Tag2020 presidential coverage

Biden gains cash advantage over Trump for first time in 2020 presidential election cycle

Joe Biden outraised Donald Trump by $150 million according to campaign finance reports filed with the Federal Election Commission on September 20.

The Biden campaign raised $212 million in August, a percentage difference of 109% from the Trump campaign’s $62 million. Biden’s campaign spent $130 million to Trump’s $61 million. As of August 31, the Biden campaign had $60 million more in cash on hand than the Trump campaign ($181 million to $121 million), marking the first time his campaign has held a cash advantage over Trump. Biden also leads Trump in overall fundraising for the first time, cumulatively raising $541 million to Trump’s $476 million.

Biden’s campaign more than quadrupled its receipts from July in August ($50 million to $212 million), while Trump’s receipts declined by $10 million ($72 million to $62 million).

Biden’s $541 million in overall fundraising is the second-highest figure for any presidential candidate at this point in the past four cycles. The only candidate to have outraised him was Barack Obama (D), who had raised $598 million in inflation-adjusted funds at this point in 2008. Biden’s cash-on-hand total of $181 million is the highest of any candidate’s at this point in the election cycle, topping Trump’s $121 million this year and Obama’s $102 million in inflation-adjusted cash on hand in September 2012.

Biden and Trump’s combined $1 billion in fundraising is the highest across the four most recent election cycles. At this point in the 2008 campaign, Barack Obama and John McCain (R) had raised a combined inflation-adjusted $908 million.

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Weekly Presidential News Briefing: September 18, 2020

Every weekday, Ballotpedia tracks the news, events, and results of the 2020 presidential election.

Here’s the latest from the campaign trail.


Candidates by the Numbers

The Cook Political Report updated its race ratings on September 17, 2020:

  • Arizona moved from Toss Up to Leans Democratic.

Notable Quotes of the Day“While debates are often seen as gamechangers, it’s often the period after the conventions are in the rearview mirror and before the debates when the political environment becomes clear.

Take a look at all the election cycles since 1972. Specifically, look at where the national polling averages stood 35 days before the election (i.e. the day of the first 2020 general debate). The polls have been surprisingly predictive.

There has just been about a 3 point difference between where the polling average stood 35 days before the election and the eventual result. To put that into context, there has been about a 2 point difference between the polling averages and the results on the final day of the election.”

Harry Enten, CNN


“[Trump’s approval rating] is rising, and at a fairly steady clip. He isn’t at the 46% threshold yet, and it’s likely he’ll level off in the next few weeks, but that isn’t a given.

This is, frankly, a much better position for Trump to be in than the two most recent presidents who lost their reelection bids. President George H.W. Bush’s job approval was consistently in the mid-to-high 30s post-Labor Day, while Jimmy Carter’s job approval was in the low 30s. Trump’s job approval isn’t good, but it is closer to that of recent presidents who have won than to recent presidents who have lost.

Finally, in this vein, one of the more perplexing features of 2020 is that Trump’s job approval has outpaced his vote share in head-to-head polls. Who are these people who approve of the job he is doing but don’t plan on voting for him? My guess is they are eventual Trump voters, who either won’t admit to themselves or to the pollster that they are going to vote for him. Perhaps Trump will lose a substantial number of people who approve of the job he is doing, but I’m not sure I’d bet on it.

Sean Trende, senior elections analyst for RealClearPolitics


Week in Review

Biden on the campaign trail

  • On Monday, Joe Biden discussed climate change and the economy during an event in Delaware.
  • On Tuesday, Biden met with veterans in Tampa and attended a Hispanic Heritage Month event in Kissimmee.
  • On Wednesday, Biden delivered remarks about the coronavirus pandemic in Delaware.
  • On Thursday, Biden participated in a town hall in Scranton, Pennsylvania.
  • On Friday, Biden campaigned in northern Minnesota.
Trump on the campaign trail

  • On Sunday, Donald Trump held his first indoor rally in three months in Nevada.
  • On Monday, Trump traveled to California to speak with local and federal officials about the wildfires across the state.
  • On Tuesday, Trump traveled to Philadelphia to participate in an ABC News town hall.
  • On Wednesday, Trump remained in Washington, D.C.
  • On Thursday, Trump held a campaign rally in Mosinee, Wisconsin.
  • On Friday, Trump campaigned in northern Minnesota.

