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Joel Williams

Joel Williams is a staff writer at Ballotpedia. Contact us at editor@ballotpedia.org.

Six candidates running in the Republican primary for Virginia’s 7th Congressional District

Six candidates are running in the Republican primary for Virginia’s 7th Congressional District on June 21, 2022. Derrick Anderson, Bryce Reeves, Crystal Vanuch, and Yesli Vega have raised the most money. Incumbent Rep. Abigail Spanberger (D) is running for re-election in the redrawn 7th District.

Anderson served as a Green Beret in the U.S. Army. After retiring from active duty, he received a J.D. from Georgetown University. In Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection Survey, Anderson listed his three priorities as “standing up for our veterans, keeping our country and communities safe, and stand up for our conservative values.” Based on fundraising totals reported to the Federal Election Commission (FEC) in April 2022, Anderson led the field in fundraising and spending. U.S. Sen. Tom Cotton (R-Ark.) and Greene County Supervisor Davis Lamb endorsed Anderson.

Reeves was elected to the Virginia State Senate in 2012. He served in the U.S. Army and worked for the Prince William County Police Vice/Narcotics Bureau. Reeves raised and spent the second most of the six candidates. Reeves has campaigned on his legislative record and his history of winning in what he called “Democrat districts,” citing victories in 2011 and 2019. The National Republican Congressional Committee, U.S. Sen. Mike Lee (R-Utah), and Del. Nick Freitas endorsed Reeves.

Vanuch serves on the Stafford County Board of Supervisors and has experience working in the health care field helping individuals with terminal or chronic illnesses find affordable treatment. In Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection Survey, Vanuch listed her three priorities as decreasing government spending, defending law enforcement, and supporting the right of parents to make decisions for their children. U.S. Rep. Elise Stefanik (R-N.Y.) endorsed Vanuch.

Vega serves on the Prince William County Board of Supervisors and has experience working in law enforcement. Her campaign website detailed a platform that included advocating for the “conservative values of freedom, limited government, the rule of law, and a firm reliance on our Creator.” Former U.S. Rep. Dave Brat (R-Va.), who lost to Spanberger in 2018, endorsed Vega, along with U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas) and Ginni Thomas, the wife of Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas.

The general election is expected to be competitive. Three independent race forecasting outlets rated the race Toss-up, Lean Democratic, and Tilt Democratic. Nathan Gonzales of Roll Call said that President Joe Biden (D) would have won the district by seven points in the 2020 presidential election and Gov. Glenn Youngkin (R) would have won the district by six points in the 2021 gubernatorial election. Spanberger defeated Brat by two points in 2018 and Freitas by two points in 2020.

Also running in the primary are Gina Ciarcia and David Ross.



One month to voter registration deadline for Missouri’s primary

The voter registration deadline for Missouri’s 2022 primary election is one month away. Those who wish to vote in-person must be registered by July 6. Registration is possible online, in-person, or by mail. If registration forms are mailed, they must be postmarked on or before July 6. The primary is scheduled for Aug. 2.

A primary election is used to narrow the field of candidates for certain positions or to determine the political party nominees before a general election. Missouri has an open primary. Voters are not required to be affiliated with a political party in order to vote in that party’s primary. Voters are also able to declare any party at the polls regardless of previous party affiliation. 

In the Missouri primary, voters throughout the state will select one candidate to serve in the U.S. Senate, eight candidates to serve in the House of Representatives, a state auditor, 17 state senators, and 163 state representatives. Clay County, Jackson County, Platte County, and the city of St. Louis have several municipal positions that will be on the ballot. Using Ballotpedia’s sample ballot lookup tool, voters can find the candidates that will be on their ballot on Aug. 2. 

The state of Missouri does not have early voting. Those who qualify for an absentee ballot must have their request form received in the mail by July 20. 

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Results in the five most expensive Republican Pennsylvania Senate primaries

5 Most Expensive Elections

Republican primary elections for 22 of 49 seats in the Pennsylvania State Senate took place on May 17, 2022. Of the 22 seats up for election in 2022, nine had a primary election with more than one candidate.

