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Maddie Sinclair Johnson

Maddie Sinclair Johnson is a staff writer at Ballotpedia. Contact us at editor@ballotpedia.org.

Seven Missourian candidates complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey since May 1

Below are a selection of responses from the candaidates who filled out Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey since May 1. To read each candidate’s full responses, click their name at the bottom of the article.

Christopher Davis is running for Missouri House of Representatives District 143 and the Republican primary is on Aug. 2. Here’s how Davis responded to the question “What areas of public policy are you personally passionate about?”

“As a single father I am extremely passionate about reforming child custody laws. The most common denominator in poverty, prisons, drug abuse, high school drop out rates, and just about every other negative metric is a Fatherless household. For far to long the state has played a very large role in the absence of fathers by alienating them and in many case removing any meaningful contact whatsoever. I will work hard to pass a 50/50 Shared Custody Presumption law that will ensure that the family court systems opinion is that equal time with the Father and Mother is in the best interest of the child.”

Click here to read the rest of Davis’ answers.

Joshua Shipp is running for U.S. Senate and the Democratic primary is on Aug. 2. Here’s how Shipp responded to the question “What qualities does the U.S. Senate possess that makes it unique as an institution?”

“It helps represent the voices of the population as an equal spectrum of billing, and provides a safety net of checks and balances to ensure tyranny, oppression, or any other abuses of power isn’t established against citizens.”

Click here to read the rest of Shipp’s answers.

If you’re a Missouri candidate or incumbent, click here to take the survey. The survey contains over 30 questions, and you can choose the ones you feel will best represent your views to voters. If you complete the survey, a box with your answers will display on your Ballotpedia profile. Your responses will also populate the information that appears in our mobile app, My Vote Ballotpedia.

If you’re not running for office but you would like to know more about candidates in Missouri, share the link and urge them to take the survey!

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Two bills passed during Missouri’s 2022 legislative session

The Missouri General Assembly adjourned on May 13 having passed two bills during the 2022 legislative session. Both House Bill 3014 and House Bill 3015 are appropriation bills. There were a total of 11 resolutions adopted between the two chambers.

In 2021, Missouri state legislature passed a total 58 bills. That is 97% decrease in passed bills from last year’s legislative session to this year’s session. Alaska passed the fewest amount of bills last year with a total of 48 bills. 

After the Missouri legislature adjourns, there will be 20 state legislatures in session, 28 adjourned, one in special session, and one yet to convene.

The Missouri General Assembly is the state legislature of Missouri. It is a bicameral legislature composed of a 34-member Senate and a 163-member House of Representatives. Senators are term limited to two terms and representatives are limited to four. The Missouri General Assembly is a part-time legislature. Legislative sessions are held between January and May. 

Missouri is one of 23 Republican state government trifectas in the U.S. The Republican Party controls the office of governor and both chambers of the General Assembly. There is a 24-10 Republican majority in the Senate and a 108-49 majority in the House. The Republicans have a veto-proof supermajority in both chambers. In the event of a veto issued by Gov. Parson, the Republican majority is large enough to override the veto without any votes from members of the Democratic party. 

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State legislator partisan breakdown for April

Image of donkey and elephant to symbolize the Democratic and Republican parties.

According to Ballotpedia’s April partisan count of the 7,383 state legislative seats across the United States, 54.35% of all state legislators are Republicans and 44.37% are Democrats. This is a 0.06% increase for Republicans and a 0.57% decrease for Democrats from April 2021. 

Ballotpedia tallies the partisan balance of state legislatures at the end of every month. Republicans control 62 chambers, while Democrats hold 36. The Alaska House of Representatives is the only chamber organized under a multipartisan, power-sharing coalition. 

Democrats hold 861 state Senate seats and 2,415 state House seats, gaining three senate seats and four house seats since last month. Republicans hold 1,096 state Senate seats and 2,917 state House seats, retaining the same number of senate seats and losing four house seats since last month.

Independent or third-party legislators hold 41 seats across 18 different states, of which 33 are state House seats and eight state Senate seats. There are 46 vacant state House seats and seven vacant state Senate seats across 22 different states.

