Category2022 elections

Both candidates for Oregon Court of Appeals Position 3 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Oregon Court of Appeals Position 3 —incumbent Darleen Ortega and Vance Day — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office.

The Oregon Court of Appeals, established by statute in 1969, is the intermediate appellate court in Oregon. The court hears all civil and criminal appeals from the circuit courts and also has jurisdiction to review some state administrative agency actions.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office?            

Ortega:               

  • “I am experienced and highly competent. I have authored over 800 opinions and have participated in thousands of cases during my time on the Court of Appeals. That experience has not made me complacent nor institutionalized my thinking.”
  • “I am a judicial and community leader, including on issues of access to justice. I am a frequent speaker and discussion leader on addressing the gaps that exist between the goal of justice and the lived experience of people who interact with the legal system. I relentlessly make space for the voices of the unheard and lead by example in a practice of listening to those voices myself.”
  • “I approach my work with integrity and a relentless commitment to the ideal of justice for all.”

Day:               

  • “Equality: It is my firm belief that our laws should be applied to all people in all places at all times equally.”
  • “Freedom: It is my heartfelt conviction that government in a civil society under our Constitutions exists to respect and preserve our freedoms, not to erode or cancel them in favor of short-term administrative convenience or corrupt political gain.”
  • “Rule of Law: Every citizen has the right to expect that our Constitution and the laws that operate within it mean what they say and don’t mean what they don’t say in a concrete way and that these laws enacted by the People’s elected representatives prevail over the arbitrary and occasionally capricious whims of temporary elected officials.”

Click on candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

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All candidates for Pennsylvania House of Representatives District 87 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Pennsylvania House of Representatives District 87 —Kristal Markle (D) and Thomas Kutz (R) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office.

Eighty-eight of the country’s 99 state legislative chambers will hold regularly scheduled elections in 2022. The Republican Party controls both chambers of Pennsylvania’s state legislature. Pennsylvania is one of 13 states with divided government.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What areas of public policy are you personally passionate about?            

Markle:               

“I am a defender of women’s rights, equal rights, victim’s rights, public education and putting people before politics. I am thrilled to be making history in the 87th district. I will be the first Democrat to sit in this seat and advocate for you. Together, we are breaking glass ceilings by doing the right thing with character and true leadership.

We, the American people, have faced a brutal assault of sickness, death, separation, war, loss, and division. I will lead with courage and love that unites and breathes new life into what can seem hopeless.”

Kutz:               

“As someone building a family in Cumberland County, Thomas is most passionate about leaving the next generation in a better place than Pennsylvania is today. For Thomas, this means advocating for policies that will make Pennsylvania the next hotbed for businesses to come to and where families can move for a great quality of life. Thomas is passionate about ensuring our children have a quality education and that their schools are safe. Thomas is also passionate about finding ways to fund infrastructure improvements so that we can rebuild our roads and bridges. Thomas is pro-life and a strong supporter of the Second Amendment and will promote policies that protect life in all forms.” 

Click on candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

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All candidates for Pennsylvania House of Representatives District 29 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

All three of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Pennsylvania House of Representatives District 29 —Tim Brennan (D), Diane Smith (R), and Rob Ronky (I) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office.

Eighty-eight of the country’s 99 state legislative chambers will hold regularly scheduled elections in 2022. The Republican Party controls both chambers of Pennsylvania’s state legislature. Pennsylvania is one of 13 states with divided government.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What areas of public policy are you personally passionate about?            

Brennan:               

“I am interested in improving education opportunities, investing in infrastructure and improving the dialogue in Harrisburg. Our legislature has failed to fund public education or address structural deficits, while subsidizing shale and big business at the expense of our kids, targeted tax relief and early childhood education.”

Smith:               

“Our economic policies that includes taxes, protecting our environment and preserving open space and the quality of our lives, small businesses/farmers and our infrastructure (both road/bridges and utility).”

Ronky:

“I would vote to keep Pa pro choice. I believe as parents we can do better teaching our children about choices they make. Take the time to explain how babies are made. Teach them ways to be safe. Teach them they can talk to us about how some actions may change their lives.”

Click on candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

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All candidates for Michigan House of Representatives District 60 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Michigan House of Representatives District 60 —Linda Rose Clor (D) and Joseph Aragona (R) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office.

Eighty-eight of the country’s 99 state legislative chambers will hold regularly scheduled elections in 2022. The Republican Party controls both chambers of Michigan’s state legislature. Michigan is one of 13 states under divided government.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What areas of public policy are you personally passionate about?            

