Tag2020 presidential coverage

Federal judge orders New York State Board of Elections to reinstate Democratic presidential preference primary on June 23

On May 5, Judge Analisa Torres of the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York ordered the New York State Board of Elections to reinstate the Democratic presidential preference primary on June 23, 2020, which the board had previously canceled. The order was the result of a lawsuit filed on April 28 by Andrew Yang, a former candidate for the Democratic presidential nomination, and several candidates for New York’s delegation to the Democratic National Convention.

The New York State Board of Elections canceled the Democratic presidential preference primary on April 27, operating from a state law enacted that month that authorized the board of elections to remove candidates from ballots upon the suspension or termination of their campaigns. Senator Bernie Sanders (I) suspended his presidential campaign on April 8, making former Vice President Joe Biden (D) the presumptive Democratic nominee.

To date, 20 states and one territory have postponed state-level elections. For more information, click on the “learn more” button below.


Joe Biden outraises Donald Trump in March while Trump retains cash on hand advantage

Joe Biden outraised Donald Trump by more than three-to-one last month, while Trump had a nearly four-to-one advantage in cash on hand, according to campaign finance reports filed with the Federal Election Commission Monday.

The Biden campaign raised $46.7 million in March, 110% more than the Trump campaign’s $13.6 million. Biden’s campaign spent 109% more than Trump’s ($32.5 million to $9.6 million). As of March 31, the Trump campaign had 115% more cash on hand than the Biden campaign ($98.5 million to $26.4 million). Trump continues to lead Biden in overall fundraising since the beginning of 2017, having raised 58% more ($245.6 million to $134.8 million).

Trump’s $245.6 million in overall fundraising is the second-highest figure for any presidential candidate at this point in the past three elections. The only candidate to have out-raised Trump was Barack Obama (D), who had raised an inflation-adjusted $305.1 million as of April 2008. Trump’s cash-on-hand figure is also the second-highest during this time, bested only by Obama’s inflation-adjusted $119.7 million at this point in his re-election campaign.

Biden and Trump’s combined $380.4 million in fundraising is the second-highest combined total when compared to the past three election cycles. At this point in the 2008 campaign, Obama and John McCain (R) had raised a combined inflation-adjusted $409.1 million.



DNC outraises RNC for the first time in the 2020 election cycle

The Democratic National Committee (DNC) outraised the Republican National Committee (RNC) for the first time since October 2018 last month, according to April 2020 campaign finance reports filed with the FEC Monday.

The DNC raised $32.7 million and spent $11.0 million to the RNC’s $24.0 million in fundraising and $23.8 million in spending. So far in the 2020 cycle, the RNC has raised 73.9% more than the DNC ($318.6 million to $146.7 million). The RNC’s 73.9% fundraising advantage is down from 88.4% in March and 89.8% in February.

At this point in the 2016 campaign cycle (the most recent presidential cycle) the RNC had a smaller 44.5% fundraising advantage over the DNC ($137.9 million to $87.7 million).

The Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee (DSCC) raised $11.0 million and spent $6.1 million last month, while the National Republican Senatorial Committee (NRSC) raised $9.1 million and spent $6.9 million. So far in the 2020 cycle, the NRSC has raised 7.0% more than the DSCC ($98.0 million to $91.3 million). The NRSC’s 7.0% fundraising advantage is down from 10.1% in March and 8.4% in February.

On the House side, the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee (DCCC) raised $14.3 million and spent $6.2 million, while the National Republican Congressional Committee (NRCC) raised $11.6 million and spent $7.9 million. So far in the cycle, the DCCC has raised 30.0% more than the NRCC ($168.4 million to $124.5 million). The DCCC’s 30.0% fundraising advantage is down from 30.9% in March and 33.4% in February.

