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Former LAUSD board member Jackie Goldberg wins special election for District 5 LAUSD seat

Former Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD) board member Jackie Goldberg defeated former vice president of the Board of Public Works Commissioners Heather Repenning in a runoff election for the District 5 seat on the LAUSD Board of Education in California Tuesday night. Goldberg received 72 percent of the vote to Repenning’s 28 percent, according to unofficial results.
 
The district’s elections in 2017 flipped the LAUSD board from a 4-3 majority of members supported by United Teachers Los Angeles (UTLA) to a 4-3 majority of members supported by the California Charter Schools Association (CCSA). Former District 5 member Ref Rodriguez, who resigned in 2018 and whose seat was up for election, was a member of the latter group. Goldberg’s election returns the board to a majority of UTLA-backed members.
 
LAUSD is the second-largest school district in the United States and had 224 independently operated charter schools in 2017, more than any other school district in the nation.
 
In 2019, UTLA endorsed Goldberg, and the CCSA did not endorse a candidate. Both Goldberg and Repenning said they support holding charter schools to the same standards as public schools, but they differed in the degree of emphasis they placed on charter school policy and other issues in their campaigns. Goldberg made charter school accountability a key plank of her campaign. Repenning described herself as a coalition builder and emphasized other issues.
 
In addition to UTLA, Goldberg’s endorsers included U.S. Rep. Maxine Waters (D) and the Los Angeles chapter of the Democratic Socialists of America. Repenning received endorsements from the Service Employees International Union (SEIU) Local 99, Mayor Eric Garcetti (D), and the Los Angeles Times editorial board, among others.
 
 


May fundraising reports: Justus raises twice as much as Lucas’ in KC mayoral election

In Kansas City, Missouri’s, mayoral election, Jolie Justus raised twice as much as fellow city council member Quinton Lucas as of May 9. Reports filed 40 days out from the election showed Justus had raised $1.02 million compared to $497,000 raised by Lucas. Justus had also spent $755,000 to Lucas’ $351,000.
 
The only polling released in the general election shows Lucas with a lead, however. A Remington Research poll conducted in mid-April gave Lucas a 38-31 edge, with 31 percent of respondents undecided and a 4 percent margin of error.
 
The general election will take place on June 18. Lucas and Justus advanced from a field of 11 candidates on April 2. In that contest, Justus received 22.8 percent of the vote and Lucas received 18.4 percent. The winner of the general election will succeed term-limited Mayor Sly James (D).
 
Thirty-one mayoral elections in the 100 largest cities are being held in 2019. In 20 of those cities, the pre-election incumbent is Democratic. Seven pre-election incumbents are Republican, three are independent, and the affiliation of one is unknown. Justus served as a Democratic state senator, while Lucas’ party affiliation is not publicly known.


Three Select Board members retained in Maine recall

An election took place on May 9, 2019, in Ogunquit, Maine, in an attempt to recall three members of the town’s Select Board. Board Chairman Charles Waite, Selectwoman Madeline Mooney, and Selectman Bob Winn all retained their seats. They were retained with 51.75%, 51.61%, and 55.53% of the vote, respectively.
 
Recall organizers began the recall process after the three board members voted last October to uphold the termination of the town’s former fire chief, Mark O’Brien. Waite, Mooney, and Winn filed a lawsuit to prevent the recall effort from going to a vote, but York County Superior Court Judge John O’Neil lifted a temporary stay and permitted the election to move forward.
 
Recall elections for local elected officials are permitted in some—but not all—jurisdictions in Maine. These laws are documented in local charters and ordinances in cities and towns throughout the state. A total of 39 states have provisions allowing for recall of elected officials at the state or local level.
 
So far, Ballotpedia has identified 41 recall efforts taking place in 2019. This includes six recalls for state legislators, one for a state executive, seven for school board members, one at the county level, 23 at the city level, and three for special districts.
 


LAUSD special runoff election is Tuesday

Former LAUSD board member Jackie Goldberg and former vice president of the Board of Public Works Commissioners Heather Repenning face each other in a runoff election for the District 5 seat on the Los Angeles Unified School District Board of Education in California next Tuesday.
 
In recent years, LAUSD elections have been characterized by divisions between union-backed candidates and charter school group-backed candidates. LAUSD (the second-largest district in the U.S.) had 224 independently operated charter schools in 2017, more than any other school district in the nation.
 