Across all contested Republican primary elections, candidates raised $2.4 million. Incumbents raised an average of $463,755 per candidate and challengers raised an average of $57,612 per candidate.

Five primary elections with the most fundraising

The table below details the five Republican primary elections with the most fundraising in the State Senate. Winning candidates’ names are in bold.

District Money Raised Officeholder Candidates
District 16 $738,303 Pat Browne (R) Pat Browne and Jarrett Coleman
District 34 $728,534 Jake Corman III (R) Greg Rothman and Mike Gossert
District 36 $495,493 Ryan Aument (R) Ryan Aument and Mike Miller
District 20 $204,855 Lisa Baker (R) Lisa Baker and Nathan Turock
District 24 $110,950 Bob Mensch (R) Tracy Pennycuick, David Moyer, and Nick Fountain

#1 District 16 – $738,303

Incumbent Pat Browne raised $738,303 and Jarrett Coleman raised $0.

Pat Browne received NaN percent of the vote and Jarrett Coleman received NaN percent of the vote.

#2 District 34 – $728,534

Greg Rothman raised $728,534 and Mike Gossert raised $0.

Greg Rothman advanced to the general election with 68 percent of the vote and Mike Gossert received 32 percent of the vote.

#3 District 36 – $495,493

Incumbent Ryan Aument raised $448,106 and Mike Miller raised $47,387.

Ryan Aument advanced to the general election with 59 percent of the vote and Mike Miller received 41 percent of the vote.

#4 District 20 – $204,855

Incumbent Lisa Baker raised $204,855 and Nathan Turock raised $0.

Lisa Baker advanced to the general election with 100 percent of the vote and Nathan Turock received 0 percent of the vote.

#5 District 24 – $110,950

Tracy Pennycuick raised $104,650, David Moyer raised $6,300, and Nick Fountain raised $0.

Tracy Pennycuick advanced to the general election with 68 percent of the vote, David Moyer received 32 percent of the vote, and Nick Fountain withdrew.

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Pennsylvania PACs submitted to the Pennsylvania Department of State. Federal PACs are not required to report to state agencies. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Report Name Report Due Date
2021 Annual (C7) 1/31/2022
2022 Pre-Primary (C1) 4/05/2022
2022 Pre-Primary (C2) 5/9/2022
2022 Post-Primary (C3) 6/20/2022
2022 Pre-General (C4) 9/22/2022
2022 Pre-General (C5) 10/31/2022
2022 Post-General (C6) 12/12/2022
2022 Annual (C7) 2/1/2023

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



Results in the five most expensive Democratic Pennsylvania Senate primaries

Democratic primary elections for 22 of 49 seats in the Pennsylvania State Senate took place on May 17, 2022. Of the 22 seats up for election in 2022, four had a primary election with more than one candidate.

Across all contested Democratic primary elections, candidates raised $1.0 million. Incumbents raised an average of $656,824 per candidate and challengers raised an average of $47,291 per candidate.

Four primary elections with the most fundraising

The table below details the four Democratic primary elections with the most fundraising in the State Senate. Winning candidates’ names are in bold.

District Money Raised Officeholder Candidates
District 8 $792,953 Anthony Williams (D) Anthony Williams and Paul Prescod
District 14 $206,977 John Yudichak (I) Tara Zrinski, Nick Miller, and Yamelisa Taveras
District 24 $35,225 Bob Mensch (R) Jill Dennin and Emanuel Wilkerson
District 34 $0 Jake Corman III (R) Jim Massey and Rick Coplen

#1 District 8 – $792,953

Incumbent Anthony Williams raised $656,824 and Paul Prescod raised $136,130.

Anthony Williams advanced to the general election with 61 percent of the vote and Paul Prescod received 39 percent of the vote.

#2 District 14 – $206,977

Tara Zrinski raised $146,401, Nick Miller raised $57,261, and Yamelisa Taveras raised $3,315.

