TagDaily Brew

California, Oregon certify four measures for this year’s statewide ballot

Welcome to the Thursday, July 7, Brew. 

By: David Luchs

Here’s what’s in store for you as you start your day:

  1. California, Oregon certify four measures for this year’s statewide ballot
  2. Five candidates seek Republican nomination for United States Senate in Arizona
  3. Sign-up today: Ballotpedia Expedition on judicial deference begins July 11

California, Oregon certify four measures for this year’s statewide ballot

As of July 5, 113 statewide measures have been certified for the ballot in 35 states. That’s 19 less than the average number certified at this point in other even-numbered years from 2010 to 2020. 

From 2010 to 2020, the average number of statewide ballot measures certified in an even-numbered year was 164. By this time during even-numbered years from 2010 through 2020, an average of 132 statewide measures had been certified for the ballot. 

Four new measures were certified for the ballot last week, including three in California and one in Oregon.

California Proposition 1, State Constitutional Right to Reproductive Freedom Amendment

This measure would amend California’s constitution to prohibit the state from interfering with or denying an individual’s right to reproductive freedom, which it defines as including both access to abortion and to contraceptives. 

The state Senate voted 29-8 in favor of placing the amendment on the ballot, with all votes in favor from Democrats and all votes opposed from Republicans. The state Assembly voted 58-17 to put the measure on the ballot. All but one vote in favor was cast by a Democrat, and all votes against were cast by Republicans.

California Proposition 27, Legalize Sports Betting and Revenue for Homelessness Prevention Fund Initiative

This measure would legalize online and mobile sports betting for those 21 and older, establish regulations for the industry, and impose a 10% tax on sports betting revenue and licensing fees. The tax would go towards homelessness programs and financial support for tribes choosing not to operate sports betting.

The measure qualified for the ballot after organizers submitted 1.1 million valid signatures in favor to the Secretary of State’s office. One million signatures were required to put the measure on the ballot.

Thirty-five states and the District of Columbia have either legalized sports betting or approved laws that would legalize the practice. Five of those states legalized sports betting via ballot measure.

California Proposition 30, Tax on Income Above $2 Million for Zero-Emissions Vehicles and Wildfire Prevention Initiative

This measure would increase the tax on personal income above $2 million by 1.75% and allocate the additional revenue towards subsidies and infrastructure funding for zero-emissions vehicles as well as wildfire suppression and prevention programs.

The measure qualified for the ballot after organizers submitted 720,000 valid signatures in favor to the Secretary of State’s office. 620,000 valid signatures were needed to put the measure on the ballot. The signature threshold was lower for Proposition 30 than for Proposition 27 because Proposition 30 would not amend the state constitution.

Oregon Exclusion from Re-election for Legislative Absenteeism Initiative

This measure would disqualify any state legislators who missed more than 10 legislative floor sessions without permission or excuse from qualifying for re-election.

The measure qualified for the ballot after organizers submitted 155,000 valid signatures in favor to the Secretary of State’s office. 149,000 valid signatures were needed to put the measure on the ballot.

Ballotpedia has tracked five state legislative walkouts in Oregon since 2000 where legislators left the state for at least a week or received significant national media attention. A state legislative walkout occurs when a number of legislators do not attend a legislative session in order to impact the passage of legislation by preventing the chamber from meeting its attendance quorum. Four of the walkouts involved Republican legislators leaving while the legislature had a Democratic majority, and one involved Democratic legislators leaving while the legislature had a Republican majority.

Signatures have been submitted and are pending verification for seven initiatives in six states:

  1. Colorado Decriminalization, Regulated Distribution, and Therapy Program for Certain Hallucinogenic Plants and Fungi Initiative
  2. Idaho Income Tax Increases for Education Funding Initiative
  3. Michigan Payday Loan Interest Rate Cap Initiative
  4. Missouri Marijuana Legalization Initiative
  5. Missouri Top-Four Ranked-Choice Voting Initiative
  6. Nevada Top-Five Ranked Choice Voting Initiative
  7. Oklahoma State Question 820, Marijuana Legalization Initiative

Keep reading

Five candidates seek Republican nomination for United States Senate in Arizona

Five candidates are running in the Republican primary for United States Senate in Arizona on August 2, 2022. Incumbent Mark Kelly (D) is running for re-election.

Mark Brnovich, Jim Lamon, and Blake Masters have led in polling, fundraising, and media attention.

Brnovich, a career prosecutor, has served as Arizona’s attorney general since 2015. Before that, Brnovich served as an assistant attorney general from 1998 to 2003 and as the director of Arizona’s Department of Gaming from 2009 to 2013. Brnovich’s campaign refers to the legal challenges his office has brought against President Joe Biden’s (D) tax and immigration policies, among others. TV show host Sean Hannity and radio host Mark Levin endorsed Brnovich.

Lamon is a businessman who founded DEPCOM Power, a solar energy company he sold in 2021. Lamon has largely self-funded his senate effort. According to Open Secrets, Lamon had contributed $13M to his campaign as of July 3, 2022, or 94% of all funds donated. Lamon has cited U.S.-China trade relations as a top issue, saying, “Communist China is the biggest threat to our economic security and national sovereignty.” The Conservative Political Action Coalition, the National Border Patrol Council, and a number of state legislators endorsed Lamon.

Masters is a tech entrepreneur who co-authored “Zero to One: Notes on a Startup”, a business book based on a class tech investor Peter Thiel taught at Stanford. Masters joined Thiel Capital in 2014 and was named president of the Thiel Foundation in 2015. Masters has expressed support for tightening regulations on technology companies and privatizing social security. Thiel, former President Donald Trump (R), and TV show host Tucker Carlson endorsed Masters.

Three election forecasters rate the race a toss-up, meaning the general election is expected to be competitive. The previous two Senate elections—held in 2018 and 2020—were both decided by 2.4 percentage points. In 2020, Kelly defeated incumbent Sen. Martha McSally (R) in a special election, 51.2% to 48.8%. In 2018, Kyrsten Sinema (D) defeated McSally, 50.0% to 47.6%.

Michael McGuire and Justin Olson are also running in the primary.

Keep reading 

Sign-up today: Ballotpedia Expedition on judicial deference begins July 11

Let Ballotpedia be your guide to deepening your knowledge on concepts that matter in government today. Our Expeditions are scholarly mini-courses centered around the pillars of the administrative state

Join us this month as we focus on the judicial deference pillar through a series of carefully curated readings, questions, and exclusive expert interviews.  

Judicial deference to administrative agencies happens when a court yields to the agency’s interpretation of statutes or regulations. Our Expedition on judicial deference guides you through the ins and outs of when and why courts defer to administrative agencies’ interpretation of their statutes and regulations. Learn about different types of deference and why they matter, the reasoning behind judicial deference as a legal concept, and how judicial deference is exercised in the modern administrative state.

Sign up at the link below.

Sign up today



Supreme Court ruling completes redistricting for 2022 elections

Welcome to the Wednesday, July 6, Brew. 

