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Seventy candidates filed to run for 15 U.S. House districts in Ohio

The filing deadline for candidates running for the U.S. House of Representatives in Ohio was March 4, 2022. This year, 70 candidates filed to run in Ohio’s 15 U.S. House districts, including 39 Republicans, 29 Democrats, and two independents. That’s 4.7 candidates per district, more than the 4.4 candidates per district in 2020 and fewer than the 5.5 in 2018.

The Ohio Redistricting Commission approved a redrawn congressional map on March 2 in a 5-2 vote along party lines, meaning the map will last for four years. On March 18, the Ohio Supreme Court ruled that it did not have jurisdiction to overturn the map as part of the legal challenge that overturned the initial congressional map. The revised map will be in effect for Ohio’s 2022 congressional elections unless a court rules otherwise in response to a legal challenge.

Here are some other highlights from this year’s filings:

  • This is the first election to take place under new district lines following the 2020 census. Ohio was apportioned 15 seats in the House of Representatives, one less than it received after the 2010 census.
  • Although Rep. Bob Gibbs (R) originally filed for re-election, he announced on April 6 that he was retiring. Early voting has already begun, and his name will still appear on the ballot.
  • Ohio’s 13th Congressional District is also an open-seat race. Rep. Tim Ryan (D) is running for election to the U.S. Senate. Seven candidates are running for the Republican nomination to face state Rep. and former House minority leader Emilia Sykes (D), who is unopposed for her party’s nomination.
  • There are 19 contested U.S. House primaries —10 Republican and nine Democratic —this year in Ohio.
  • The two open U.S. House seats this year is the same number as in 2018. All U.S. House incumbents in Ohio ran for re-election in 2020.
  • Six incumbents do not face primary challengers.
  • All 15 U.S. House districts will be contested in the general election, as every district has both Democratic and Republican candidates.

Ohio’s primary for U.S. House districts is scheduled for May 3, 2022. The Ohio Supreme Court announced on March 29 that it will not decide challenges to the state’s congressional map until after that date.

Additional reading:



These PACs are the best fundraisers in Ohio

In Ohio politics, non-candidate political action committees (PACs) have received $31.0 million in total donations between January 1, 2021, and December 31, 2021. The top 10 PACs raised more than $16.9 million, or 54 percent of all donations made to state-level PACs.

These are the top 10 PACs in Ohio state-level politics in the 2022 election cycle, according to the most recent campaign finance reports submitted to the Ohio Secretary of State:

Top 10 Ohio PACs (1/1/2021 – 12/31/2021)

RankDonor NameTotal Donations
1Republican Senate Campaign Committee (Rscc)$4,340,164
2Ohio Democratic Party$3,604,218
3Ohio House Republican Alliance (Ohra)$1,368,998
4Ohio Education Association Educators PCE$1,354,446
5Coalition to Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol$1,295,000
6Ohio Republican State Central and Executive Committee State Account$1,140,137
7Ohio Democratic Party Building Fund$1,094,314
8Ohio Republican State Central & Executive Committee State Candidate Fund$1,028,767
9Realtors PAC$993,206
10Ohio Democratic Party State Candidate Fund$691,775

A PAC is broadly defined as a group that spends money on elections. They may be established and administered by corporations, labor unions, membership organizations, or trade associations.

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Ohio PACs submitted to the Ohio Secretary of State. Federal PACs are not required to report to state agencies. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Report NameReport Due Date
2021 Annual1/31/2022
2022 Pre-Primary4/21/2022
2022 Post-Primary6/10/2022
2022 Semiannual7/29/2022
2022 Pre-General10/27/2022
2022 Post-General12/16/2022

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



Seven candidates are running in the Republican primary for Ohio’s 13th Congressional District

Seven candidates are running in the Republican primary for Ohio’s 13th Congressional District on May 3, 2022. Incumbent Rep. Tim Ryan (D) announced on April 26, 2021, that he was not seeking re-election and instead running for U.S. Senate.