At this point in the 2018 campaign cycle, Democrats led in both Senate and House fundraising, although their advantage in the House was smaller than in this cycle. The DSCC had raised 20.8% more than the NRSC ($71.3 million to $57.9 million), while the DCCC had raised 18.4% more than the NRCC ($139.7 million to $116.2 million).

So far in the 2020 cycle, the RNC, NRSC, and NRCC have raised 28.4% more than the DNC, DSCC, and DCCC ($541.0 million to $406.5 million). The Republican fundraising advantage is down from 35.0% in March and 35.3% in February.

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Louisiana postpones presidential preference primary to July 11, 2020

Louisiana has postponed its presidential preference primary to July 11, 2020. This marks the second postponement of the primary, which was first postponed to June 20, 2020. The original date of the primary was April 4, 2020.

Louisiana joined Georgia and Puerto Rico in postponing its primaries a second time in response to the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. To date, 20 states and one territory have postponed state-level primary or special elections.

Ballotpedia is providing comprehensive coverage on how the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic is affecting America’s political and civic life. Our coverage includes how federal, state, and local governments are responding, and the effects those responses are having on campaigns and elections.


Wisconsin’s absentee ballot rejection rate averaged 1.14% for spring elections since 2012

Wisconsin voters went to the polls April 7 for the state’s annual spring election. This year, in addition to presidential primaries, a seat on the state Supreme Court and a ballot measure proposing an expansion of rights for victims of crime were on the ballot. Due to the coronavirus pandemic, the deadline for voters to return absentee ballots was extended from April 7 to April 13. Reporting of results was also delayed to that date.

Voters requested 1.29 million absentee ballots, the most requests since at least 2012. Between 2012 and 2019, an average of 118,445 absentee ballots were sent out in each Wisconsin spring election. The year where the most ballots were sent was 2016 with 247,052. The year with the least was 2014 with 67,917. An average of 82% of ballots were received in time to be counted, ranging from 92.22% in 2016 to 74.10% in 2019.

Each year, less than 2% of absentee ballots were rejected. The year with the most rejections was 2016 with 1,629, while the year with the greatest percentage of rejections was 2012 with 1.81%. Across all eight spring elections, an average of 1.14% of those ballots completed on time were rejected.

For an absentee ballot to be valid, Wisconsin law requires that the voter sign a certificate enclosed in the ballot envelope. A witness must be present for completion of the ballot and is also required to provide their signature. A ballot which does not meet these requirements may be rejected. A ballot is not considered to have been rejected if it was not delivered to the voter on time or if it was not returned on time. An absentee ballot is considered to have been cancelled rather than rejected if a voter is ruled ineligible or votes in-person.



Sanders suspends presidential campaign, Biden becomes presumptive Democratic nominee

Sen. Bernie Sanders (Vt.) suspended his presidential campaign on Wednesday. He said in a video statement to supporters, “I wish I could give you better news, but I think you know the truth. We are now some 300 delegates behind Vice President Biden and the path toward victory is virtually impossible.”

Biden has won an estimated 1,217 Democratic pledged delegates to Sanders’ 914. With a plurality of pledged delegates, Biden has become the presumptive Democratic nominee. To officially win the nomination, a candidate needs to secure 1,991 pledged delegates.

Sanders said, “I congratulate Joe Biden, a very decent man, who I will work with to move our progressive ideas forward. On a practical note, let me also say this, I will stay on the ballot in all remaining states and continue to gather delegates.”

Through these delegates, Sanders said he would “exert significant influence” over the party platform at the Democratic National Convention.

Originally scheduled to take place in July, the convention will be held the week of August 17 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. The event was postponed in response to the coronavirus pandemic.


Democrats postpone national convention until August

The Democratic Party postponed its presidential nominating convention to the week of August 17 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Organizers pushed back the event, which was originally scheduled for July 13-16, in response to the coronavirus pandemic.

“After a great deal of scenario planning and giving thought to how it is this event can have the greatest impact in the electoral process and the greatest impact in terms of what we can bring to Milwaukee, we felt the best decision, not knowing all the answers, was to delay this,” said convention chief executive Joe Solmones. “More than anything we continue to monitor the public health landscape.”

