Category2022 elections

Analysis of major party candidates on the primary ballot for U.S. Senate and U.S. House seats in 2022

In 2022, 2,422 major party candidates appeared on the primary ballot for 474 seats in the U.S. Congress. The seats included 34 U.S. Senate seats, the seats of all 435 U.S. Representatives, and the seats of five of the six non-voting delegates to the U.S. House.

Of the 2,422 candidates who appeared on the primary ballot, 989, or 40.83%, were Democrats, and 1,433, or 59.17%, were Republicans. 

In the U.S. Senate: 

  • There were 304 major party candidates on the primary ballot this year, including 119 Democrats, or 39.14% of all candidates who ran, and 185 Republicans, or 60.86% of all candidates who ran.
  • The 119 Democrats who appeared on the primary ballot this year were 11 more than the 108 who appeared on the ballot in 2020 and 33 more than the 86 who appeared in 2018.
  • The 185 Republicans who appeared on the ballot were 62 more than the 123 who appeared on the ballot in 2020 and 44 more than the 141 who appeared in 2018.

  • The percentage of major party candidates this year who identified as Democrats was lower than in 2020, when 46.75% of major party candidates did, but higher than in 2018, when 37.89% did.
  • Conversely, the percentage of major party candidates who identified as Republicans this year was higher than in 2020, when 53.25% did, but lower than in 2018, when 62.11% did.

  • There were 3.5 Democratic candidates on the ballot per U.S. Senate seat this year. That’s more than the 3.27 Democrats per seat who appeared on the ballot in 2020 and the 2.61 Democrats per seat who appeared in 2018.
  • There were 5.44 Republican candidates on the ballot per U.S. Senate seat in 2022. That’s more than the 3.73 Republicans per seat who appeared on the ballot in 2020 and the 4.27 Republicans per seat who appeared in 2018.

In the U.S. House

  • There were 2,118 major party candidates on the primary ballot this year, including 870 Democrats, or 41.08%% of all candidates who ran, and 1,248 Republicans, or 58.92% of all candidates who ran.

  • The 870 Democrats who appeared on the primary ballot this year were 75 fewer than the 945 who appeared on the ballot in 2020 and 211 fewer than the 1,081 who appeared in 2018.
  • The 1,248 Republicans who appeared on the ballot were 195 more than the 1,053 who appeared on the ballot in 2020 and 382 more than the 866 who appeared in 2018.
  • The percentage of major party candidates this year who identified as Democrats was lower than in 2020, when 47.3% of major party candidates did, and in 2018, when 55.52% did.
  • Conversely, the percentage of major party candidates who identified as Republicans this year was higher than in 2020, when 52.7% did, and in 2018, when 44.48% did. 

  • There were 1.98 Democratic candidates on the ballot per U.S. House seat this year. That’s fewer than the 2.14 Democrats per seat who appeared on the ballot in 2020 and the 2.46 Democrats per seat who appeared in 2018.
  • There were 2.84 Republican candidates on the ballot per U.S. House seat in 2022. That’s more than the 2.39 Republicans per seat who appeared on the ballot in 2020 and the 1.06 Republicans per seat who appeared in 2018.



All candidates for New York State Assembly District 75 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for New York State Assembly District 75 — Tony Simone (D) and Joseph A. Maffia (R) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office.

Eighty-eight of the country’s 99 state legislative chambers will hold regularly scheduled elections in 2022. The Democratic Party controls both chambers of New York’s state legislature. New York is one of 14 states with a Democratic trifecta.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office?            

Simone:       

  • “Government can be a force for equity, progress, and the improvement of all our lives. (That’s why I’m a Democrat!) Our district has had strong representation over the last fifty years by Assembly Member Gottfried fighting for our district’s interests here at home and for progressive values in Albany.” 
  • “I believe in co-governance. It takes a collaborative approach to find lasting solutions to our most complex problems. That’s how we’ll get things done.”
  • “I’m not running for this seat for a fancy title. I’m running because I love the community that I’ve lived in, and have served, for over two decades — from serving on the community board to working for local elected officials and most recently working for Friends of Hudson River Park.”

Maffia:       

  • “NYS finances are in dire straights. Unfunded retirement benefit have put the state at risk which must be addressed now! It is not often publicized enough because of the inherent nature of the budgeting and accounting system – long term structural problems, i.e. if the bill is not due today we can kick the can down the road. This has to stop.”
  • “Art stirs imagination, engages, heals, and promotes economic expansion and like the saying goes ‘Art saves lives’.”
  • “Crime, quality of life and education are significant concerns for the 75th Assembly district. NYS’s dire fiscal health and conditions on the ground in this important district demands a proven leader, with a business background and a vision to support the 75th Assembly District which is the life blood of New York.”

Click on candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

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All candidates for Nevada State Senate District 12 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Nevada State Senate District 12 — Julie Pazina (D) and Cherlyn Arrington (R) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office.

Eighty-eight of the country’s 99 state legislative chambers will hold regularly scheduled elections in 2022. The Democratic Party controls both chambers of Nevada’s state legislature. Nevada is one of 14 states with a Democratic trifecta.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office?            

Pazina:               

  • “Creating Jobs, Diversifying the Economy”
  • “Ensuring Accessible and Affordable Health Care”
  • “World Class Education for Nevada’s Students”

Arrington:           

  • “EDUCATION – SCHOOL CHOICE – QUALITY EDUCATION – NO COMMOM CORE…”
  • “MEDICAL FREEDOM – GOVERNMENT SHOULD NOT TELL US WE MUST HAVE A SHOT TO WORK AND PROVIDE FOR OUR FAMILIES…”
  • “STAND STRONG WITH OUR LAW ENFORCMENT AND FIRST RESPONDERS…”

Click on candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

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All candidates for Nevada State Assembly District 25 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Nevada State Assembly District 25 — Selena La Rue Hatch (D) and Sam Kumar (R) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office.

Eighty-eight of the country’s 99 state legislative chambers will hold regularly scheduled elections in 2022. The Democratic Party controls both chambers of Nevada’s state legislature. Nevada is one of 14 states with a Democratic trifecta.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office?            

La Rue Hatch:           

  • “We face many challenges in Nevada. From an underfunded education system to the highest unemployment in the nation to the ravages of climate change.”
  • “We’ve known it for years – education is broken in Nevada. And yet, nothing seems to change. Every two years, our leaders promise to fix our education system, but as someone who is in the classroom, I can tell you, I don’t see the fixes happening.”
  • “Our district needs a teacher’s voice in the room where decisions are made. A voice of someone who understands what it means to carry thousands of dollars in student debt and pay almost half your income in childcare expenses.”

Kumar:           

  • “We need a free market system in education where the funding travels with the child. Schools need to focus on Reading, wRiting and aRithmetic, not politics and sex education”
  • “We need better ballot integrity. Proof of citizenship and valid picture ID should be presented to vote. Mail ballot on request only, with real signature verification. End ballot harvesting.”
  • “Immigration should be legal, limited and merit based. No welfare, stimulus or other types of payments to illegal aliens.”

Click on candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

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All candidates for Texas House of Representatives District 76 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Texas House of Representatives District 76 — Suleman Lalani (D) and Dan Mathews (R) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office.

Eighty-eight of the country’s 99 state legislative chambers will hold regularly scheduled elections in 2022. The Republican Party controls both chambers of Texas’s state legislature. Texas is one of 23 states with a Republican trifecta.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What areas of public policy are personally passionate about?            

Lalani:   

“For many years I felt a sense of frustration seeing how our healthcare system was failing people throughout their lives. In my practice, geriatric medicine, I saw people riddled with ailments that would have been prevented with continuously regular health care. Because of this life experience I will focus on healthcare and the economic impact of lacking healthcare.”           

Mathews:   

“Dan’s campaign will focus on strong conservative values, securing elections, protecting our Second Amendment rights, improving the Texas school system, border security, increased energy independence, supporting law enforcement and protecting families and children. Dan is a servant leader and will campaign that way.”

Click on candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

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All candidates for Texas House of Representatives District 73 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Texas House of Representatives District 73 — Justin Calhoun (D) and Carrie Isaac (R) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office.

Eighty-eight of the country’s 99 state legislative chambers will hold regularly scheduled elections in 2022. The Republican party controls both chambers of Texas’s state legislature. Texas is one of 23 states with a Republican trifecta.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office?            

Calhoun:               

  • “Elected Officials have ignored large groups of people simply because they didn’t vote for them. A representative is elected by the majority to represent ALL of their constituents, not just those that voted for them.”
  • “For years politicians use issues like education, and the environment as political fatter doing little if anything to actively solve these issues. We need representation that focuses on issues rather than flip flopping to whatever is trending.”
  • “Texas has grown and our diversity with it. We need to celebrate that growth and ensure all voices are heard in the legislative process.”

Isaac:   

  • “Carie will work to secure the border and keep communities safe by building a wall and stopping magnet policies that encourage illegal immigration, supporting law enforcement and stop the ‘defund the police’ movement, and implementing reforms to ensure a reliable electric grid.”
  • “Soaring property taxes are out of control and have created a burden on working families, small businesses, and seniors. Carrie will fight to reform our property tax system and cut taxes — not just keep them from rising any higher.”
  • “Carrie will uphold American values by preserving the Second Amendment, ensuring election integrity, standing up to Big Tech censorship of conservatives, and fighting for religious freedom.”

Click on candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

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All candidates for Texas House of Representatives District 70 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Texas House of Representatives District 70 — Mihaela Plesa (D) and Jamee Jolly (R) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office.