Adelson, Bloomberg plan to boost presidential candidates

Former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg committed at least $100 million to help Joe Biden’s campaign. The spending will primarily be focused on television and digital advertising.

On Thursday, the Democratic-aligned Priorities USA announced that it was using $5.4 million from Bloomberg to air ads focused on the coronavirus pandemic in 10 media markets in Florida.

CNBC reported that casino executive Sheldon Adelson is expected to contribute $20 million to $50 million to Preserve America, the Republican National Committee, and other Republican groups to support Donald Trump’s campaign.

Battleground ads focus on pandemic, healthcare, Black voters, and economy

The Joe Biden campaign began airing new ads in battleground states on Wednesday focused on healthcare and the Affordable Care Act. The campaign is spending $65 million on television, radio, and print advertising this week.

Other pro-Biden and anti-Trump ads released this week include:

  • Spanish-language ads in Florida about the economy, coronavirus pandemic, and the Trump administration’s response to Hurricane Maria
  • Two new ads focused on manufacturing and union jobs in Michigan, North Carolina, Ohio, Wisconsin, and Pennsylvania
  • A series of digital and television ads aimed at Black voters in Florida, Michigan, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin

Donald Trump launched an ad buy of more than $10 million focused on the economy. The ads will run nationwide and in Arizona, Pennsylvania, North Carolina, Florida, Georgia, Michigan, Minnesota, and Wisconsin.

Other pro-Trump and anti-Biden ads released this week include:

  • An ad that highlights the Israel-United Arab Emirates normalization agreement signed this week set to air nationwide and in Florida and Philadelphia
  • A new $9.7 million ad campaign from CatholicVote attacking Biden for his position on abortion in Michigan and Pennsylvania

Jorgensen qualifies for the ballot in all 50 states and Washington, D.C.

The Jo Jorgensen campaign announced on Monday that it had met ballot access requirements in all 50 states and Washington, D.C. Jorgensen is the fifth Libertarian candidate to reach this milestone following candidates in 1980, 1992, 1996, and 2016.

Hawkins, West battle for ballot access in the courts

An Idaho court ruled on Wednesday that Kanye West could remain on the ballot as an independent presidential candidate despite being registered to vote in Wyoming as a Republican.

A Wisconsin judge upheld a decision by the state elections commission to block West from the ballot because an aide submitted the paperwork after the 5 p.m. filing deadline.

Wisconsin and Pennsylvania judges ruled that Howie Hawkins would not appear on those state’s ballots.

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Candidates on the Issues


What we’re reading this week

Flashback: September 14-18, 2016

  • September 14, 2016: Gary Johnson qualified for the ballot in all 50 states.
  • September 15, 2016: Donald Trump shared the results of a medical physical written by Dr. Harold Bernsein.
  • September 16, 2016: The country’s largest law enforcement union, the National Fraternal Order of Police, endorsed Donald Trump.
  • September 17, 2016: Bernie Sanders campaigned at Kent State University in Ohio on behalf of Hillary Clinton.
  • September 18, 2016: The Morning Call profiled Donald Trump’s campaign in Pennsylvania coal country.


Weekly Presidential News Briefing: September 11, 2020

Candidates by the Numbers

The Cook Political Report updated its race ratings on September 10, 2020:

  • Florida moved from Leans Democratic to Toss Up.
  • Nevada moved from Likely Democratic to Leans Democratic.

Sabato’s Crystal Ball also updated its race ratings on September 10, 2020:

  • Nebraska’s 2nd Congressional District moved from Toss Up to Leans Democratic. Nebraska and Maine are the only states to appoint individual electors based on the popular vote statewide and in each congressional district.

Notable Quotes of the Day “One of the reasons Mr. Biden was able to wipe away Mr. Trump’s early cash edge was that he sharply contained costs with a minimalistic campaign during the pandemic’s worst months. Trump officials derisively dismissed it as his ‘basement’ strategy, but from that basement Mr. Biden fully embraced Zoom fund-raisers, with top donors asked to give as much as $720,000.