The entire primary landscape has shifted in recent weeks. Sixteen states and territories—representing 28% of all pledged delegates—are now holding their Democratic primary events in June.



Four presidential candidates raised a combined $80 million in February

Bernie Sanders led presidential candidates in fundraising in February 2020, according to financial reports filed with the Federal Election Commission Friday. Sanders raised $47.7 million in February, while Joe Biden raised $18.1 million. On the Republican side, Donald Trump raised $14.2 million and Roque De La Fuente raised $50,000.

As of the February 29, 2020, reporting cutoff, Trump led the four presidential candidates in cash on hand with $94.4 million. Sanders followed with $18.7 million, while Biden had $12.1 million and De La Fuente $4.8 million.

President Trump’s $232 million in fundraising to date is 19.6% more than the inflation-adjusted $190 million President Barack Obama had raised at this point in his 2012 re-election campaign. According to Republican National Committee (RNC) finance reports filed Friday, Trump and the RNC have raised a combined $851 million. At this point in the 2012 election cycle, Obama and the Democratic National Committee had raised an inflation-adjusted $606 million.

Since the start of the election cycle, Biden and Sanders have raised a combined $270 million to Trump and De La Fuente’s combined $246 million. Biden and Sanders have a combined $30.8 million in cash on hand to Trump and De La Fuente’s $99.3 million. The four candidates have raised a cumulative $516 million since the beginning of the election.



Delaware becomes latest state to postpone elections in response to coronavirus outbreak

On March 24, Delaware postponed its presidential preference primary election to June 2. It was originally scheduled to take place on April 28.

Delaware is the latest state to postpone elections in response to the coronavirus outbreak. To date, the following 10 states and one territory have postponed statewide primary elections:

  • Alaska: In-person voting in Democratic presidential preference primary canceled; vote-by-mail deadline extended to April 10
  • Connecticut: Presidential preference primary postponed to June 2
  • Delaware: Presidential preference primary postponed to June 2
  • Georgia: Presidential preference primary postponed to May 19
  • Indiana: Primary postponed to June 2
  • Kentucky: Primary postponed to June 23
  • Louisiana: Presidential preference primary postponed to June 20
  • Maryland: Primary postponed to June 2
  • Ohio: In-person primary voting postponed to June 2
  • Puerto Rico: Democratic presidential preference primary postponed to April 26
  • Rhode Island: Presidential preference primary postponed to June 2

Another four states have postponed primary runoffs in congressional contests:

  • Alabama: Primary runoff elections postponed to July 14
  • Mississippi: Republican primary runoff election for the state’s 2nd Congressional District postponed to June 23
  • North Carolina: Republican primary runoff for North Carolina’s 11th Congressional District postponed to June 23
  • Texas: Primary runoff elections postponed to July 14


Bernie Sanders wins Democrats Abroad primary

Sen. Bernie Sanders won the Democrats Abroad presidential primary, according to an official tally of results released Monday. Sanders received 57.9% of the vote to former Vice President Joe Biden’s 22.7%. The two were the only candidates to receive the 15% of the vote required to be allocated delegates at the Democratic National Convention. Sanders will receive nine of the group’s 13 delegates while Biden will receive the remaining four.

Democrats Abroad is the official international arm of the Democratic Party. Registered voters who live outside of the United States and did not participate in a state or territorial primary were eligible to cast a presidential vote with Democrats Abroad between March 3-10. The group does not cast electoral votes for president in the November general election.

Turnout was reported at 39,984 votes, the largest in Democrats Abroad history and a 15% increase from the turnout in 2016. Just under 15% of votes were cast from the United Kingdom (5,689), more than any other country. Germany followed with 5,268 votes, while Americans residing in Canada cast 4,691 votes. The primary reported votes from 180 countries.

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