School board elections in 2017 flipped the LAUSD board from a 4-3 majority of members supported by United Teachers Los Angeles (UTLA) to a 4-3 majority of members supported by the California Charter Schools Association (CCSA). Former District 5 member Ref Rodriguez, who resigned in 2018, was a member of the latter group. His resignation left a 3-3 split.
 
In the 2019 special election, UTLA endorsed Jackie Goldberg, and the CCSA has not endorsed. Both Goldberg and Repenning say they support holding charter schools to the same standards as public schools. But they differ in the degree of emphasis they place on charter school policy and other issues in their campaigns. Goldberg has made charter school accountability a key plank of her campaign. Repenning has described herself as a coalition builder and has emphasized other issues.
 
Along with UTLA, Goldberg has been endorsed by U.S. Rep. Maxine Waters (D) and the Los Angeles chapter of the Democratic Socialists of America. Repenning’s backers include the Service Employees International Union Local 99, Mayor Eric Garcetti (D), and the Los Angeles Times editorial board.
 
The special election has drawn $2.8 million in satellite spending. A teacher’s union-sponsored satellite group has spent $1.3 million in support of Goldberg and an SIEU Local 99 group has spent $875,000 supporting Repenning.
 


Two advance to June runoff in San Antonio mayor race

The city of San Antonio held nonpartisan general elections for mayor on Saturday. None of the nine mayoral candidates, including incumbent Ron Nirenberg, won at least 50 percent of the vote in the election. As a result, the top two vote recipients—Nirenberg (49,297 votes) and challenger Greg Brockhouse (46,129 votes)—advanced to a general runoff election on June 8. Nirenberg was first elected as mayor in 2017, and he is running for a second term. The filing deadline to run for office was February 15.
 
Ballotpedia also covered elections for all 10 seats on the San Antonio City Council on Saturday. The races in Districts 2, 4, and 6 advanced to a June runoff election, while the remaining seven districts were won outright in the general election.
 
Thirty-one mayoral elections in the nation’s 100 largest cities are being held in 2019. In 20 of those cities, the incumbent was Democratic at the start of 2019. Seven incumbents were Republican, three were independent, and the affiliation of one was unknown. As of May 2019, one partisan change has taken place. Voters in Phoenix, Arizona, elected Kate Gallego (D) in a nonpartisan mayoral runoff election on March 12, 2019. Gallego succeeded Thelda Williams, a Republican.
 
San Antonio is the second-largest city in Texas and the eighth-largest city in the U.S. by population.
 


Seven of 16 Denver races head to June 4 runoff; others decided outright in general election

Nearly half of the city offices that were on the ballot in Denver’s May 7 general election are heading to a runoff election on June 4. The District 1, 3, 5, 9, and 10 seats on the city council as well as the offices of mayor and clerk and recorder will be decided in the runoff election since no candidate received a majority of votes in the general election.
 
Incumbent Michael Hancock and Jamie Giellis received the most votes in the mayoral race, defeating eight other candidates (including four write-ins) to advance to the runoff. The general election for the open clerk and recorder position had three candidates. Paul López and Peg Perl defeated Sarah McCarthy to advance to the runoff.
 
The five city council seats advancing to runoff elections all had at least four candidates running in the general election. The District 5, 9, and 10 incumbents all moved on to the runoff. No incumbents ran for the District 1 and 3 seats.
 
In the race for city auditor, incumbent Tim O’Brien ran unopposed and won re-election outright in the general election. Incumbents also won re-election to all eight city council seats that did not advance to a runoff. Three won re-election unopposed, while the others defeated between one and six opponents each to win another term on the council.
 


Judicial filing deadline passes in Hamilton County, Ohio

Candidates had until May 6 to file for seven seats on the Hamilton County Municipal Court in Ohio. Twelve candidates, including six incumbents, filed by the deadline. Judges will be elected in nonpartisan general elections on November 5.
 
District 6 Judge Richard Bernat did not file for re-election. Three candidates are competing for his open seat. District 1 Judge Dwane Mallory, District 3 Judge Ted Berry, and District 7 Judge Gwen Bender are all unopposed in the general election. In the three other races on the ballot, District 2 Judge Tyrone Yates, District 4 Judge Josh Berkowitz, and District 5 Judge Heather Russell will all face off against one challenger in the general election.
 