These virtual events typically took less than 90 minutes of the candidate’s time, could raise millions of dollars and cost almost nothing. Mr. Trump has almost entirely refused to hold such fund-raisers. Aides say he doesn’t like them.”

– Shane Goldmacher and Maggie HabermanThe New York Times


“I would say this about an October surprise. I mean, given this year, it’d be unlikely that there wouldn’t be a major turn of events between now and the election. But there will be no surprise that has to do with Trump. It’s just not possible. Everything that anybody could possibly think about him, good or bad, they already think. Like, when you think about a bell curve, he’s already at the tails. So, any surprise that happens will be a surprise around Biden-Harris.”

– Beth Hansen, former campaign manager for John Kasich


Week in Review

Biden, Trump respond to Woodward interview on coronavirus

In a recorded interview with journalist Bob Woodward from February 2020 released on Wednesday, Donald Trump discussed the dangers of the coronavirus. He said it was deadlier than the flu and a delicate issue because it was airborne. In another interview about the coronavirus from March 2020, Trump said, “I wanted to always play it down. I still like playing it down because I don’t want to create a panic.”

Joe Biden addressed Trump’s comments during an event in Michigan, saying, “He had the information. He knew how dangerous it was. And while this deadly disease ripped through our nation, he failed to do his job on purpose. It was a life-and-death betrayal of the American people.”

Trump defended his comments in a Fox News interview on Wednesday. He said, “I’m the leader of the country, I can’t be jumping up and down and scaring people. I don’t want to scare people. I want people not to panic, and that’s exactly what I did.”

Trump, RNC raise $210 million in August, trail Biden and DNC’s fundraising total

Donald Trump and the Republican National Committee raised $210 million in August, setting a record for the campaign. They trailed Joe Biden and the Democratic National Committee’s fundraising total for the month by $154 million.

Biden and the DNC raised $365 million in August, bypassing Barack Obama’s record $193 million monthly total from September 2008.

Maine ballots will use ranked-choice voting for presidential election

On Tuesday, the Maine Supreme Court stayed a lower court’s decision regarding a veto referendum on ranked choice voting in the state, effectively putting its inclusion on the ballot on hold. As a result, Maine Secretary of State Matthw Dunlap said he would proceed with printing ballots that included ranked choice voting for the presidential race.

Trump releases list of potential Supreme Court nominees

Donald Trump released a list of 20 potential Supreme Court nominees on Wednesday. The list includes Sens. Tom Cotton (Ark.), Ted Cruz (Texas), and Josh Hawley (Mo.), and five current or former members of his administration.

Satellite groups release ads focused on military families, protests

The Democratic-aligned group American Bridge launched a $4 million television and radio ad campaign focused on military families and rural voters in Michigan, Wisconsin, and Pennsylvania. The ad highlights negative comments Donald Trump allegedly made about dead U.S. soldiers.

The pro-Trump America First Action announced a $22 million ad buy in Florida, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin, and Ohio that will run until Election Day. The series of ads will focus on protests in Wisconsin and other states, Biden’s mental acuity, and calls to defund the police.

Where the candidates were this week

Joe Biden spoke at a virtual town hall inside the Pennsylvania American Federation of Labor and Congress Industrial Organizations headquarters in Harrisburg on Monday.

He discussed American manufacturing in Warren, Michigan, on Wednesday. Biden last visited the state in March.

On Friday, Biden commemorated September 11 at the Flight 93 National Memorial in Shanksville, Pennsylvania. He also attended a ceremony at the 9/11 Memorial & Museum in New York City.

Donald Trump campaigned in Jupiter, Florida, on Tuesday, where he discussed conservation and environmental protection in the Everglades. He also held a rally in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, on the same day.

On Thursday, Trump spoke at the MBS International Airport in Saginaw County, Michigan. He also traveled to Shanksville, Pennsylvania, to commemorate September 11 at the Flight 93 National Memorial on Friday.

Trump is expected to campaign in Nevada over the weekend. He originally planned to hold rallies at airport hangars in Reno and Las Vegas, but the events were canceled due to COVID-19 restrictions.

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Candidates on the Issues


What we’re reading

Flashback: September 8-11, 2016

  • September 8, 2016: Donald Trump unveiled his education proposal, including designating $20 billion for federal school choice grants.
  • September 9, 2016: Mike Pence released a decade of his tax filings. In 2015, Pence and his wife had a reported adjusted gross income of $113,026.
  • September 10, 2016: TIME reported that Hillary Clinton said at a fundraiser, “You could put half of Trump’s supporters into what I call the basket of deplorables.”
  • September 11, 2016: Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump both visited Ground Zero in New York City to commemorate September 11.


Weekly Presidential News Briefing: August 28th, 2020

Every weekday, Ballotpedia tracks the news, events, and results of the 2020 presidential election.

Here’s the latest from the campaign trail.

Candidates by the Numbers

Notable Quotes of the Day

“Biden is not the first politician, upon entering the general election phase of the campaign, to pivot towards the center and try to build a broad coalition. And Trump is not the first politician to wield social issues designed to drive wedges through the electorate and complicate attempts by opponents to build a broad coalition.

What’s unusual is seeing these two strategies deployed with such force at the same time. Trump has done so little over the course of his 3½ years as president to broaden his appeal that he has little choice but to believe his base can once again thread the Electoral College needle. Biden defied conventional wisdom by talking as much as he did about bipartisanship while winning a partisan primary, so he has every reason to lean in even harder now. The result is a general election where both candidates are fighting over Republican and right-leaning independent voters.

– Bill ScherRealClearPolitics

“Political conventions are usually as much about a party’s next nominee as they are about its current flag-bearer. The Republican convention on Monday night featured a glimpse of the coming fight to define the post-Trump world: Will it look and sound more like Donald Trump Jr. or Nikki Haley? …

With these speeches from Haley and Don Jr. Monday we are starting to see the GOP divide into two halves: one that tries to straddle the pre- and post-Trump GOP, and another that fully embraces undiluted Trumpism. The quality of the messenger matters a great deal. Maybe it’s only Donald Trump himself who can pull off this act again. But over the last five years the straddlers in the GOP have not fared well against those who wholeheartedly embrace what Trump has wrought.”

– Ryan LizzaPolitico

Week in Review

Republican National Convention concludes with Trump acceptance speech

The Republican National Convention (RNC) concluded on Thursday after four days of virtual speeches and limited in-person events in Charlotte, North Carolina.

Each night of the convention had a different theme: Land of Heroes, Land of Promise, Land of Opportunity, and Land of Greatness. Featured speakers included former U.N. Ambassador Nikki Haley, Sen. Tim Scott (S.C.), First Lady Melania Trump, Vice President Mike Pence, and Ivanka Trump.

Donald Trump formally accepted the Republican presidential nomination from the White House grounds on Thursday. He highlighted his first-term accomplishments and discussed the economy, coronavirus pandemic, protests, and public safety. Trump also attacked Biden, calling him “a Trojan horse for socialism.”

The RNC also voted on August 22 to extend the party’s 2016 platform to 2024 because “it did not want a small contingent of delegates formulating a new platform without the breadth of perspectives within the ever-growing Republican movement.” The committee’s resolution also said that the Republican Party would continue to support Trump’s America First agenda.

Biden and allies counter Republican convention with ads

The Joe Biden campaign launched several ads this week in national and battleground state markets, including a two-minute ad during the final night of the Republican National Convention. The ad, which discusses Biden’s vision for the country and does not mention Donald Trump, will continue to run in battleground states over the weekend.

The campaign also released an ad in Ohio and North Carolina focused on Trump’s call to boycott Goodyear tires because one of the company’s factories banned MAGA hats. Three Spanish-language and bilingual ads about the coronavirus pandemic and healthcare are also airing in Arizona and Florida.

The Lincoln Project launched a $4 million ad campaign in Arizona, Florida, Texas, North Carolina, Michigan, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin. The campaign focuses on the death toll from the coronavirus pandemic. The Democratic-aligned group, American Bridge, released a digital ad featuring Trump’s former personal attorney, Michael Cohen, saying Trump could not be trusted.

Ranked-choice voting will not be used in Maine for presidential election

On Monday, a Maine Superior Court judge ruled that a veto referendum on ranked-choice voting (RCV) for presidential primaries and general elections would appear on the November ballot. Maine was set to use RCV for the presidential election in November. Since the veto referendum has qualified for the ballot, however, the law is now suspended until voters decide to either uphold or repeal it. Therefore, RCV will not be used to elect the president in Maine this year.

West files a lawsuit for ballot access in Ohio

Kanye West filed a lawsuit on Wednesday against Ohio Secretary of State Frank LaRose (R) seeking to be placed on Ohio’s ballot after LaRose’s office disqualified his petition, saying there were mismatched signatures in his paperwork.

Republican staffers and officials endorse Biden

Twenty-seven Republican former members of Congress, including former Sens. Jeff Flake (Ariz.), Gordon Humphrey (N.H.), and John Warner (Va.), announced their support for Joe Biden on Monday.

Thirty-four former 2012 Romney presidential campaign staffers, calling themselves Romney Alumni for Biden, also signed an open letter backing Biden’s campaign. Another group, 43 Alumni for Biden shared a list of nearly 300 former Bush administration and campaign officials who have endorsed Biden.

More than 100 former John McCain congressional and campaign staffers also endorsed Biden on Thursday.

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What We’re Reading

Flashback: August 24th – 28th, 2016

  • August 24, 2016: Purple PAC, a group supporting Libertarian nominee Gary Johnson, launched a $1 million national ad buy.
  • August 25, 2016: Jill Stein discussed NATO, Russia, Syria, and climate change in an interview with the editorial board of The Washington Post.
  • August 26, 2016: The Trump campaign hired Bill Stepien as national field director.
  • August 27, 2016: The Clinton campaign launched an ad focused on Donald Trump’s statements about and to Black voters.
  • August 28, 2016: Jake Tapper interviewed Mike Pence about immigration on CNN’s State of the Union.


Upcoming filing deadlines for independent presidential candidates from August 24 to August 30

Although there is no formal, national deadline to file to run for president of the United States, independent presidential candidates must keep a close eye on the election calendar as each state has its own filing requirements and deadline to qualify to appear on the general election ballot.

These requirements may include submitting a petition with a certain number of signatures or paying a filing fee.

Filing deadlines for independent presidential candidates have already passed in 39 states.

In the week of August 24, there are four filing deadlines the following week:
• Idaho (August 24)
• Massachusetts (August 25)
• Oregon (August 25)

• Wyoming (August 25)

The final seven filing deadlines will pass in the week of August 31.

The following chart shows how many days are left until each remaining state’s filing deadline passes:

 

https://app.datawrapper.de/chart/9bWCG/publish



Upcoming filing deadlines for independent presidential candidates from August 17 to August 23

Although there is no formal, national deadline to file to run for president of the United States, independent presidential candidates must keep a close eye on the election calendar as each state has its own filing requirements and deadline to qualify to appear on the general election ballot.

These requirements may include submitting a petition with a certain number of signatures or paying a filing fee.

Filing deadlines for independent presidential candidates have already passed in 32 states.

In the week of August 17, there are seven filing deadlines:

• Utah (August 17)
• Minnesota (August 18)
• Montana (August 19)
• Alabama (August 20)
• Tennessee (August 20)
• Louisiana (August 21)

• Virginia (August 21)

There are four filing deadlines the following week.

• Idaho (August 24)
• Massachusetts (August 25)
• Oregon (August 25)

• Wyoming (August 25)

The following chart shows how many days are left until each remaining state’s filing deadline passes:

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Biden picks Harris as vice presidential running mate

Presumptive 2020 Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden named U.S. Sen. Kamala Harris (D-Calif.) as his running mate on Tuesday.

“I have the great honor to announce that I’ve picked @KamalaHarris — a fearless fighter for the little guy, and one of the country’s finest public servants — as my running mate,” Biden tweeted. “Back when Kamala was Attorney General, she worked closely with Beau. I watched as they took on the big banks, lifted up working people, and protected women and kids from abuse. I was proud then, and I’m proud now to have her as my partner in this campaign.”