Under the congressional district maps most recently approved during Ohio’s redistricting process, the 13th District—which race forecasters rated as Solid Democratic in 2020—will lean more Republican in 2022. According to FiveThirtyEight, the new 9th District had an R+2 lean, while the old district was even, meaning neither party had an advantage. These congressional district lines are currently subject to a state lawsuit. Learn more here.

As of March 2022, Madison Gesiotto GilbertShay Hawkins, and Janet Folger Porter have received the most media coverage. Gilbert works as a small business owner, attorney, and television commentator. She also worked on Donald Trump’s (R) 2016 and 2020 election campaigns. A Gilbert campaign ad said, “Ohioans are fed up with the incompetence in Washington. Only Madison Gesiotto Gilbert can take on the woke mob.”

Hawkins works as president and chief executive officer of the Opportunity Funds Association and as an adjunct professor. He worked as a lead policy advisor for U.S. Sen. Tim Scott (R-S.C.). In an interview with Cleveland.com, Hawkins said, “I am in this race because I am the best candidate to represent this area who can hit the ground running with experience the first day,” and, “I think I’ve got a lot to offer Republicans across the spectrum.”

Porter works as the founder and president of Faith2Action. She also worked as the legislative director for Ohio Right to Life, where she advocated for anti-abortion legislation. In her campaign announcement video, she said: “I have more than 40 years of actions and results on issues of life and liberty and family. That is the distinguishing factor between me and everybody else in the race.”

Santana F. KingDante SabatucciRyan Saylor, and Gregory Wheeler are also running.



Ohio Gov. DeWine receives $8 million, with Ohio Republican Party State Central Committee as top donor

In Ohio, Gov. Mike DeWine is the number one fundraiser in state politics in the 2022 election cycle so far. According to the most recent campaign finance reports made to the Ohio Secretary of State, the governor received $7,990,689 in total contributions and spent $826,577 between January 1, 2021 and December 31, 2021. DeWine is running for re-election in 2022.

Gov. DeWine is a member of the Republican Party and first assumed office in 2019.

Gov. DeWine’s reported campaign finance activity, by quarter (2017-2021)

Source: Transparency USA

Contributions to Gov. DeWine

Of the $8 million already reported in the 2022 election cycle, 19.2 percent came from the top 10 donors.

Top Donors to Gov. DeWine (1/1/2021 – 12/31/2021)

RankTotal AmountDonor NameDonor Type
1.$870,968Ohio Republican State Central & Executive Committee State Candidate FundEntity
2.$520,784Ohio Republican PACEntity
3.$25,000Lee Ann and James PastoreIndividual
4.$18,704Dean KereiakesIndividual
5.$17,929Leslie MillerIndividual
6.$17,500Barbara J SiemerIndividual
7.$17,500Michael BairdIndividual
8.$17,404John A PayiavlasIndividual
9.$16,204Yaromir SteinerIndividual
10.$15,000Adrienne DelligattiIndividual

Expenditures by Gov. DeWine

On the expenditures side, Gov. DeWine reported $826,577, with 80.2 percent of all spending going to the 10 payees topping the list. 

Top Expenditures by Gov. DeWine (1/1/2021 – 12/31/2021)

RankTotal AmountPayee NamePayee Type
1.$143,000Arena OnlineEntity
2.$130,473Ohio Alliance of Boys and Girls ClubsEntity
3.$115,351Tarrance GroupEntity
4.$72,759SRCP Media IncEntity
5.$60,000Deep Root Analytics LLCEntity
6.$35,000America Rising CorpEntity
7.$28,630StripeEntity
8.$27,103Rst MarketingEntity
9.$25,674Dot the IEntity
10.$24,678Kessler CreativeEntity

How Gov. DeWine’s fundraising compares to other governors

Among elected officials holding the same level of state office, fundraising varies widely. A number of factors, including whether an incumbent officeholder is running for reelection, influence donor activity. Here is how fundraising by Ohio Gov. DeWine compares to the 10 other governors with campaign finance data available from Transparency USA in 2022:

Fundraising reported by 11 U.S. governors in the 2022 election cycle

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Ohio PACs submitted to the  Ohio Secretary of State. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Report NameReport Due Date
2021 Annual1/31/2022
2022 Pre-Primary4/21/2022
2022 Post-Primary6/10/2022
2022 Semiannual7/29/2022
2022 Pre-General10/27/2022
2022 Post-General12/16/2022

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



Ohio Supreme Court says it does not have jurisdiction to rule further on approved congressional map, new legal challenge filed

The Ohio Supreme Court ruled in League of Women Voters of Ohio v. DeWine and Adams v. DeWine on March 18 saying it did not have jurisdiction to rule on further challenges to the congressional map at the center of those cases. Barring a successful legal challenge, the Ohio Redistricting Commission’s March 2 congressional plan will take effect for Ohio’s 2022 congressional elections and last for four years.

Governor Mike DeWine (R) signed the state’s initial congressional map into law on Nov. 20, 2021. However, the Ohio Supreme Court struck down the map in a 4-3 decision in its League of Women Voters of Ohio and Adams decisions on Jan. 14, 2022. The court ordered the Ohio State Legislature to redraw the map.

A month later, State House Speaker Bob Cupp (R) announced the legislature would not vote on a map, instead passing map-making authority to the Ohio Redistricting Commission. The members of the Ohio Redistricting Commission include Cupp, state Sen. Vernon Sykes (D), Gov. Mike DeWine (R), Secretary of State Frank LaRose (R), State Auditor Keith Faber (R), State Senate President Matt Huffman (R), and state Rep. Allison Russo (D).

The Ohio Redistricting Commission approved a redrawn congressional map in a 5-2 vote on March 2, 2022. Since the approval was along party lines, the map is set to last for four years, rather than ten, per the 2018 state constitutional amendment establishing the commission.

Further action from the Ohio Supreme Court regarding the March 2 congressional plan is possible. In its March 18 ruling, the court said “nothing in this order shall be construed as precluding the filing of a new original action challenging the validity of the March 2, 2022 plan.”

The National Redistricting Action Fund, which filed the Adams lawsuit, filed a new lawsuit on March 21 against the redrawn congressional map. In the suit, the plaintiffs requested the court invalidate the March 2 congressional map, delay election-related deadlines and the congressional primary, and choose a new map or order the General Assembly to adopt a new congressional map.

Ohio’s congressional primary is currently scheduled for May 3 and early voting begins on April 4.

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These 10 Ohio donors gave over $2.3 million

In Ohio politics, state-level candidates and political action committees have received $64.2 million in total donations between January 1, 2021, and December 31, 2021. The 10 largest donors gave more than $2.3 million, or 4 percent of all contributions.

These are the top 10 individual donors to Ohio state-level candidates and political action committees (PACs) in the 2022 election cycle, according to the most recent campaign finance reports submitted to the Ohio Secretary of State:

Top 10 Ohio Donors (1/1/2021 – 12/31/2021)

RankDonor NameTotal Donations
1James B Renacci$1,080,649
2Ellen Dolores Rakowski$441,442
3Richard H Rosenthal$155,804
4Susan B and James A Haslam III$119,635
5Lisa Mennet$100,000
6Geraldine B Warner$86,204
7Brian Colleran$81,300
8Jason S Lucarelli$77,704
9See Upload Payroll Deductions$74,532
10Marianne E Gable$70,146

The list of Ohio donors in this time period includes more than 1,272 individuals identified by name in the Ohio Secretary of State’s public records.

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Ohio PACs submitted to the Ohio Secretary of State. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Report NameReport Due Date
2021 Annual1/31/2022
2022 Pre-Primary4/21/2022
2022 Post-Primary6/10/2022
2022 Semiannual7/29/2022
2022 Pre-General10/27/2022
2022 Post-General12/16/2022

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



Seven candidates are running in the May 3 Republican primary for U.S. Senate in Ohio

Seven candidates are running in the May 3 Republican primary for U.S. Senate in Ohio on May 3, including Mike Gibbons, Josh Mandel, Jane Timken, and J.D. Vance. Incumbent Rob Portman (R), first elected in 2010, announced on Jan. 25, 2021, that he would not seek re-election.

Matt Dolan, Neil Patel, and Mark Pukita are also running in the primary. Gibbons, Mandel, Timken, and Vance have led in fundraising, endorsements, and polling.

Politico’s Alex Isenstadt wrote that “[t]he Senate race in Ohio is a high-profile example of how Trump is dominating Republican down-ballot primaries, and how his support is seen as make-or-break for those seeking the party’s nomination.”

Gibbons, a businessman and investor, says his background in the private sector has prepared him for the U.S. Senate: “My job was to go in and convince CEOs and CFOs that they could trust me to handle the most important transactions those companies would ever do. And I have to tell you, I think it’s great practice for the U.S. Senate.” Gibbons co-chaired former President Donald Trump’s (R) 2016 campaign in Ohio, and has said, “I don’t believe we had a president that did more for this country in my lifetime than Donald Trump did.” Gibbons also said, “the Republican Party is not about just Donald Trump, the Republican Party most carefully reflects my ideology which is, as I said philosophical conservatism.” Sen. Rand Paul (R) endorsed Gibbons.

Mandel served as Ohio treasurer from 2011 to 2019. Mandel said, “when I get to Washington, I’m not just going to drain the swamp, I’m going to blow up the swamp. And yes, I’ll be taking on the secular left, yes, I’ll be taking on the radical left. But with as much ferocity and strength and force, I’m going to take on the squishy establishment RINO Republicans,” a group he says includes Utah Sen. Mitt Romney (R), Wyoming Sen. Liz Cheney (R), and Ohio Rep. Anthony Gonzalez (R). Mandel has also said, “there’s only one candidate that consistently says in every audience — whether it’s Hudson, Ohio, or Cincinnati, Ohio, or Toledo or Marietta — what I am about to say to you…that I believe the 2020 election was stolen from Donald J. Trump.” U.S. Sens. Mike Lee (R) and Cynthia Lummis (R) endorsed Mandel.

Timken has been the chair of the Ohio Republican Party since 2017. Timken said her experience leading the Ohio Republican Party shows that she can unite the party: “As soon as I became chair, I realized that I needed to bring people together. We had new Republicans that came into the party because of President Trump. We had some that drifted away. I successfully unified the party when I became chair, and so I have a real understanding of building a broad base and coalition of support. And that’s what I’ve been working on since I announced this campaign.” Timken has said she believes the November 2020 presidential election was marked by fraud and that she would not have voted to certify the election results. On Feb. 16, 2022, Portman endorsed Timken.

Vance served in the U.S. Marine Corps. from 2003 to 2007 before working in venture capital in San Francisco. In 2016, he wrote Hillbilly Elegy, a memoir about growing up in Middletown, Ohio. Vance has campaigned on bringing manufacturing back to Ohio, fixing the country’s immigration system and completing the wall along the southern border, and breaking up large technology companies. Vance was critical of Trump in 2016 but has said, “I ask folks not to judge me based on what I said in 2016, because I’ve been very open that I did say those critical things and I regret them, and I regret being wrong about the guy. I think he was a good president, I think he made a lot of good decisions for people, and I think he took a lot of flak.” Sen. Josh Hawley (R) endorsed Vance.

In 2016, Portman defeated Ted Strickland (D) 58% to 37.2%. Sen. John H. Glenn Jr., who served from 1974 to 1999, was the last Democrat to hold the seat, serving from 1974 to 1999.

Donald Trump won Ohio by eight percentage points in 2016.



Republicans outraise Democrats by 130% in Ohio House races

Campaign finance requirements govern how much money candidates may receive from individuals and organizations, how often they must report those contributions, and how much individuals, organizations, and political entities may contribute to campaigns.

