Author

Douglas Kronaizl

Douglas Kronaizl is a staff writer at Ballotpedia. Contact us at editor@ballotpedia.org.

Primary watch: number of contested state legislative primaries is up 25% compared to 2020

There are 25% more contested state legislative primaries this year than in 2020, including 55% more Republican primaries and 8% more top-two/four primaries. Democratic primaries are down 8%.

These figures include elections in 36 states that account for 4,538 of the 6,166 state legislative seats up for election this year (74%).

A primary is contested when there are more candidates running than available nominations, meaning at least one candidate must lose.

Since our last update on July 18, we have added post-filing deadline data from Connecticut and Delaware. Overall, 11 states in this analysis have Democratic trifectas, 19 have Republican trifectas, and six have divided governments.

Of the 36 states in this analysis, 33 are holding partisan primaries. Three states—California, Nebraska, and Washington—use top-two primaries.

The number of Democratic primaries has increased in 11 states, decreased in 18, and remains the same in three. The number of Republican primaries has increased in 29 states and decreased in four. The table below shows partisan statistics for the three states with the largest increases and decreases so far.

In addition to a state’s political makeup and party activity, redistricting is another reason for an increase in primary competitiveness.

After redistricting, some states—like Arkansas—hold elections for every district, while in other years, fewer districts are up each cycle. This creates more opportunities for primaries to occur. Or, like in West Virginia, redistricting creates new districts and, by extension, more primary opportunities. Currently, the total number of possible primaries affected by these changes is up 1.4% compared to 2020.

For states like New Mexico and South Carolina, where only one chamber is up for election every two years, only those chambers holding elections in 2022 that also held elections in 2020 are included.

Ballotpedia will continue to update these figures as information becomes available. In addition to this analysis, Ballotpedia collects competitiveness statistics at all levels of government, available here. This data is calculated following candidate filing deadlines and readjusted at the time of the primary to account for any changes to candidate lists.



156 state legislators have changed their party affiliations while in office since 1994

Welcome to the Friday, July 21, Brew. 

By: Douglas Kronaizl

Here’s what’s in store for you as you start your day:

  1. 156 state legislators have changed their party affiliations while in office since 1994
  2. And that’s a wrap—final statewide filing deadline passes in Louisiana
  3. #FridayTrivia: How many states begin early general election voting in September?

156 state legislators have changed their party affiliations while in office since 1994

When we talk about districts changing partisan control, we usually think of election results with one party defeating the other at the polls. But partisan control can change mid-cycle, too, when incumbent legislators choose to change or drop their affiliation.

Ballotpedia has identified 156 state legislators who have changed their party affiliations while in office since 1994.

The most common change has been Democrats switching to become Republicans. Of the 156 changes, 76, or 49%, fall into that category.

This is followed by Democrats who switch to a third party or drop their affiliation to become an independent. There have been 27 such changes, representing 17% of the total.

Overall, since 1994:

  • Democrats have lost 103 seats and gained 25, resulting in a net loss of 78.
  • Republicans have lost 42 seats and gained 82, a net 40 gain.
  • Minor party/independent members have lost 11 seats and gained 49, giving them a net gain of 38.

The largest number of changes came in 2010 when 27 legislators changed their party affiliations. During that year, 25 Democrats switched to become Republicans and one Democrat and one Republican switched to become independents. No incumbents switched to become Democrats.

The next-largest number came in 2021, with 19 changes: one Republican and three other legislators became Democrats, four Democrats and one other legislator became Republicans, and five Democrats and five Republicans switched to a third party or dropped their affiliations.

Democrats had their largest losses and, inversely, Republicans had their largest gains, during the period around the 2010 midterm elections, which was a Republican wave at the state legislative level. 

The 2010 elections also switched which party controlled the majority of state legislative seats across the country from Democrats to Republicans, a majority that continues today with Republicans holding 54% of all seats to Democrats 44%.