The county court is located in the city of Cincinnati and has jurisdiction over municipal ordinance violations. The court is made up of 14 judges who are elected to six-year terms.
 
In 2019, Ballotpedia is covering elections in 23 counties across 11 states. In addition to the counties, Ballotpedia is also covering elections in 59 of America’s 100 largest cities by population.
 


Incumbent Michael Hancock and urban development consultant Jamie Giellis advance to runoff in Denver mayoral election

Incumbent Michael Hancock and former River North Art District President Jamie Giellis advanced to a June 4 runoff for mayor of Denver. Hancock led with 39.1% of the vote to Giellis’ 25.7%. The third-place candidate, criminal justice professor Lisa Calderón, had 17.4%. A candidate must receive more than 50% of the vote in order to avoid a runoff between the top two finishers.
 
The central issue in the election was Denver’s approach to housing and development following a decade of rapid population growth. Hancock argued that he had expanded the city’s economy since taking office in 2011 and said his plan for his third term included creating a municipal department of transportation and approving a 20-year development master plan. Giellis, a former urban management consultant and president of Denver’s River North Art District, said that she would expand the role that local residents play in approving development plans and would spend $1 billion to expand access to housing in the city.
 
Although the election is officially nonpartisan, Hancock and Giellis are both members of the Democratic Party.
 


Baird wins Lincoln, Nebraska, mayoral election

Lincoln, Nebraska, held general elections for mayor, city council, and one seat on its airport authority on May 7, 2019. City elections are officially nonpartisan and political parties do not appear on the ballot, but candidates have the option to file with political parties. Of the six seats up for election, four were won by Democrats, one by a Republican, and one by a nonpartisan candidate.
 
Incumbent Mayor Chris Beutler (D) could not run for re-election due to term limits. At-large city council member Leirion Gaylor Baird (D) defeated District 1 city council member Cyndi Lamm (R) in the general election. Baird received 54.4% of the vote to Lamm’s 45.4% of the vote. They faced three other candidates (one Democrat and two nonpartisan candidates) in the officially nonpartisan primary.
 
The Lincoln city council is made up of four by-district seats and three at-large seats. All four by-district seats were on the ballot. District 3 council member Jane Raybould (D) was the only incumbent to seek re-election. She won another term on the board with 67.8% of the vote. Newcomers James Michael Bowers (D-District 1), Richard Meginnis (R-District 2), and Tammy Ward (D-District 4) all won terms on the board. The last time these seats were on the ballot was in 2015. That year, two Democratic candidates and two Republican candidates were elected.
 
One of five seats on the Lincoln Airport Authority was also on the ballot. Incumbent Nick Cusick (nonpartisan) received 66.1% of the vote to challenger Aurang Zeb’s (D) 33.1% of the vote.
 
Lincoln is the second-largest city in Nebraska and the 71st-largest city in the U.S. by population.
 


No incumbents defeated in Fort Wayne primary, incumbent mayor advances with 86% of the vote

Fort Wayne, Indiana, held partisan primaries for mayor, city clerk, and all nine city council seats on May 7, 2019. Nine incumbents filed for re-election and all advanced to the general election on November 5, 2019.
 
Current Mayor Tom Henry (D) defeated two challengers in the Democratic primary, Gina Burgess and Tommy Schrader, receiving 86.2% of the vote. Henry will face Tim Smith (R) in the general election. Smith received 56.4% of the vote in the Republican primary. He faced candidates John Crawford and David Roach.
 
The Fort Wayne City Clerk Democratic and Republican primary elections both featured unopposed candidates. Incumbent Lana Keesling is facing Katie Zuber in the general election.
 
A total of 25 candidates filed for the nine city council seats. Seven incumbents are seeking another term on the board; one at-large incumbent and the District 6 incumbent did not file for re-election. District 1 incumbent Paul Ensley (R) and District 2 incumbent Russ Jehl (R) did not face challengers in the primary and are unopposed in the general election. District 5 incumbent Geoff Paddock (D) was also unopposed in the primary but faces Taylor Vanover (R) in the general. District 6 candidate Sharon Tucker (D) is the last unopposed candidate in the general election. She defeated two other candidates in the Democratic primary. The remaining six races are all contested.
 
Independent candidates have until July 1 to file for election. Fort Wayne is the second-largest city in Indiana and the 75th-largest city in the U.S. by population.
 


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