Tara Zrinski received NaN percent of the vote, Nick Miller received NaN percent of the vote, and Yamelisa Taveras received NaN percent of the vote.

#3 District 24 – $35,225

Jill Dennin raised $35,225 and Emanuel Wilkerson raised $0.

Jill Dennin advanced to the general election with 73 percent of the vote and Emanuel Wilkerson received 27 percent of the vote.

#4 District 34 – $0

Jim Massey raised $0 and Rick Coplen raised $0.

Jim Massey advanced to the general election with 100 percent of the vote and Rick Coplen withdrew.

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Pennsylvania PACs submitted to the Pennsylvania Department of State. Federal PACs are not required to report to state agencies. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Report Name Report Due Date
2021 Annual (C7) 1/31/2022
2022 Pre-Primary (C1) 4/05/2022
2022 Pre-Primary (C2) 5/9/2022
2022 Post-Primary (C3) 6/20/2022
2022 Pre-General (C4) 9/22/2022
2022 Pre-General (C5) 10/31/2022
2022 Post-General (C6) 12/12/2022
2022 Annual (C7) 2/1/2023

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



Results in the five most expensive Democratic Pennsylvania House primaries

5 Most Expensive Elections

Democratic primary elections for 145 of 203 seats in the Pennsylvania House of Representatives took place on May 17, 2022. Of the 145 seats up for election in 2022, 45 had a primary election with more than one candidate.

Across all contested Democratic primary elections, candidates raised $5.1 million. Incumbents raised an average of $130,266 per candidate and challengers raised an average of $24,224 per candidate.

Five primary elections with the most fundraising

The table below details the five Democratic primary elections with the most fundraising in the House of Representatives. Winning candidates’ names are in bold.

District Money Raised Officeholder Candidates
District 172 $1,107,101 Kevin Boyle (D) Kevin Boyle, Robert Stewart, and Nathanael Cheng
District 182 $369,792 Brian Sims (D) Benjamin Waxman, Will Gross, Jonathan Lovitz, Deja Alvarez, and Tyrell Brown
District 194 $311,193 Pamela DeLissio (D) Tarik Khan and Pamela DeLissio
District 181 $272,521 Malcolm Kenyatta (D) Malcolm Kenyatta and Joy Crudup-Dorsey
District 10 $254,243 Amen Brown (D) Amen Brown, Cass Green, and Sajda Blackwell

#1 District 172 – $1,107,101

Incumbent Kevin Boyle raised $1,076,958, Robert Stewart raised $30,143, and Nathanael Cheng raised $0.

Kevin Boyle advanced to the general election with 67 percent of the vote, Robert Stewart received 33 percent of the vote, and Nathanael Cheng was disqualified.

#2 District 182 – $369,792

Jonathan Lovitz raised $203,844, Deja Alvarez raised $72,770, Benjamin Waxman raised $47,349, Will Gross raised $45,831, and Tyrell Brown raised $0.

Benjamin Waxman advanced to the general election with 41 percent of the vote, Will Gross received 20 percent of the vote, Jonathan Lovitz received 20 percent of the vote, Deja Alvarez received 19 percent of the vote, and Tyrell Brown withdrew.

#3 District 194 – $311,193

Incumbent Pamela DeLissio raised $27,488 and Tarik Khan raised $283,705.

Tarik Khan advanced to the general election with 60 percent of the vote and Pamela DeLissio received 40 percent of the vote.

#4 District 181 – $272,521

Incumbent Malcolm Kenyatta raised $272,521 and Joy Crudup-Dorsey raised $0.

Malcolm Kenyatta advanced to the general election with 100 percent of the vote and Joy Crudup-Dorsey was disqualified.

#5 District 10 – $254,243

Incumbent Amen Brown raised $193,875, Cass Green raised $60,368, and Sajda Blackwell raised $0.

Amen Brown received NaN percent of the vote, Cass Green received NaN percent of the vote, and Sajda Blackwell received NaN percent of the vote.