More recently, a mixture of both Democrats and Republicans have switched their partisan affiliations to independent or a minor party. These changes have been most pronounced from 2017 to the present, with 39 major party incumbents making such a change. These recent years account for 80% of all changes to third party or independents since 1994.

The charts below show the number of changes over time since 2005. The first has the number of legislators who changed to the party shown. The second has the number of legislators who changed from the party shown.

The most recent incumbent to change their party affiliation, and the only so far this year, was Mississippi State Rep. Shanda Yates, who left the Democratic Party in January to become an independent.

For context, these 156 changes represent a drop in the bucket in terms of the total number of state legislators. Today, there are 7,383 state legislative seats: 1,972 in Senates and 5,411 in Houses.

But when an incumbent legislator changes their party affiliation while in office, it can speak to larger political changes at a district or statewide level. 

These changes can also shake up control of a chamber, like in the Washington Senate in 1981, when a Democratic incumbent became a Republican, breaking a tie and giving Republicans a majority.

To learn more about incumbent legislators who changed their party affiliations or to let us know of others we might have missed, use the link below.

Keep reading 

And that’s a wrap—final statewide filing deadline passes in Louisiana

Today, July 22, is the filing deadline for statewide candidates in Louisiana and the final filing deadline for major-party candidates for statewide office in the 2022 election cycle

The first statewide filing deadline was on Dec. 13, 2021, in Texas. The month with the single-most U.S. House filing deadlines was March (20) followed by June (9) and April (8). In addition to Louisiana, Delaware and Rhode Island also had filing deadlines in July.

How did we get here? While most filing deadlines are set before the election cycle begins, states might move or change their filing deadlines throughout the process. This year, redistricting affected congressional filing deadlines in seven states, as district lines must be in place so candidates know where they are running. 

Additionally, in Louisiana, a federal court moved the deadline for candidates qualifying by petition from June 22 to July 8. The July 22 deadline for candidates qualifying by paying a filing fee remained unchanged.

In the 2020 election cycle, two states postponed filing deadlines for major party, statewide candidates in response to the coronavirus pandemic: Louisiana and Michigan. Several other states left deadlines in place but reduced or eliminated petition signature requirements.

After a filing deadline, voters learn who exactly qualified to appear on their ballots. But these candidate lists can still change as candidates might withdraw or drop out of races before the election. 

We will stay on top of these changes so you can use our Sample Ballot Lookup tool to see the candidates in your upcoming elections here!

Keep reading 

#FridayTrivia: How many states begin early general election voting in September?

The November general election is 109 days away, but in some states, voters can start casting ballots even sooner. In Pennsylvania, for example, voting will begin 59 days from now on Sept. 19, the day absentee/mail-in ballots become available there. In the Wednesday Brew, we brought you a nationwide look at when states’ early voting periods begin.

How many states begin early general election voting in September?

  1. 9
  2. 13
  3. 4
  4. 20


4.8% of state legislative incumbents who filed for re-election have lost in primaries

So far this year, 135 state legislative incumbents—29 Democrats and 106 Republicans—have lost to primary challengers.

Across the 27 states that have held primaries, 4.8% of incumbents running for re-election have lost, an elevated level of incumbent losses compared to previous cycles.

These totals include data from Maryland, which held state legislative primaries on July 19. No incumbents have lost in these primaries so far, but 55 races remain uncalled.

This year, Republican incumbents have lost at a higher rate than Democrats. Of the 1,574 Republican incumbents who filed for re-election, 106 (6.7%) have lost to primary challengers. For Democrats, 29 of the 1,208 who filed for re-election (2.4%) have lost.

But fewer Democratic incumbents are facing primary challengers than their Republican counterparts. Around 25% of Democratic incumbents who filed for re-election faced contested primaries compared to 32% for Republicans.

In these 26 states, 2,784 incumbents filed for re-election, 806 of whom (29%) faced primary challengers.