Compared to April 2021, Democrats have lost eight state Senate seats (869 v. 861) and 34 state House seats (2,449 v. 2,415). Republicans have gained five state Senate seats (1,091 v. 1,096) and have the same number of House seats (2,917).  

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Missouri Supreme Court issues 10 decisions

The Missouri Supreme Court issued 10 decisions on April 26, 2022. This is the most decisions issued on a single day by the Missouri Supreme Court in 2022. 

Car Credit, Inc vs. Cathy L. Pitts was argued on March 22, 2022, and the circuit court’s decision was unanimously affirmed. 

State of Missouri vs. Eric G. Hollowell was argued on Feb. 7, 2022, and the circuit court’s decision was unanimously vacated and remanded.

John Doe vs. Kurt Frisz, Chief Law Enforcement Officer, St. Charles County, Missouri was argued on Feb. 23, 2022, and the circuit court’s decision was unanimously affirmed. 

City of St. Louis; St. Louis County; and Jackson County vs. State of Missouri; and Eric Schmitt, Attorney General of Missouri was argued on Feb. 7, 2022, and the circuit court’s decison was reversed and remanded with one justice dissenting. 

Christopher Klecka vs. Treasurer of Missouri as Custodian of the Second Injury Fund was ​​argued on Feb. 23, 2022, and the circuit court’s decision was affirmed with one justice dissenting. 

Clifton Jameson vs. Alexis Still was argued on Feb. 1, 2022, and the circuit court’s decision was unanimously vacated and remanded.

State of Missouri vs. Andrea Shaunte Straughter was argued on Dec. 14, 2021, and the circuit court’s decision was vacated and remanded with one justice dissenting.

State of Missouri vs. Timothy A. Shepherd was argued on Dec. 14, 2021, and the circuit court’s decision was vacated and remanded with two justices dissenting. 

City of Normandy, et al. vs. Michael L. Parson in his Official Capacity as Governor of Missouri, et al. was argued on Oct. 6, 2021, and the circuit court’s decision was unanimously vacated and remanded. 

Jefferson County 9-1-1 Dispatch vs. Joseph G. Plaggenberg, Acting Director of the Missouri Department of Revenue was argued on Sept. 15, 2021, and the appeal was dismissed with two justices dissenting. 

The Missouri Supreme Court has heard arguments in 25 cases in 2022 and issued 25 decisions. The Court has eight cases on the docket for May. Hearings will be held on May 11 and May 24. 

Founded in 1820, the Missouri Supreme Court is the state’s court of last resort and has seven justices. Justices are are appointed to 12-year terms by the governor from a list provided by the Missouri Appellete Judicial Comission. As of Sept. 2021, three judges were appointed by a Democratic governor and four by a Republican governor. 

The jurisdiction of the Missouri Supreme Court includes appeals concerning the validity of federal statutes and treaties in addition to state statues, state revenue laws, the right of a state elected official to hold office, and the imposition of the death penalty. The Missouri Supreme Court also has the discretion to hear appeals on questions of general interest and if a lower court’s decision is in conflict with a previous appellate decision.



One bill has passed during Missouri’s 2022 legislative session and one week remains

One week remains in the Missouri legislative session and there has been one bill passed by both the House and Senate and signed by Gov. Mike Parson (R). House Bill 3014 is an appropriations bill signed on Feb. 24, 2022. There have been a total of 11 resolutions adopted between the two chambers. The most recent resolutions were adopted on April 27.

According to PR Newswire, next to Alaska, the Missouri state legislature passed the fewest number of bills in 2021, passing 58 bills. By the first week of May in 2021, there had been four bills to pass both chambers of the Missouri General Assembly and be signed by Parson. Texas passed the highest number of bills in 2021, enacting 3,849 in total. 

The Missouri General Assembly is the state legislature of Missouri. It is a bicameral legislature composed of a 34-member Senate and a 163-member House of Representatives. Senators are term limited to two terms and representatives are limited to four. The Missouri General Assembly is a part-time legislature. The 2022 session convened on Jan. 5 and will adjourn May 13. 