Clor:   

“I WILL DO EVERYTHING IN MY POWER TO GET BACK THE RIGHTS OF FEMALES TO HAVE REPRODUCTIVE FREEDOM OF CHOICE, TO PROTECT OUR CHILDREN AT SCHOOL AND ALL PEOPLE IN ALL PUBLIC PLACES. I SUPPORT PUBLIC EDUCATION, THE RIGHT TO HAVE AFFORDABLE OR FREE EDUCATION, HEALTHCARE FOR ALL AND A CLEAN ENVIRONMENT.”       

Aragona:       

“Joseph Aragona is a pro-life, pro-2A, fiscal conservative. He has and will continue to support the efforts of our police departments to protect our society. Joseph started fishing with his father from a young age. As a result, Joseph is passionate about water quality and efforts to clean up our watershed. During the pandemic, Joseph frequented many local businesses, and tried to bring public exposure to their hardship.”

Click on candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

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All candidates for Michigan House of Representatives District 38 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Michigan House of Representatives District 38 —Joey Andrews (D) and Kevin Whiteford (R) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office.

Eighty-eight of the country’s 99 state legislative chambers will hold regularly scheduled elections in 2022. The Republican Party controls both chambers of Michigan’s state legislature. Michigan is one of 13 states under divided government.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office?            

Andrews:               

  • “A common and urgent problem for coastal communities is the rising water levels. Homes have fallen into the lake, basements are constantly flooding, water is standing in yards or fields, and backed-up sewer systems are flooding the streets.”
  • “Affordable Housing has become a critical issue in our communities. Much of this has been driven by the explosion of the short-term rental industry which has sent prices spiraling upwards and broken up neighborhoods and communities.”
  • “While tourism has brought many benefits, investments, and prosperity to our region; the scales have since tipped too far. The tourism and service industry do not provide sustainable middle class jobs to our residents seeking to live here year round and raise a family.”

Whiteford:       

  • “Kevin is a CPA with a Masters in Taxation & has been a successful businessman for over 35 years. He understands the effect of rising inflation and taxes and will work to strengthen communities while working with small businesses of the district by ensuring that everyone can keep more of their hard earned money.”
  • “To protect our community, Kevin knows it is essential to back our brave men and women of law enforcement. Kevin will also prioritize measures to keep our most volnerable populations safe such as the unborn, victims of domestic violence and human trafficking.”
  • “Kevin understands the ways that the pandemic has changed many facets of our lives. Just like for his own family, Kevin is ready to work hard to make positive change through conservative legislation, empowering our communities for today and future generations.”

Click on candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

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132 statewide measures will be on Nov. 8 ballot

Voters in 37 states will decide on 132 ballot measures at the general election on November 8. As five ballot measures were decided at elections earlier this year, and three more will be decided in December, the annual total of statewide ballot measures for 2022 is 140.

Across the U.S., ballot measures will address issues like abortion, marijuana, and election law in November. Topics like sports betting, psychedelic fungi and plants, flavored tobacco, alcohol, firearms, and income taxes are featured on ballots in some states.

Number of citizen-initiated measures below average

This year’s annual total—140—is more than the number of statewide ballot measures in 2020, which was 129. However, the annual total is below the previous decade’s (2010-2020) average of 164. 

The number of citizen-initiated ballot measures and legislative referrals has decreased since 2010. The number of citizen-initiated measures in 2022 is 30, which is the lowest number during the prior decade. In 2020, there were 43 citizen-initiated measures. 

There could be several reasons for the lower number of initiatives in 2022. For 2022, 851 initiatives were proposed, and 3.5% made the ballot. In 2016, for instance, 1,069 initiatives were proposed, and 7.1% made the ballot. Overall, there is a correlation between the number of initiatives proposed and the number certified for the ballot, and there is also a decade-long trend toward fewer proposed initiatives making the ballot. There are also fewer initiatives, on average, during mid-term years compared to presidential years. From 2010 to 2022, presidential years featured an average of 60 citizen-initiated measures, whereas mid-term years featured an average of 47 citizen-initiated measures. Campaigns have also cited the effects of COVID-19 and labor shortages on signature drive costs in 2022.

An additional factor for ballot initiative campaigns is recent signature increases. Of the 26 states that allow for some form of initiative or referendum, 22 states base their signature requirements on turnout at specific elections, which either occurred in 2018 or 2020. According to the U.S. Elections Project, the midterm turnout in 2018 was 50%, the highest since 1912, and 13.3 percentage points above 2014. The presidential election turnout in 2020 was 66.8%, the highest since 1900, and 6.7 percentage points above 2016. In California, which saw the largest signature increase, the requirement increased by 70.3%. 