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Pennsylvania PACs submitted to the Pennsylvania Department of State. Federal PACs are not required to report to state agencies. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Report Name Report Due Date
2021 Annual (C7) 1/31/2022
2022 Pre-Primary (C1) 4/05/2022
2022 Pre-Primary (C2) 5/9/2022
2022 Post-Primary (C3) 6/20/2022
2022 Pre-General (C4) 9/22/2022
2022 Pre-General (C5) 10/31/2022
2022 Post-General (C6) 12/12/2022
2022 Annual (C7) 2/1/2023

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



Results in the five most expensive Republican Pennsylvania House primaries

Republican primary elections for 164 of 203 seats in the Pennsylvania House of Representatives took place on May 17, 2022. Of the 164 seats up for election in 2022, 48 had a primary election with more than one candidate.

Across all contested Republican primary elections, candidates raised $4.1 million. Incumbents raised an average of $118,454 per candidate and challengers raised an average of $14,339 per candidate.

Five primary elections with the most fundraising

The table below details the five Republican primary elections with the most fundraising in the House of Representatives. Winning candidates’ names are in bold.

District Money Raised Officeholder Candidates
District 94 $1,349,617 Stanley Saylor (R) Wendy Fink and Stanley Saylor
District 100 $724,857 Bryan Cutler (R) Bryan Cutler and Anne Weston
District 187 $290,558 Ryan Mackenzie (R) Ryan Mackenzie and Gary Day
District 73 $122,161 Thomas Sankey (R) Dallas Kephart, Derek Walker, and John Sobel
District 87 $118,815 Greg Rothman (R) Thomas Kutz and Eric Clancy

#1 District 94 – $1,349,617

Incumbent Stanley Saylor raised $847,507 and Wendy Fink raised $502,110.

Wendy Fink advanced to the general election with 56 percent of the vote and Stanley Saylor received 44 percent of the vote.

#2 District 100 – $724,857

Incumbent Bryan Cutler raised $691,163 and Anne Weston raised $33,694.

Bryan Cutler advanced to the general election with 70 percent of the vote and Anne Weston received 30 percent of the vote.

#3 District 187 – $290,558

Incumbent Gary Day raised $99,400 and Incumbent Ryan Mackenzie raised $191,158.

Ryan Mackenzie advanced to the general election with 61 percent of the vote and Gary Day received 39 percent of the vote.

#4 District 73 – $122,161

Derek Walker raised $61,411, Dallas Kephart raised $60,750, and John Sobel raised $0.

Dallas Kephart advanced to the general election with 62 percent of the vote, Derek Walker received 26 percent of the vote, and John Sobel received 12 percent of the vote.

#5 District 87 – $118,815

Thomas Kutz raised $66,700 and Eric Clancy raised $52,115.

Thomas Kutz advanced to the general election with 54 percent of the vote and Eric Clancy received 46 percent of the vote.

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Pennsylvania PACs submitted to the Pennsylvania Department of State. Federal PACs are not required to report to state agencies. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Report Name Report Due Date
2021 Annual (C7) 1/31/2022
2022 Pre-Primary (C1) 4/05/2022
2022 Pre-Primary (C2) 5/9/2022
2022 Post-Primary (C3) 6/20/2022
2022 Pre-General (C4) 9/22/2022
2022 Pre-General (C5) 10/31/2022
2022 Post-General (C6) 12/12/2022
2022 Annual (C7) 2/1/2023

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



Three candidates running in the Democratic primary for governor of New York

Incumbent Kathy Hochul, Tom Suozzi, and Jumaane Williams are running in the Democratic primary election for Governor of New York on June 2, 2022. Hochul is running for re-election to a full term. Hochul, previously New York’s lieutenant governor, became governor in August 2021 following the resignation of Gov. Andrew Cuomo (D).