Thirty of these 135 incumbent defeats (22%) were guaranteed due to redistricting. When states redraw legislative lines, incumbents can oftentimes end up in a new district with other incumbents leading to incumbent v. incumbent primaries or general elections. Since, in these races, there are more incumbents running than nominations or seats available, at least one incumbent must lose.

Of the 27 states that have held primaries so far, eight have Democratic trifectas, 15 have Republican trifectas, and four have divided governments. Across these 27 states, there are 3,525 seats up for election, 57% of the nationwide total.

The figures for 2022 will likely increase. There are currently 61 uncalled primaries featuring incumbents—39 Democratic and 23 Republican—and 20 primaries featuring New York Senate incumbents scheduled for Aug. 23.

You can view more information about state-specific and historic information regarding incumbent defeats by clicking “Learn More” below.



Sixteen states are holding primaries in August

Welcome to the Tuesday, July 19, Brew. 

By: Douglas Kronaizl

Here’s what’s in store for you as you start your day:

  1. Looking ahead to the August primaries
  2. Eight candidates running in Wisconsin’s Democratic U.S. Senate primary
  3. You’re invited: Election Timing and Voter Turnout book discussion

Looking ahead to the August primaries

Maryland is holding statewide primaries today, July 19, the only state to do so in July this cycle. But one of the busiest months on this year’s election calendar is rapidly approaching.

Sixteen states will hold statewide primaries in August, second only to June when 17 states held primaries. August primaries will take place on six different dates, up from four in June.

August’s six statewide primary dates are:

And here’s a closer look at a few of the battleground primaries we will be covering throughout the month:

  • Michigan’s Republican gubernatorial primary: six candidates are running in the primary. Gov. Gretchen Whitmer (D) is running for re-election. The fundraising and polling leaders are Tudor Dixon, Ryan Kelley, Kevin Rinke, and Garrett Soldano. Five candidates failed to make the ballot after state officials found petition circulators those campaigns hired had forged signatures on their nominating petitions. One of those candidates—James Craig—is running as a write-in.
  • Alaska’s At-large Congressional District top-four primary: twenty-two candidates are running in a top-four primary for Alaska’s at-large U.S. House district. All candidates will appear on the same ballot. The top four finishers will advance to a general election using ranked-choice voting. This primary coincides with a special ranked-choice general election to pick a successor to U.S. Rep. Don Young (R), who died in March. One Democrat—Mary Peltola—and two Republicans—Nick Begich and Sarah Palin—are running in that race after Al Gross (I) dropped out after the primary.
  • New York’s 12th Congressional District Democratic primary: in what is likely to be the cycle’s sixth and final incumbent v. incumbent primary, six candidates are seeking the nomination, including U.S. Reps. Carolyn Maloney and Jerry Nadler. Both are members of the Congressional Progressive Caucus and describe themselves as progressives. 

Four incumbents—two Democrats and two Republicans—have lost in incumbent v. incumbent primaries so far this cycle. In addition to New York’s 12th District Democratic primary, there is another Democratic primary in Michigan’s 11th District featuring U.S. Reps. Andy Levin and Haley Stevens.

To stay on top of the latest primary conflicts, subscribe to Ballotpedia’s free weekly newsletter, The Heart of the Primaries. The Heart of the Primaries details policy differences between candidates, which donor groups are behind which candidates (and why!), moves by political operatives, polling, and more. Two versions are published weekly: one for Democratic primaries and one for Republican primaries.

Keep reading 

Eight candidates running in Wisconsin’s Democratic U.S. Senate primary

Speaking of August primaries, today, we’re highlighting the Democratic U.S. Senate primary in Wisconsin, scheduled for Aug. 9.

Eight candidates are running in the primary. Lt. Gov. Mandela Barnes, Treasurer Sarah Godlewski, Milwaukee Bucks executive Alex Lasry, and Outagamie County Executive Tom Nelson have received the most media attention. Kou Lee, Steven Olikara, Peter Peckarsky, and Darrell Williams are also running.

