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Maddie Sinclair Johnson

Maddie Sinclair Johnson is a staff writer at Ballotpedia. Contact us at editor@ballotpedia.org.

Candidates for office in Missouri complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Below are a selection of responses from the candidates who filled out Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey since May 15, 2022. To read each candidate’s full responses, click their name at the bottom of the article.

Raymond Reed is running for election to the U.S. House to represent Missouri’s 2nd Congressional District and the Democratic primary is on Aug. 2. Here’s how Reed responded to the question “Who do you look up to? Whose example would you like to follow, and why?”

“Obviously Barack Obama because I think we both approach politics and life similarly with an optimistic and hopeful outlook. But I also have to give credit to Jason Kander (former Secretary of State in Missouri). Most folks think Kander materialized in a viral 2016 campaign ad of him breaking down an assault rifle while blindfolded, but I always encourage folks to research his work in the Missouri legislature and more importantly his work since 2018 protecting our democracy and fighting for veterans. Kander is some one who always placed integrity over expediency and service over his own ambition, and I’ve tried to emulate that in my own race.”

Click here to read the rest of Reed’s answers. 

Christopher Ray is running for Missouri House of Representatives District 111 and the Republican primary is on Aug. 2. Here’s how Ray responded to the question “Do you believe that compromise is necessary or desirable for policymaking?”

“We have districts for a reason and an elected individual from each district for a reason. That reason is clear. Each district is going to have a difference of opinion on many subjects that come across the legislatures table. If everyone agreed on every subject we would not need districts. The system we have in place was designed to have differences of opinion and to put those differences to a vote amongst others from other areas in our state. In the end after a vote is how a compromise is made.”

Click here to read the rest of Ray’s answers. 

If you’re a Missouri candidate or incumbent, click here to take the survey. The survey contains over 30 questions, and you can choose the ones you feel will best represent your views to voters. If you complete the survey, a box with your answers will display on your Ballotpedia profile. Your responses will also populate the information that appears in our mobile app, My Vote Ballotpedia.

If you’re not running for office but you would like to know more about candidates in Missouri, share the link and urge them to take the survey!

Additional reading:

  • Aaron Crossley (D) – Missouri House of Representatives District 29
  • Robert Smith (L) – Missouri House of Representatives District 125
  • Raymond Reed (D) – U.S. House Missouri 2nd District
  • Jon Karlen (D) – U.S. House Missouri 3rd District
  • Matthew Griese (R) – Missouri House of Representatives District 108
  • Christopher Ray (R) – Missouri House of Representatives District 111
  • Don Houston (D) – Missouri House of Representatives District 68
  • Andrew Daly (D) – U.S. House Missouri 3rd Congressional District
  • Andrew Hurt (R) – Missouri House of Representatives District 125


Missouri General Assembly considered the highest number of education bills since 2019

In 2022, the Missouri General Assembly considered the highest number of education bills since 2019. The House and Senate considered 149 bills during the 2022 legislative session and 73 in 2019. There were no education bills to become law in either year.

Education bills have been adopted into law in two (2020 and 2021) out of the past four years. In order for a bill to become law, it must pass both the House and Senate and be signed by Gov. Mike Parson (R) or the legislature overrides a veto from the governor. 

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There are three education committees in the Missouri Legislature. The Senate Education Committee, the House  Primary and Secondary Education Committee, and the House Higher Education Committee. The Missouri General Assembly has 66 total standing committees. The Missouri Senate has 20 standing committees, the Missouri House of Representatives has 34 standing committees, and there are 12 joint legislative committees in the Missouri Legislature. 

The Missouri General Assembly is the state legislature of Missouri. It is a bicameral legislature composed of a 34-member Senate and a 163-member House of Representatives. Senators are term limited to two four-year terms and representatives are limited to four two-year terms. The Missouri General Assembly is a part-time legislature. The 2022 session convened on Jan. 5 and will adjourn May 13. 

Missouri is one of 23 Republican state government trifectas in the U.S. The Republican Party controls the office of governor and both chambers of the General Assembly. There is a 24-10 Republican majority in the Senate and a 108-49 majority in the House. The Republicans have a veto-proof supermajority in both chambers. In the event of a veto issued by Gov. Parson, the Republican majority is large enough to override the veto without any votes from members of the Democratic Party. 

Additional reading:



Two months to Missouri’s primary

Missouri’s 2022 primary election is in two months. It is scheduled for Aug. 2. The filing deadline was on March 29.

A primary election is used to narrow the field of candidates for certain positions or to determine the political party nominees before a general election. Missouri has an open primary. Voters are not required to be affiliated with a political party in order to vote in that party’s primary. Voters are also able to declare any party at the polls regardless of previous party affiliation. 

In the Missouri primary, voters throughout the state will select one candidate to serve in the U.S. Senate, eight candidates to serve in the U.S. House of Representatives, a state auditor, 17 state senators, and 163 state representatives. Clay County, Jackson County, Platte County, and the city of St. Louis have municipal positions that will be on the ballot. Using Ballotpedia’s sample ballot lookup tool, voters can find the candidates that will be on their ballot on Aug. 2. 

Those who wish to vote in-person must be registered by July 6. Registration is possible online, in-person, or by mail. If registration forms are mailed, they must be postmarked on or before July 6. The state of Missouri does not have early voting. Those who qualify for an absentee ballot must have their request form received in the mail by July 20. 

Additional reading:



Nine Missourian candidates completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey since May 15

Below are a selection of responses from the candidates who filled out Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey since May 15, 2022. To read each candidate’s full responses, click their name at the bottom of the article.

Aaron Crossley is running for Missouri House of Representatives District 29 and the Democratic primary is on Aug. 2. Here’s how Crossley responded to the question “What areas of public policy are you personally passionate about?”

“As a social worker, husband, and father raising children in Independence, I understand the struggles families in our community are facing. We need competent, accountable leadership in Jefferson City who will speak up for our families’ values and interests.”

Click here to read the rest of Crossley’s answers. 

Matthew Griese is running for Missouri House of Representatives District 108 and the Republican primary is on Aug. 2. Here’s how Griese responded to the question “Please list below 3 key messages of your campaign. What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office?”

“I will fight to lower taxes. The income tax, Personal Property Tax, along with the Gas Tax. Giving parents the power back in their children’s education. Fighting to make sure your second amendment rights remain!”

Click here to read the rest of Griese’s answers. 

If you’re a Missouri candidate or incumbent, click here to take the survey. The survey contains over 30 questions, and you can choose the ones you feel will best represent your views to voters. If you complete the survey, a box with your answers will display on your Ballotpedia profile. Your responses will also populate the information that appears in our mobile app, My Vote Ballotpedia.

If you’re not running for office but you would like to know more about candidates in Missouri, share the link and urge them to take the survey!

Additional reading:

  • Aaron Crossley (D) – Missouri House of Representatives District 29
  • Robert Smith (L) – Missouri House of Representatives District 125
  • Raymond Reed (D) – U.S. House Missouri 2nd District
  • Jon Karlen (D) – U.S. House Missouri 3rd District
  • Matthew Griese (R) – Missouri House of Representatives District 108
  • Christopher Ray (R) – Missouri House of Representatives District 111
  • Don Houston (D) – Missouri House of Representatives District 68
  • Andrew Daly (D) – U.S. House Missouri 3rd Congressional District
  • Andrew Hurt (R) – Missouri House of Representatives District 125


Missouri had one irregular officeholder transition in the last two months

In April and May, there has been one irregular officeholder transition in Missouri for offices within Ballotpedia’s coverage scope. This includes the resignation, death, appointment, or winning of a special election in positions such as a state executive office, a seat in the General Assembly, or a non-district judgeship. 

Missouri House Rep. Rory Rowland left office on April 17 after he was elected Mayor of Independence, Missouri. Rowland represented District 29 and had been serving in the Missouri House of Representatives since 2015. The vacancy has not been filled. 

Currently, there are seven vacancies in the Missouri house of Representatives including District 29. District 34 became vacant after Rick Roeber was expelled from the House by unanimous vote in April 2021. District 65 became vacant after the death of Tom Hannegan in Oct. 2021. District 114 has been vacant since Nov. 2021 and was previously held by Becky Ruth. In the first week of Jan. 2022, Districts 147, 108, and 61 all became vacant. They were held by Wayne Wallingford, Justin Hill, and Aaron Griesheimer, respectively. 

Vacancies in the Missouri General Assembly are filled through a special election called by the governor. Missouri is one of 25 states that fill vacancies in the state legislature through special elections. As of April 2022, 45 state legislative special elections have been scheduled nationwide for 2022 in 20 states. Missouri Gov. Mike Parson (R) has not called for any legislative special elections this year. All Missouri House of Representatives districts will be up for regular election on Nov. 8. 

Additional reading:



Missouri Supreme Court issues one decision and hears arguments in four cases

The Missouri Supreme Court has made one decision, heard arguments in four cases, and has four more cases on the docket for May.

State of Missouri v. Joshua Steven Collins was argued on Dec. 8, 2021, and the opinion was issued on May 17. The circuit court’s decision was unanimously affirmed. The case summary can be found here.

The Court heard arguments in the following cases on May 11:

  • Bruce S. Schlafly v. Anne S. Cori
  • Carfax Inc. v. Director of Revenue
  • Robert March v. Treasurer of the State of Missouri – Custodian of the Second Injury Fund
  • Travis Poke v. Independence School District

In 2022, the Missouri Supreme Court has heard arguments in 29 cases and issued 26 decisions. The Court has eight cases on the docket for May. The final four hearings for the month will be held on May 24. 

Founded in 1820, the Missouri Supreme Court is the state’s court of last resort and has seven justices. Justices are are appointed to 12-year terms by the governor from a list provided by the Missouri Appellete Judicial Comission. As of Sept. 2021, three judges were appointed by a Democratic governor and four by a Republican governor. 

The jurisdiction of the Missouri Supreme Court includes appeals concerning the validity of federal statutes and treaties in addition to state statues, state revenue laws, the right of a state elected official to hold office, and the imposition of the death penalty. The Missouri Supreme Court also has the discretion to hear appeals on questions of general interest and if a lower court’s decision is in conflict with a previous appellate decision. 



Summary of Missouri’s 2022 legislative session

After 128 days in session, the Missouri General Assembly adjourned the 2022 legislative session on May 13. There were a total of 2,104 bills introduced and two bills passed passed both chambers of the legislature and were signed by Gov. Mike Parson (R).

Both bills that passed are appropriation bills. House Bill 3014 was signed by Parson on Feb. 24, and House Bill 3015 was signed on May 13.

According to data from BillTrack50, the average number of bills introduced annually between 2017 and 2022 was 2,019 bills. The fewest bills were introduced in 2019 (1,826), while the most bills were introduced in 2020 (2,170).

The Missouri state legislature has passed 1,123 bills since 2011, an average rate of 94 bills per year. The most bills were passed in the 2015 session (154). Excluding 2022, the fewest bills were passed in 2020 (37).

The 2022 legislative session convened on Jan. 5 and adjourned on May 13. There are 20 state legislatures currently in session, 28 have adjourned, one is in special session, and one has yet to convene.

The Missouri General Assembly is the state legislature of Missouri. It is a bicameral legislature composed of a 34-member Senate and a 163-member House of Representatives. Senators are term limited to two terms and representatives are limited to four. The Missouri General Assembly is a part-time legislature. Legislative sessions are held between January and May. 

Missouri is one of 23 Republican state government trifectas in the U.S. The Republican Party controls the office of governor and both chambers of the General Assembly. There is a 24-10 Republican majority in the Senate and a 108-49 majority in the House. The Republicans have a veto-proof supermajority in both chambers. In the event of a veto issued by Gov. Parson, the Republican majority is large enough to override the veto without any votes from members of the Democratic party. 

Additional reading:



Seven Missourian candidates complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey since May 1

Below are a selection of responses from the candaidates who filled out Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey since May 1. To read each candidate’s full responses, click their name at the bottom of the article.

Christopher Davis is running for Missouri House of Representatives District 143 and the Republican primary is on Aug. 2. Here’s how Davis responded to the question “What areas of public policy are you personally passionate about?”

“As a single father I am extremely passionate about reforming child custody laws. The most common denominator in poverty, prisons, drug abuse, high school drop out rates, and just about every other negative metric is a Fatherless household. For far to long the state has played a very large role in the absence of fathers by alienating them and in many case removing any meaningful contact whatsoever. I will work hard to pass a 50/50 Shared Custody Presumption law that will ensure that the family court systems opinion is that equal time with the Father and Mother is in the best interest of the child.”

Click here to read the rest of Davis’ answers.

Joshua Shipp is running for U.S. Senate and the Democratic primary is on Aug. 2. Here’s how Shipp responded to the question “What qualities does the U.S. Senate possess that makes it unique as an institution?”

“It helps represent the voices of the population as an equal spectrum of billing, and provides a safety net of checks and balances to ensure tyranny, oppression, or any other abuses of power isn’t established against citizens.”

Click here to read the rest of Shipp’s answers.

If you’re a Missouri candidate or incumbent, click here to take the survey. The survey contains over 30 questions, and you can choose the ones you feel will best represent your views to voters. If you complete the survey, a box with your answers will display on your Ballotpedia profile. Your responses will also populate the information that appears in our mobile app, My Vote Ballotpedia.

If you’re not running for office but you would like to know more about candidates in Missouri, share the link and urge them to take the survey!

Additional reading:



Two bills passed during Missouri’s 2022 legislative session

The Missouri General Assembly adjourned on May 13 having passed two bills during the 2022 legislative session. Both House Bill 3014 and House Bill 3015 are appropriation bills. There were a total of 11 resolutions adopted between the two chambers.

In 2021, Missouri state legislature passed a total 58 bills. That is 97% decrease in passed bills from last year’s legislative session to this year’s session. Alaska passed the fewest amount of bills last year with a total of 48 bills. 

After the Missouri legislature adjourns, there will be 20 state legislatures in session, 28 adjourned, one in special session, and one yet to convene.

The Missouri General Assembly is the state legislature of Missouri. It is a bicameral legislature composed of a 34-member Senate and a 163-member House of Representatives. Senators are term limited to two terms and representatives are limited to four. The Missouri General Assembly is a part-time legislature. Legislative sessions are held between January and May. 

Missouri is one of 23 Republican state government trifectas in the U.S. The Republican Party controls the office of governor and both chambers of the General Assembly. There is a 24-10 Republican majority in the Senate and a 108-49 majority in the House. The Republicans have a veto-proof supermajority in both chambers. In the event of a veto issued by Gov. Parson, the Republican majority is large enough to override the veto without any votes from members of the Democratic party. 

Additional reading:



State legislator partisan breakdown for April

Image of donkey and elephant to symbolize the Democratic and Republican parties.

According to Ballotpedia’s April partisan count of the 7,383 state legislative seats across the United States, 54.35% of all state legislators are Republicans and 44.37% are Democrats. This is a 0.06% increase for Republicans and a 0.57% decrease for Democrats from April 2021. 

Ballotpedia tallies the partisan balance of state legislatures at the end of every month. Republicans control 62 chambers, while Democrats hold 36. The Alaska House of Representatives is the only chamber organized under a multipartisan, power-sharing coalition. 

Democrats hold 861 state Senate seats and 2,415 state House seats, gaining three senate seats and four house seats since last month. Republicans hold 1,096 state Senate seats and 2,917 state House seats, retaining the same number of senate seats and losing four house seats since last month.

Independent or third-party legislators hold 41 seats across 18 different states, of which 33 are state House seats and eight state Senate seats. There are 46 vacant state House seats and seven vacant state Senate seats across 22 different states.

Compared to April 2021, Democrats have lost eight state Senate seats (869 v. 861) and 34 state House seats (2,449 v. 2,415). Republicans have gained five state Senate seats (1,091 v. 1,096) and have the same number of House seats (2,917).  

Additional reading: