Category2022 elections

All candidates for the Collin County Justice of the Peace, Precinct 3 Place 2 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Collin County Justice of the Peace, Precinct 3 Place 2 —incumbent Mike Missildine (R) and Irvin Barrett (D) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office.

According to the Collin County website, a Justice of Peace’s “primary function is to hold civil court both justice and small claims as quickly and judiciously as possible to relieve the caseload of the higher courts. In addition to these functions the court has criminal jurisdiction of such cases as bad checks, truancy, some traffic offenses, issue peace bonds and hold hearings on the same.”

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office?            

Missildine:       

  • “Court Access: Everyone in the community should have equal access to Justice and the courts. While in office, I have worked my staff and county partners to ensure our office provides the best and most accessible service possible.”
  • “Growth: Case management is a critical issue to JP courts as they are the busiest courts in Texas by volume.”
  • “Community Service: Most guests of the court are self-represented litigants. It is understandable that the majority of visitors to the court do not know the process to file a case and represent themselves.”

Barrett:               

  • “Education is extremally important. Reverend Barrett believes it is a great equalizer in our country. As Justice of the Peace, Reverend Barrett is responsible for handling Truancy cases from the various ISDs in Pct.3.”
  • “Accessibility to the courtroom is another key point for Reverend Barrett. He believes the Justice of the Peace works for the people; not the other way around.”
  • “Our environment is our community. As Justice of the Peace Reverend Irvin will handle tenant and property management disputes as well as handling small claims disputes between community members.”

Click on candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

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All candidates for South Carolina House of Representatives District 85 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for South Carolina House of Representatives District 85 —Jay Kilmartin (R) and John Davis (L) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office.

Eighty-eight of the country’s 99 state legislative chambers will hold regularly scheduled elections in 2022. The Republican Party controls both chambers of South Carolina’s state legislature. South Carolina is one of 23 states with a Republican trifecta.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What areas of public policy are you personally passionate about?            

Kilmartin:               

“I am 100% pro-life. With Roe v. Wade poised to be overturned, there is no reason that South Carolina shouldn’t outlaw abortion immediately. In 2020, I spoke on the state house steps to end the lockdowns. Our right to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness doesn’t end due to a pandemic. Citizens including students should never be forced to wear masks. I believe in healthcare freedom. Nobody should be forced to take a vaccine to make a living and go about their every day lives.”

Davis:           

“One of the primary points of my campaign is the legalization of marijuana. First off, there is a growing body of research that shows medical use of marijuana has a profound beneficial effect on the lives of those suffering from a variety of illnesses. Far too many people would benefit from medical marijuana, whether it’s to help a veteran through PTSD or depression, a young child reduce the number and frequency of seizures, or to help cancer patients with their post Chemo nausea, there’s proof that allowing marijuana use for medicinal purposes would be a major benefit to our communities.”

Click on candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

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All candidates for South Carolina House of Representatives District 66 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for South Carolina House of Representatives District 66 —Carla Litrenta (D) and David O’Neal (R) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office.

Eighty-eight of the country’s 99 state legislative chambers will hold regularly scheduled elections in 2022. The Republican Party controls both chambers of South Carolina’s state legislature. South Carolina is one of 23 states with a Republican trifecta.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What areas of public policy are you personally passionate about?            

Litrenta:               

  • “Our Economy – preserving and protecting our economy to ensure prosperity for our district, county, and State. Enacting legislation that helps keep small businesses open and allows families to succeed.”
  • “Our Safety – protecting our community members and children. Enacting legislation that helps support law enforcement and allows for gun sense laws.”
  • “Our Future – funding our school systems and supporting our educators. Enacting legislation that supports our school systems and helps retain the teachers and educators.”

O’Neal:           

  • “While our community continues to grow, it is important that public safety remains a top priority. During my time as Mayor of Tega Cay, I was a strong supporter and advocate of our law enforcement.”
  • “Our students are our greatest assets, and our schools are the foremost fountain of knowledge children are exposed to.” 
  • “For every $1 of gas taxes York County sends to Columbia we get 56 cents in return! I will work with SCDOT and York County to ensure ample funding is available to address our regional and local road issues.”