By: Samuel Wonacott

Here’s what’s in store for you as you start your day:

  1. Looking back on the past 18 months of redistricting
  2. Ranked-choice voting campaign submits signatures for Nevada ballot 
  3. 54% of state legislators are Republican, 44% Democratic

Looking back on the past 18 months of redistricting

Since spring 2021, we’ve brought you regular updates on the status of congressional and state legislative redistricting. With a recent Supreme Court decision, that process is now complete for 2022.  

On June 28, the U.S. Supreme Court (SCOTUS) overturned a U.S. district court ruling that struck down Louisiana’s congressional district boundaries. Louisiana was the last state to complete congressional redistricting this year. SCOTUS will review the case in an upcoming term (along with a similar case out of Alabama). The decision means the map the legislature approved in March will be used for this year’s elections. Now that this year’s maps are set, let’s take a look back on how we got here. 

  • Voters in five states will use congressional or legislative boundaries in the 2022 elections that will be in effect for this cycle only. In the following states, federal or state courts adopted remedial maps with the stipulation that they be redrawn before the 2024 elections. Those states are:
  • Alaska (state Senate)
  • South Carolina (state House of Representatives)
  • New York (state Assembly)
  • North Carolina (Congress)
  • Ohio legislative (state House of Representatives and state Senate)
  • South Carolina Gov. Henry McMaster signed legislation on June 24 establishing new state House district maps for use beginning in 2024. The maps were redrawn as part of a settlement of a federal lawsuit that a group of civil rights groups filed in December 2021 alleging racial gerrymandering in the original map. South Carolina enacted the state legislative district boundaries that will be used for this year’s elections on Dec. 10, 2021.
  • At the federal level, 44 states adopted congressional district maps after the 2020 census. Six states were apportioned one U.S. House district, so no congressional redistricting was required.
  • At the state level, 49 states redrew legislative district maps for both chambers. Montana, however, has not yet adopted legislative redistricting plans and will use the boundaries enacted after the 2010 census for this year’s elections. The state’s legislature will draw state House and Senate boundaries next year, in 2023. It holds sessions in odd-numbered years and adjourned before the U.S. Census delivered detailed census information to states.
  • The Census Bureau released apportionment counts and state-level population data on April 26, 2021, and block-level data and county-level demographic information on Aug. 12, 2021. The agency was originally scheduled to deliver apportionment counts from the 2020 census to the President of the United States by Dec. 31, 2020, and redistricting data to the states by March 30, 2021. Mike Schneider of Yahoo News reported in December 2020 that the COVID-19 pandemic caused a shortage of survey workers and forced the Census Bureau to suspend field operations in the spring of 2020. The Bureau also announced in November 2020 that it needed additional time to address data processing anomalies due to the shortened timeline for tabulating the results.

Learn more about redistricting below. 

Keep reading

Ranked-choice voting campaign submits signatures for Nevada ballot 

On June 29, the Nevada Voters First campaign submitted signatures to qualify a ranked choice voting measure for the November ballot. This came on the day after the Nevada Supreme Court ruled the initiative may proceed to the ballot. 

On Dec. 6, 2021, Nathan Helton, a registered voter in Churchill County, filed a lawsuit against the sponsors of the initiative. The challenge to the ballot initiative argued that the measure violated the single-subject rule. The Supreme Court backed a lower court ruling from January. 

The campaign reported submitting 266,000 signatures. To qualify for the ballot, 135,561 valid signatures are required. The submitted signatures will have to be verified in order for the measure to qualify for the Nevada ballot.

The ballot initiative would establish open top-five primaries and ranked-choice voting for general elections. Rank-choice voting allows a voter to rank candidates in preference from first to last. A candidate receiving 50% or more of the first choice votes wins. If no candidate is the first choice of more than 50%, the candidate with the fewest votes is eliminated. First-preference votes cast for the failed candidate are eliminated, lifting the second-preference choices indicated on those ballots. A new tally is conducted to determine whether any candidate has won a majority of the adjusted votes. The process is repeated until a candidate wins an outright majority.

If voters approve an initiated amendment in one election, it must win again at the next general election in an even-numbered year for it to become part of the constitution. In other words, if the initiative is approved in 2022, it must be approved again in 2024 to take effect.

Ranked-choice voting is also used for certain elections in Alaska and Maine. In 2020, voters in Alaska passed Ballot Measure 2 50.55%-49.45%. The measure established open top-four primaries for state executive, state legislative, and congressional offices and ranked-choice voting for general elections, including presidential elections. 

In May, signatures were submitted for a top-four ranked-choice voting initiative in Missouri. 

Click below to read more about the Nevada Top-Five Ranked Choice Voting Initiative.

Keep reading 

54% of state legislators are Republican, 44% Democratic

Here’s an update on the partisan breakdown in state legislatures.

At the end of June 2022, 54.27% of all state legislators in the United States are Republicans while 44.41% are Democrats. There are 7,383 state legislative seats in the country.

Republicans control 62 chambers, while Democrats hold 36. The Alaska House of Representatives is the only chamber organized under a multipartisan, power-sharing coalition.

Democrats hold 862 state Senate seats and 2,417 state House seats, gaining two Senate seats since last month. Republicans hold 1,095 state Senate seats and 2,912 state House seats, gaining two Senate seats and losing six House seats since last month.

Independent or third-party legislators hold 41 seats across 18 different states, including 33 state House seats and eight state Senate seats. There are 49 vacant state House seats and seven vacant state Senate seats across 18 different states.

Compared to June 2021, Democrats have lost five state Senate seats (867 v. 862) and 29 state House seats (2,446 v. 2,417). Republicans have gained three state Senate seats (1,092 v. 1,095) and lost seven state House seats (2,919 v. 2,912). 

Keep reading



A mid-year report on state legislative sessions

Welcome to the Tuesday, July 5, Brew. 

By: Samuel Wonacott

Here’s what’s in store for you as you start your day:

  1. Lawmakers are in session in six states
  2. President Joe Biden’s approval at 39%, the lowest of his presidency thus far 
  3. We’re hiring—and we’d like you to be our next colleague! 

Lawmakers are in session in six states

Now that we’ve reached the halfway point of the year, let’s look back at the status of state legislative sessions over the last six months.  

Currently, most states are out of session. But six state legislatures are in regular session—California, Massachusetts, Michigan, New Jersey, Ohio, and Pennsylvania. Lawmakers in California, Massachusetts, Michigan, and Ohio are considered full-time legislators, because they meet periodically throughout the year (in 41 other states, state legislators are considered part-time because they only meet for a portion of the year). 

Massachusetts’ legislative session is scheduled to end July 31. California’s is scheduled to end Aug. 31, while Pennsylvania’s is scheduled to end Nov. 30. In Michigan, New Jersey, and Ohio, sessions are scheduled to end on Dec. 31. 

Since January, lawmakers in all but four states have held regular sessions. That’s because  46 state legislatures hold regular sessions annually. In Montana, Nevada, North Dakota, and Texas, however, lawmakers hold regular sessions in odd-numbered years only. 

The length of a session varies among the states, and is set by a state’s constitution, a statute, or by the legislature. 

