Category2022 elections

All candidates for Arizona State Senate District 12 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Arizona State Senate District 12 —Mitzi Epstein (D) and David Richardson (R) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office.

Eighty-eight of the country’s 99 state legislative chambers will hold regularly scheduled elections in 2022. The Republican Party controls both chambers of Arizona’s state legislature. Arizona is one of 23 states with a Republican trifecta.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office?                

Epstein:       

  • “Education – Our community expects high quality public schools to support property values and local businesses today and to prepare our children to meet the unknowns of tomorrow with skills and confidence.” 
  • “Economy-Having worked in the financial sector and in technology, Mitzi uses her experience and knowledge to take a critical eye to proposed legislation.”
  • “Fiscal Responsibility – Taxpayers deserve results from their investment in government projects. To know how our dollars are performing we must have transparency and accountability. Mitzi is highly respected in the legislature for her careful attention to detail and to budgets.”

Richardson:       

  • “My wife and I found out we were pregnant last summer, and I was burdened with the thought of the Arizona my son might inherit. Specifically, I’m concerned about our water supply, our school systems, our local economy, and our individual liberties.”
  • “The issues facing Arizona have never been more complex or daunting than they are right now. We need skilled decision-makers in our state legislature. As an engineer-scientist and businessman, I’m skilled at diving into complex problems and finding innovative, economical solutions.” 
  • “I believe it is possible to uphold strong conservative values while still treating those who disagree with us as neighbors, not enemies.” 

Click on candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

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All candidates for Arizona House of Representatives District 27 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

All three of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Arizona House of Representatives District 27 — incumbent Kevin Payne (R), incumbent Ben Toma (R), and Don Kissinger (D) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office.

Eighty-eight of the country’s 99 state legislative chambers will hold regularly scheduled elections in 2022. The Republican Party controls both chambers of Arizona’s state legislature. Arizona is one of 23 states with a Republican trifecta.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What do you perceive to be your state’s greatest challenges over the next decade?            

Payne:       

  • “I’m a constitutional conservative they will uphold both the Arizona and the US constitution”
  • “I’m an advocate of public safety to include correctional, police police and firefighters”
  • “I believe in backpack funding for for our students where the money follows the child to whatever school ever school they attend. This includes public district, public charter, private and home schools.”

Ben Toma:           

  • “Economy, Small Government, & Low and Fair Taxes: I believe the best way to grow the economy and recover from this downturn is to get the government out of the way.”
  • “Pro-life & Pro-school Choice: I’m pro-life. It’s a shame to see the liberal media hype up certain kinds of violence while completely ignoring the thousands of lives lost each day due to abortion.” 
  • “Pro Law Enforcement & 2nd Amendment: I fully support our Constitutional right to bear arms. The freedom to defend oneself is a necessary and practical freedom, especially during this time of riots and pushes to de-fund police departments.” 

Kissinger:           

  • “I am pro choice and supportive of federal and state constitutional amendments to ensure reproductive freedom.”
  • “I support public education and would support improved oversight of charter or private schools receiving public money.”
  • “I believe Arizona elections have been and continue to be free and fair. Those stating otherwise are simply dishonest.”

Click on candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area tofill out the survey.

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All candidates for Arizona House of Representatives District 17 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

All four of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Arizona House of Representatives District 17 completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office.

The candidates are Dana Allmond (D), Brian Radford (D), Rachel Jones (R), and Cory McGarr (R).

Eighty-eight of the country’s 99 state legislative chambers will hold regularly scheduled elections in 2022. The Republican Party controls both chambers of Arizona’s state legislature. Arizona is one of 23 states with a Republican trifecta.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What areas of public policy are you personally passionate about?                    

Allmond:           

“Dana will be an advocate for common sense gun laws, voter protection, a woman’s right to choose, and quality public schools among other topics.”

Radford:

“I believe free public education is a foundation for future further education and employment opportunities and that employment and education builds stronger, safer communities.”

Jones:

“The Second Amendment, pro-life, low taxes, medical freedom, small government, school choice, and life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness for all AZ citizens!”