Trends include abortion, marijuana, and election policies

Abortion has been a topic for statewide ballot measures since the 1970s. Since 2000, there have been just two general election cycles, 2002 and 2016, without abortion-related state ballot measures. In November, there are five ballot measures addressing abortion—the most on record for a single year. Earlier, in August, one measure was defeated in Kansas. Before 2022, the highest number of abortion-related measures on statewide ballots was four in 1986. In California, Michigan, and Vermont, voters will decide on constitutional rights to abortion. In Kentucky, like Kansas, voters will decide on a constitutional amendment to declare that the state constitution cannot be interpreted as creating a right to abortion. Voters in Montana will decide on a measure requiring medical care to be provided to infants born alive after an attempted abortion or other procedure.

Heading into November, marijuana is legal in 19 states and D.C. Of those 19 states, 13 and D.C. had legalized marijuana through the ballot measure process. In 2022, five more states will decide on marijuana legalization ballot measures. In the central U.S., voters in Arkansas, Missouri, North Dakota, and South Dakota will consider citizen-initiated measures to legalize marijuana. In Maryland, the state legislature voted to put the issue before voters.

Voters in 10 states will decide on ballot measures to change election policies or laws in November. South Dakota decided on a measure in June, and Louisiana will decide on one in December. Voters will decide on a top-five ranked-choice voting system in Nevada, where approval of an initiated constitutional amendment is required twice in 2022 and 2024. Voters in three states will decide on legislative proposals to change the processes for citizen-initiated ballot measures this year. Other issues on the ballot include early voting, voter identification, citizenship requirements, and campaign finance reporting.

You can learn more about this year’s statewide ballot measures at Ballotpedia.org.



Incumbent Maggie Hassan (D), Don Bolduc (R), and Jeremy Kaufmann (L) in battleground N.H. U.S. Senate election

Incumbent Maggie Hassan (D), Don Bolduc (R), and Jeremy Kauffman (L) are running for U.S. Senate in New Hampshire on November 8, 2022.

Hassan took office in 2017. Hassan is campaigning on what she describes as a bipartisan record and her support for a gas tax holiday through 2022, saying she has worked to lower costs for residents. Hassan says Bolduc is an extremist and that he “said he would vote for any anti-choice legislation in the U.S. Senate, and that he would never compromise.”

Bolduc, a retired Army brigadier general, said the election “is about the economy, fiscal responsibility and the safety and security of this nation.” He attributes inflation and high gas prices to Hassan and other Democrats. Bolduc’s campaign ads emphasize his military background and call Hassan a career politician. Bolduc said he’d support allowing states to set abortion policy.

A mid-September poll showed Hassan leading Bolduc 51% to 40%. The poll’s credibility interval, similar to a margin of error, was +/- 3.4 percentage points.

In the state’s 2020 Senate election, incumbent Jeanne Shaheen (D) won re-election against Bryant Messner (R) by a margin of 16 percentage points. In 2016, Hassan defeated incumbent Kelly Ayotte (R) by 0.1 percentage points.

President Joe Biden (D) won New Hampshire by 7 percentage points in 2020. Hillary Clinton (D) won the state in the 2016 presidential election by 0.3 percentage points.

The outcome of this race will affect the partisan balance of the U.S. Senate. Thirty-five of 100 seats are up for election, including one special election. Democrats have an effective majority, with the chamber split 50-50 and Vice President Kamala Harris (D) having the tie-breaking vote. Fourteen seats held by Democrats and 21 seats held by Republicans are up for election in 2022.




Abigail Spanberger and Yesli Vega are running for Virginia’s 7th Congressional District on Nov. 8

Incumbent Abigail Spanberger (D) and Yesli Vega (R) are running in the general election for Virginia’s 7th Congressional District on November 8, 2022.

Spanberger was first elected in 2018, defeating then-incumbent David Brat (R) 50.3% to 48.4%. Before that election, a Republican had represented the 7th District since 1971. According to various estimates, the district became more Democratic as a result of redistricting. The Cook Partisan Voting Index score for the old district was R+2, while the score for the new district is D+1. According to data from Daily Kos, voters in the redrawn 7th District supported Joe Biden (D) over Donald Trump (R) 52.6% to 45.8% in the 2020 presidential election.

Before she was elected to Congress, Spanberger worked in federal law enforcement and was a case officer in the CIA. In June 2022, Spanberger said, “My strength and what I endeavor to do every day is to listen to voters and to be responsive to the needs that people are facing. And I don’t just talk about problems such as inflation or the cost of prescription drugs or the challenges that our communities are facing. I endeavor to hit them head-on.”