Here’s a roundup of facts about state legislative sessions this year: 

  • 46 states held regular sessions in 2022. 
    • 39 state legislatures convened in January.  
    • Five state legislatures—Oregon, Oklahoma, Connecticut, Arkansas, and Wyoming—convened in February. 
    • Louisiana’s state legislature convened in March, and North Carolina’s convened in May. 
  • 40 states have ended their sessions
    • One state legislature ended its session in February. 
    • 12 state legislatures ended their sessions in March. 
    • Eight state legislatures ended their sessions in April. 
    • 13 state legislatures ended their sessions in May. 
    • Five state legislatures ended their sessions in June.
    • North Carolina ended its session on July 1.  

State legislatures sometimes meet outside of their regularly scheduled sessions in what are called special or extraordinary sessions. According to MultiState, 12 states have held special sessions so far this year—Alabama, Florida, Indiana, Louisiana, New Mexico, New York, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Utah, Virginia, West Virginia, and Wisconsin. Additionally, South Carolina has a forthcoming special session on a date to be determined.

Click below to read more about state legislative sessions.

Keep reading

President Joe Biden’s approval at 39%, the lowest of his presidency so far 

We’ve aggregated polling data since the first days of the Trump administration. Let’s take a look at some recent polling data. 

Recent polling averages show President Joe Biden’s (D) approval rating at 39% as of June 30, the lowest of his presidency thus far. Fifty-six percent of voters disapprove.

Biden first received this rating on June 13. At the end of May, his approval rating was at 40%. Biden’s highest approval rating was 55% on May 26, 2021.

Our polling index takes the average of polls conducted over the last 30 days to calculate presidential and congressional approval ratings. We average the results and show all polling results side-by-side because we believe that paints a clearer picture of public opinion than any individual poll can provide. The data is updated daily as new polling results are published.

Keep reading 

We’re Hiring!

We’re hiring interns and full-time staff! If you’re interested in getting paid to help ensure that every voter in America has unbiased election information, then we encourage you to join our team! We’re looking for fast learners and creative problem solvers who are eager to work hard to make the world a better place.

To apply for these 100% remote opportunities, visit our Job Opportunities page at the link below and submit an application today! 

Keep reading



Exploring last month’s data with our new Election Administration Legislation Tracker

Welcome to the Friday, July 1, Brew. 

By: Douglas Kronaizl

Here’s what’s in store for you as you start your day:

  1. Legislatures took action on 159 election-related bills in June
  2. Entering the final stretch for candidate filing deadlines
  3. #FridayTrivia: How many U.S. House incumbents lost re-election on June 28?

Legislatures took action on 159 election-related bills in June

Over the past few days, we’ve been bringing you snapshots and highlights alongside the launch of our new Election Administration Legislation Tracker. This free and accessible online resource will help you quickly and easily track election-related legislation in all 50 states, including your own!

Today, let’s explore activity across the country over the last month. In June, legislatures in 19 states and the District of Columbia took action on 159 election bills, ranging from introducing a bill, holding a committee vote, or passing a measure out of a chamber. Forty-seven of those 159 bills were enacted.

Thirty-nine percent of those bills were concentrated in three states: Arizona (21), Louisiana (20), and New Jersey (21). Fifteen states’ legislatures were in session for all or part of the month.

Of the 159 bills acted upon this month, 37 involved voter registration or voter list maintenance. Thirty dealt with election audits and oversight protocols. Twenty-eight covered absentee/mail-in voting. Those were the three most common policy areas, but the chart below lists the top 10 over the past month.

Blue portions represent the number of bills sponsored by Democrats, and red portions indicate Republican-sponsored bills. The purple and gray portions cover bills with bipartisan or unspecified sponsorship, respectively. Quick note: the numbers listed here don’t add up to 159 because some bills cover multiple subjects.

By party, Democrats sponsored 39% (62) of the 159 bills acted on in June. Republicans sponsored 44% (70). Bipartisan groups sponsored 14% (22). Partisan sponsorship was not specified for the remaining 3% (5).

Want to learn more about election-related bills in your state? Use the link below to access our Election Administration Legislation Tracker! Additionally, we’re providing a weekly digest summarizing noteworthy election-related legislation, which you can sign up for here.

Keep reading 

Entering the final stretch for candidate filing deadlines

July marks the end of the major party candidate filing process for the 2022 election cycle, with three states—Delaware, Rhode Island, and Louisiana—set to finalize their ballots by the end of the month.

Delaware’s major party filing deadline is July 12, followed by Rhode Island’s on July 15. Louisiana has two deadlines in July. For candidates qualifying by submitting signatures, the deadline is July 8. Louisiana also allows candidates to qualify by paying a filing fee, the deadline for which is July 22.

Candidates are filing for federal and state offices in Delaware and Rhode Island, both of which are holding U.S. House, state executive, and state legislative elections.

Louisiana holds most of its state-level elections in odd-numbered years. In 2022, candidates are filing for U.S. Senate and U.S. House, as well as two public service commissioner spots.

The candidate filing process kicked off last December in Texas, followed by six other states in January and February. By itself, March was the busiest month for candidate filings with 19. Taken together, there were 14 deadlines in April and May, and, in June, seven states’ filing deadlines passed.

Keep reading 

#FridayTrivia: How many U.S. House incumbents lost re-election on June 28?

In the Thursday Brew, we brought you some highlights from this week’s election results, including those from three U.S. House primaries where incumbents—one Democrat and two Republicans—lost. We decided to look back at the last decade and found that the total number of incumbents defeated so far in 2022 is above the overall decade average.

How many U.S. House incumbents lost in primaries, on average, between 2012 and 2020?

  1. 7
  2. 14
  3. 9
  4. 4


Breaking down election administration laws enacted in 2022

Welcome to the Thursday, June 30, Brew. 

By: David Luchs

Here’s what’s in store for you as you start your day:

  1. Breaking down election administration laws enacted in 2022
  2. Reviewing this week’s election results
  3. An update on recent statewide ballot measure activity

Breaking down election administration laws enacted in 2022

Yesterday, Ballotpedia launched our Election Administration Legislation tracker. This tool allows you to quickly and easily track election-related legislation in all 50 states, with access to easy-to-digest bill tags and summaries written and curated by our election administration experts.

In addition to our onsite tracker, we’re providing a weekly digest summarizing noteworthy election-related legislation from across the country, including a breakdown of recent activity on bills and a look at the bigger picture. Click here to sign up for the free weekly digest.

Today, let’s take a look at some of the data at your fingertips using the tracker. As of this week, state legislatures in 33 states and the District of Columbia have enacted 162 election bills during the 2022 calendar year. Five of these states have enacted more than 10 election bills each: Louisiana (17), Tennessee (15), West Virginia (13), Rhode Island (12), and Arizona (11). 

States with Republican trifectas (i.e., states in which Republicans hold the governorship and majorities in both chambers of the state legislature) have seen the greatest number of enacted bills: 81 (50.0 percent of the total). States with Democratic trifectas have enacted 39 bills (24.1 percent of the total). States with divided governments (i.e., states where the governor belongs to a different party than that which has a majority in the state legislature) have enacted 42 bills (25.9 percent of the total). 

Of the 162 enacted bills, 83 (51.2 percent) were sponsored exclusively by Republicans, 38 (23.5 percent) by Democrats, and 24 (14.8 percent) by bipartisan coalitions. Sponsorship of the remaining 17 bills (10.5 percent) was not specified. 

The chart below identifies the 10 most common subject areas dealt with in the enacted bills. The number listed on the blue portion of each bar indicates the number of Democratic-sponsored bills dealing with the subject in question. The number listed on the red portion of the bar indicates the number of Republican-sponsored bills. The purple and gray portions of the bar indicate the number of bipartisan-sponsored bills and bills with unspecified sponsorship, respectively. Note that the numbers listed here will not, when summed, equal the total number of enacted bills because some bills deal with multiple subjects.

Stay tuned for more data in tomorrow’s Brew.

Keep reading

Reviewing this week’s election results

Statewide primaries and primary runoffs took place in six states Tuesday, including 16 races we identified as battlegrounds. Here’s a look at nine races:

  • Joe O’Dea wins Republican nomination for U.S. Senate in Colorado: Joe O’Dea defeated Ron Hanks in the Republican primary for U.S. Senate in Colorado, winning 55% of the vote to Hanks’ 46%. O’Dea and Hanks differed on their stance regarding the outcome of the 2020 presidential election, with O’Dea saying Joe Biden (D) had won and Hanks saying Donald Trump (R) had won.
  • Darren Bailey wins Republican nomination for governor of Illinois: Darren Bailey defeated five other candidates to win the Republican nomination for governor of Illinois. Bailey had 58% of the vote to runner-up Jesse Sullivan’s 16%. Bailey’s endorsers included President Trump (R) and U.S. Rep. Mary Miller (R).
  • Sean Casten defeats Marie Newman: U.S. Rep. Sean Casten defeated fellow incumbent Marie Newman in the Democratic primary in Illinois’ 6th Congressional District. Newman and Casten were placed in the same district under new lines adopted following the 2020 census. Casten had 68% of the vote to Newman’s 29%. The two had differed on a vote last year to provision more Iron Dome missile defense systems for Israel, with Casten voting in favor of the proposal and Newman voting against it.
  • Mary Miller defeats Rodney Davis: In Illinois’ other incumbent-versus-incumbent post-redistricting primary, U.S. Rep. Mary Miller defeated fellow incumbent Rodney Davis in the Republican nomination for Illinois’ 15th Congressional District. Miller had 58% of the vote to Davis’ 43%. Former President Donald Trump (R) endorsed Miller, while the U.S. Chamber of Commerce endorsed Davis.
  • Michael Guest wins re-nomination in runoff: U.S. Rep. Michael Guest defeated challenger Michael Cassidy in the Republican primary runoff in Mississippi’s 3rd Congressional District, with 67% of the vote to Cassidy’s 33%. Guest was one of 35 House Republicans who voted in favor of establishing a bipartisan commission to investigate the Capitol breach on January 6, 2021.
  • Steven Palazzo loses re-nomination in runoff: U.S. Rep. Steven Palazzo lost to challenger Mike Ezell in the Republican primary runoff in Mississippi’s 4th Congressional District. Ezell had 54% of the vote to Palazzo’s 46%. Ezell accused Palazzo during the primary of having misused campaign funds for personal expenses and referred to a 2020 House Ethics Committee investigation into the claims.
  • Kathy Hochul wins nomination for full term as governor of New York: New York Gov. Kathy Hochul, who ascended to the post following Andrew Cuomo’s (D) resignation last year, won the Democratic nomination for a full term as governor over two challengers. Hochul had 67% of the vote to runner-up Jumaane Williams’ 20%.
  • Markwayne Mullin, T.W. Shannon advance to U.S. Senate runoff: No candidate won the 50% of the vote necessary to receive the Republican nomination for U.S. Senate in Oklahoma’s special election Tuesday. The top two finishers, U.S. Rep. Markwayne Mullin and businessman and former state House Speaker T.W. Shannon, will advance to an August 23 runoff. Mullin had 44% of the vote to Shannon’s 18%. The winner will face Kendra Horn (D), Robert Murphy (L), and Ray Woods (I) in the November 8 general election.
  • Oklahoma Attorney General John O’Connor loses re-nomination: Oklahoma Attorney General John O’Connor lost the Republican primary for a full term to challenger Gentner Drummond. O’Connor was appointed to the post last year following Mike Hunter’s (R) resignation. Drummond had run against Hunter for the GOP nomination in 2018, losing the primary runoff that year by a 273-vote margin. O’Connor said he was a stronger supporter of former President Donald Trump’s (R) than Drummond, saying that Trump had nominated him for a federal judgeship and accusing Drummond of having donated $1,000 to Joe Biden’s (D) 2020 campaign. Drummond said the donation had been made by his wife on a shared card and that he had obtained a refund.

Keep reading 

An update on recent statewide ballot measure activity

This is the time of year when legislatures are wrapping up sessions – which usually means a flurry of ballot measure activity. As of June 28, 115 statewide measures have been certified for the ballot in 35 states for elections this year. Between 2010 and 2020, the average number of statewide measures certified for the ballot in an even-numbered year was 164. Here’s a look at some recent developments in 2022’s statewide ballot measure landscape:

  • Arizona voters to decide on sales tax to finance fire districts: The Arizona House of Representatives voted 34-25 on June 22 to place a measure related to fire district financing on this November’s ballot, clearing the measure’s last hurdle following state senate approval in February. The 34 votes in favor included 28 Democrats and six Republicans. All 25 votes against were cast by Republicans. If enacted, the measure would implement a statewide 0.1% sales tax for 20 years beginning on December 31, 2022. Proceeds from the tax would go towards funding the state’s fire districts.
  • Arizona voters to consider property tax exemptions measure: Also June 22, the Arizona House voted 58-0 with two Democrats abstaining to put a measure related to property tax exemptions on the ballot following state senate approval of the same measure in February. The measure would consolidate the existing property tax provisions in the state constitution into a single provision and would allow the state legislature to enact exemptions from property tax for specific groups.
  • Arizona approves vote on change to ballot measure procedures: On June 23, the Arizona State Senate voted 16-12 to put a measure related to ballot measure laws on the November ballot. All 16 of the chamber’s Republicans voted in favor of the measure, while Democrats cast all 12 votes against it. The state house had earlier approved the measure in February. The measure would require that any future statewide ballot measures in Arizona receive a 60% supermajority of votes in favor in order to pass. Currently, ballot measures in Arizona require a 50% majority of votes in favor. There are 11 states where voters must approve a constitutional amendment by more than a simple majority or by some rule that combines different criteria besides just the vote total in favor. Both Illinois and Florida require that a ballot measure win at least a 60% supermajority. The highest margin required for a ballot measure to be approved is 67% in New Hampshire.
  • Arizona voters to decide on creating an office of Lieutenant Governor: The Arizona House voted 43-15 in favor of placing an amendment to create an office of lieutenant governor on the November ballot, following the state senate’s approval of the measure in March. The 43 votes in favor included 30 Republicans and 13 Democrats, while the 15 votes against included 14 Democrats and one Republican. The lieutenant governor would be elected on a ticket with the governor and would succeed to the governor’s office in the event of a vacancy. Arizona is currently one of five states without a lieutenant governor; in the event of a vacancy in the governor’s office, the secretary of state succeeds to the position.
  • California voters will consider online sports betting: On June 27, the California Secretary of State announced that the campaign in favor of an initiated constitutional amendment allowing for legalized sports betting had obtained enough signatures to put the amendment on the November ballot. If passed, the amendment would legalize online and mobile betting on sports for those 21 and older and would implement a 10% tax on bets. Revenues from the tax would be allocated towards homelessness programs and tribes that chose not to operate sports betting.
  • Colorado campaign submits signatures in support of psychedelics measure: A ballot measure campaign in Colorado submitted 222,648 signatures to the Colorado Secretary of State on June 27 to place a measure related to psychedelics on the November ballot. The campaign would need 124,632 of those signatures (56%) to be valid for the amendment to make it onto the ballot. If enacted, the amendment would decriminalize the personal usage of a number of psychedelic substances for those over 21 and would create a program allowing for the supervised administration of such substances.