Click on candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

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Incumbent Chris Pappas (D) and Karoline Leavitt (R) face off in NH-01

Incumbent Chris Pappas (D) and Karoline Leavitt (R) are running for New Hampshire’s 1st Congressional District on November 8, 2022.

Pappas served on the New Hampshire Executive Council and in the state House of Representatives before Congress. He emphasizes his experience owning a restaurant. Pappas says his record includes working for affordable healthcare for New Hampshirites and combatting the opioid crisis. Pappas called Leavitt “the most extreme, out-of-step nominee” the district has seen and has criticized Leavitt’s support for the Supreme Court decision that overturned Roe v. Wade.

Leavitt was a presidential writer and assistant press secretary under President Donald Trump (R). She highlights working for her family’s small business while growing up and her work in the Trump administration. Leavitt discusses securing the border, supporting police, and banning critical race theory as priorities. She said Pappas, along with President Joe Biden (D) and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D), are “destroying our economy, brainwashing our children, and allowing illegals to invade.”

Democrats have held the seat since 2017. The 1st District changed party hands five times in elections between 2006 and 2016, alternating between Democrat Carol Shea-Porter and Republican Frank Guinta. Pappas was first elected in 2018, when he defeated Eddie Edwards (R) 54% to 45%. In 2020, Pappas defeated Matt Mowers (R) 51% to 46%.

Leavitt defeated Mowers in the 2022 Republican primary 33% to 26%.

The outcome of this race will affect the partisan balance of the U.S. House of Representatives in the 118th Congress. All 435 districts in the House are up for election. As of September 20, 2022, Democrats hold a 221-212 advantage in the U.S. House with two vacancies. Republicans need to gain a net of six districts to win a majority in the chamber.

Daily Kos calculated what the results of the 2020 presidential election in this district would have been following redistricting. Joe Biden (D) would have received 52.2% of the vote in this district and Donald Trump (R) would have received 46.2%.



Three candidates running in Michigan’s 7th Congressional District

Incumbent Elissa Slotkin (D), Tom Barrett (R), and Leah Dailey (L) are running in the general election for Michigan’s 7th Congressional District on Nov. 8, 2022.

Michigan’s congressional district boundaries were redrawn after the 2020 census. Slotkin was first elected to represent Michigan’s 8th Congressional District in 2018, defeating incumbent Mike Bishop (R) 50.6% to 46.8%. In 2020, she was one of seven Democrats to win a House district that voted for former President Donald Trump (R) in the 2020 election. In December 2021, Slotkin announced that she would run for re-election in the redrawn 7th District, saying, “This new district contains nearly two-thirds of the population that I currently represent, my current congressional headquarters, and my campaign offices from 2018 and 2020.”

The redrawn 7th District encompasses Clinton, Ingham, Livingston, and Shiawassee counties, most of Eaton County, and parts of Oakland and Genessee counties, as well as Lansing, the state’s capital. According to data from Daily Kos, voters in the redrawn 7th District backed President Joe Biden (D) in the 2020 presidential election over former President Donald Trump (R) 49.4% to 48.9%.

Slotkin said, “After three years of representing this area of Mid-Michigan in Congress, I understand the mandate that families here expect me to prioritize: making daily life more affordable by lowering the cost of prescription drugs and child care; rebuilding Michigan’s manufacturing capacity by creating good-paying American jobs that cannot be outsourced; and not letting China eat our lunch.” On her campaign website, Slotkin said, “I’m running for re-election … because I want to build the next generation of cars and chips here in the U.S.; lower the cost of prescription drugs; fight for the Roe standard to preserve women’s personal freedom; and prevent corporate money from warping the political process.”

Before she was elected to Congress, Slotkin was a Middle East analyst in the CIA and worked in national security under Presidents George W. Bush (R) and Barack Obama (D).

Barrett was elected to represent Michigan Senate District 24 in 2018. Before serving in the Senate, Barrett represented District 71 in the Michigan House of Representatives from 2015 to 2019. Barrett served in the U.S. Army during Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom and was a helicopter pilot in the Michigan Army National Guard.

