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Joel Williams

Joel Williams is a staff writer at Ballotpedia and can be reached at joel.williams@ballotpedia.org

Bernie Sanders leads Democratic pageviews for second consecutive week; Deval Patrick sees biggest increase in pageviews

Each week, we report the number of pageviews received by 2020 presidential campaigns on Ballotpedia. These numbers reflect the time investments of our community of thousands of readers who visit a Ballotpedia because they think the candidate is worth knowing more about, whether they believe the candidate has a strong chance of winning or is an unknown who warrants a closer look.

Last week, Bernie Sanders led all Democratic campaigns in pageviews. His campaign page was viewed 3,568 times, equaling 15.5% of pageviews for all Democratic campaigns this week. He was followed by Joe Biden with 11.2% of pageviews and Michael Bloomberg with 10.2%.

Deval Patrick’s campaign received the most pageviews this week relative to last week. His campaign page increased in pageviews by 55.3 percent. Andrew Yang saw the smallest increase in pageviews relative to last week among Democratic candidates with 7.4 percent.

The top three Democratic presidential candidates in lifetime pageviews are Yang with 162,812, Pete Buttigieg with 153,302, and Biden with 146,353.

As in previous weeks, every other Republican candidate led Donald Trump in pageviews. Trump received 1,857 pageviews, while Joe Walsh received 3,537, Roque de la Fuente received 3,233, and Bill Weld received 3,093.

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Tester endorses Cooney in MT governor primary

On Saturday, U.S. Sen. Jon Tester (D-MT) endorsed Lt. Gov. Mike Cooney in the Democratic primary for Governor of Montana. Term-limited Gov. Steve Bullock (D) previously endorsed Cooney in October 2019. Whitney Williams also has noteworthy endorsements in this race, from EMILY’s List, former Superintendent of Public Instruction Denise Juneau (D), and Missoula Mayor John Engen.

In addition to Conney and Williams, former state Rep. Reilly Neill (D) and state Rep. Casey Schreiner (D) are also running in the June 2 Democratic primary. The filing deadline for this election is March 9, so the field could still change.

The winner of the Democratic primary will compete in the general election on November 3. U.S. Rep. Greg Gianforte, Montana Attorney General Tim Fox, and state Sen. Albert Olszewski are all running in the Republican primary.

Montana is one of 11 states holding gubernatorial elections this year, and the only state where the governor is term-limited. All three major race rating outlets have rated the race a toss-up.

With a Democratic governor and a Republican-controlled legislature, Montana is currently one of 14 states under divided government. If Republicans win this seat and hold their majorities in the legislature, Montana will become a Republican trifecta. If Democrats hold this seat and win the state legislature, the state will instead become a Democratic trifecta. Across the country, there are currently 21 Republican trifectas and 15 Democratic trifectas.

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Bernie Sanders leads Democratic pageviews after Andrew Yang led for previous three weeks

Each week, we report the number of pageviews received by 2020 presidential campaigns on Ballotpedia. These numbers reflect the time investments of our community of thousands of readers who visit a Ballotpedia because they think the candidate is worth knowing more about, whether they believe the candidate has a strong chance of winning or is an unknown who warrants a closer look.

Last week, Bernie Sanders led all Democratic campaigns in pageviews. His campaign page was viewed 2,590 times, equaling 13.0% of pageviews for all Democratic campaigns this week. He was followed by Joe Biden with 11.2% of pageviews and Andrew Yang with 10.6%.

Michael Bloomberg received the most pageviews this week relative to last week, increasing 62.0 percent. While all candidates had a positive rate of pageview growth compared to the previous week, Yang saw the smallest increase at 10.1 percent. The other candidates saw at least a 20 percent increase.

The top three Democratic presidential candidates in lifetime pageviews are Yang with 160,560, Pete Buttigieg with 151,377, and Biden with 143,782.

As in previous weeks, every other Republican candidate led Donald Trump in pageviews. Trump received 1,683 pageviews, while Bill Weld received 2,522, Joe Walsh received 2,460, and Roque de la Fuente received 2,261.

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January 14’s state legislative special elections are the first of 27 scheduled this year

Thirteen state legislative special elections are taking place this January, including races for six seats in five states on Tuesday, January 14. This is the most state legislative special elections in January since Ballotpedia began comprehensively covering them in 2011. In 2019, by comparison, seven special elections were held in January.

Twenty-seven special elections have been called for the calendar year. Twelve will be for seats previously held by a Democrat and 15 for seats previously held by a Republican. Nine were triggered by the incumbent being appointed, elected to, or seeking election to another position. Seven were triggered by the retirement of an incumbent, and another seven were triggered by the death of an incumbent. Four were triggered by the resignation of an incumbent related to criminal charges.

Between 2011 and 2019, an average of 77 state legislative special elections was held each year. The most special elections held in a single year was 99 in 2018, while the fewest was 40 in 2014. In four of those years, Democrats saw a neat gain in seats while Republicans saw a decrease. In the other five years, the opposite was true: Republicans gained seats and Democrats lost seats.

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Virginia becomes Democratic trifecta as legislators are sworn in

Legislators elected in Virginia’s 2019 elections were sworn into office on Wednesday, January 8. As a result, Democrats now have control of both chambers of the legislature and, alongside Gov. Ralph Northam (D), a Democratic state government trifecta.

A state government trifecta is a term to describe when one political party controls both chambers of the legislature and the governor’s office.

Democrats gained a 21-19 majority in the state Senate, compared to a 21-19 Republican majority before the fall elections. The majority caucus is now led by Dick Saslaw (D) and the minority caucus by Thomas Norment Jr. (R).

Democrats gained a 55-45 majority in the state House, compared to a 51-49 Republican majority before the elections. The Speaker of the House is Eileen Filler-Corn (D). The majority caucus is led by Charniele Herring (D) and the minority caucus is led by C. Todd Gilbert (R).

Trifecta status was at stake in five states that held elections in November 2019. At the time of the elections, Republicans held trifectas in Kentucky and Mississippi. Democrats had a trifecta in New Jersey. Louisiana and Virginia both had divided governments, with Republicans controlling the legislature and Democrats the governorship. Republicans in Kentucky lost their trifecta when Andy Beshear (D) defeated Matt Bevin (R) in the gubernatorial election. Democrats in Virginia gained a trifecta with their victories in the state legislature.

There are currently 36 trifectas: 15 Democratic and 21 Republican. The remaining 13 states are under divided government—having no trifecta for either major party. In 2020, there will be 86 state legislative chambers holding elections and 11 states with gubernatorial elections.

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Additional Reading:
Virginia State Senate elections, 2019
Virginia House of Delegates elections, 2019



Andrew Yang leads Democratic pageviews for third straight week, Booker sees the biggest change from previous week

Each week, we report the number of pageviews received by 2020 presidential campaigns on Ballotpedia. These numbers reflect the time investments of our community of thousands of readers who visit a Ballotpedia because they think the candidate is worth knowing more about, whether they believe the candidate has a strong chance of winning or is an unknown who warrants a closer look.

Last week, Andrew Yang led all Democratic campaigns in pageviews. His campaign page was viewed 1,903 times, or 11.9% of pageviews for all Democratic campaigns. He was followed by Bernie Sanders with 11.6% of pageviews and Joe Biden with 10.2%.

Cory Booker received the most pageviews this week relative to last week. His campaign page increased in pageviews by 72.4 percent. Two other candidates, Marianne Williamson and Elizabeth Warren, saw their pageviews increase by 70 percent.

The top three Democratic presidential candidates in lifetime pageviews are Yang with 158,464, Pete Buttigieg with 149,758, and Biden with 141,560.

As in previous weeks, every other Republican candidate led Donald Trump in pageviews. Trump received 1,072 pageviews, while Joe Walsh received 1,816, Bill Weld received 1,766, and Roque de la Fuente received 1,626.

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After 23 December district court confirmations, Trump has second-most federal judicial appointments by end of a president’s third year

Donald Trump appointed and the Senate confirmed 187 Article III federal judges through December 31, 2019, his third year in office. This is the second-most Article III judicial appointments through this point in a presidency of all presidents dating back to Theodore Roosevelt. Only Jimmy Carter (197) had more.

 

The average number of federal judges appointed by a president at the end of their third year in office is 99.

 

The median number of Supreme Court justices appointed is two. William Taft’s (R) five appointments were the most among this set. Presidents Franklin Roosevelt (D), Jimmy Carter (D), and George W. Bush (R) did not appoint any justices through at the end of their third years in office. Trump has appointed 2 justices so far.

 

The median number of United States Court of Appeals appointees is 19. Trump appointed the most with 50, and President Woodrow Wilson (D) appointed the fewest with five. Trump’s 50 appointments make up 28 percent of the total 179 judgeships across the courts of appeal.

 

The median number of United States District Court appointees is 67. Bill Clinton (D) appointed the most with 151. President Theodore Roosevelt (R) appointed the fewest with 14. Trump has appointed 133 district court judges. Those appointments make up 20 percent of the 677 judgeships across the district courts.

 

Article III federal judges are appointed for life terms by the president of the United States and confirmed by the U.S. Senate per Article III of the United States Constitution. Article III judges include judges on the: Supreme Court of the United States, U.S. courts of appeal, U.S. district courts, and the Court of International Trade.

 

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One 2020 Congressional retirement announced last week; 2,115 major party candidates filed for 2020 races

Last week, Rep. Ted Yoho (R-Fla.) announced he was retiring in 2020, making him the 19th Republican member of the U.S. House to do so. To date, four Senators (three Republicans and one Democrat) and 32 Representatives (23 Republicans and nine Democrats) are not running for re-election. In 2018, 55 total members of Congress—18 Democrats and 37 Republicans—did not seek re-election.

As of December 16, 2019, 313 candidates are filed with the Federal Elections Commission (FEC) to run for U.S. Senate in 2020. Of those, 268—143 Democrats and 125 Republicans—are from one of the two major political parties. In 2018, 527 candidates filed with the FEC to run for U.S. Senate, including 137 Democrats and 240 Republicans.

1,976 candidates are filed with the FEC to run for U.S. House in 2020. Of those, 1,847—912 Democrats and 935 Republicans—are from one of the two major political parties. In 2018, 3,244 candidates filed with the FEC, including 1,566 Democrats and 1,155 Republicans.

On November 3, 2020, 35 Senate seats and all 435 House seats are up for election. Of those Senate seats, 33 are regularly-scheduled elections, while the other two are special elections in Arizona and Georgia. Twelve are Democratic-held seats and 23 are Republican-held seats. In the House, where all the seats are up for election, Democrats currently hold a 233-seat majority.

Additional Reading:
United States Senate Elections, 2020
United States House of Representatives Elections, 2020
List of U.S. Congress incumbents who are not running for re-election in 2020



Joe Biden leads in weekly Ballotpedia pageviews, Bennet sees biggest negative decrease in views

Each week, we report the number of pageviews received by 2020 presidential campaigns on Ballotpedia. These numbers reflect the time investments of our community of thousands of readers who visit a Ballotpedia because they think the candidate is worth knowing more about, whether they believe the candidate has a strong chance of winning or is an unknown who warrants a closer look.

Last week, Joe Biden led all Democratic campaigns in pageviews in a week where all campaigns received fewer pageviews than last week. His campaign page was viewed 2,015 times, equaling 11.8% of pageviews for all Democratic campaigns this week. He was followed by Andrew Yang with 10.2% of pageviews and Bernie Sanders with 10.1%.

All candidates saw a decrease in pageviews relative to last week. The candidates with the smallest decrease were Biden and Sanders, whose pageviews decreased 32.2% and 34.3%, respectively. Four candidates saw their pageviews decrease by more than 60%: John Delaney (65.3%), Tulsi Gabbard (65.7%), Deval Patrick (66.5%), and Michael Bennet (67.1%).

The top three Democratic presidential candidates in lifetime pageviews are Yang with 152,535, Pete Buttigieg with 145,971, and Biden with 136,897.

As in previous weeks, every other Republican candidate led Donald Trump in pageviews. Trump received 1,133 pageviews, while Joe Walsh received 3,335, Roque de la Fuente received 2,688, and Bill Weld received 2,262.

 



Three 2020 Congressional retirements announced last week; more than 2,200 candidates filed to run for House or Senate

In the past week, three members of Congress announced 2020 retirements: Reps. Denny Heck (D-Wash.), Tom Graves (R-Ga.), and George Holding (R-N.C.). To date, four Senators (three Republicans and one Democrat) and 31 Representatives (22 Republicans and nine Democrats) are not running for re-election. In 2018, 55 members of Congress—18 Democrats and 37 Republicans—did not seek re-election.
As of December 9, 2019, 308 candidates are filed with the Federal Elections Commission (FEC) to run for U.S. Senate in 2020. Of those, 265—141 Democrats and 124 Republicans—are from one of the two major political parties. In 2018, 527 candidates filed with the FEC to run for U.S. Senate, including 137 Democrats and 240 Republicans.
1,923 candidates are filed with the FEC to run for U.S. House in 2020. Of those, 1,802—895 Democrats and 907 Republicans—are from one of the two major political parties. In 2018, 3,244 candidates filed with the FEC, including 1,566 Democrats and 1,155 Republicans.
On November 3, 2020, 35 Senate seats and all 435 House seats are up for election. Of those Senate seats, 33 are regularly-scheduled elections, while the other two are special elections in Arizona and Georgia. Twelve are Democratic-held seats and 23 are Republican-held seats. In the House, where all the seats are up for election, Democrats currently hold a 233-seat majority.
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