Keep reading



Our newest offering – introducing the Election Administration Legislation Tracker

Welcome to the Wednesday, June 29, Brew. 

By: Samuel Wonacott

Here’s what’s in store for you as you start your day:

  1. Introducing the Election Administration Legislation Tracker
  2. Californians will decide on an amendment that would provide a right to abortion and contraceptives in November 
  3. We’ve got June 28 election results!

Introducing the Election Administration Legislation Tracker

Election administration in the U.S. is characterized by an ever-changing patchwork of federal, state, and local laws and policies. This year alone, states have enacted 162 bills related to election administration. That can make it difficult to understand how election administration is changing in your state. To help cut through the noise, we’re excited to announce the launch of our new Election Administration Legislation Tracker—a resource to help you quickly and easily track election-related legislation in all 50 states

This free and accessible online resource allows you to find easy-to-digest bill tags and summaries—written and curated by our election administration experts! We update our database and bill-tracking daily. Using our powerful interactive search function, you can zero in on more 2,500 bills (and counting) covering these topics:

  • Absentee/mail-in voting and early voting policies
  • Ballot access requirements for candidates, parties, and ballot initiatives
  • Election dates and deadlines
  • Election oversight protocols
  • In-person voting procedures
  • Post-election procedures (including counting, canvassing, and auditing policies)
  • Voter ID
  • Voter registration and eligibility

To make your search results more precise, we first place bills into one of 22 parent categories. We then apply to each bill one or more of the 88 tags we’ve developed. 

But don’t worry—if you don’t want to immerse yourself in the world of election legislation quite that often, we have a free, weekly digest that goes straight to your inbox and keeps you caught up on the week’s developments.

The Election Administration Legislation Tracker dashboard allows you to narrow your search through eight different factors that can be combined into any combination:

  • Keyword
  • Bill number
  • Most recent action
  • State
  • Current bill status
  • Topic
  • Party affiliation of the bill sponsor
  • State trifecta status

For example, here’s some trivia for you: legislators from both parties have co-sponsored 8.64% of the bills we’ve tracked. 

We also make it easy to visualize much of our data, including which states are introducing the most bills. 

Click here to sign up for our weekly digest of election-related legislation. Each week, we’ll bring you noteworthy bills from around the country, recent activity, and a look at the big picture. 

Click below to use the Election Administration Legislation Tracker! We’ll be back tomorrow and Friday with more data from the tracker – stay tuned! Go explore it for yourself.

Keep reading

Californians will decide on an amendment to provide a right to abortion and contraceptives in November 

California will be the fifth state to vote on an abortion-related ballot measure this year. This year will feature the most abortion-related ballot measures on record

On June 27, the California Assembly voted 58-16 to advance the California Right to Reproductive Freedom Amendment, a legislatively referred constitutional amendment providing that “The state shall not deny or interfere with an individual’s reproductive freedom in their most intimate decisions …” Earlier, the state Senate passed the amendment by a vote of 29-8 with three absent.

Voters will decide on the measure in November.

Voters in Kansas, Kentucky, Montana, and Vermont will also decide abortion-related ballot measures this year. The proposed Vermont amendment would provide that an “individual’s right to personal reproductive autonomy is central to the liberty and dignity to determine one’s own life course …” The Kansas and Kentucky amendments state that nothing in their respective state constitutions provides a right to abortion or requires government funding for abortion. Montana voters will decide on a law to require medical care to be provided to infants born alive. It makes it a felony for healthcare providers to refuse to offer such care.

The California Right to Reproductive Freedom Amendment was introduced following the leak of a draft majority opinion for Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization on May 2. Gov. Gavin Newsom (D) said, “We are proposing an amendment to enshrine the right to choose in the California constitution. We can’t trust SCOTUS to protect the right to abortion, so we’ll do it ourselves. Women will remain protected here.”

The amendment states: “The state shall not deny or interfere with an individual’s reproductive freedom in their most intimate decisions, which includes their fundamental right to choose to have an abortion and their fundamental right to choose or refuse contraceptives.”

Currently, abortion is legal in California up to fetal viability and after viability if the procedure is necessary to protect the life or health of the mother.

On June 24, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in Dobbs that “The Constitution does not confer a right to abortion; Roe and Casey are overruled; and the authority to regulate abortion is returned to the people and their elected representatives.”

Click here to read more about the history of abortion-related ballot measures. Click below to read more about California’s Right to Reproductive Freedom Amendment.

Keep reading 

We’ve got June 28 election results!

Yesterday was one of the busiest primary nights of the year. There were statewide primaries in Colorado, Illinois, New York, Oklahoma, and Utah on Tuesday. Our team stayed up late into the night collecting results and monitoring the most significant developments. In tomorrow’s Brew, we’ll take a closer look at the biggest storylines to emerge from Tuesday’s results and how they may affect the November elections. 

In the meantime, check out our June 28 election hub to see the latest results. You can also subscribe to The Heart of the Primaries, our weekly dive into key congressional, legislative, and executive races. The next edition comes out Thursday! 

Click on the links below to see results from the battleground elections that happened last night:

Colorado

Illinois

Mississippi 

New York

Oklahoma

Click below to view all June 28 election results.  

Keep reading



Two new states added—state legislative contested primaries up 30% compared to 2020

Welcome to the Tuesday, June 28, Brew. 

By: Douglas Kronaizl

Here’s what’s in store for you as you start your day:

  1. Number of contested state legislative primaries is up 30% compared to 2020
  2. Here’s what’s on the ballot today
  3. A quick primer on New York’s primary elections

Number of contested state legislative primaries is up 30% compared to 2020

We are back with this week’s update on the elevated number of contested state legislative primaries throughout this election cycle. This week, we added New York and Wisconsin, bringing our total to 29 states that account for 3,661 of the 6,166 (59%) state legislative seats up for election this year.

There are 30% more contested state legislative primaries this year than in 2020, including 62% more Republican primaries and 18% more top-two/four primaries. Democratic primaries are down 9%.

A primary is contested when more candidates are running than available nominations, meaning at least one candidate must lose.

Overall, eight states in this analysis have Democratic trifectas, 17 have Republican trifectas, and four have divided governments.