Hochul was first elected lieutenant governor in 2014. She served one term in the U.S. House from 2011 to 2013. The Democratic Party of New York endorsed Hochul at its state convention in February 2022. Her other endorsements include U.S. Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, 12 members of the state’s U.S. House delegation, 77 members of the state legislature, and four New York City boroughs Democratic parties (Bronx, Brooklyn, Manhattan, and Queens). Public safety is a key policy of Hochul’s campaign. In response to a May 2022 shooting in Buffalo, New York, Hochul said, “New York already has some of the toughest gun laws in the country but clearly we need to make them even stronger. New Yorkers deserve to feel safe in schools, in grocery stores, in movie theaters, in shopping malls, and on our streets — and we must do everything in our power to protect them.”

Suozzi was elected to the U.S. House in 2016. New York City Councilmember Robert Holden and former councilmember Diana Reyna endorsed Suozzi. Suozzi criticized Hochul for what he called “pandering to the far left” and said his campaign was focused on “reducing taxes, making New York more affordable and cutting crime.” Suozzi also said his campaign would focus on lowering taxes. “I’ve always known that taxes are the biggest drawback in our state. Our state and local taxes are one of the highest taxes in the United States of America and it’s one of the reasons people leave to these lower tax states, like North Carolina, South Carolina, and Florida,” he said.

Williams was elected New York City Public Advocate in 2019 and served on the New York City Council from 2009 to 2019. Our Revolution, the Working Families Party, two members of the state legislature, nine members of the New York City Council, and 2021 Buffalo mayoral candidate India Walton endorsed Williams. Williams’ policy platform on his website has three pillars: housing, public safety, and healthcare. Williams said he believes that housing is a human right and the government must play a role in providing it, that public safety requires creating thriving communities, and that New York should enact a universal, single-payer healthcare system.

Candidates for the positions of governor and lieutenant governor are elected separately. Candidates for governor may choose to endorse a candidate for lieutenant governor as an unofficial running mate. Suozzi endorsed Diana Reyna and Williams endorsed Ana Maria Archila. Hochul initially endorsed then-Lt. Gov. Brian Benjamin (D). Following Benjamin’s resignation, Hochul appointed Antonio Delgado as lieutenant governor and endorsed him.



These Pennsylvania Senate candidates raised the most and lost their primaries

General elections for 25 of 49 seats in the Pennsylvania State Senate will take place on November 8, 2022. State senatorial primary elections were held on May 17, 2022.

This article details the five candidates in each party who raised the most money and lost their primary election. In the 2022 election cycle, nine of 22 Republican primaries and four of 22 Democratic primaries were contested. The losing candidates are shown along with the percentage of the vote they received compared to the primary winner. In cases where the race was pushed to a runoff, vote percentages for both advancing candidates are included.

Top fundraisers with unsuccessful primary campaigns this cycle

This information comes from candidate reports to the Pennsylvania Department of State covering the period of January 1, 2021, through May 2, 2022.

The Democratic candidates who raised the most money and lost their primary were:

  • Paul Prescod – $136,130 – District 8 (Lost primary 39% – 61%)
  • Emanuel Wilkerson – $0 – District 24 (Lost primary 27% – 73%)

The Republican candidates who raised the most money and lost their primary were:

  • Mike Miller – $47,387 – District 36 (Lost primary 41% – 59%)
  • Omy Maldonado – $28,128 – District 14 (Lost primary 21% – 49%)
  • David Moyer – $6,300 – District 24 (Lost primary 32% – 68%)
  • Cindy Miller – $0 – District 14 (Lost primary 30% – 49%)
  • Jake Roberts – $0 – District 38 (Lost primary 32% – 68%)

Top fundraisers with unsuccessful primary campaigns last cycle

This information comes from candidate reports to the Pennsylvania Department of State covering the period of January 1, 2019, through December 31, 2020.