CNN’s Simone Pathe described the Democratic primary as “the last truly unsettled Democratic contest in a competitive general election state.”

Barnes was elected lieutenant governor in 2018 and served in the state Assembly from 2013 to 2017. According to the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel’s Isaac Yu, Barnes “is running on issues that range from rebuilding the middle class to bringing manufacturing back to Wisconsin to supporting family farms.” The Congressional Black Caucus, U.S. Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y.), and U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) endorsed Barnes.

Godlewski was elected state treasurer in 2018 and has highlighted that experience, saying she “ensured the state invested in renewable energy projects, broadband expansion, … supported Wisconsin small businesses,” and secured “record funding for technology and books in public schools.” EMILY’s List, the National Organization for Women, and former U.S. Rep. Steve Kagen (D-Wisc.) endorsed Godlewski.

Lasry is a vice president of the NBA’s Milwaukee Bucks who previously worked in former President Barack Obama’s (D) administration. In a Candidate Connection survey submitted to Ballotpedia, Lasry listed raising wages and creating union jobs, rebuilding infrastructure, and protecting democracy as his three key messages. Seven Wisconsin labor union chapters and Milwaukee Mayor Cavalier Johnson (D) endorsed Lasry.

Nelson was elected executive of Outagamie County in 2011 after serving in the state Assembly since 2005, including a period as the chamber’s majority leader from 2008 to 2011. In a Candidate Connection survey submitted to Ballotpedia, Nelson said he supports labor, family farms, and universal healthcare. Nelson also said he had a history of winning in Republican-leaning areas. Six Wisconsin labor union chapters, Our Wisconsin Revolution, and New Deal America endorsed Nelson.

Incumbent U.S. Sen. Ron Johnson (R), first elected in 2010, is seeking re-election, making him one of two incumbent Republicans up for election this year in a state Joe Biden (D) won in the 2020 presidential election. The other such incumbent, U.S. Sen. Pat Toomey (R-Penn.), is retiring.

Two election forecasters rate the general election as Tilt or Lean Republican, and one rates it as a Toss-up.

Keep reading 

You’re invited: Election Timing and Voter Turnout book discussion

Elections take place at various—and sometimes unpredictable—times throughout the year. Why isn’t the election calendar more uniform? Who decides when elections are held? What are the effects of a spread-out electoral schedule?

You are invited to listen in as Ballotpedia staff, led by assistant staff writer Paul Rader, dive into these questions and more while discussing Sarah F. Anzia’s 2013 book Timing and Turnout: How Off-Cycle Elections Favor Organized Groups.

Discussions will be held every Friday at 4:00 PM ET from July 29 to Sept. 16, 2022, as we cover Anzia’s findings as well as Ballotpedia’s role in informing and educating voters about the ins and outs of the U.S. electoral calendar.

You can use the link below to sign up for notifications and learn more about the book.

We hope you will join us!

Keep reading



Primary watch: number of contested state legislative primaries is up 26% compared to 2020

There are 26% more contested state legislative primaries this year than in 2020, including 56% more Republican primaries and 8% more top-two/four primaries. Democratic primaries are down 8%.

These figures include elections in 34 states that account for 4,289 of 6,166 state legislative seats up for election this year (70%).

A primary is contested when there are more candidates running than available nominations, meaning at least one candidate must lose.

Since our last update on July 5, we have added post-filing deadline data from Tennessee and Washington. Overall, nine states in this analysis have Democratic trifectas, 19 have Republican trifectas, and six have divided governments.

Of the 34 states in this analysis, 31 are holding partisan primaries. Three states—California, Nebraska, and Washington—use top-two primaries.

The number of Democratic primaries has increased in 11 states, decreased in 16, and remains the same in three. The number of Republican primaries has increased in 28 states and decreased in three. The table below shows partisan statistics for the three states with the largest increases and decreases so far.