Eighty-eight of the country’s 99 state legislative chambers will hold regularly scheduled elections in 2022. The Republican Party controls both chambers of Texas’s state legislature. Texas is one of 23 states with a Republican trifecta.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What areas of public policy are you personally passionate about?

Plesa:       

“Some of the areas of public policy that I am particularly passionate about include education, healthcare, women’s rights, infrastructure, and voting rights.”

Jolly:

“Education, Free Enterprise, Property Tax Reform, Pro-Police/ Anti-Crime, Border Security”

Click on candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

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All candidates for Texas House of Representatives District 63 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Texas House of Representatives District 63 — H. Denise Wooten (D) and Ben Bumgarner (R) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office.

Eighty-eight of the country’s 99 state legislative chambers will hold regularly scheduled elections in 2022. The Republican Party controls both chambers of Texas’s state legislature. Texas is one of 23 states with a Republican trifecta.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What areas of public policy are you personally passionate about?

Wooten:       

“Funding for education and special education, Social Security Disability Income, Medicare and Medicaid, Disability Services post high school, Child Protective Services, employment and training opportunities in school and post high school…”

Bumgarner:

“I want to help solve the tax problem. We are taxing people out of their homes in Texas. It’s time to stop kicking the can down the road and address the problem head on.”

Click on candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

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Lydia York defeats Delaware Auditor Kathy McGuiness in Democratic primary

Lydia York defeated incumbent Kathy McGuiness in the Democratic primary for state auditor on September 13, 2022. McGuiness was elected to the office in 2018.

McGuiness was convicted on three misdemeanor charges in July 2022: conflict of interest, structuring, and official misconduct. The charges stemmed from McGuiness hiring her daughter to work in the auditor’s office as other employees’ hours were cut during the COVID-19 pandemic. Following the conviction, leaders in both chambers of the state legislature called on McGuiness to resign. This was the first instance of a sitting statewide elected official in Delaware being convicted of a crime. McGuiness faces maximum sentences of up to one year in prison for each misdemeanor count.

McGuiness said that the charges against her were politically motivated and that it was not illegal to hire a family member. Her attorney said they would appeal the case to the Delaware Supreme Court. “I have a great team so I look forward to working again with them to rectify the situation,” McGuiness said.

The Democratic Party of Delaware endorsed York in July. Chairwoman Betsy Maron said, “We saw Ms.York’s candidacy as an opportunity to restore the Auditor’s office to its intended function and do away with the political theater that has kept the incumbent at center stage for all the wrong reasons. Her legal, business, and finance backgrounds make Lydia York an immensely qualified Auditor who we are confident will do right by all Delawareans.”

York’s professional experience includes working as an accountant with PriceWaterhouseCoopers (then Coopers & Lybrand) and as a tax attorney. York said she filed to run because of the charges against McGuiness. “[R]egardless of your views on the trial and the outcome and all of that all a lot of witnesses testified to a work environment that was described across the board as toxic and it would be one of my primary missions frankly is to make that stop so people can do their work,” she said.



U.S. Rep. Dina Titus (D), Mark Robertson (R) running in a district that became less Democratic due to redistricting

U.S. Rep. Dina Titus (D), Mark Robertson (R), and Ken Cavanaugh (L) are running in the general election for Nevada’s 1st Congressional District on November 8, 2022.

The partisan balance of Nevada’s 1st Congressional District changed as a result of redistricting following the 2020 census. According to data compiled by Daily Kos, Joe Biden (D) would have won this district in the 2020 presidential election with 53% of the vote. Under the old district lines, Biden won the 1st District with 62% of the vote. The district’s Partisan Voter Index, a measurement tool that scores each congressional district based on how strongly it leans toward one political party, changed from D+15 in 2018 to D+3 in 2022.

Titus was elected to the U.S. House in 2013 and also served a term from 2009 to 2011. Titus served in the Nevada State Senate from 1998-2008 and worked as a professor at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Titus outlined her policy stances to Nevada Newsmakers. She said: “I am a progressive, but I don’t believe in defunding the police. I’m for Medicare for all, but you’ve got to do it in a step-by-step process. I am for every environmental issue out there … But I can’t just say overall the ‘Green New Deal’ because that is a push toward nuclear power.”

Robertson served in the U.S. Army and retired as a colonel in the U.S. Army Reserves. He also taught as an assistant professor and adjunct faculty at UNLV, the National Defense University, and the American College. In his response to Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey, Robertson said, “He can use his national and international experience to develop solutions to the complex problems we face as a Nation.” He highlighted school choice, 1st Amendment issues, border control, police funding, and balancing the federal budget as top issues.

The outcome of this race will affect the partisan balance of the U.S. House of Representatives in the 118th Congress. All 435 districts in the House are up for election. As of September 13, 2022, Democrats hold a 221-212 advantage in the U.S. House with two vacancies. Republicans need to gain a net of six districts to win a majority in the chamber.