In his response to Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey, Barrett said he was running for Congress “to cut inflation by opposing reckless spending in Washington D.C. to lower the cost of living.” In order to “[m]ake America energy independent again,” Barrett said he would “work to expand America’s energy production, open pipelines, increase drilling, and end our reliance on foreign oil.” On his campaign website, Barret said, “My opponent, Elissa Slotkin, has voted with President Biden every single time – a perfect 100% voting record in support of his disastrous policies.” He said, “[Slotkin’s] support for corporate welfare, slashing domestic energy production, open borders, and higher inflation, is crushing Mid-Michigan families.”

Democratic and Republican House campaign committees have prioritized this election. The Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee (DCCC) included Slotkin in Frontline, its program to help Democratic incumbents win re-election in competitive House districts. The National Republican Congressional Committee (NRCC) included the 7th District in its target list and designated Barrett as a member of the highest tier of its Young Guns program. According to Daily Kos, as of Sept. 19, the DCCC, House Majority PAC, NRCC, and Congressional Leadership Fund had spent more combined in this race than in any other House district.

The outcome of this race will affect the partisan balance of the U.S. House of Representatives in the 118th Congress. All 435 districts in the House are up for election. Democrats hold a 221-212 advantage in the U.S. House with two vacancies.



Voters will decide on 14 statewide ballot measures related to elections, voting, campaign finance, and term limits in 2022

Voters in 10 states will decide on 14 ballot measures related to elections, voting, campaign finance, and term limits in 2022.

Elections and voting policy measures

Ten ballot measures address electoral systems and voting policies.

On Nov. 8, Nevadans will decide whether to join Maine and Alaska in using a form of ranked-choice voting for congressional and certain state offices. Nevada Question 3 would establish an open top-five primary system and ranked-choice voting for general elections. 

In Alabama, voters will decide on Amendment 4, which would prohibit changes to election conduct laws within six months of general elections. Some states, including Alabama, made modifications to election dates, procedures, and administration in 2020, largely in response to the coronavirus pandemic.

Arizona voters are deciding on two measures related to election and voting. Proposition 131 would create the office of lieutenant governor. Arizona is one of five states without a lieutenant governor. Proposition 309 would add requirements for Arizona citizens casting a mail-in ballot, as well as change voter ID requirements for in-person voters.

Connecticut will vote on a constitutional amendment to allow no-excuse early voting. Connecticut is one of five states that has not enacted the policy in some form.

Kansas voters will decide on an amendment to require the election of county sheriffs in counties that had not abolished the office as of January 2022 and provide that sheriffs may be recalled from office or removed by a writ of quo warranto initiated by the attorney general.

The Louisiana State Legislature sent a constitutional amendment to the Dec. 10 ballot that would add that “No person who is not a citizen of the United States shall be allowed to register and vote in this state.” Ohio voters will be deciding on a similar amendment on Nov. 8 that would specifically prohibit local governments from allowing noncitizens or those who lack the qualifications of an elector to vote in local elections.

In Michigan, voters will decide on Proposal 2, which would amend the state constitution to provide voters with the right to vote without harassment, interference, or intimidation; guarantee that military and overseas ballots postmarked by election day are counted; allow for a signed affidavit, as an alternative to the existing photo ID requirement; provide for nine days of early voting; and make other changes.

Nebraska voters will decide on Initiative 432, which would require a photo ID to vote in the state. Twenty-one states require a photo voter ID to vote in person. An additional 14 states require a non-photo ID to vote in person. Nebraska is one of 15 states without an ID requirement.

Campaigns and campaign finance

Arizona voters will also be deciding on Proposition 211, which would require that persons or entities that make an independent expenditure of $50,000 or more on a statewide campaign or $25,000 or more on a local campaign must disclose the names of the money’s original sources. The term original sources would be defined as the persons or businesses that earned the money being spent.

In November, Louisiana voters will decide on a measure to allow classified service/civil service employees to publicly support the election campaigns of individuals in their immediate family when off duty.

Term limits

Voters in Michigan and North Dakota will decide on two measures related to term limits. Michigan Proposal 1 would ​​change the term limits for state legislators from three 2-year terms (6 years) in the state House and two 4-year terms (8 years) in the state Senate to 12 combined years in the legislature. It would also require that elected state legislative and state executive officials must file annual financial disclosure reports.

The North Dakota measure would limit the governor to serving two four-year terms and limit state legislators to serving eight years in the state House and eight years in the state Senate. Currently, North Dakota does not have any term limits on the governor or state legislators.



Votes for Arkansas marijuana legalization initiative will be counted

Votes for Arkansas Issue 4, a marijuana legalization initiative on the November ballot, will be counted after the Arkansas Supreme Court overturned the Arkansas State Board of Election Commissioners’ decision to not certify the initiative’s ballot title.

Responsible Growth Arkansas, the campaign behind the marijuana legalization initiative, submitted more than 190,000 signatures on July 8. The Arkansas secretary of state announced on July 29 that the campaign had submitted more than the required number of valid signatures (89,151) and qualified for the ballot.

On Aug. 3, 2022, the election commissioners declined to certify the ballot title and popular name for the initiative, stating that the language was misleading. The next day, Responsible Growth Arkansas filed a lawsuit in the state Supreme Court. The campaign said the board “[thwarted] the will of the people and their right to adopt laws by initiative.” The campaign requested an expedited review because the deadline for the secretary of state to certify measures for the 2022 ballot was August 25. On August 11, the state Supreme Court ordered the secretary of state to certify the measure for the ballot.

Under Issue 4, adults 21 years old and older would be authorized to possess up to one ounce of marijuana. Adults could possess up to one ounce of marijuana. By March 7, 2023, businesses that already hold licenses under the state’s medical marijuana program would be authorized to sell adult-use marijuana at their existing dispensaries and one additional location for adult-use marijuana sales only. By July 5, 2023, an additional 40 licenses would be given to businesses chosen by a lottery and would need to be located at least five miles away from a dispensary with an active license. The Alcoholic Beverage Control (ABC) Division of the Department of Finance and Administration would regulate the program and provide for licensing.

Responsible Growth Arkansas has raised $4.01 million according to campaign finance reports covering information through August 31. The campaign said Issue 4 would “[support] law enforcement salaries and bolster local police budgets so that our officers can go after serious crime,” “[improve] the Arkansas’ existing medical marijuana program by removing burdensome taxes that are currently being paid by qualified patients receiving medical treatment,” and “safely legalize the sale of cannabis to adults 21 and older and create revenue that goes to more funding for local police departments.”

Safe and Secure Communities registered to oppose the initiative and has raised $2 million. Safe and Secure Communities said, “We’re on a mission to save Arkansas from the destructive effects of legalized drugs, and we need your support. Many cities around the nation are destroyed, and now Arkansas is at risk. Help keep Arkansas communities secure and our citizens safe. The pot industry is directly targeting kids, even though hundreds of scientific studies show that marijuana – especially today’s high-potency weed – permanently damages the teenage brain. Teens who smoke pot regularly drop out at twice the rate of non-users, and as adults they earn less and have a lower IQ. Marijuana-related policy changes, including legalization, have significant unintended consequences for children, adolescents, and cities large and small.”

Marijuana legalization measures are certified to appear on the 2022 ballot in Maryland, Missouri, North Dakota, and South Dakota. Currently, 19 states and Washington, D.C., have legalized the possession and personal use of marijuana for recreational purposes. Eleven states and D.C. had legalized marijuana through the ballot initiative process. A marijuana legalization initiative targeting the 2022 ballot in Oklahoma was ordered to appear on the 2024 ballot after legal challenges were not resolved before state deadlines to print ballots.



Five party committees report largest spending numbers of 2022 election cycle in August

Six party committees have raised a combined $1.4 billion thus far in the 2022 election cycle. In August, the committees raised $84 million, according to recent filings with the Federal Election Commission. 

The Republican National Committee (RNC), Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee (DSCC), National Republican Senatorial Committee (NRSC), Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee (DCCC), and National Republican Congressional Committee (NRCC) all reported their highest disbursement numbers of the cycle in August.

In August, the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee (DSCC) raised $12.6 million and spent $20.9 million, while the National Republican Senatorial Committee (NRSC) raised $12.6 million and spent $19.8 million. So far in the 2022 election cycle, the NRSC has outraised the DSCC with $194.1 million in receipts to the DSCC’s $184.8 million. At this point in the 2020 election cycle, the NRSC led in cumulative fundraising with $167.7 million to the DSCC’s $165.2 million. 

The Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee (DCCC) raised $15.5 million and spent $23.6 million in August. The National Republican Congressional Committee (NRCC) raised $15.6 million and spent $12.5 million. So far in the 2022 election cycle, the DCCC leads in fundraising with $268.4 million to the NRCC’s $240.5 million. At this point in the 2020 cycle, the DCCC had raised $248.8 million and the NRCC had raised $191.0 million.

Between the national committees, the Republican National Committee (RNC) raised and spent more than the Democratic National Committee (DNC) in August. The RNC raised $17.2 million and spent $26.6 million, while the DNC raised $10.9 million and spent $14.5 million. So far in the 2022 election cycle, the RNC has raised $276.4 million to the DNC’s $244.4 million. At this time in the 2020 election cycle, the RNC led in fundraising by a larger margin, with $532.7 million in cumulative receipts to the DNC’s $281.0 million.

This election cycle, the RNC, NRSC, and NRCC have raised 1.9% more than the  DNC, DSCC, and DCCC ($711.1 million to $697.7 million). The Republican committees’ fundraising advantage is up from 1.1% last month.

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Both candidates for Michigan House of Representatives District 8 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Michigan House of Representatives District 8 —Mike McFall (D) and Rob Noble (R) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office.

Eighty-eight of the country’s 99 state legislative chambers will hold regularly scheduled elections in 2022. The Republican Party controls both chambers of Michigan’s state legislature. Michigan is one of 13 states with divided government.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What areas of public policy are you personally passionate about?            

McFall:   

“We must destigmatize mental illness and make care affordable and available when people need help, whether in times of crisis or for routine care. Every kid in Michigan deserves a great public education and providing that is a priority. This starts with affordable or free childcare and preschool for all kids and continues on through making college and technical training affordable and accessible. I will fight for voting rights and oppose every effort to disenfranchise voters or to place barriers between voters and their ballots.”

Noble:       

“1) One item that riles me more than most is the discussion with grade school children of sex and transgenderism. This is WRONG! There is plenty of time for a child to gage their personal lifestyle and a grade school child should be a kid, learning and playing and not thinking about issues such as this! 2) Our teachers are valuable and they should not be forced to take pay cuts or lay-offs because of ‘our’ draconian Governor and her horrible decisions. 3) We need to pay good teachers great money and retain the best of the best. Quality teachers deserve better incomes!”

Click on candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

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Both candidates for Michigan State Senate District 16 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Michigan State Senate District 16 —Katybeth Davis (D) and Joseph Bellino (R) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office.

Eighty-eight of the country’s 99 state legislative chambers will hold regularly scheduled elections in 2022. The Republican Party controls both chambers of Michigan’s state legislature. Michigan is one of 13 states with divided government.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office?            

Davis:   

  • “Racial Justice- The injustice of systemic racism needs to be addressed through, comprehensive criminal justice reform, and investment in BIPOC communities.”
  • “Climate Crisis & Environmental Issues- Ensure the Great Lakes and critical sources of drinking water are protected from contamination by toxic chemicals such as PFAS.”
  • “Access to Healthcare- I will fight to protect healthcare by standing up for people’s access to critical health services such as birth control, mental health services, and cancer screenings.”

Bellino:   

  • “Experience. I have been a house representative for 6 years now and I have learned to apply an empathetic but shrewd approach to legislation that ensures the responsible decision is made but that nobody gets left out in the cold.”
  • “Parental control in education. I will fight to ensure more parental rights in schools, and more options for school of choice, ensuring our children receive the best opportunities.”
  • “Economic development. I have proudly been involved with legislation that has created numerous jobs and brought vast arrays of business to the state and I will continue to do so.”

Click on candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

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