Vega, who has a background in local law enforcement, was elected to the Prince William County Board of Supervisors in 2019.

Vega’s campaign website says, “Yesli looks forward to fulfilling Congress’s responsibility of being a check and balance on the woefully inept Biden administration. She will be a strong advocate for the timeless American ideals of freedom, limited government, and restoration of the rule of law.”

Both the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee (DCCC) and the National Republican Congressional Committee (NRCC) have prioritized this election. The DCCC designated Spanberger as a 2022 Frontline Member, providing her campaign resources meant to help her win re-election and maintain a Democratic majority. The NRCC included this district in its list of Democratic-held target seats and named Vega as an “On the Radar” member of its Young Guns program.

The outcome of this race will affect the partisan balance of the U.S. House of Representatives in the 118th Congress. All 435 districts in the House are up for election.

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Incumbent Craig, Kistner, and Overby running in Minnesota’s 2nd Congressional District general election on Nov. 8

Angie Craig (D), Tyler Kistner (R), and Paula Overby (Legal Marijuana Now Party) are running in the general election in Minnesota’s 2nd Congressional District on Nov. 8. 

Nathan L. Gonzales of Inside Elections wrote in Roll Call in April 2022 that “The suburban Twin Cities seat didn’t change much in redistricting; just 8 percent of the 2nd District is new to both candidates. And Biden would have won it by 7 points, putting it within reach for Republicans in the current political environment.”

Craig was first elected in 2018, defeating then-incumbent Jason Lewis (R), 53% to 47%. She was re-elected in 2020 against Kistner, 48% to 46%.

Before serving in the U.S. House, Craig worked as a journalist and in corporate communications and executive roles in the medical device industry. She stated why she was running on her campaign website as follows: “I worked hard to get where I am, but I was pretty lucky, too. For too many Americans, hard work doesn’t pay off like it used to. College is unaffordable and technical training is unavailable. Healthcare costs too much. Incomes aren’t keeping up with the costs of groceries and prescription drugs. We can do better.”

Kistner served as an officer in the U.S. Marine Corps and was a consultant at the time of the 2022 election. He stated his campaign’s mission on his website: “I’m running for Congress to ‘serve’ – not to serve big business, not to serve the political elites – but to serve Minnesotans who are increasingly concerned about our country’s future. I will be a check and balance to the Biden Administration and work to make a greater prosperity for our children and future generations.”

This race was one of 89 congressional races that were decided by 10 percent or less in 2020.

As of September 2022, three election race newsletters rated the contest as a Toss-up. Kyle Kondik of the University of Virginia’s Center for Politics told MPR News in June 2022, “Look, this is a race that Craig only won by a couple of points in 2020. And we have a pretty good feeling that the political environment for Democrats is going to be worse, perhaps significantly worse, than it was in 2020.”

The outcome of this race will affect the partisan balance of the U.S. House of Representatives in the 118th Congress. All 435 districts in the House are up for election. As of September 13, 2022, Democrats hold a 221-212 advantage in the U.S. House with two vacancies. Republicans need to gain a net of six districts to win a majority in the chamber.

Daily Kos calculated what the results of the 2020 presidential election in this district would have been following redistricting. Joe Biden (D) would have received 52.5% of the vote in this district and Donald Trump (R) would have received 45.4%. Biden carried the previous version of the district in the 2020 presidential election, 52.4% to 45.5%. Trump carried the district in 2016 with 47% of the vote to Hillary Clinton’s (D) 45%.

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All candidates for Michigan House of Representatives District 77 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Michigan House of Representatives District 77 —Emily Dievendorf (D) and John Magoola (R) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office.

Eighty-eight of the country’s 99 state legislative chambers will hold regularly scheduled elections in 2022. The Republican Party controls both chambers of Michigan’s state legislature. Michigan is one of 13 states under divided government.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office?            

Dievendorf:               

  1. “There is no excuse for a lack of living wage. Every resident should make enough to both survive AND thrive.”
  2. “Public schools must be funded well, equitably, and funded as the long-term, consistent investment our future success and community should be.”
  3. “In the 77th District and nationally we need to address gun violence. We can all agree that we want more safety for our families and that responsible gun ownership is a reasonable expectation in order to save lives.”

Magoola:       

  1. “Staunchly pro-2nd Amendment; I believe in pushing for Constitutional carry and state nullifying of federal gun restrictions”
  2. “Pro-parental rights in education; I am vehemently opposed to forcing parents to use public schools as well as against racial and gender indoctrination in public schools”
  3. “Staunchly pro-life; I am absolutely opposed to unfettered abortion and in favor of the defending of the human rights of unborn children”

Click on candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

Additional reading: