedotENTITY
9.$1,745.56Ebee PrintingENTITY
10.$1,694.50Hey Hey Bar & GrillENTITY

How donations to Huffman compare to the equivalent role in other states

A number of factors, including whether the position holder is the lieutenant governor or a state senator, can influence donor activity. Here is how Huffman compares to the 10 other senate presidents with campaign finance data available from Transparency USA in 2022:

Across the U.S., 30 senate presidents are members of the Republican Party and 19 are members of the Democratic Party, with one vacancy. The lieutenant governor serves as the president of the senate in 25 states. In other states, the president of the senate is a state senator chosen by the members of the chamber. 

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Ohio PACs submitted to the Ohio Secretary of State. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Report NameReport Due Date
2021 Annual1/31/2022
2022 Pre-Primary4/21/2022
2022 Post-Primary6/10/2022
2022 Semiannual7/29/2022
2022 Pre-General10/27/2022
2022 Post-General12/16/2022

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



$22.1 million raised in the race for Ohio governor

The general election for Governor of Ohio will take place on Nov. 7, 2022. In total, candidates running for Ohio governor have raised $22.1 million and spent $19.6 million between Jan. 1, 2021, and Jun. 3, 2022.

Here’s the breakdown for the five candidates who are still in the running:

Active Gubernatorial Candidates’ Campaign Finance, 1/1/2021- 6/3/2022

CandidatePartyContributionsExpenditures
Richard Michael DeWine (Incumbent)Republican$12,309,442.69$6,800,936.06
Nan WhaleyDemocratic$4,545,363.45$4,035,743.54
F. Patrick CunnaneIndependent$0.00$0.00
Niel PetersenIndependent$24,812.75$23,965.23
Tim Grady (Write-In)Independent$0.00$0.00

The remaining $5.2 million raised in the race for Ohio governor went to candidates who did not advance to the general election or have withdrawn.

Total fundraising in nine gubernatorial races in the 2022 election cycle

A number of factors, including whether an incumbent officeholder is running for re-election and number of candidates in a race, can influence donor activity. Here is how total fundraising by all candidates for Ohio governor compares to the eight other gubernatorial races with campaign finance data available from Transparency USA for the 2022 election cycle:

RankStateTotal DonationsTotal CandidatesActive CandidatesElection StageAvailable Reporting Period
1Florida$106,753,1151210Primary Election1/1/2021 – 3/31/2022
2Texas$72,717,055245General Election1/1/2021 – 5/14/2022
3Pennsylvania$55,727,674205General Election1/1/2021 – 6/16/2022
4Arizona$24,376,8841512Primary Election1/1/2021 – 3/31/2022
5Ohio$22,113,46895General Election1/1/2021 – 6/3/2022
6Michigan$20,716,429167Primary Election1/1/2021 – 4/20/2022
7California$13,997,678322General Election1/1/2021 – 5/21/2022
8Wisconsin$13,933,407109Primary Election1/1/2021 – 3/13/2022
9Minnesota$8,263,0721411Primary Election1/1/2021 – 3/30/2022

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Ohio candidate PACs submitted to the Ohio Secretary of State. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Report NameReport Due Date*
2021 Annual1/31/2022
2022 Pre-Primary4/21/2022
2022 Post-Primary6/10/2022
2022 Semiannual7/29/2022
2022 Pre-General10/27/2022
2022 Post-General12/16/2022
*Some Ohio report dates are subject to change due to rescheduled elections

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



Ohio attorney general raises $2.03 million this election cycle

According to the most recent campaign finance reports filed with the Ohio Secretary of State, Ohio Attorney General Dave Yost has raised $2.03 million and spent $211,002 between Jan. 1, 2021, and Jun. 3, 2022. Yost is currently ranked fifth in state-level donations in the 2022 election cycle.

Yost is a member of the Republican Party and assumed office in 2019. In Ohio, the attorney general is an elected position. The primary job of a state attorney general is to serve as chief legal adviser to the agencies and legislative organs that make up his or her state’s government, in addition to the citizens residing within the state. Yost is running for re-election in 2022.

Yost’s reported campaign finance activity, by quarter (2017-2022)

Source: Transparency USA

Contributions to Yost

Of the $1.03 million already reported in the 2022 election cycle, 50.66 percent came from the top 10 donors.

Top Donors to Yost (1/1/2021 – 6/3/2022)

RankTotal AmountDonor NameDonor Type
1.$717,863.84Ohio Republican State Central & Executive Committee State Candidate FundENTITY
2.$198,051.05Ohio Republican PACENTITY
3.$18,700.00Keating Muething & Klekamp PACENTITY
4.$13,980.31Mary FergusonINDIVIDUAL
5.$13,750.00Summit County Republican Central Committee State Candidate FundENTITY
6.$13,704.41Lee SchearINDIVIDUAL
7.$13,700.00Audrey RatnerINDIVIDUAL
8.$13,700.00Drew DimaccioINDIVIDUAL
9.$13,700.00Jason S LucarelliINDIVIDUAL
10.$13,000.00Gary W JamesINDIVIDUAL

Expenditures by Yost

Yost reported $170,948 in expenditures, with 81.02 percent going to the 10 payees topping this list. “Payees” are entities or individuals listed as the recipients of campaign expenditures, and may include vendors, campaign accounts, and transfers.

Top Expenditures by Yost (1/1/2021 – 6/3/2022)

RankTotal AmountPayee NamePayee Type
1.$92,278.13Targeted VictoryENTITY
2.$27,000.00Campaign Mail & DataENTITY
3.$17,888.75Winterset CPA Group IncENTITY
4.$7,361.38Printpro & SignsENTITY
5.$7,093.07Athletic Club of ColumbusENTITY
6.$4,512.85Apple.comENTITY
7.$4,358.12Winred Technical Services LLCENTITY
8.$3,989.37AnedotENTITY
9.$3,412.50Right Digital LLCENTITY
10.$3,054.11Verizon WirelessENTITY

How donations to Yost compare to the same office in other states

Contributions vary widely among officeholders in the same role. A number of factors, including whether the position is appointed or elected, can influence donor activity. Here is how Yost’s donations compare to the 10 other attorney generals with campaign finance data available from Transparency USA in 2022:

Across the U.S., 27 attorney generals are members of the Republican Party and 23 are members of the Democratic Party. Voters elect the attorney general in 43 states, while they are chosen by a state government organ in the other seven. In 2022, 30 states are holding elections for the position.

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Ohio PACs submitted to the Ohio Secretary of State. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Report NameReport Due Date*
2021 Annual1/31/2022
2022 Pre-Primary4/21/2022
2022 Post-Primary*6/10/2022
2022 Semiannual7/29/2022
2022 Pre-General10/27/2022
2022 Post-General12/16/2022

*Some 2022 Ohio report dates may be subject to change due to rescheduled elections.This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



Ohio Republican candidates have raised $19.9 million more than Democrats

In Ohio, state-level candidates have raised $39.6 million between Jan. 1, 2021, and Apr. 13, 2022. Democratic candidates have raised $9.5 million and Republican candidates spent $29.4 million. 

Ohio Campaign Finance Snapshot (1/1/2021 – 4/13/2022)

Top 10 Democratic candidates, by donations (1/1/2021 – 4/13/2022)

In the 2022 election cycle, 172 state-level Democrats have filed campaign finance reports with the Ohio Secretary of State. Here are the 10 Democratic candidates who have raised the most.

RankDemocratic CandidateTotal Raised
1.Nan Whaley$3,531,073.83
2.John Cranley$2,824,497.42
3.Jennifer Brunner$448,125.61
4.Nickie Antonio$218,170.00
5.David Leland$179,218.00
6.Jeffrey Crossman$122,484.45
7.Terri Jamison$117,556.60
8.Chelsea Clark$101,963.84
9.Casey Weinstein$95,998.60
10.Kenny Yuko$86,812.06

Top 10 Republican candidates, by donations (1/1/2021 – 4/13/2022)

During the same time period, 197 Republicans have filed campaign finance reports with the Ohio Secretary of State. These are the 10 Republican candidates with the highest reported donations for the 2022 election cycle so far.

RankRepublican CandidateTotal Raised
1.Richard Michael DeWine$1,821,025.53
2.David Yost$1,747,724.80
3.Frank Larose$1,304,721.56
4.James Renacci$1,087,477.19
5.Keith Faber$874,463.51
6.Matthew Huffman$805,991.33
7.Joe Blystone$797,883.92
8.Sharon Kennedy$547,764.28
9.Robert Sprague$538,627.83
10.Pat DeWine$430,101.34

In some states, officeholders may accept donations to their campaign accounts when they are not up for election. Those donations are included in candidate campaign finance numbers.

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Ohio candidate PACs submitted to the Ohio Secretary of State. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Report NameReport Due Date
2021 Annual1/31/2022
2022 Pre-Primary4/21/2022
2022 Post-Primary6/10/2022
2022 Semiannual7/29/2022
2022 Pre-General10/27/2022
2022 Post-General12/16/2022

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.