In addition to a state’s political makeup and party activity, redistricting is another reason for an increase in primary competitiveness.

After redistricting, some states—like Arkansas—hold elections for every district, while in other years, fewer districts are up each cycle. This creates more opportunities for primaries to occur. Or, like in West Virginia, redistricting creates new districts and, by extension, more primary opportunities. Currently, the total number of possible primaries affected by these changes is up 1.3% compared to 2020.

For states like New Mexico and South Carolina, where only one chamber is up for election every two years, only those chambers holding elections in 2022 that also held elections in 2020 are included.

Ballotpedia will continue to update these figures as information becomes available. In addition to this analysis, Ballotpedia collects competitiveness statistics at all levels of government, available here. This data is calculated following candidate filing deadlines and readjusted at the time of the primary to account for any changes to candidate lists.



The final sneak peek: mayoral and school board elections

Welcome to the Friday, July 15, Brew. 

By: Douglas Kronaizl

Here’s what’s in store for you as you start your day:

  1. Previewing mayoral and school board elections
  2. The next U.S. Supreme Court term begins in October
  3. #FridayTrivia: How many abortion-related ballot measures have been certified for the ballot so far this year?

Previewing mayoral and school board elections

All this week, we’ve brought you analyses and sneak peeks into the upcoming general elections at all levels of government, from the U.S. Senate to state legislatures.

In a midterm election year, attention tends to focus on these high-profile races. But when voters go to the polls, they’re likely to find local races on their ballots, as well – particularly with more than 500,000 elected officials nationally.

Here’s a look at mayoral and school board races Ballotpedia covers across the largest cities and school districts in the country.

Mayoral elections

Twenty-four of the 100 largest U.S. cities by population are holding mayoral elections in 2022. In 15 of those cities, the incumbent is a Democrat. Four incumbents are Republicans, one is independent, and three are nonpartisan. One office is currently vacant.

Of the races we cover, two of those cities hold partisan elections, where candidates appear on the ballot with party labels. The rest hold nonpartisan elections. In cities with nonpartisan elections, Ballotpedia uses several sources to identify partisan affiliation: direct outreach to the officeholder, candidacy in some other partisan office, or identification of partisan affiliation by multiple media outlets.

While most mayoral elections are scheduled for later this year, four of the 100 largest cities have already held their contests:

No party changes resulted from any of those elections.

Ballotpedia also covers mayoral elections in every state capital, 11 of which are holding elections in 2022. At the start of this year, Democrats held the mayorship in nine of those cities, and Republicans held two.

One race we will be watching closely is the mayoral race in Los Angeles, Calif., where Karen Bass (D) and Rick Caruso (D) will face off in November after advancing from a top-two primary in June. Bass, a member of the U.S. House, has held elected office as a Democrat since 2005. In January 2022, Caruso announced he changed his party registration from no party preference to Democrat.

School board elections

Ballotpedia covers school board elections in 470 school districts, including the 200 largest districts by student enrollment and all districts in the 100 largest cities by population. 

This year, we are covering school board elections in 373 districts across 28 states and Washington D.C. Within those districts, 1,149 seats are up for election with an average term length of four years.

School districts hold elections throughout the year, with a majority clustered in November. Twenty-seven percent of districts within our coverage scope have already held general elections, with 70% scheduled for Nov. 8.

Most districts we cover only hold a single general election, but 38% hold primaries and general elections. A majority of primaries—63%—have already come and gone. Maryland, the next state with upcoming school board elections, will hold primaries on July 19.

This year, 2,487 candidates are running for 1,062 school board seats within Ballotpedia’s coverage scope where the filing deadline has passed, an average of 2.34 candidates per seat. This is an 18.7% increase from the average of 1.94 candidates per seat in 2020.

To stay informed on the latest in school board elections and district policy, subscribe to Hall Pass, our weekly education-related newsletter.

Keep reading 

The next U.S. Supreme Court term begins in October

Yesterday we reviewed the events of the most recent SCOTUS sitting. Now, let’s look to the fall. The U.S. Supreme Court will begin hearing cases for its next term on Oct. 3, 2022. 

To date, the court has added 23 cases to its docket for the next term, which the court will decide after hearing oral arguments. None of the cases have been scheduled for arguments as of this writing.

Here’s a look at some of the most recent cases the court accepted for review:

  • Percoco v. United States, which asks whether a private citizen who can influence governmental decision-making should be convicted of bribery;
  • Moore v. Harper, involving the independent state legislature doctrine, which theorizes that the U.S. Constitution allows state legislatures to regulate federal elections without oversight from state courts.

This will be the first full term for Justice Ketanji Brown Jackson, who was sworn in on June 30 to succeed Justice Stephen Breyer following her nomination by President Joe Biden (D) earlier this year.

Keep reading 

#FridayTrivia: How many abortion-related ballot measures have been certified so far this year?

On Tuesday, we brought you an update from the world of ballot measures. 2022 will see the largest number of abortion-related statewide ballot measures on record.

How many abortion-related ballot measures have been certified for the ballot so far this year?

  1. 12
  2. 3
  3. 9
  4. 5


Public defender and deputy district attorney advance to runoff for Office 67 of the Superior Court of Los Angeles County

Elizabeth Lashley-Haynes and Fernanda Maria Barreto advanced from a nonpartisan primary for Office 67 of the Superior Court of Los Angeles County after finishing first and second over a third candidate, Ryan Dibble.

Lashley-Haynes received 37% of the vote in the June 3 primary followed by Barreto with 36%. Since neither candidate received over 50% of the vote needed to win outright, the two will advance to a runoff on Nov. 8.

While the race was officially nonpartisan, meaning candidates appeared on the ballot without party labels, both candidates were endorsed by at least one organization affiliated with the Democratic Party.

The candidates’ legal backgrounds represent both sides of the courtroom, Lashley-Haynes as a public defender and Barreto as a deputy district attorney.

Both Lashley-Haynes and Barreto completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. Below are excerpts from their surveys, which can be viewed in full by clicking on each candidate’s name:

  • Lashley-Haynes“[M]ass incarceration has failed us. Public defenders like me … are well equipped to understand the circumstances that bring Californians into the courtroom and to understand how to prevent crime.”
  • Barreto“With almost 16 years of experience as a [deputy district attorney] handling complex felony cases including murder, rape, and domestic violence, I am capable and qualified … of being a Superior Court Judge.”

The Los Angeles County Democratic Party, the Los Angeles County Public Defenders Union, and four superior court judges in the county endorsed Lashley-Haynes.

The Los Angeles Times, the Burbank Police Officers’ Association, and 21 superior court judges in the county endorsed Barreto.

There are 494 judges on the Superior Court of Los Angeles County, making it the largest trial court in the country. Judges serve six-year terms. Offices on the court only appear on the ballot when an incumbent judge is challenged or, in the case of Office 67, no incumbent files for re-election.

Judges on the Superior Court of Los Angeles County conduct all original trials in the county, except in cases where appellate level courts have original jurisdiction. According to the court’s website, “Cases range from simple traffic infractions to murders; landlord/tenant disputes to multi-million dollar lawsuits; guardianships to involuntary commitments.”



A look at contested state legislative primaries in Wyoming

Wyoming has 48 contested state legislative primaries this year, 31% of the total number of possible primaries, and a 4% increase from 2020.

A primary is contested when more candidates file to run than there are nominations available, meaning at least one candidate must lose.

Of the 48 contested primaries, there are two for Democrats and 46 for Republicans. For Democrats, this is down from six in 2020, a 67% decrease. For Republicans, the number increased 15% from 40 in 2020.

Twenty-eight primaries feature an incumbent, representing 49% of all incumbents who filed for re-election. This is down from 2020, when 31, or 52% of incumbents, faced contested primaries.

All 28 incumbents in contested primaries this year are Republicans. No Democratic incumbents who filed for re-election face a contested primary.

Overall, 168 major party candidates—27 Democrats and 141 Republicans—filed to run. All 62 House districts and 16 of the state’s 31 Senate districts are holding elections. This includes two new House districts and one new Senate district created following redistricting.

Twenty-one of those districts are open, meaning no incumbents filed. This guarantees that at least 23% of the legislature will be represented by newcomers next year.

Wyoming has had a Republican trifecta since 2010 when the party gained control of the governorship. Republicans have controlled both legislative chambers since 1977 and currently hold a 28-2 majority in the Senate and a 51-7 majority in the House with two districts represented by third-party or independent incumbents.

Wyoming’s state legislative primaries are scheduled for August 16, the 14th statewide primary date of the 2022 state legislative election cycle.

Additional reading:

Wyoming State Senate elections

Wyoming House of Representatives elections, 2022



State legislative primaries in Michigan increase compared to recent election cycles

Michigan has 139 contested state legislative primaries this year, 47% of the total number of possible primaries, the highest rate of contested primaries in the state over the past five election cycles.

A primary is contested when more candidates file to run than there are nominations available, meaning at least one candidate must lose.

The Michigan House holds elections every two years. The Senate holds elections every four years during midterm election cycles.

Of the 139 contested primaries, 58 are for Democrats, and 81 are for Republicans. For Democrats, this is down from 67 in 2018—the last time both chambers held elections—marking a 13% decrease. For Republicans, the number increased 37% from 59 in 2018.

Forty-three primaries feature an incumbent: 18 Democrats and 25 Republicans. This represents 52% of all incumbents who filed for re-election, another high of the past five election cycles.

Overall, 548 major party candidates—256 Democrats and 292 Republicans—filed to run for the state’s 110 House and 38 Senate districts. 

Sixty-seven of those districts are open, guaranteeing that at least 45% of the legislature will be represented by newcomers next year.

Michigan has had a divided government since the election of Gov. Gretchen Whitmer (D) in 2018. Republicans currently hold a 22-16 majority in the Senate and a 56-53 majority in the House with one vacant district.

Michigan’s state legislative primaries are scheduled for August 2, the 11th statewide primary date of the 2022 state legislative election cycle.

Additional reading:

Michigan State Senate elections, 2022

Michigan House of Representatives elections, 2022



Contested state legislative primaries in Ohio increase from 2020

Ohio has 56 contested state legislative primaries this year, 24% of the total number of possible primaries, and 40% more that the 40 contested primaries in 2020.

A primary is contested when more candidates file to run than there are nominations available, meaning at least one candidate must lose.

Of the 56 contested primaries, there are 23 for Democrats and 33 for Republicans. For Democrats, this is up from 17 in 2020, a 35% increase. For Republicans, the number increased 43% from 23 in 2020.

Twenty-six primaries feature an incumbent: eight Democrats and 18 Republicans. This represents 30% of all incumbents who filed for re-election, the highest rate of incumbents in contested primaries compared of the preceding five election cycles.

Overall, 261 major party candidates—120 Democrats and 141 Republicans—filed to run. All of the state’s 99 House districts and 17 of the 33 Senate districts are holding elections this year.

Thirty-one of those districts are open, guaranteeing that at least 23% of the state legislature will be represented by newcomers next year.

Ohio has had a Republican trifecta since 2010 when the party won control of the governorship and state House. Republicans currently hold a 25-8 majority in the Senate and a 64-35 majority in the House.

Ohio’s state legislative primaries are scheduled for August 2, the 11th statewide primary date of the 2022 state legislative election cycle, and the state’s second statewide primary this year. Voters previously decided state executive and congressional primaries on May 3, with state legislative primaries delayed due to litigation regarding redistricting.

Additional reading:

Ohio State Senate elections, 2022

Ohio House of Representatives elections, 2022