McGarr:

“We need election integrity, medical freedom, school reform and school choice. We need to protect the border, our first and second amendments and the sanctity of life.”

Click on candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

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All candidates for Arizona House of Representatives District 24 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Arizona House of Representatives District 24 — Lydia Hernandez (D) and Analise Ortiz (D) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office.

Eighty-eight of the country’s 99 state legislative chambers will hold regularly scheduled elections in 2022. The Republican Party controls both chambers of Arizona’s state legislature. Arizona is one of 23 states with a Republican trifecta.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What do you perceive to be your state’s greatest challenges over the next decade?            

Hernandez:           

“Economic Sustainable Growth and its Impact on all Arizonans.”

Ortiz:   

“Our biggest challenge is combatting climate change. I support putting contingency plans in place in Arizona to protect our water resources, capture solar energy, and expand clean energy.”

Click on candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

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All candidates for New York State Assembly District 105 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for New York State Assembly District 105 — Jill Fieldstein (D) and Anil Beephan Jr. (R) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office.

Eighty-eight of the country’s 99 state legislative chambers will hold regularly scheduled elections in 2022. The Democratic Party controls both chambers of New York’s state legislature. New York is one of 14 states with a Democratic trifecta.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office?            

Fieldstein:           

  • “Economic Development: New York is a hub of innovation and entrepreneurship. I will collaborate with public and private partners to attract these innovators—and good-paying jobs—to our area.”
  • “Affordable Housing To support a growing workforce, we must offer more affordable housing: I will encourage the development of attractive, affordable, single family homes and mixed-use developments in communities throughout the 105th District.”
  • “Education: Our children’s future is our most important investment, and it must start with our youngest children. Publicly funded, high quality pre-K must be available to every three- and four-year-old in our district.”

Beephan:   

  • “MAKE NEW YORK SAFE AGAIN: Cashless Bail has turned our criminal justice system upside down. Our state now sympathizes with criminals and repeat offenders over our uniformed heroes while simultaneously placing victims, witnesses, and emergency services at risk of retaliation.” 
  • “Reduce the Cost of Energy: Our residents are struggling to fill their gas tanks at the pump, purchase heating oil, and power their homes. We need representatives in Albany that will fight for real solutions to the energy crisis.”
  • “PRO-BUSINESS Coming from a family of small business owners, I understand the difficulties of starting and owning a business in New York. I started the #HometownHotspot initiative highlighting our small businesses and non-profits to receive feedback on how we can become better partners in government.”

Click on candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

Additional reading:



Number of major party candidates on the primary ballot for state legislative offices in 2022

This year, 13,491 major party candidates were on the primary ballot for 6,278 state legislative seats around the country, including 1,300 state senate seats and 4,978 state house seats.

Of the 13,491 major party candidates on the ballot, 6,063, or 44.94%, were Democrats, and 7,428, or 55.06%, were Republicans. 

In state senate races: 

  • There were 2,824 major party candidates on the primary ballot, including 1,254 Democrats, or 44.41% of all candidates who ran, and 1,570 Republicans, or 55.59% of all candidates who ran. 
  • The percentage of major party candidates this year who identified as Democrats was lower than in 2020, when 50.16% of major party candidates did, and in 2018, when 53.11% did.
  • Conversely, the percentage of major party candidates who identified as Republicans this year was higher than in 2020, when 49.84% did, and in 2018, when 46.89% did. 
  • There were 0.96 Democratic candidates on the ballot per state senate seat this year. That’s fewer than the 1.09 Democrats per seat who appeared on the ballot in 2020 and the 1.2 Democrats per seat who appeared in 2018.
  • There were 1.21 Republican candidates on the ballot per U.S. state senate seat in 2022. That’s more than the 1.08 Republicans per seat who appeared on the ballot in 2020 and the 1.06 Republicans per seat who appeared in 2018.

In state house races: 

  • There were 10,667 major party candidates on the primary ballot this year, including 4,809 Democrats, or 45.08% of all candidates who ran, and 5,858 Republicans, or 54.92% of all candidates who ran. 
  • The percentage of major party candidates this year who identified as Democrats was lower than in 2020, when 50.41% of major party candidates did, and in 2018, when 52.69% did.
  • Conversely, the percentage of major party candidates who identified as Republicans this year was higher than in 2020, when 49.59% did, and in 2018, when 47.31% did. 
  • There were 0.97 Democratic candidates on the ballot per state house seat this year. That’s fewer than the 1.06 Democrats per seat who appeared on the ballot in 2020 and the 1.16 Democrats per seat who appeared in 2018.
  • There were 1.18 Republican candidates on the ballot per state house seat in 2022. That’s more than the 1.04 Republicans per seat who appeared on the ballot in 2020 and in 2018.


Number of major party candidates on the primary ballot for state judicial offices in 2022

In 2022, there were 88 state judicial positions up for partisan election in states that select judges using partisan elections. One-hundred sixty major party candidates were on the primary ballot in those races, including 72 Democrats, or 45% of all major party candidates who ran, and 88 Republicans, or 55% of all major party candidates who ran.

The percentage of major party candidates this year who identified as Democrats was lower than in 2020, when 51.27% of major party candidates did, but higher than in 2018, when 38.12% did.

Conversely, the percentage of major party candidates who identified as Republicans this year was higher than in 2020, when 48.73% did, but lower than in 2018, when 61.88% did.

There were 0.82 Democratic candidates on the ballot per state judicial seat this year. That’s fewer than the 1.11 Democrats per seat who appeared on the ballot in 2020 and more than the 0.71 Democrats per seat who appeared in 2018.

There was one Republican candidate on the ballot per state judicial seat in 2022. That’s fewer than the 1.05 Republicans per seat who appeared on the ballot in 2020 and the 1.15 Republicans per seat who appeared in 2018.



Incumbent Frank Mrvan (D) and Jennifer-Ruth Green (R) are running in Indiana’s 1st Congressional District

Incumbent Frank Mrvan (D) and Jennifer-Ruth Green (R) are running in the general election for Indiana’s 1st Congressional District on November 8, 2022. William Powers (Independent) is running as a write-in candidate.

Mrvan was elected to the 1st District in 2020, winning the open seat 57% to 40%. A Democrat has represented the district since 1930. According to The Cook Political Report and FiveThirtyEight, the district’s partisan lean did not change significantly after redistricting. In the 2020 presidential election, Joe Biden (D) received 53.6% of the 1st District’s vote to Donald Trump’s (R) 44.8%. According to data from Daily Kos, the redrawn 1st District voted for Biden 53.4% to 45.0%.

Mrvan says he is running for re-election “to continue to address the pandemic health crisis, make investments to grow the Northwest Indiana economy with good-paying jobs, and bridge the division gripping our nation.” He said, “Throughout my career as an elected official, I have listened to all individuals and worked in a bipartisan fashion to bring people together to solve problems. I look forward to continuing to represent our collective interests in Washington, D.C., and bringing back federal resources to enhance the Northwest Indiana economy by supporting existing businesses and attracting new people and good-paying jobs to our region.” Before being elected to Congress, Mrvan served as township trustee for North Township, Indiana, for 15 years.

Green served in the U.S. Air Force for 12 years, after which she joined the U.S. Air Force Reserve and founded a nonprofit STEM education organization. In a campaign ad, Green said, “Our economy is shrinking, costs are surging, and crime is skyrocketing. And career politicians aren’t getting the job done.” In another ad, she said, “I’m a proud conservative. And like you, I’m concerned about skyrocketing gas prices and inflation, liberal efforts to defund the police, and woke madness like indoctrinating our children with critical race theory. … In Congress, I’ll defend the Second Amendment, protect life, and advance President Trump’s America First policies.”

In May 2022, The Times’ Dan Carden wrote, “Northwest Indiana is poised to have its first competitive congressional election in decades.” After Sabato’s Crystal Ball moved the district’s rating from leans Democratic to toss-up in July 2022, managing editor Kyle Kondik wrote, “This working-class, post-industrial northwest Indiana district has seen its Democratic lean erode in the Donald Trump era, even though Biden still carried it by 8 points. But Democrats have been losing ground in these kinds of districts in recent years[.] … This district is covered by the Chicago media market, so the ad wars could get pricey, although it may be that the most competitive race in the Chicago media market is this one, which is taking place across the Illinois border in Indiana.”