Of the 29 states in this analysis, 27 are holding partisan primaries. Two states—California and Nebraska—use top-two primaries.

The number of Democratic primaries has increased in 10 states, decreased in 14, and remains the same in two. The number of Republican primaries has increased in 25 states and decreased in two. 

Use the link below to view these figures and additional state-specific statistics.

Keep reading 

Here’s what’s on the ballot today

Happy Election Day! Today, June 28, voters in five statesColorado, Illinois, New York, Oklahoma, and Utah—will make their picks for this year’s state and congressional races. Plus, there’s a special U.S. House election in Nebraska and runoffs for various offices in Mississippi and South Carolina.

Here are some of the highlights:

Illinois: at least two U.S. House incumbents are guaranteed to lose in Illinois because of two incumbent vs. incumbent primaries. In the Chicago-area 6th District, Democratic Reps. Sean Casten and Marie Newman are facing off and, farther downstate, Republican Reps. Rodney Davis and Mary Miller are seeking their party’s nod in the 15th District.

Colorado: earlier this year, The Colorado Sun’s Jesse Paul wrote, “In virtually every major Republican primary race … voters will have a choice between a candidate or candidates who … believe the outcome of the last presidential election was fraudulent and those who don’t.” The topic has played a central role in two of the Colorado Republican Party’s primaries we’re watching, in particular—U.S. Senate and secretary of state—where voters will select nominees to challenge Democratic incumbents in November.

Mississippi: there are two Republican primary runoffs in Mississippi featuring incumbents. The primaries were on June 7, but since no candidate received more than 50% of the vote, there are runoffs in the 3rd District—between Rep. Michael Guest and Michael Cassidy—and 4th District—between Rep. Steven Palazzo and Mike Ezell.

Oklahoma: the state’s incumbent attorney general, John O’Connor (R), faces his first electoral test after Gov. Kevin Stitt (R) appointed him to the position in 2021. Recent polling showed O’Connor at 28% behind challenger Gentner Drummond (R), a 2018 candidate for the office, with 41%. Thirty percent of respondents were undecided. 

New York: in another first, Gov. Kathy Hochul (D) faces U.S. Rep. Tom Suozzi (D) and New York City Public Advocate Jumaane Williams (D) in New York’s Democratic gubernatorial primary. Hochul assumed office in 2021 following the resignation of former Gov. Andrew Cuomo (D). Averages of two June polls showed Hochul at 56%, followed by Suozzi at 18%, and Williams at 9%, with 19% undecided.

Use the link below to view all of the races we will be covering, and be sure to check back later this week as we take a look at the results!

Keep reading 

A quick primer on New York’s primary elections

The primaries taking place in New York today, June 28, are the first of two statewide primaries this year. In May, a federal judge moved the primaries for the U.S. House and state Senate to Aug. 23 following lawsuits over the maps for those offices as part of the redistricting process.

That leaves primaries for state executive offices and the state’s 150 Assembly districts on the June ballot. The state is also holding a U.S. Senate election this year, but the Democratic and Republican primaries were canceled after only one candidate filed in each race—U.S. Sen. Chuck Schumer (D) and Joe Pinion (R)—meaning they automatically advanced.

One unique feature of New York’s primaries is that the state allows fusion voting, where more than one political party can support a candidate. It is common for candidates to seek both major and third-party nominations. Under this system, candidates who lose one primary, but win another, can still appear on the general election ballot.

New York does not hold runoff elections. This means the candidate with the most votes in the primary—even if less than 50% of the total votes cast—advances to the general election.

If you have primaries coming up, use Ballotpedia’s Sample Ballot Lookup to see what’s on your ballot and bring your choices to the polls with our My Vote app!

Keep reading



Nearly $30 million raised among nine AGs

Welcome to the Monday, June 27, Brew. 

By: Samuel Wonacott

Here’s what’s in store for you as you start your day:

  1. Across nine states, attorneys general have collectively raised $48.4 million this election cycle
  2. A look at Utah’s June 28 elections 
  3. A look at Oklahoma’s June 28 elections

Across nine states, attorneys general have collectively raised $27.8 million this election cycle

Thirty states are holding attorney general elections this year. Let’s take a look at campaign finance numbers in nine of those states, where we partner with Transparency USA to provide detailed campaign finance data. 

In the current election cycle across nine states, attorneys general have collectively raised $27.8 million. Two attorneys general—Rob Bonta of California ($8.7 million) and Ken Paxton of Texas ($5.9 million)—have raised $5 million or more for re-election campaigns.

Figures from Virginia, which held an election for attorney general in 2021, are not included above. Jason Miyares (R) raised $7.4 million and spent $6.9 million during the 2021 campaign cycle. He defeated then-Attorney General Mark Herring (D) 50.4%-49.6%.

Here’s what the data show:

You can take a deeper dive into these fundraising figures by clicking on the links below:

Thirty states are holding attorney general elections this year. Of those 30 attorney general offices, Democrats hold 16 and Republicans hold 14. In 2018, the last time all 30 offices were up for election, Democrats gained control of four in Colorado, Michigan, Nevada, and Wisconsin.

Overall, Democrats hold 22 attorney general offices, while Republicans hold 26. 

This year, we plan to publish several hundred articles breaking down campaign finance numbers in the 12 states covered by Transparency USA: Arizona, California, Florida, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Texas, Virginia, and Wisconsin. To learn more about our partnership with Transparency USA, click below.

Keep reading

A look at Utah’s June 28 elections 

By the time July comes around, a majority of states will have held statewide primaries. In contrast to May and June, when states held primaries nearly every week, only Maryland will hold statewide elections in July. 

Let’s turn to this month’s final primaries. Five states will hold primaries on June 28—Colorado, Illinois, New York (state legislative districts and state executive offices only), Oklahoma, and Utah. Here’s a preview of what’s on the ballot in Utah and Oklahoma. 

Congress

Utah will hold elections for a U.S. Senate seat and all four U.S. House districts. Seven candidates are running in the Republican Senate seat, including incumbent Mike Lee (R). Lee first took office in 2011. One candidate, Kael Weston, is running in the Democratic primary. Three independent election forecasters consider the general election Solid Republican or Likely Republican

All four of Utah’s House districts are up for election. Republicans represent all four districts. Thirteen candidates filed to run across all four districts, including four Democrats and nine Republicans. All four incumbents are running for re-election, and all four face primary challengers. There are no contested Democratic primaries.

State

Utah voters will decide primaries for state treasurer and eight of the 15 seats on the Board of Education. Voters will also decide primaries for state Senate and state House

Fifteen districts in the state Senate are up for election. Republicans have a 23-6 Senate majority. Seventy-five districts in the House are up for election. Republicans have a 58-17 majority. Fifteen of the 82 Utah state legislators running for re-election this year—two Democrats and 13 incumbents—have contested primaries. 

Utah uses a unique convention-primary structure where candidates participate in party conventions before advancing to the primary. Conventions were held on April 23. Three incumbents were defeated in conventions this year: Reps. Stephen Handy (R), Douglas Sagers (R), and Steve Waldrip (R). This was the most state legislative incumbents defeated in Utah’s conventions since 2014.

In Utah, the primary candidate with the most votes wins—even if that candidate receives less than 50% of the total vote. Utah is one of 40 states without primary election runoffs. The state cancels uncontested primaries, and write-in candidates participate only in general elections, not primaries. 

Keep reading 

A look at Oklahoma’s June 28 elections

Now, over to Oklahoma’s June 28 primaries. If necessary, primary runoffs will be held Aug. 23.

Congress

Voters will decide primaries for two U.S. Senate seats and all five U.S. House districts. 

Oklahoma is the only state this cycle in which both its U.S. Senate seats are up for election. Longtime U.S. Sen. Jim Inhofe, who took office in 1994, announced he would retire on Jan. 3, 2023, triggering a special election. The candidate who wins in the general election will serve the remainder of Inhofe’s term, which ends in 2027. Ten candidates are running in the special Republican primary. The special Democratic primary was canceled because Kendra Horn was the only candidate to file. The winner of the Republican primary will face Horn, Robert Murphy (L), and Ray Woods (I) in the November general election. 

Approximately one-third of U.S. Senate seats is up for election every two years. In 2020, Georgia held two U.S. Senate elections (both went to runoffs in January 2021). Before that, both of Mississippi’s U.S. Senate seats were up for election in 2018.   

Sen. James Lankford (R) is running in a regularly scheduled U.S. Senate election. Three candidates—Lankford, Joan Farr, and Jackson Lahmeyer—are running in the Republican primary. Six candidates—Arya Azma, Dennis Baker, Jason Bollinger, Jo Glenn, Madison Horn, Brandon Wade—are running in the Democratic primary. 

All five of Oklahoma’s U.S. House districts are on the ballot this year. Republicans represent all five districts. Twenty-eight candidates are running for Oklahoma’s five U.S. House districts, including five Democrats and 23 Republicans.

State

Oklahoma voters will decide primaries for a range of state executive offices, including governor, lieutenant governor and attorney general. Additionally, voters will decide primaries for 24 districts in the state Senate and all 101 districts in the state Assembly. 

Republicans have a 39-9 Senate majority and an 82-18 majority in the Assembly. Eighty-eight of the 125 districts up for election in Oklahoma in 2022 are uncontested, meaning voters in 70% of districts will have either only a Democrat or only a Republican on their general election ballots. This is both the largest number and highest rate of uncontested districts since 2014. 

In Oklahoma, primary candidates must get a majority of the vote to win. If no candidate receives more than 50% of the total vote, the two candidates with the most votes advance to an Aug. 23 runoff election. Oklahoma is one of 10 states that conduct runoff elections as part of their party nomination process.

Keep reading



Decade-high rate of state legislative open seats

Welcome to the Friday, June 24, Brew. 

By: Douglas Kronaizl

Here’s what’s in store for you as you start your day:

  1. The percentage of state legislative open seats is at a decade-high
  2. The latest on ballot measure certifications
  3. Election preview—Illinois’ Republican gubernatorial primary

The percentage of state legislative open seats is at a decade-high

A decade-high 23% of state legislative seats up for election this year are open, meaning no incumbents are running. This is based on an analysis of 30 states where Ballotpedia has collected post-filing deadline data in 2022.

This elevated rate of open seats is similar to the last post-redistricting cycle, 2012, in which 22% of seats up for election in these 30 states were open.

Open seats typically occur when an incumbent leaves office. But in post-redistricting cycles it is also common to see open seats when incumbents are drawn into other districts, leaving their old districts open

When compared to 2012, these three states have the largest increase in the number of open seats this year:

  • Oregon: a 140% increase from 10 open seats to 24;
  • Pennsylvania: a 122% increase from 18 to 40; and,
  • Georgia: a 96% increase from 26 to 51.

These three states have the largest decrease in the number of open seats this year compared to 2012:

  • Utah: a 43% decrease from 14 open seats to eight;
  • New Mexico: a 41% decrease from 22 to 13; and,
  • North Carolina: a 37% decrease from 22 to 15.

Open seats can alter the makeup of state legislatures both in terms of politics and personality. Since no incumbents are present, newcomers to the chamber are guaranteed to win these seats. Open seats represent a baseline, but the number of newcomers can increase if incumbents lose in primaries or general elections.

There are four states—Arizona, Colorado, Maine, and Idaho—where over one-third of the state legislature will be represented by newcomers based solely on the number of open seats.

Of these four, Arizona, Colorado, and Maine all have term limit laws, which can require incumbents to leave office after serving a maximum number of years. Maine had the largest number of term-limited incumbents in this group with 46, followed by Colorado with 13, and Arizona with nine.

In three states—Utah, Indiana, and South Carolina—less than 10% of the state legislature is guaranteed to newcomers based on open seats. None of these states have term limit laws.

Open seats are just one of the many primary competitiveness statistics Ballotpedia analyzes throughout the election cycle. Use the link below to view more information on primary competitiveness at all levels of government in 2022.

Keep reading 

The latest on ballot measure certifications

We’ve got another update on this year’s statewide ballot measure certifications! The last time we checked in on certified measures, on June 8, we reported 103 statewide measures certified for the 2022 ballot in 34 states. That number is now up to 108 measures in 35 states, 16 less than the average number certified at this point in other even-numbered years from 2010 to 2020.

Here’s an update on the most recent news from the world of ballot measures:

Three new measures in two states were certified for the ballot last week, meaning voters will have a chance to weigh in on them in November:

Supporters have submitted signatures that are pending verification for nine initiatives in five states:

From 2010 to 2020, the average number of statewide ballot measures certified in an even-numbered year was 164. By this time during those years, an average of 124 statewide measures had been certified for the ballot.

Use the link below to read more about this year’s statewide ballot measures. And to keep up with all things ballot measures, click here to subscribe to the State Ballot Measure Monthly!

Keep reading 

Election preview—Illinois’ Republican gubernatorial primary

With this week’s quiet primary scheduled behind us, we’ve got a busy Tuesday coming up on June 28 with five states holding primaries. Today, we’re taking a closer look at one of those primaries in particular: Illinois’ Republican gubernatorial race.

Six candidates are running for the Republican nod for governor of Illinois. State Sen. Darren Bailey and Aurora Mayor Richard Irvin have led the field in fundraising and media coverage. Here’s a bit more on those candidates :

  • Bailey was first elected to the Illinois Senate in 2020. In his campaign ads, he has highlighted his support of law enforcement and former President Donald Trump (R) and his opposition to the state’s current tax and spending structure.
  • Irvin was first elected mayor of Aurora, the state’s second-largest city, in 2017. His ads have highlighted his experience as a prosecutor, support for increasing police department budgets, and his economic record as mayor.

Both candidates have also emphasized their opposition to incumbent Gov. J.B. Pritzker (D) who is seeking a second term.

Gary Rabine, Paul Schimpf, Max Solomon, and Jesse Sullivan are also running in the primary.

Donations and campaign ads have been a point of focus in the race. The Chicago Sun-Times’ Tina Sfondeles wrote, “Rather than on debate stages, the race is largely being played out via millions of dollars worth of competing TV campaign ads.” 