The Democratic candidates who raised the most money and lost their primary in 2020 were:

  • Lawrence M. Farnese Jr. – $1,026,939 – District 1 (Lost primary 43% – 57%)
  • Brett Burman – $334,616 – District 9 (Lost primary 46% – 54%)
  • Daylin Leach – $180,577 – District 17 (Lost primary 35% – 65%)
  • Don Vymazal – $76,579 – District 19 (Lost primary 32% – 51%)
  • Craig Lehman – $73,293 – District 13 (Lost primary 46% – 54%)

The Republican candidates who raised the most money and lost their primary in 2020 were:

  • John Herm Suplizio – $556,122 – District 25 (Lost primary 31% – 59%)
  • Jeff Neff – $55,621 – District 37 (Lost primary 42% – 58%)
  • James Brown – $2,700 – District 25 (Lost primary 10% – 59%)

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Pennsylvania PACs submitted to the Pennsylvania Department of State. Federal PACs are not required to report to state agencies. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Report Name Report Due Date
2021 Annual (C7) 1/31/2022
2022 Pre-Primary (C1) 4/05/2022
2022 Pre-Primary (C2) 5/9/2022
2022 Post-Primary (C3) 6/20/2022
2022 Pre-General (C4) 9/22/2022
2022 Pre-General (C5) 10/31/2022
2022 Post-General (C6) 12/12/2022
2022 Annual (C7) 2/1/2023

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



These Pennsylvania House candidates raised the most and lost their primaries

Most money raised by a losing primary candidate

General elections for all 203 seats in the Pennsylvania House of Representatives will take place on November 8, 2022. State house primary elections were held on May 17, 2022. Republicans hold a 113-90 majority heading into the election.

This article details the five candidates in each party who raised the most money and lost their primary election. In the 2022 election cycle, 48 of 164 Republican primaries and 45 of 145 Democratic primaries were contested. The losing candidates are shown along with the percentage of the vote they received compared to the primary winner. In cases where the race was pushed to a runoff, vote percentages for both advancing candidates are included.

Top fundraisers with unsuccessful primary campaigns this cycle

This information comes from candidate reports to the Pennsylvania Department of State covering the period of January 1, 2021, through May 2, 2022.

The Democratic candidates who raised the most money and lost their primary were:

  • Jonathan Lovitz – $203,844 – District 182 (Lost primary 20% – 41%)
  • Isabella Fitzgerald – $121,432 – District 200 (Lost primary 38% – 62%)
  • Michael Giangiordano – $84,740 – District 184 (Lost primary 22% – 78%)
  • Andre Carroll – $82,093 – District 201 (Lost primary 43% – 57%)
  • Patrick Flynn – $80,900 – District 113 (Lost primary 35% – 65%)

The Republican candidates who raised the most money and lost their primary were:

  • Stanley Saylor – $847,507 – District 94 (Lost primary 44% – 56%)
  • Gary Day – $99,400 – District 187 (Lost primary 39% – 61%)
  • Johnathan Hershey – $85,373 – District 86 (Lost primary 45% – 55%)
  • Lu Ann Fahndrich – $82,832 – District 98 (Lost primary 28% – 50%)
  • Derek Walker – $61,411 – District 73 (Lost primary 26% – 62%)

Top fundraisers with unsuccessful primary campaigns last cycle

This information comes from candidate reports to the Pennsylvania Department of State covering the period of January 1, 2019, through December 31, 2020.

The Democratic candidates who raised the most money and lost their primary in 2020 were:

  • G. Roni Green – $224,330 – District 190 (Lost primary 39% – 43%)
  • Chris Roland – $176,595 – District 34 (Lost primary 23% – 77%)
  • Marco Attisano – $135,445 – District 30 (Lost primary 46% – 54%)
  • Maria Donatucci – $127,600 – District 185 (Lost primary 43% – 57%)
  • Adam Ravenstahl – $120,703 – District 20 (Lost primary 45% – 55%)

The Republican candidates who raised the most money and lost their primary in 2020 were:

  • Greg Archetto – $251,342 – District 29 (Lost primary 36% – 64%)
  • Mimi Legro – $186,350 – District 106 (Lost primary 27% – 46%)
  • Michael Schlossberg – $103,364 – District 132 (Lost primary 18% – 82%)
  • Tom Kirsch – $54,050 – District 39 (Lost primary 49% – 51%)
  • Scott Timko – $53,818 – District 12 (Lost primary 35% – 65%)

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active Pennsylvania PACs submitted to the Pennsylvania Department of State. Federal PACs are not required to report to state agencies. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Report Name Report Due Date
2021 Annual (C7) 1/31/2022
2022 Pre-Primary (C1) 4/05/2022
2022 Pre-Primary (C2) 5/9/2022
2022 Post-Primary (C3) 6/20/2022
2022 Pre-General (C4) 9/22/2022
2022 Pre-General (C5) 10/31/2022
2022 Post-General (C6) 12/12/2022
2022 Annual (C7) 2/1/2023

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.



Results in the five most expensive Republican North Carolina Senate primaries

5 Most Expensive Elections

Republican primary elections for 49 of 50 seats in the North Carolina State Senate took place on May 17, 2022. Of the 49 seats up for election in 2022, 15 had a primary election with more than one candidate.

Across all contested Republican primary elections, candidates raised $1.8 million. Incumbents raised an average of $111,949 per candidate and challengers raised an average of $35,619 per candidate.

Five primary elections with the most fundraising

The table below details the five Republican primary elections with the most fundraising in the State Senate. Winning candidates’ names are in bold.

District Money Raised Officeholder Candidates
District 47 $239,472 Deanna Ballard (R) Ralph Hise and Deanna Ballard
District 10 $230,582 Brent Jackson (R) Benton Sawrey, Jill Homan, and Matt Ansley
District 1 $211,509 Bob Steinburg (R) Norman Sanderson and Bob Steinburg
District 12 $197,674 Jim Burgin (R) Jim Burgin, David Buboltz, and Ernie Watson
District 4 $187,933 Milton F. Fitch Jr. (D) Eldon Sharpe Newton III and Joe Democko

#1 District 47 – $239,472

Incumbent Ralph Hise raised $118,076 and Incumbent Deanna Ballard raised $121,396.

Ralph Hise advanced to the general election with 51 percent of the vote and Deanna Ballard received 49 percent of the vote.

#2 District 10 – $230,582

Benton Sawrey raised $131,260, Jill Homan raised $99,322, and Matt Ansley raised $0.

Benton Sawrey advanced to the general election with 66 percent of the vote, Jill Homan received 20 percent of the vote, and Matt Ansley received 15 percent of the vote.

#3 District 1 – $211,509

Incumbent Norman Sanderson raised $77,457 and Incumbent Bob Steinburg raised $134,052.

Norman Sanderson advanced to the general election with 56 percent of the vote and Bob Steinburg received 44 percent of the vote.

#4 District 12 – $197,674

Incumbent Jim Burgin raised $125,730, Ernie Watson raised $51,753, and David Buboltz raised $20,191.

Jim Burgin advanced to the general election with 53 percent of the vote, David Buboltz received 37 percent of the vote, and Ernie Watson received 11 percent of the vote.

#5 District 4 – $187,933

Eldon Sharpe Newton III raised $147,547 and Joe Democko raised $40,386.

Eldon Sharpe Newton III advanced to the general election with 68 percent of the vote and Joe Democko received 32 percent of the vote.

The data above are based on campaign finance reports that active North Carolina PACs submitted to the North Carolina State Board of Elections (NCSBE). Federal PACs are not required to report to state agencies. Transparency USA publishes campaign finance data following major reporting deadlines. State or federal law may require filers to submit additional reports.

Report Name Report Due Date
2022 Semiannual 1/28/2022
2022 Q1 Plus 5/10/2022
2022 Semiannual (only candidates not on 2022 ballot) 7/29/2022
2022 Q3 Plus 10/31/2022
2022 Q4 1/11/2023
2022 Year End Semiannual (only candidates not on 2022 ballot) 1/27/2023

This article is a joint publication from Ballotpedia and Transparency USA, who are working together to provide campaign finance information for state-level elections. Learn more about our work here.