Tagbiden

Appeals court extends block of Biden administration’s student loan forgiveness plan

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eighth Circuit on November 14 extended its pause on the Biden administration’s plan to forgive up to $20,000 of federal student loan debt per borrower. The court initially blocked the plan on Oct. 21, and forgiveness will remain frozen until the court reviews an appeal from six states suing the administration. The states argue the executive branch does not have the power to forgive student loans without the approval of Congress.

The appeal came after U.S. District Judge Henry Autrey ruled on Oct. 20 that the states did not sufficiently demonstrate that the forgiveness plan harmed them, so they did not, in his view, have the standing to sue. The states argued that the administration’s forgiveness plan would harm their investments and reduce their tax revenues, which was, in their view, a sufficient basis to sue.

The six states (Arkansas, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska, and South Carolina) filed a joint lawsuit against the Biden administration on September 29. The states alleged the administration overstepped its executive authority under the HEROES Act. The states also argued that the Department of Education was legally required to collect student loans and could not stop collecting without congressional approval.

Of the six states, five have Republican trifectas and one (Kansas) has a divided government. All of the states except Iowa have Republican attorneys general.

If the forgiveness plan survives court challenges, it will cancel $10,000 in student loan debt per person for individual tax filers making less than $125,000 or married filers with less than $250,000 in income. Pell Grant recipients are eligible to have an additional $10,000 forgiven under the plan.

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State responses to federal mandates

Court cases related to federalism

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Appeals court temporarily blocks Biden administration’s student loan forgiveness plan

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eighth Circuit on Oct. 21 temporarily blocked the Biden administration’s plan to forgive up to $20,000 of federal student loan debt per borrower. The forgiveness will remain frozen until the court reviews an appeal from six states suing the administration. The states allege the executive branch does not have the power to forgive student loans without the approval of Congress.

The appeal came after U.S. District Judge Henry Autrey ruled that the states did not sufficiently demonstrate that the forgiveness plan harmed them, so they did not, in his view, have the standing to sue. The states argued that the administration’s forgiveness plan would harm their investments and reduce their tax revenues, which was, in their view, a sufficient basis to sue.

The six states (Arkansas, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska, and South Carolina) filed a joint lawsuit against the Biden administration on September 29. The states alleged the administration overstepped its executive authority under the HEROES Act. The states also argued that the Department of Education was legally required to collect student loans and could not stop collecting without congressional approval.

Of the six states, five have Republican trifectas and one (Kansas) has a divided government. All of the states except Iowa have Republican attorneys general.

If the forgiveness plan survives court challenges, it will cancel $10,000 in student loan debt per person for individual tax filers making less than $125,000 or married filers with less than $250,000 in income. Pell Grant recipients are eligible to have an additional $10,000 forgiven under the plan.

Additional reading:

  1. Court cases related to federalism
  2. Legislation related to federalism


President Joe Biden’s approval rating rises to 44% in October, highest since 2021

Recent approval polling averages show President Joe Biden (D) at 44% approval, the highest rating he’s received since 2021. Fifty-four percent of voters disapprove of his performance.

Biden last had a 44% approval rating on December 22, 2021. The lowest approval rating he’s received is 38%, last seen on July 27, 2022 The highest approval rating Biden has received is 55%, last seen on May 26, 2021.

Congress was at 26% approval and 63% disapproval at the end of October. The highest approval rating Congress has received is 36%, last seen on July 16, 2021, and the lowest approval rating it has received is 14%, last seen on January 26, 2022.

At the end of October 2018 during the Trump administration, presidential approval was also at 44%, and congressional approval was seven points lower at 19%.

Ballotpedia’s polling index takes the average of polls conducted over the last thirty days to calculate presidential and congressional approval ratings. We average the results and show all polling results side-by-side because we believe that paints a clearer picture of public opinion than any individual poll can provide. The data is updated daily as new polling results are published.



Six states sue Biden administration over student loan forgiveness plan

Six states filed a joint lawsuit against the Biden administration on September 29 to block the federal government’s plan to forgive up to $20,000 of federal student loans per person. The states allege the administration overstepped its executive authority and was “not remotely tailored to address the effects of the pandemic on federal student loan borrowers.” The states also argued that the Department of Education was legally required to collect student loans and could not stop collecting without congressional approval.

The lawsuit, led by Arkansas Attorney General Leslie Rutledge, alleged that four of the states (Iowa, Kansas, Nebraska, and South Carolina) were harmed by the policy because they could not collect taxes on the loan relief. It also alleged that Missouri would lose revenue from loans it owned through the Federal Family Education Loan Program.

Of the six states, five have Republican trifectas and one (Kansas) has a divided government. All of the states except Iowa have Republican attorneys general.

If the forgiveness plan survives court challenges, it will cancel $10,000 in student loan debt per person for individual tax filers making less than $125,000 or married filers with less than $250,000 in income. Pell Grant recipients are eligible to have an additional $10,000 forgiven under the plan.

Additional reading:



President Joe Biden’s approval rating rises to 43% in September, highest since January

Approval polls show President Joe Biden (D) at an average 43% approval at the end of September, the highest rating he’s received since January. Fifty-three percent of voters disapprove of his performance.

Biden last had a 43% approval rating on January 12, 2022. The lowest approval rating he’s received is 38%, last seen on July 27, 2022 The highest approval rating Biden has received is 55%, last seen on May 26, 2021.

Congress was at 28% approval and 61% disapproval at the end of September. The highest approval rating Congress has received is 36%, last seen on July 16, 2021, and the lowest approval rating it has received is 14%, last seen on January 26, 2022.

At the end of September 2018 during the Trump administration, presidential approval was three percentage points lower at 40%, and congressional approval was nine points lower at 17%.

Ballotpedia’s polling index takes the average of polls conducted over the last thirty days to calculate presidential and congressional approval ratings. We average the results and show all polling results side-by-side because we believe that paints a clearer picture of public opinion than any individual poll can provide. The data is updated daily as new polling results are published.