As of May 22, Bailey and Irvin had both received noteworthy individual campaign contributions, including $9 million to Bailey from businessman Richard Uihlein and $50 million to Irvin from hedge fund manager Ken Griffin.

Recent polling has shown Bailey in the lead followed by Irvin but with large percentages of undecided voters. Averages from three polls since the start of May show Bailey with 30% support followed by Irvin with 20%. Collectively, all other candidates have received 23% support and 27% remain undecided.

In Illinois, a candidate can win a primary with a plurality, rather than a majority, of the vote, meaning the winner is the candidate with the most votes regardless of whether he or she crosses the 50% threshold.

Illinois has had a Democratic governor since Pritzker defeated then-incumbent Gov. Bruce Rauner (R) 55-39% in 2018. In that race, the two candidates contributed a total of $240 million to their own campaigns, $172 million for Pritzker and $68 million for Rauner.

Two race forecasters rate the 2022 general election as Solid Democratic and one gives it a Likely Democratic rating.

Keep reading



Ballotpedia’s mid-year recall report shows sustained interest in school board recall

Welcome to the Thursday, June 23, Brew. 

By: David Luchs

Here’s what’s in store for you as you start your day:

  1. Ballotpedia’s mid-year recall report shows sustained interest in school board recall
  2. An update on this week’s battleground primary results
  3. New York court overturns state Assembly map for 2024; rules existing boundaries be used for this year’s elections

Ballotpedia’s mid-year recall report shows sustained interest in school board recall

In the first half of 2022, Ballotpedia tracked 152 recall efforts against 240 officials. These figures represent an 8% drop in recall efforts from 2021, when we tallied 165 recall efforts against 263 officials by midyear. In comparison, the highest number of recall efforts we have tracked by midyear was 189 in 2016. The lowest was 72 in 2019.

For the second year in a row, school board members drew more recall petitions than any other group. One-third of officials who faced recall campaigns in the first half of 2022 were school board members. City council members—the officials who drew the most efforts from 2016 to 2020—accounted for 32% of officials targeted for recall in 2022. 

For the first time since Ballotpedia started tracking this statistic in 2015, Michigan was the state with the most officials facing recall efforts in the first half of the year. Michigan saw 70 officials subject to a recall campaign, surpassing California, which had the most officials targeted for recall midway through the year from 2015 through 2021. 

In 2020, Ballotpedia began following recalls related to coronavirus and government responses to it. We have tallied 245 such efforts since 2020, including 27 efforts against 66 officials in the first half of 2022.

In this report, Ballotpedia also highlighted five noteworthy recall campaigns: the effort against Colorado Governor Jared Polis (D), the effort against San Francisco District Attorney Chesa Boudin, the effort against County Commissioner William Bunek (R) in Leelanau County, Michigan, and the efforts against members of the San Francisco school board in California and the Newberg school board in Oregon.

Keep reading

An update on this week’s battleground primary results

We covered elections in four states and the District of Columbia on Tuesday, including statewide primaries in Virginia and statewide primary runoffs in Alabama, Arkansas, and Georgia.

Here’s a look at election results in the four races we identified as battlegrounds:

  • Katie Britt wins Republican nomination for U.S. Senate in Alabama: Katie Britt defeated Mo Brooks in the Republican primary runoff for U.S. Senate in Alabama, winning 63% of the vote to Brooks’ 37%. Britt, a former chief of staff to outgoing incumbent Richard Shelby (R), had endorsements from Shelby and former President Donald Trump (R). Brooks, a member of the U.S. House, had endorsements from U.S. Sens. Ted Cruz (R-Texas) and Rand Paul (R-Ky.).
  • Dale Strong wins Republican nomination in AL-05: Dale Strong defeated Casey Wardynski in the Republican primary runoff in Alabama’s 5th Congressional District. Strong had 63% of the vote to Wardynski’s 37%. Neither President Trump (R) nor incumbent Mo Brooks (R) endorsed in this race.
  • Wes Allen wins Republican nomination for Alabama Secretary of State: Wes Allen defeated Jim Zeigler in the Republican primary runoff for Alabama Secretary of State. Allen had 65% of the vote to Zeigler’s 35%.
  • Yesli Vega wins Republican nomination to challenge U.S. Rep. Abigail Spanberger: Yesli Vega defeated four other candidates to win the Republican nomination in Virginia’s 7th Congressional District. Vega had 29% of the vote to runner-up Derrick Anderson’s 24%. She will face incumbent Abigail Spanberger (D) in a general election that forecasters expect will be close.

As of writing, three incumbent state legislators had lost renomination in Arkansas’ primary runoffs and a fourth lost renomination in a primary runoff in Georgia. All four legislators were Republicans.

This year, Republican incumbents have lost at a higher rate than Democrats. Of the 1,265 Republican incumbents who filed for re-election, 93 (7.3%) have lost to primary challengers. For Democrats, 18 of the 786 who filed for re-election (2.3%) have lost.

Keep reading 

New York court overturns state Assembly map for 2024; rules existing boundaries be used for this year’s elections

An appellate division of the New York Supreme Court ruled on June 10 that the state’s Assembly district boundaries adopted in February 2022 were invalid but should still be used for the 2022 legislative elections. The appellate division ruling determined that the Assembly district map was enacted in violation of the state’s constitutional redistricting process and that a New York City-based state trial court should oversee new boundaries for the 2024 elections.

New York enacted new state Senate districts on May 20 when Steuben County Surrogate Court Justice Patrick McAllister ordered the adoption of maps drawn by a court-appointed redistricting special master. McAllister had overturned the Senate district boundaries on March 31 for violating the state’s process for redistricting. The New York Court of Appeals, the state’s highest court, upheld McAllister’s decision on April 27. On April 29, McAllister postponed New York’s primary elections for U.S. House and state Senate districts to August 23.

In 2014, New York voters approved a constitutional amendment establishing new redistricting procedures beginning in 2020. This amendment created a 10-member commission to adopt redistricting plans, with state legislative leaders appointing eight members of the commission and the commission itself selecting the other two members. The amendment required that the legislature reject two separate sets of redistricting plans before amending the commission’s proposals and that districts not be drawn to favor or disfavor candidates or parties. In prior redistricting cycles, the legislature was responsible for its own redistricting.

The commission voted 5-5 on January 3, 2022, on two sets of proposals for legislative redistricting, so it submitted both sets of proposals to the legislature. Both the state Assembly and state Senate voted down the map proposals on January 10, and the commission did not submit a new set of maps to the legislature. On February 3, 2022, Gov. Kathy Hochul (D) signed new state legislative district boundaries that the legislature had developed after the state Senate approved them 43-20 and the state Assembly approved them 120-27. 

In other recent redistricting-related developments, the Louisiana state legislature finished its special redistricting session on Friday without approving a new congressional map. A federal judge had given the state until June 20 to draw a new congressional map after finding the original draft unconstitutional because only one of the state’s six congressional districts was majority Black. Secretary of State Kyle Ardoin (R) and Attorney General Jeff Landry (R) appealed to the Supreme Court of the United States Friday requesting the court overturn the order and allow the original maps to stand.

Keep reading