Harris, who suspended her presidential campaign in December 2019, is the first Black woman on a major party’s ticket.

The Trump campaign responded to Biden’s pick with the following statement: “Joe Biden is no moderate, and with Harris as his ‘political living will,’ he is surrendering control of our nation to the radical mob with promises to raise taxes, cut police funding, kill energy jobs, open our borders, and appease socialist dictators.”

The Democratic National Convention begins next week on August 17. The Republican National Convention will be held the following week, starting on August 24.



Upcoming filing deadlines for independent presidential candidates from August 8 to August 14

Although there is no formal, national deadline to file to run for president of the United States, independent presidential candidates must keep a close eye on the election calendar as each state has its own filing requirements and deadline to qualify to appear on the general election ballot.

These requirements may include submitting a petition with a certain number of signatures or paying a filing fee.

Filing deadlines for independent presidential candidates have already passed in 29 states.

In the week of August 10, there are three filing deadlines:

• Georgia (August 14)
• Iowa (August 14)

• Nevada (August 14)

There are seven filing deadlines the following week.

• Utah (August 17)
• Minnesota (August 18)
• Montana (August 19)
• Alabama (August 20)
• Tennessee (August 20)
• Louisiana (August 21)

• Virginia (August 21)

The following chart shows how many days are left until each remaining state’s filing deadline passes:

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Biden outraised Trump by $8 million, closed cash-on-hand gap in June

Joe Biden outraised Donald Trump by $8 million and closed the cash-on-hand gap in June, according to campaign finance reports filed with the Federal Election Commission on July 20.

The Biden campaign raised $63.4 million in June, a percentage difference of 13.8% from the Trump campaign’s $55.2 million. Trump’s campaign spent $50.3 million compared to Biden’s $36.9 million. As of June, the Biden and Trump campaigns were nearly matched in cash on hand with $108.9 million and $113 million, respectively. Trump continues to lead Biden in overall fundraising since the beginning of 2017 ($342.7 million to $278.8 million).

Biden’s campaign raised 71% more in June than it did in May ($63.4 million versus $37 million), while Trump more than doubled his receipts ($24.9 million versus $55.2 million).

Trump’s $342.7 million in overall fundraising is the third-highest figure for any presidential candidate at this point in the past four cycles. The only candidate to have outraised him was Barack Obama (D), who had raised $444.3 million in inflation-adjusted funds at this point in 2008 and $358.2 million at this point in 2012. Trump’s cash-on-hand total of $113 million is the highest of any candidate’s at this point in the election cycle, topping Obama’s $112.2 million in inflation-adjusted cash-on-hand in July 2012.

Biden and Trump’s combined $621.6 million in fundraising is the second-highest combined total across the four most recent election cycles. At this point in the 2008 campaign, Barack Obama and John McCain (R) had raised a combined inflation-adjusted $634.1 million. Obama and Mitt Romney (R) had raised a combined $538.5 million in 2012, while Trump and Hillary Clinton (D) had raised a combined $384.1 million.

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Upcoming filing deadlines for independent presidential candidates from July 27 to August 2

Although there is no formal, national deadline to file to run for president of the United States, independent presidential candidates must keep a close eye on the election calendar as each state has its own filing requirements and deadline to qualify to appear on the general election ballot.

These requirements may include submitting a petition with a certain number of signatures or paying a filing fee.

Filing deadlines for independent presidential candidates have already passed in 10 states:

• Florida (July 15)
• Illinois (July 20)
• Indiana (June 30)
• Maine (July 25)
• Michigan (July 16)
• New Mexico (June 25)
• North Carolina (March 3)
• Oklahoma (July 15)
• South Carolina (July 15)

• Texas (May 11)

In the week of July 27, there are three filing deadlines:

• Missouri (July 27)
• New Jersey (July 27)

• New York (July 30)

There are 16 filing deadlines the following week.

The following chart shows how many days are left until each remaining state’s filing deadline passes:

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