Both the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee (DCCC) and the National Republican Congressional Committee (NRCC) have prioritized this election. The DCCC designated Mrvan as a member of its 2022 Frontline Program, a program providing resources intended to help incumbents hold competitive seats. The NRCC listed Indiana’s First Congressional District as one of its target districts in 2022, and Green qualified for the highest tier of the NRCC’s Young Guns program.

The outcome of this race will affect the partisan balance of the U.S. House of Representatives in the 118th Congress. All 435 districts in the House are up for election. As of September 13, 2022, Democrats hold a 221-212 advantage in the U.S. House with two vacancies. Republicans need to gain a net of six districts to win a majority in the chamber.



Incumbent Cindy Axne (D) and Zach Nunn running in Iowa’s 3rd Congressional District election

Incumbent Cindy Axne (D) and Zach Nunn (R) are running in Iowa’s 3rd Congressional District election on Nov. 8, 2022.

The Gazette’s Liz Mathews said the race was “likely Iowa’s most competitive House election.” In the 2020 election, Axne defeated David Young (R) by 1.4 percentage points. According to a Daily Kos analysis of the 2020 presidential election, Donald Trump (R) would have defeated Joe Biden (D) by 0.1 percentage points in the 3rd district and, after redistricting, would have defeated Biden by 0.4 percentage points in the redrawn district.

Axne has represented Iowa’s 3rd Congressional District since 2018. Axne ran a digital design firm and worked for the Iowa state government from 2005 to 2014, including positions in the Iowa Department of Natural Resources, Iowa Department of Management, and Iowa Department of Administrative Services. “My parents raised me to speak out and not be afraid to take on the tough fights – even when it’s uncomfortable and means standing up to someone more powerful – and that’s how I’ve lived my life. And now, it’s why I’m running for Congress, because every Iowan deserves to be heard,” Axne said.

Nunn has represented Iowa State Senate District 15 since 2019, and previously represented District 30 in the Iowa House of Representatives from 2015 to 2019. Nunn served in the Air Force in Afghanistan and Iraq and was a national counterintelligence officer and director of cybersecurity on the National Security Council. As of the 2022 election, Nunn owned a marketing business and commanded an intelligence squadron in the Iowa Air National Guard. “As Iowans, we live in tight knit communities and will always lend a helping hand to our neighbors during natural disasters and tough times. We are selfless, hard-working, and honest people living right in the Heartland of America – and it’s time to bring more of these values to Washington,” Nunn said.

The outcome of this race will affect the partisan balance of the U.S. House of Representatives in the 118th Congress. All 435 districts in the House are up for election. As of Sept. 2, 2022, Democrats hold a 219-211 advantage in the U.S. House with five vacant districts. Republicans need to gain a net of seven districts to win a majority in the chamber.



Number of major party candidates on the primary ballot for state executive offices in 2022

This year, 1,140 major party candidates were on the primary ballot for 304 state executive seats around the country. The offices up for election include 36 gubernatorial seats, 30 lieutenant gubernatorial seats, 30 state attorney general seats, and 26 secretary of state seats. 

Of the major party candidates on the ballot, 463, or 40.61%, were Democrats, and 677, or 59.39%, were Republicans.

The percentage of major party candidates this year who identified as Democrats was lower than in 2020, when 46.25% of major party candidates did, and in 2018, when 49.02% did.

Conversely, the percentage of major party candidates who identified as Republicans this year was higher than in 2020, when 53.75% did, and in 2018, when 50.98% did.

There were 1.52 Democratic candidates on the ballot per state executive seat this year. That’s more than the 1.35 Democrats per seat who appeared on the ballot in 2020 and fewer than the 1.7 Democrats per seat who appeared in 2018.

There were 2.23 Republican candidates on the ballot per state executive seat in 2022. That’s more than the 1.56 Republicans per seat who appeared on the ballot in 2020 and the 1.76 Republicans per seat who appeared in 2018.