Missouri is one of 23 Republican state government trifectas in the U.S. The Republican Party controls the office of governor and both chambers of the General Assembly. There is a 24-10 Republican majority in the Senate and a 108-49 majority in the House. The Republicans have a veto-proof supermajority in both chambers. In the event of a veto issued by Gov. Parson, the Republican majority is large enough to override the veto without any votes from members of the Democratic party. 

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Missouri Senate Education Committee passes “Parent’s Bill of Rights”

The Missouri Senate Education Committee passed a bill outlining parental rights with regard to the education of minors by state-funded schools on April 26 by a 5-4 vote. House Bill 1858, also known as the “Parent’s Bill of Rights,” passed the House by an 85-59 vote on April 19. Before HB 1858 goes to the Senate floor, it will go to the Senate Committee on Governmental Accountability and Fiscal Oversight. 

In his opening statement on the House floor, HB 1858 sponsor Rep. Ben Baker (R-160) said, “This bill is for every parent who might have been ignored at a school board meeting, and not listened to, and purposefully relegated to sit in silence as business was done. This is about those who have concerns about the content of the classroom and classroom materials, what is being put in front of their child in the classroom.” Proponents of HB 1858 believe it will allow for more parent involvement in education and discourage indoctrination in classrooms. 

Opponents of HB 1858 argue that to the bill may prevent teachers from covering important topics and vague language could cause logistical issues in schools. Representative Mike Stephens (R-128) said in response to the bill, “This language [in the bill] can wreak havoc in the classroom. Even though we want schools to be more open and we want the institutions of the public schools to be more open, we still have to have a system that is functional and that is not hamstrung by overkill and overzealous regulations.”

FutureEd has identified 80 bills in 26 states that address parental rights in the education of minors and content taught in classrooms that were pre-filed or introduced in 2022. 

For the House vote on HB 1858, 144 representatives voted. There were 11 absent and one abstained. Eighty-five Republicans voted in favor of the bill. Fifteen Republicans and all 44 Democrats voted against. In the Senate Education Committee, five Republicans voted in favor, one voted against, and all three Democrats voted against.

Missouri is one of 23 Republican state government trifectas in the U.S. The Republican Party controls the office of governor and both chambers of the General Assembly. There is a 24-10 Republican majority in the Senate and a 108-49 majority in the House. The Republicans have a veto-proof supermajority in both chambers. In the event of a veto issued by Gov. Parson, the Republican majority is large enough to override the veto without any votes from members of the Democratic party. 

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Three resolutions adopted in Missouri General Assembly

Since April 19, one resolution was adopted in the Missouri State Senate and two were adopted in the Missouri House of Representatives. There were no bills to pass both the House and Senate and be signed by Gov. Mike Parson (R). So far in the 2022 session, nine bills and resolutions have been passed. The following arethe resolutions that have passed since April 19:

House Resolution 3279 encourages the U.S. to negotiate a free trade agreement with the United Kingdom. The resolution was introduced by Rep. Derek Grier (R) and was adopted on April 26. 

HR 3886 recognizes the achievements of former University of Missourifootball coach Gary Pinkel, who was elected to the college football hall of fame in 2022. The resolution was introduced by Rep. Kurtis Gregory (R) and was adopted on April 27. 

SR 702 also recognizes the achievements of Pinkel. The resolution was introduced by Sen. Caleb Rowden (R) and was adopted on April 27. 

The Missouri General Assembly is the state legislature of Missouri. It is a bicameral legislature composed of a 34-member Senate and a 163-member House of Representatives. Senators are term limited to two terms and representatives are limited to four. The Missouri General Assembly is a part-time legislature. The 2022 session convened on Jan. 5 and will adjourn May 13. 

Missouri is one of 23 Republican state government trifectas in the U.S. The Republican Party controls the office of governor and both chambers of the General Assembly. There is a 24-10 Republican majority in the Senate and a 108-49 majority in the House. The Republicans have a veto-proof supermajority in both chambers. In the event of a veto issued by Gov. Parson, the Republican majority is large enough to override the veto without any votes from members of the Democratic party. 