While campaign finance is not the only factor in electoral outcomes, successful fundraising can provide a candidate with advantages during a campaign. Fundraising can also indicate party momentum.

This article lists top fundraisers in the Ohio House of Representatives, overall and by party. It is based on campaign finance reports that officeholders in and candidates for the House submitted to the Ohio Secretary of State. It includes activity between January 1, 2021, and December 31, 2021.

Top fundraisers in the Ohio House of Representatives by party

The top fundraisers in Ohio House of Representatives elections are shown below. Individuals are presented with the office that they are on the ballot for in 2022, if applicable.

In the Democratic Party, the top fundraisers were:

  • Casey Weinstein – $94,694
  • Joseph A. Miller III – $75,123
  • Emilia Sykes – $69,862
  • Jessica Miranda – $60,787
  • Gavi Begtrup (District 26) – $56,621

In the Republican Party, the top fundraisers were:

  • Jay Edwards – $429,201
  • Bob Cupp – $330,751
  • Thomas Patton – $300,039
  • Jason Stephens – $233,402
  • Phil Plummer – $219,237

Fundraising totals

Overall, Democratic officeholders and candidates raised $1.10 million in this period. Republican officeholders and candidates raised $5.16 million. Combined, all House fundraisers in the January 1, 2021, through December 31, 2021, filing period raised $6.26 million.

The five largest Democratic fundraisers were responsible for 32 percent of all Democratic House fundraising. The five largest Republican fundraisers were responsible for 29 percent of all Republican House fundraising.

The table below provides additional data from the campaign finance reports from the top ten fundraisers during this period.

TOP TEN FUNDRAISERS – OHIO HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES (January 1, 2021, through December 31, 2021)

NameParty AffiliationRaisedSpent
Jay EdwardsRepublican Party$429,201$68,023
Bob CuppRepublican Party$330,751$154,545
Thomas PattonRepublican Party$300,039$187,196
Jason StephensRepublican Party$233,402$70,181
Phil PlummerRepublican Party$219,237$111,521
Jon CrossRepublican Party$215,456$85,222
Bill SeitzRepublican Party$180,222$146,520
Rick CarfagnaRepublican Party$177,638$101,429
Brian BaldridgeRepublican Party$175,476$28,033
Alessandro CutronaRepublican Party$151,039$15,070

Campaign finance reporting periods

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that candidate PACs submitted to the Ohio Secretary of State. Candidate PACs represent individuals who have run for state or local office at any point, including past and present officeholders. This article does not include non-candidate PACs. In 2022, Transparency USA will publish campaign finance data after the following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Report NameReport Due Date
2021 Annual1/31/2022
2022 Pre-Primary4/21/2022
2022 Post-Primary6/10/2022
2022 Semiannual7/29/2022
2022 Pre-General10/27/2022
2022 Post-General12/16/2022

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



Republicans outraise Democrats by 155% in Ohio Senate races

Campaign finance requirements govern how much money candidates may receive from individuals and organizations, how often they must report those contributions, and how much individuals, organizations, and political entities may contribute to campaigns.

While campaign finance is not the only factor in electoral outcomes, successful fundraising can provide a candidate with advantages during a campaign. Fundraising can also indicate party momentum.

This article lists top fundraisers in the Ohio State Senate, overall and by party. It is based on campaign finance reports that officeholders in and candidates for the State Senate submitted to the Ohio Secretary of State. It includes activity between January 1, 2021, and December 31, 2021.

Top fundraisers in the Ohio State Senate by party

The top fundraisers in Ohio State Senate elections are shown below. Individuals are presented with the office that they are on the ballot for in 2022, if applicable.

In the Democratic Party, the top fundraisers were:

  • Nickie Antonio – $128,375
  • Kenny Yuko – $86,812
  • Vernon Sykes – $71,895
  • Hearcel Craig – $71,682
  • Teresa Fedor – $61,555

In the Republican Party, the top fundraisers were:

  • Matt Huffman – $874,464
  • Kristina Daley Roegner – $233,137
  • Jay Hottinger – $228,252
  • George Lang – $218,243
  • Theresa Gavarone – $206,782

Fundraising totals

Overall, Democratic officeholders and candidates raised $498,315 in this period. Republican officeholders and candidates raised $3.93 million. Combined, all State Senate fundraisers in the January 1, 2021, through December 31, 2021, filing period raised $4.43 million.

The five largest Democratic fundraisers were responsible for 84 percent of all Democratic State Senate fundraising. The five largest Republican fundraisers were responsible for 45 percent of all Republican State Senate fundraising.

The table below provides additional data from the campaign finance reports from the top ten fundraisers during this period.

TOP TEN FUNDRAISERS – OHIO STATE SENATE (January 1, 2021, through December 31, 2021)

NameParty AffiliationRaisedSpent
Matt HuffmanRepublican Party$874,464$530,188
Kristina Daley RoegnerRepublican Party$233,137$71,883
Jay HottingerRepublican Party$228,252$203,691
George LangRepublican Party$218,243$158,903
Theresa GavaroneRepublican Party$206,782$108,418
Robert McColleyRepublican Party$179,856$128,958
Jerry CirinoRepublican Party$174,200$64,478
Mark J. RomanchukRepublican Party$166,045$81,800
Steve WilsonRepublican Party$154,756$130,792
Matt DolanRepublican Party$135,800$224,496

Campaign finance reporting periods

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that candidate PACs submitted to the Ohio Secretary of State. Candidate PACs represent individuals who have run for state or local office at any point, including past and present officeholders. This article does not include non-candidate PACs. In 2022, Transparency USA will publish campaign finance data after the following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Report NameReport Due Date
2021 Annual1/31/2022
2022 Pre-Primary4/21/2022
2022 Post-Primary6/10/2022
2022 Semiannual7/29/2022
2022 Pre-General10/27/2022
2022 Post-General12/16/2022

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



Three Republican candidates running to challenge Rep. Marcy Kaptur in Ohio’s 9th Congressional District

Three candidates—Theresa Gavarone, J.R. Majewski, and Craig Riedel—are running in the Republican primary election for Ohio’s 9th Congressional District on May 10, 2022. Incumbent Rep. Marcy Kaptur (D), the longest-serving woman in U.S. House history, was first elected in 1982 and is seeking re-election.

The Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee listed Kaptur as a Frontline candidate, a distinction used to identify and support vulnerable Democratic incumbents.

Ohio is undergoing congressional redistricting, meaning the exact boundaries of the 9th District are currently unknown. The Crescent News‘ Todd Helberg wrote that recent proposals “substantially changed … the district that elected Democrat Marcy Kaptur … to Congress for years” by giving the district a more Republican lean.

Gavarone is a member of the Ohio State Senate. She was appointed to the office in 2019 after serving in the Ohio House of Representatives since 2016. In a campaign ad, Gavarone highlighted her legislative experience, saying that she “turned conservative principles into action,” and that she “pass balanced budgets, brought parents to the table to improve our schools, and defended our men and women in uniform.”

Majewski works in the nuclear industry in project management positions and served in the U.S. Air Force from 1999 to 2003. In a Candidate Connection survey submitted to Ballotpedia, Majewski described himself as “the America First Candidate” and said he would “Bring back good paying American jobs … Maintain a strong national defense and stop the endless wars.” Read his full responses here.

Riedel is a member of the Ohio House of Representatives where he was first elected in 2016. Riedel said Kaptur had been in office for too long and said, “I am sick and tired of career politicians … who always make promises, fail to deliver, then pass the buck,” adding that he would “work with President Trump and … the Freedom Caucus to push an America-first agenda.”

The winner of the primary will face Kaptur, who is running unopposed in the Democratic primary, and independent candidate Youseff Baddar.