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Six current vacancies in Missouri House of Representatives; oldest vacancy open since April 2021

Six seats are currently vacant in the Missouri House of Reprsentatives, with the oldest open since April 21, 2021. On that date, former State Rep. Rick Roeber (R)—who represented District 34—was expelled from the House by unanimous vote due to allegations of child abuse. 

District 65 became vacant after the death of State Rep. Tom Hannegan (R) in Oct. 2021. District 114 has been vacant since Nov. 2021 and was previously held by Becky Ruth (R). In the first week of Jan. 2022, Districts 147, 108, and 61 all became vacant. They were held by Wayne Wallingford (R), Justin Hill (R), and Aaron Griesheimer (R) respectively. 

Vacancies in the Missouri General Assembly are filled through a special election called by the governor. Missouri is one of 25 states that fill vacancies in the state legislature through special elections. As of April 2022, 45 state legislative special elections have been scheduled nationwide for 2022 in 20 states. Missouri Gov. Mike Parson (R) has not called for any legislative special elections this year. All Missouri House of Representatives districts will be up for regular election on Nov. 8. 

In April, there were no irregular officeholder transitions in Missouri for offices within Ballotpedia’s coverage scope. This includes the resignation, death, appointment, or winning of a special election in positions such as a state executive office, a seat in the General Assembly, or a non-district judgeship. 

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Two Democratic incumbents to face each other in Missouri House of Representatives 73rd District primary

Missouri state Representatives Mike Person (D) and Raychel Proudie (D) are both running in House District 73 in this year’s Aug. 2 primary. The two incumbents are competing in the same district due to redistricting. Person was elected to the Missouri House of Representatives in 2020 and currently represents District 74. Proudie was elected in 2019 and currently represents District 73. Kevin McConnel (L) also qualified in this district and will face the Democratic primary winner in the Nov. 8 general election.

All 163 seats in the Missouri House of Representatives and even-numbered districts in the state Senate are up for election this year, which is 91% of all legislative seats. Ninety-seven (60%) House districts have Democratic candidates and 12 (71%) Senate districts have Democratic candidates.

Seventeen Democratic incumbents are running uncontested for seats in the Missouri House of Representatives, which is 10% of House races. Twenty-two Democratic state House incumbents have at least one challenger. The two Democratic incumbents running for re-election in the state Senate are unopposed in the primary and have only Republican challengers. There are five districts currently held by a Democrat that will not have an incumbent running. 

Fourteen races across both chambers have more than one Democratic candidate. Twelve races in the House are contested and two in the Senate. 

Missouri is one of 23 Republican state government trifectas, meaning that the Republican Party controls the office of governor and both chambers of the General Assembly. Republicans currently have a 24-10 Republican majority in the state Senate and a 108-49 majority in the state House of Representatives. 

The candidate filing deadline for this year’s elections in Missouri was on March 29. Missouri is one of 46 states holding legislative elections in 2022. The Democratic primary for all districts in the Missouri General Assembly is on Aug. 2.

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23% of Missouri’s 2022 legislative races have uncontested Republican incumbents

In 2022, 41 Republican incumbents are running without opposition for the Missouri General Assembly, which represents 23% of the state’s legislative races. Forty of these incumbents are in the House of Representatives and one is in the state Senate.  

Thirty-nine Republican incumbents in the state House and six incuments in the Senate have at least one challenger. A total of 38 districts in both chambers do not have an incumbent running. 

Fifty-seven legislative races have more than one Republican candidate. Forty-five of these contested elections are in the House are and 12 are in the Senate. 

All 163 seats in the Missouri House of Representatives are up for election and the even-numbered districts in the state Senate are up for election—91% of all legislative seats. One hundred and thirty five—or 83% of House districts have Republican candidates as do all 17 Senate districts.

Missouri is one of 23 Republican state government trifectas in the U.S. The Republican Party controls the office of governor and both chambers of the General Assembly. There is a 24-10 Republican majority in the Senate and a 108-49 majority in the House. 

The candidate filing deadline for this year’s elections in Missouri was on March 29. Missouri is one of 46 states holding legislativeelections in 2022. The Republican primary for all districts in the Missouri General Assembly is on Aug. 2. 

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