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Gov. Edwards (D), Rispone (R) advance to general election in Louisiana

The Daily Brew

Welcome to the Monday, October 14, Brew. Here’s what’s in store for you as you start your day:

  1. Gov. Edwards (D), Rispone (R) advance to general election in Louisiana
  2. California governor vetoes pay-per-signature ban 
  3. Washington State Supreme Court chief justice announces retirement

Gov. Edwards (D), Rispone (R) advance to general election in Louisiana

Incumbent Gov. John Bel Edwards (D) and businessman Eddie Rispone (R) advanced from Louisiana’s primary election Saturday as the top two finishers out of six candidates. Edwards received 46% of the vote and Rispone received 27%. U.S. Rep. Ralph Abraham (R) was third with 24% of the vote. The general election will be held November 16. 

Louisiana uses what’s known as a blanket primary, where all candidates in any race appear on the ballot—regardless of party. A candidate can win the election outright by receiving more than 50% of the primary vote. Otherwise, the top two finishers advance to a general election.

Edwards campaigned on what he considers the accomplishments of his administration. Rispone emphasized his background as a businessman, referring to himself as a conservative outsider and job creator.  

President Donald Trump (R) and the Louisiana Republican Party endorsed both Rispone and Abraham. Trump held a campaign rally with both candidates in the state Friday. Several polls leading up to the primary showed either Rispone and Abraham tied within the margin of error for second place or Rispone with a small advantage.

Edwards is the only Democratic governor in the Deep South and the only Democrat holding statewide office in Louisiana. He defeated U.S. Sen. David Vitter (R) in the general election in 2015 with 56% of the vote. Trump won the state—58% to 38%—in 2016. Louisiana’s previous governor—Bobby Jindal (R)—received 65.8% of the vote in the primary to win re-election in 2011.

According to unofficial vote totals, 1,343,478 total votes were cast in Saturday’s primary. This was  230,002 more than the 1,113,476 votes cast in the 2015 primary. The distribution of 2019 primary votes by party—based on unofficial vote totals—was 51.8% for the three Republican candidates, 47.4% for the two Democrats, and 0.8% for one independent candidate.

Of the five gubernatorial elections in Louisiana between 1999 and 2015, three were won outright in the primary and two—in 2003 and 2015—proceeded to general elections. 

Learn more blank    blankblank   



California governor vetoes pay-per-signature ban 

Twenty-six states allow citizen-initiated ballot measures, and supporters must gather a specific number of signatures to get a measure on the ballot. In California, for example, initiative supporters will need to collect 623,212 signatures—or 5% of the votes cast in the 2018 gubernatorial election—to place an initiated state statute or veto referendum on the ballot in 2020 and 2022.  

Nineteen of the 26 states with statewide initiatives or referendums allow ballot measure campaigns to pay signature gatherers based on the number of signatures collected, a practice known as pay-per-signature. 

California Gov. Gavin Newsom (D) vetoed a bill October 7 that would have banned pay-per-signature for citizen initiatives in the state. Newsom’s two immediate predecessors—Arnold Schwarzenegger (R) and Jerry Brown (D)—vetoed similar bills after the state legislature passed laws prohibiting pay-per-signature in 2011 and 2018. California is one of 14 Democratic trifectas, with Democrats controlling the legislature and the governor’s office. 

The 2019 bill—Assembly Bill 1451—would have:

  • required at least 10 percent of the required signatures for an initiative or referendum petition to be collected by volunteer (unpaid) circulators; 

  • changed the timeline for local elections officials to verify signatures for initiative and referendum petitions; 

  • required petitions to include information about whether the circulator is paid or volunteer; and 

  • made other changes regarding signature verification, circulators, and petition rules. 

Supporters of pay-per-signature say it is a cost-effective method for collecting signatures, making the process more accessible to efforts without significant funding. Opponents of pay-per-signature say the process encourages signature gatherers to forge signatures or illegally misinform voters.  

Pay-per-signature bans exist in seven states. The most recent states to ban paying circulators on a per-signature basis were Florida in 2019 and Arizona in 2017. The map below shows the current status of pay-per-signature nationwide:  

Status of pay per signature

Washington State Supreme Court chief justice announces retirement

There have been 19 supreme court vacancies in 2019 where replacement justices are appointed instead of elected. Earlier this month, we learned of the first such vacancy which will occur in 2020. 

Washington Supreme Court Chief Justice Mary Fairhurst announced on October 3 that she would retire for health reasons on January 5, 2020. Fairhurst was first elected to the Washington Supreme Court in 2002 and re-elected in 2008 and 2014. She became the chief justice in 2016. 

Vacancies on the Washington State Supreme Court are filled by gubernatorial appointment. Whomever Gov. Jay Inslee (D) appoints will serve until Fairhurst’s term was due to expire—in January 2021. This will be Inslee’s second nominee to the nine-member court. 

Washington Supreme Court justices are regularly determined by nonpartisan elections and serve six-year terms. Currently, six judges on the court were elected and three were appointed by Democratic governors. 

Each state has its own supreme court, which serves as the court of last resort. Two states—Oklahoma and Texas—actually have two different state supreme courts, one for civil appeals and one for criminal appeals. Like the U.S. Supreme Court, these courts hear and decide appeals of lower trial and appellate courts in cases at the state level. The number of justices on each court varies between five and nine in each state. There are 344 state Supreme Court justices nationwide.  

Of the 19 state supreme court vacancies that have occurred this year in states where replacement justices are appointed instead of elected, 12 are in states where a Republican governor appoints the replacement. Six vacancies occurred in a state where a Democratic governor fills vacancies. One vacancy occurred in a state—Virginia—where the legislature appoints replacements.

 



Three Pennsylvania public-sector unions amend contracts, allow members to opt out at any time

Three public-sector unions in Pennsylvania have recently ratified labor contracts allowing their members to resign at any time. Previously, these unions allowed members to resign during an annual 15-day window preceding the expiration of their labor contracts. This provision is referred to as a maintenance-of-membership clause.

Who are the unions, and who do they represent?
The three unions are the Service Employees International Union (SEIU) Local 668, the Pennsylvania State Correctional Officers Association, and the United Food and Commercial Workers (UFCW) Local 1776. Together, these three unions represent approximately 22,500 public-sector workers.

What are the reactions?

  • David Osborne, president and general counsel for the Fairness Center, said, “Maintenance of membership restrictions clearly violate our clients’ constitutional rights, and union officials should have dropped those restrictions a long time ago. It’s a big step in the right direction. Our clients had to sue to enforce their rights and the rights of those who are similarly situated, and only then did their union officials start to doubt their constitutional authority to keep members from resigning.” The Pennsylvania-based Fairness Center is a nonprofit law firm that, according to its website, “provides free legal services to those hurt by public-sector union officials.”
    • The Fairness Center has filed multiple lawsuits challenging maintenance-of membership clauses since the Supreme Court issued its 2018 ruling in Janus v. AFSCME. The court found that compelling public-sector workers to give any financial support to a union violates workers’ First Amendment rights.
  • Wendell Young IV, president of UFCW Local 1776, said, “There’s a very basic element of every contract our union has in both the public and private sector and that is if any provision is found to be inconsistent due to a change in the law or invalidated by changes in the law, they are considered invalidated. So Janus changed the law. The Supreme Court ruled and whether I like the ruling or not contracts have to conform to the law. That’s why we changed them.” This appears to be one of the first instances in which a union representative has indicated that membership opt-out windows are inconsistent with Janus.

What comes next?
According to Osborne, the suits filed by the Fairness Center will proceed because state law does not prohibit the inclusion of maintenance-of-membership clauses in labor contracts. “Our clients are pursuing a court ruling that, among other protections, strikes down the ‘maintenance of membership’ statute as unconstitutional,” he said. Unions are contesting these suits, which are listed below.

  • Nguyen v. A&R Local 4200 (case number: 3:19-cv-01351-WWE; filed Sept. 2, 2019, in the U.S. District Court for the District of Connecticut)
  • Weyandt v. PSCOA (case number: 3:02-at-06000; filed June 14, 2019, in the U.S. District Court for the Middle District of Pennsylvania)
  • Kabler v. UFCW, Local 1776 (case number: 1:19-cv-00395-UN1; filed March 6, 2019, in the U.S. District Court for the Middle District of Pennsylvania)
  • James v. SEIU, Local 668 (case number: 2:19-cv-00053-CB; filed Jan. 17, 2019, in the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Pennsylvania)
  • Molina v. SEIU, Local 668 (case number: 1:19-cv-00019-YK; filed Jan. 7, 2019, in the U.S. District Court for the Middle District of Pennsylvania)

The big picture

Number of relevant bills by state

We are currently tracking 102 pieces of legislation dealing with public-sector employee union policy. On the map below, a darker shade of green indicates a greater number of relevant bills. Click here for a complete list of all the bills we’re tracking.

Union Station map October 11, 2019.png

Number of relevant bills by current legislative status

Union Station status chart October 11, 2019.png

Number of relevant bills by partisan status of sponsor(s)

Union Station partisan chart October 11, 2019.png

Recent legislative actions

No legislative actions have occurred since our last issue.



SCOTUS to hear four cases this week

We #SCOTUS, so you don’t have to

Arguments

The Supreme Court will hear arguments in four cases this week. Click here to read more about SCOTUS’ current term.

In its October 2018 term, SCOTUS heard arguments in 69 cases. Click here to read more about SCOTUS’ previous term.

Click the links below to read more about the specific cases SCOTUS will hear this week:

October 15

  • Financial Oversight and Management Board for Puerto Rico v. Aurelius Investment, LLC, concerns the U.S. Constitution’s Appointments Clause. The case is consolidated with Aurelius Investment, LLC v. Puerto RicoOfficial Committee of Debtors v. Aurelius Investment, LLCUnited States v. Aurelius Investment, LLC, and UTIER v. Financial Oversight and Management Board for Puerto Rico.

    In 2016, Congress enacted the Puerto Rico Oversight, Management, and Economic Stability Act. The act created the Financial Oversight and Management Board and authorized the board to begin debt adjustment proceedings on behalf of the Puerto Rico government. After the board began proceedings in 2017, Aurelius Investment, LLC, (“Aurelius”) and the Unión de Trabajadores de la Industria Eléctrica y Riego (“UTIER”) challenged the board’s authority in U.S. District Court, arguing the board members’ appointment violated the Constitution’s Appointments Clause. The District of Puerto Rico ruled against Aurelius and UTIER. On appeal, the 1st Circuit Court of Appeals reversed the district court in part, holding the board members “must be, and were not, appointed in compliance with the Appointments Clause.”

    The issue: Whether the Appointments Clause governs the appointment of members of the Financial Oversight and Management Board for Puerto Rico.

October 16

  • In Kansas v. Garcia, Ramiro Garcia, Donaldo Morales, and Guadalupe Ochoa-Lara were convicted of identity theft in Johnson County, Kansas. In each case, prosecutors used Social Security numbers found on I-9 and W-4 employment forms. Garcia, Morales, and Ochoa-Lara appealed their convictions, arguing the Immigration Reform and Control Act (IRCA) preempted their prosecution. On appeal, the Kansas Supreme Court reversed the three convictions.

    The issue: (1) Whether IRCA expressly preempts states from using any information entered on or appended to a federal Form I-9. This includes common information such as name, date of birth, and Social Security number, in a prosecution of any person (citizen or alien) when that same, commonly used information also appears in non-IRCA documents, such as state tax forms, leases, and credit applications. (2) Whether the Immigration Reform and Control Act indirectly preempts Kansas’ prosecution of Garcia, Morales, and Ochoa-Lara.

  • In Rotkiske v. Klemm, Kevin Rotkiske accumulated credit card debt between 2003 and 2005. Rotkiske’s bank referred the matter to Klemm & Associates (Klemm) for collection. Someone accepted service for a debt collection lawsuit on Rotkiske’s behalf without his knowledge. Klemm obtained a default judgment of approximately $1,500. Rotkiske sued Klemm for violating the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (FDCPA), arguing the statute of limitations to file a suit begins when the plaintiff knows of his injury. On appeal, the 3rd Circuit rejected Rotkiske’s argument, affirming the ruling of the Eastern District of Pennsylvania and holding that the statute of limitations begins to run when the defendant allegedly violates the FDCPA.

    The issue: Whether the one-year limitation period on a statute of limitations begins to run when a potential plaintiff violates the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, as the 3rd Circuit has held, or begins to run when a potential plaintiff discovers a violation, as the 4th and 9th Circuits have held.

  • In Mathena v. MalvoLee Boyd Malvo was convicted in 2004 of committing homicides in 2002, when he was 17 years old. Malvo was sentenced to four life terms without parole. In 2012, SCOTUS held in Miller v. Alabama that juvenile defendants could not be sentenced to life imprisonment without parole. In 2016, SCOTUS held in Montgomery v. Louisiana that the rule it established in Miller was retroactive.

    After Malvo filed applications for writs of habeas corpus relief, the district court vacated the four terms of life imprisonment and remanded the case for resentencing. On appeal, the 4th Circuit affirmed the district court’s ruling.

    The issue: Did the 4th Circuit err in concluding—in direct conflict with Virginia’s highest court and other courts—that a juvenile sentenced to life without parole is entitled to a new sentencing proceeding following SCOTUS’ 2016 decision in Montgomery v. Louisiana?

Upcoming SCOTUS dates

Here are the upcoming dates of interest in October:

  • October 15: 
    • SCOTUS will hear arguments in one case.
    • SCOTUS will release orders.
  • October 16: SCOTUS will hear arguments in three cases.
  • October 18: SCOTUS will conference. A conference is a private meeting of the justices.
  • October 21: SCOTUS will release orders.

SCOTUS trivia

Parties petition SCOTUS to hear a case if they are not satisfied with a lower court’s decision. What do the parties petition the court to grant?

  1. A writ of certiorari
  2. A writ of habeas corpus
  3. A preliminary injunction
  4. Summary judgment

Choose an answer to find out!

Federal court action

Confirmations

The Senate has not confirmed any nominees since our October 7 issue. 

The Senate has confirmed 152 of President Trump’s judicial nominees—105 district court judges, 43 appeals court judges, two Court of International Trade judges, and two Supreme Court justices—since January 2017.

Nominations

President Trump has not announced any new Article III nominees since our October 7 edition.

The president has announced 224 Article III judicial nominations since taking office Jan. 20, 2017. The president named 69 judicial nominees in 2017 and 92 in 2018. For more information on the president’s judicial nominees, click here.

Federal judicial nominations by month chartVacancies

The federal judiciary currently has 107 vacancies. As of publication, there were 40 pending nominations.

According to the Administrative Office of U.S. Courts, an additional 16 judges have announced their intention to leave active judicial status during Trump’s first term.

For more information on judicial vacancies during Trump’s first term, click here.

Vacancies on the Circuit Courts

The following table lists the number of vacancies on the United States Court of Appeals from President Trump’s inauguration to the date of publication.

Vacancies on the Circuit Courts

Committee action

The Senate Judiciary Committee has not reported any new nominees out of committee since our October 7 edition.

Do you love judicial nomination, confirmation, and vacancy information? We figured you might. Our monthly Federal Vacancy Count, published at the start of each month, monitors all the faces and places moving in, moving out, and moving on in the federal judiciary. Click here for our most current count.

Need a daily fix of judicial nomination, confirmation, and vacancy information? Click here for continuing updates on the status of all federal judicial nominees.

Or, if you prefer, we also maintain a list of individuals President Trump has nominated.

Court in the spotlight

In each issue of Bold Justice, we highlight a federal court you should know more about. Right now, we’re taking a closer look at the 94 U.S. District Courts. The district courts are the general trial courts of the U.S. federal court system.

There is at least one judicial district for each state, and one each for Puerto Rico and the District of Columbia.  

In this edition, we’re placing a spotlight on the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of New York. The Northern District of New York has original jurisdiction over cases filed in the following counties in the northern part of the state:

  • Albany County
  • Broome County
  • Cayuga County
  • Chenango County
  • Clinton County
  • Columbia County
  • Cortland County
  • Delaware County
  • Essex County
  • Franklin County
  • Fulton County
  • Greene County
  • Hamilton County
  • Herkimer County
  • Jefferson County
  • Lewis County
  • Madison County
  • Montgomery County
  • Oneida County
  • Onondaga County
  • Oswego County
  • Otsego County
  • Rensselaer County
  • Saratoga County
  • Schenectady County
  • Schoharie County
  • St. Lawrence County
  • Tioga County
  • Tompkins County
  • Ulster County
  • Warren County
  • Washington County

Decisions of the court may be appealed to the 2nd Circuit Court of Appeals.

The Northern District of New York has five authorized judgeships. There is currently one vacancy. The breakdown of current active judges by appointing president is:

  • Barack Obama (D): Two judges
  • George W. Bush (R): One judge
  • Bill Clinton (D): One judge


Ballotpedia’s Weekly Presidential News Briefing: October 7-11, 2019

 Ballotpedia's Weekly Presidential News Briefing

Every weekday, Ballotpedia tracks the events that matter in the 2020 presidential election. 

Now, we’re bringing you the highlights from our daily briefings in a weekly format so you can stay up-to-date on the 2020 election with one weekly email.

Here’s the latest from the campaign trail.

Candidates by the Number

 

Notable Quotes of the Week

“As the 2020 election season ramps up, two global events beyond President Trump’s control threaten to be decisive in determining the U.S. economic environment in which he will be fighting that election. The first is the manner in which the United Kingdom might leave the European Union. The second is whether the political crisis in Hong Kong can be resolved without mainland China sending in troops to quell the island’s political unrest.”

Desmond LachmanThe Hill

“If Democrats learned anything in 2016 — an open question, surely — it is that it is impossible to win with a campaign that is not about anything except the all-consuming ‘Can you believe he said that?’ badness of one’s opponent. McMansion wine moms in Northern Virginia want to hear about what a misogynist the gross orange man is, and they will pay $4600 a pop for the privilege. The voters Democrats actually need in 2020 are the ones in Wisconsin, Michigan, and Pennsylvania who want to hear that Trump is right about trade and manufacturing and the swamp but that he has shown he can’t get the job done.”

Matthew WaltherThe Week

“With a crucial debate looming next week in the Democratic presidential primary, the party’s populist wing appears increasingly in control of the race — rising in the polls, stocked with cash and with only a wounded leading candidate, Joseph R. Biden Jr., standing in its way.

Several slow-building trends have converged to upend the race over the last few weeks: Senator Elizabeth Warren’s steady ascent in the polls has accelerated. Both she and Senator Bernie Sanders, a fellow progressive, have raised immense sums of money from small donors online, dominating the Democratic field and each collecting about $10 million more than Mr. Biden in the last quarter. And Mr. Biden’s numbers have gradually slipped in a way that has alarmed his supporters.”

— Alexander BurnsThe New York Times

Week in Review

Candidates announce third-quarter fundraising totals

Presidential candidates continued to announce their third-quarter fundraising figures in advance of the October 15 reporting deadline. Steve Bullock announced that he had raised $2.3 million, doubling his number of individual contributions from the second quarter. Amy Klobuchar reported raising $4.8 million through September 30, up from $3.9 million raised in the second quarter but down from $5.2 million in the first quarter. 

Bullock and Klobuchar followed eight other candidates who released unofficial fundraising totals the week before. Of the candidates who have so far self-reported, the leading fundraisers are:

President Trump holds rally in Minneapolis

President Trump held a rally in Minneapolis Thursday night, his first campaign rally since September 16. At the rally, Trump criticized Joe Biden and Rep. Ilhan Omar (D-Minn.), adding that he believed he would carry the state in the 2020 election. No Republican has carried Minnesota since Richard Nixon (R) in 1972, although Trump came within two percentage points of winning the state in 2016.

In the runup to the rally, the Trump campaign and Mayor Jacob Frey (DFL) clashed over $530,000 in security costs the venue had initially charged the campaign. Frey said that the charge was necessary to pay for overtime for police officers and other necessary costs. The campaign, citing a 2009 Barack Obama rally which the city had paid for, said that the charge was an attempt to prevent the rally from taking place.

Nine candidates participate in CNN town hall focused on LGBT issues

Nine Democratic presidential candidates participated in a town hall event organized by the Human Rights Campaign and CNN and focused on LGBT issues Thursday. Cory BookerJoe BidenPete ButtigiegElizabeth WarrenKamala HarrisBeto O’RourkeAmy KlobucharJulián Castro, and Tom Steyer each attended.

In the runup to the event, several candidates released LGBT issues-related policy proposals and took place in rallies alongside members of the LGBT community. In an interview with Pride Source Wednesday, Buttigieg discussed his campaign, who he looks up to in the LGBTQ community, and where he and other candidates stand on LGBTQ issues. That night, Harris appeared at The Abbey, a gay bar in West Hollywood. Marianne Williamson, who did not participate in the town hall, attended a watch party hosted by Chicago Reader in Chicago, Illinois.

LGBT issues, foster care, and athletics among the issues covered by policy proposals this week

Presidential candidates released policy proposals this week outlining their positions on LGBT issues, campaign finance, and more:

  • Michael Bennet unveiled his housing platform, calling for the construction of nearly 3 million new housing units over the next decade and funding programs to assist  low-income renters.
  • Joe Biden released a higher education proposal on Tuesday that would guarantee two years of free community college or technical training.
  • Cory Booker released a package of policy proposals related to college and professional athletes. Included was a requirement that college athletes be allowed to profit off of their name and image.
  • Pete Buttigieg unveiled a policy related to LGBT issues. The platform calls for Senate passage of H.R. 5, called the Equality Act, as well as granting veterans’ benefits to former service members discharged on the basis of gender identity or sexual orientation.
  • Julián Castro released a foster care platform, calling for increased funding for foster care programs and allowing foster children the option to remain in foster care until they turn 21.
  • Kamala Harris released her Children’s Agenda, which includes proposals for up to six months of paid family and medical leave, more nurses and social workers at schools, and criminal justice reforms. 
  • Harris announced a set of policy proposals on LGBT issues, including establishing the office of Chief Advocate for LGBTQ+ Affairs.
  • Beto O’Rourke released a plan focused on women, including proposals to address pay gaps, provide up to 12 weeks of paid parental leave, and guarantee private insurance coverage of abortion.
  • Bernie Sanders released a campaign finance proposal. He said he would replace the Federal Election Commission with a law enforcement agency and prevent party conventions and inauguration ceremonies from corporate sponsorship.
  • Tom Steyer released an economic plan calling for a $15 minimum wage, repealing the Trump Administration’s tax cuts, and implementing a 1 percent wealth tax on individuals worth more than $32 million. His plan also includes congressional term limits and repealing Citizens United, which Steyer said would limit corporate power in the U.S. economy.
  • Elizabeth Warren released a plan Wednesday titled “Fighting for Justice as We Combat the Climate Crisis.” In it, she said, “I’ll direct one-third of my proposed climate investment into the most vulnerable communities – a commitment that would funnel at least $1 trillion into these areas over the next decade.” She also released a plan related to LGBT issues, calling for the passage of the Equality Act and increased federal funding for investigations into allegations of discrimination.

Want more? Find the daily details here:

Poll Spotlight

Staff Spotlight

Rob Friedlander is a Democratic staffer with experience handling communications for campaign and government offices. He is a former staffer to O’Rourke’s opponent Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-Minn.). Friedlander graduated from Bates College in 2010.

Previous campaign work:

  • 2018 Beto O’Rourke U.S. Senate campaign, senior advisor
  • 2012 Annie Kuster (D-N.H.) U.S. House campaign, communications director
  • 2008 Barack Obama presidential campaign, field organizer

Other experience:

  • 2015-2017: U.S. Department of the Treasury, spokesman
  • 2014-2015: Office of Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-Minn.), press secretary
  • 2013-2014: Office of Rep. Annie Kuster (D-N.H.), communications director
  • 2011-2012: White House Office of Management and Budget, press assistant
  • 2010-2011: U.S. Department of Education, confidential assistant

What We’re Reading

  • New York Magazine: The Emerging Anybody-But-Warren Campaign
  • CNN: How Bernie Sanders’ heart attack changes the 2020 race
  • FiveThirtyEight: “Which Democratic Presidential Candidate Was Mentioned Most In The News Last Week?”
  • The Hill: “Small-dollar donors reshape Democratic race”
  • The Washington Post: “We could have record turnout in the 2020 election. We’re not ready for it.”

Flashback: October 7-11, 2015

  • October 7, 2015The Washington Post published an analysis of Gallup’s decision not to do horserace polling in 2016. This was a departure from the 2008 and 2012 election cycles when Gallup published daily national polls during the primary and general elections.
  • October 8, 2015CNN Business detailed then-candidate Donald Trump’s (R) efforts to prevent the use of his trademarked phrase “Make America Great Again” on merchandise sold by vendors other than his official campaign website.
  • October 9, 2015: Hillary Clinton’s campaign had aired around 5,500 TV ads in Iowa and New Hampshire—about one-quarter of ads in the 2016 presidential race to date from any source, including Democratic and Republican candidates, political parties, and super PACs, The Center for Public Integrity reported.
  • October 10, 2015Time published a piece on Democratic candidate and former Maryland Gov. Martin O’Malley titled, “Here’s How Underdog Martin O’Malley Plans to Win the Democratic Debate.” The piece came out days ahead of the first Democratic debate of the 2016 presidential race, which was on October 13, 2015, and featured five candidates. 
  • October 11, 2015: CBS News released the results of a poll of Republican and Democratic primary voters. The CBS analysis of the Republican poll emphasized the decrease in favorability and support numbers for Jeb Bush (R-Fla.). The analysis of the Democratic poll highlighted Hillary Clinton’s support, which was unchanged relative to September but lower than in August.

Trivia

In the past century, which presidential election had the highest estimated voter turnout?



Candidates release policy proposals on housing, foster care, and LGBT issues

 Ballotpedia's Daily Presidential News Briefing

October 11, 2019: Six Democratic candidates released policies on LGBT issues, foster care, housing, and athletics Thursday. President Trump headlined a rally in Minneapolis.
        

Each Friday, we highlight a presidential candidate’s key campaign staffer.

Ballotpedia's Daily Presidential News Briefing - Staffer Spotlight - Rob Friedlander

 

Rob Friedlander is a Democratic staffer with experience handling communications for campaign and government offices. He is a former staffer to O’Rourke’s opponent Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-Minn.). Friedlander graduated from Bates College in 2010.

Previous campaign work:

  • 2018 Beto O’Rourke U.S. Senate campaign, senior advisor
  • 2012 Annie Kuster (D-N.H.) U.S. House campaign, communications director
  • 2008 Barack Obama presidential campaign, field organizer

Other experience:

  • 2015-2017: U.S. Department of the Treasury, spokesman
  • 2014-2015: Office of Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-Minn.), press secretary
  • 2013-2014: Office of Rep. Annie Kuster (D-N.H.), communications director
  • 2011-2012: White House Office of Management and Budget, press assistant
  • 2010-2011: U.S. Department of Education, confidential assistant

Notable Quote of the Day

“With a crucial debate looming next week in the Democratic presidential primary, the party’s populist wing appears increasingly in control of the race — rising in the polls, stocked with cash and with only a wounded leading candidate, Joseph R. Biden Jr., standing in its way.

Several slow-building trends have converged to upend the race over the last few weeks: Senator Elizabeth Warren’s steady ascent in the polls has accelerated. Both she and Senator Bernie Sanders, a fellow progressive, have raised immense sums of money from small donors online, dominating the Democratic field and each collecting about $10 million more than Mr. Biden in the last quarter. And Mr. Biden’s numbers have gradually slipped in a way that has alarmed his supporters.”

— Alexander Burns, The New York Times

Democrats

  • Michael Bennet unveiled his housing platform, calling for the construction of nearly 3 million new housing units over the next decade and funding programs to assist  low-income renters.
  • Joe Biden issued a statement criticizing the removal of U.S. troops from northern Syria, accusing President Donald Trump of having “betrayed our word as a nation”.
  • Cory Booker released a package of policy proposals related to college and professional athletes. Included was a requirement that college athletes be allowed to profit off of their name and image.
  • Pete Buttigieg unveiled a policy related to LGBT issues ahead of Thursday’s CNN town hall. The platform calls for Senate passage of H.R. 5, called the Equality Act, as well as granting veterans’ benefits to former service members discharged on the basis of gender identity or sexual orientation.
  • Julián Castro released a foster care platform, calling for increased funding for foster care programs and allowing foster children the option to remain in foster care until they turn 21.
  • Tulsi Gabbard criticized the Democratic primary debate process and said that she was considering not attending the upcoming October 15 debate. Marianne Williamson echoed Gabbard’s statement.
  • Kamala Harris announced a set of policy proposals ahead of CNN’s LGBT town hall, including establishing the office of Chief Advocate for LGBTQ+ Affairs.
  • In a letter sent Thursday, Amy Klobuchar called on the Department of Justice and the Federal Election Commission to open an investigation into President Donald Trump’s personal attorney, Rudy Giuliani.
  • Bernie Sanders thanked supporters for their well-wishes and said he would soon return to the campaign trail in a video statement.
  • In an interview with Fox LA, Tom Steyer predicted that Donald Trump would no longer be president at the time of the November 2020 election.
  • Elizabeth Warren released a plan related to LGBT issues, calling for the passage of the Equality Act and increased federal funding for investigations into allegations of discrimination.
  • In a statement provided to The Hill, Andrew Yang criticized the Chinese government for blocking the broadcast of National Basketball Association games.

Republicans

  • Mark Sanford criticized the withdrawal of U.S. troops from northern Syria in an interview on MSNBC.
  • Donald Trump held a rally in Minneapolis Thursday night. He criticized Biden and Rep. Ilhan Omar. At the rally, Trump predicted that he would carry the state in the general election.
  • Bill Weld headlined an event at the University of New Hampshire.

What We’re Reading

  • The Washington Post: “We could have record turnout in the 2020 election. We’re not ready for it.”
  • The Wall Street Journal: “Political Campaigns Know Where You’ve Been. They’re Tracking Your Phone.”
  • ABC News: “2020 candidates give more attention to climate change than in past elections”?

Flashback: October 11, 2015

CBS News released the results of a poll of Republican and Democratic primary voters. The CBS analysis of the Republican poll emphasized the decrease in favorability and support numbers for Jeb Bush (R-Fla.). The analysis of the Democratic poll highlighted Hillary Clinton’s support, which was unchanged relative to September but lower than in August.



Nine candidates to participate in CNN LGBTQ town hall

 Ballotpedia's Daily Presidential News Briefing

October 10, 2019: Nine candidates will participate in a CNN town hall on LGBTQ issues Thursday. Warren released an environmental justice plan proposing $1 trillion in spending over 10 years on vulnerable communities.
Presidential poll highlights, 2019-2020 - Quinnipiac University (October 4-7, 2019)

 Presidential poll highlights, 2019-2020 - Politico/Morning Consult (September 30 - October 6, 2019)

Notable Quote of the Day

“It’s entirely possible that in December or January, Democrats feel like Biden is not inspiring enough but also that Sanders and Warren have taken too many left-wing positions and are risky bets in the general. In such a scenario, Harris, along with Buttigieg, are the best positioned candidates to rise.

But a lot would have to happen for Harris to pull off such a comeback. Right now, she seems more likely to finish behind Andrew Yang than to win the Democratic nomination. … Maybe the best explanation for Harris’s struggles is that she hasn’t been a great candidate and also faced three things that were out of her control: the strong performances of Biden and Warren, doubts from some Democrats about a woman of color’s ability to win the general election and a Democratic electorate looking for either a really leftward shift (Warren, Sanders) or someone decidedly against that shift (Biden.)”

— Perry Bacon Jr., FiveThirtyEight

Democrats

  • Nine candidates will participate in a town hall Thursday focused on LGBTQ issues: Cory BookerJoe BidenPete ButtigiegElizabeth WarrenKamala HarrisBeto O’RourkeAmy KlobucharJulián Castro, and Tom Steyer. Candidates will appear in that order separately in back-to-back interviews. The event was organized by the Human Rights Campaign and will air on CNN from 7:30 p.m. to 12 a.m. ET. 
  • Michael Bennet said that he thinks he will “attract back some of the 9 million people who voted twice for Barack Obama and once for Donald Trump.”
  • Biden called for President Donald Trump’s impeachment at a town hall event in New Hampshire Wednesday, saying, “To preserve our Constitution, our democracy, our basic integrity, he should be impeached.” Before then, Biden had stated conditional support for impeachment proceedings.
  • Booker talked about the upcoming debate and the impeachment inquiry with NJTV News.
  • Steve Bullock will participate in a Democracy Town Hall event in Manchester, New Hampshire, on Thursday.
  • In an interview with Pride SourceButtigieg discussed his campaign, who he looks up to in the LGBTQ community, and where he and other candidates stand on LGBTQ issues. 
  • Castro talked with TMZ about China’s decision not to air NBA games after Rockets General Manager Daryl Morey expressed support for protesters in Hong Kong. Castro said, “It’s important for the NBA to stand up for the things that it says it believes in. …[F]ree speech is one of those things.”
  • John Delaney will participate in a Democracy Town Hall event in Rochester, New Hampshire, on Saturday.
  • Harris appeared at The Abbey, a gay bar in West Hollywood, the night before the LGBTQ forum in Los Angeles.
  • Klobuchar sent a letter to Senate Rules Committee Chairman Roy Blunt (R-Mo.) asking him to schedule a markup of the Honest Ads Act, which she co-sponsors, citing a Senate Intelligence Committee report discussing the use of social media platforms by the Russian government during the 2016 presidential election. The Act would require online political ads to meet the same disclosure requirements as TV and radio ads.
  • O’Rourke was on the AZ Central podcast The Gaggle, where he talked about his Arizona strategy as well as gun policy, healthcare, immigration, impeachment, and more. 
  • Bernie Sanders was interviewed by NBC News Wednesday. He discussed his heart attack and how his campaign handled informing the public about it. 
  • Joe Sestak met with the Pelham, NH Democrats group Wednesday.
  • Steyer described himself as an outsider in an interview with New York Daily News and said, “If you think that the issue is there’s a broken government that can’t deal with the health care crisis, can’t deal with climate, can’t deal with gun violence, can’t deal with immigration reform, then you should ask: Is it someone who has been doing it from the outside successfully that’s going to do it or is it going to be someone who has been working in Congress and the Senate for a long time.”
  • Warren released a plan Wednesday titled “Fighting for Justice as We Combat the Climate Crisis.” In it, she said, “I’ll direct one-third of my proposed climate investment into the most vulnerable communities – a commitment that would funnel at least $1 trillion into these areas over the next decade.”
  • Marianne Williamson is scheduled to attend a CNN LGBTQ town hall watch party hosted by Chicago Reader in Chicago, Illinois.
  • Andrew Yang will appear on CBS Sunday this weekend.

Republicans

  • Buzzfeed News published a text message exchange with Mark Sanford in which he discussed his campaign and his belief that Donald Trump should be censured as opposed to impeached.
  • In response to Joe Biden calling for his impeachment, Trump tweeted, “So pathetic to see Sleepy Joe Biden, who with his son, Hunter, and to the detriment of the American Taxpayer, has ripped off at least two countries for millions of dollars, calling for my impeachment — and I did nothing wrong.”
  • Joe Walsh criticized Mark Sanford on Fox News, saying, “Mark Sanford’s not serious. … I’m not in it to start a conversation about the debt. I’m in it to win, and I’m in it to stop Trump.”

What We’re Reading

  • CBS News: “Iowa voters say they want to hear more from Democrats on foreign policy”
  • Associated Press: “Warren Aims to Build Appeal in Republican Strongholds”
  • The Hill: “Small-dollar donors reshape Democratic race”

Flashback: October 10, 2015

Time published a piece on Democratic candidate and former Maryland Gov. Martin O’Malley titled, “Here’s How Underdog Martin O’Malley Plans to Win the Democratic Debate.” The piece came out days ahead of the first Democratic debate of the 2016 presidential race, which was on October 13, 2015, and featured five candidates. 



Booker, Steyer, and Yang bring November debate total (so far) to eight, DNC sets date

Ballotpedia's Daily Presidential News Briefing

October 9, 2019: Cory Booker, Tom Steyer, and Andrew Yang bring the total of candidates who’ve qualified for the November 20 debate to eight. Joe Biden was endorsed by Sen. Dianne Feinstein.


 Presidential Facebook ads, 2019-2020 (September 30-October 6, 2019)

Notable Quote of the Day

“If Democrats learned anything in 2016 — an open question, surely — it is that it is impossible to win with a campaign that is not about anything except the all-consuming ‘Can you believe he said that?’ badness of one’s opponent. McMansion wine moms in Northern Virginia want to hear about what a misogynist the gross orange man is, and they will pay $4600 a pop for the privilege. The voters Democrats actually need in 2020 are the ones in Wisconsin, Michigan, and Pennsylvania who want to hear that Trump is right about trade and manufacturing and the swamp but that he has shown he can’t get the job done.”

—Matthew Walther, The Week

Democrats

  • Eight candidates have qualified for the November Democratic debate so far. Cory BookerTom Steyer, and Andrew Yang qualified in recent days, joining Joe BidenPete ButtigiegKamala HarrisBernie Sanders, and Elizabeth Warren on the roster. The debate will take place in Georgia on November 20, the Democratic National Committee announced Tuesday.

  • Five candidates will attend the Ohio Democratic Party’s annual dinner on Sunday: ButtigiegJulián CastroAmy KlobucharSteyer, and Tim Ryan.

  • Michael Bennet‘s campaign wrote in a press release that “candidates running on Medicare for All, like Elizabeth Warren, open themselves up to attack from Donald Trump in the general election if they are not clear about the $31 trillion middle-class tax increase that comes with their healthcare plan.”

  • Biden was endorsed by U.S. Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) Tuesday.

  • Booker met with the editorial board of the Des Moines Register.

  • Steve Bullock announced $2.3 million in third-quarter fundraising. He has raised a total of $4.3 million in the five months he’s been campaigning. The campaign said it hopes to be approved for public matching funds.

  • Buttigieg released a digital ad titled “Light the Way” in Iowa, New Hampshire, and Nevada Tuesday. The ad features video from a Buttigieg rally in Nevada where attendees used cellphones to light the stage amid a power outage.

  • Tulsi Gabbard was interviewed by John Stossel. They discussed foreign policy, government spending, and drug legalization.

  • Harris released her Children’s Agenda, which includes proposals for up to six months of paid family and medical leave, more nurses and social workers at schools, and criminal justice reforms. 

  • Klobuchar criticized Donald Trump’s decision to remove troops from the Syrian border. She told Iowa’s KMA News, “We should be dealing with China right now in trying to work out this trade war, all right? … We should be dealing with farm prices. Instead, he causes all these self-inflicted wounds, whether it is getting out of the Iranian agreement, so that that’s blowing up, and they are enriching uranium and blowing the caps, to what is happening now with Syria.”

  • Beto O’Rourke released a plan focused on women, including proposals to address pay gaps, provide up to 12 weeks of paid parental leave, and guarantee private insurance coverage of abortion.

  • Sanders said Tuesday he was “feeling good” and “getting stronger” after his heart attack. He also said, “[I]f there’s any message that I hope we can get out there is that I want people to pay attention to the symptoms. When you’re hurting, when you’re fatigued, when you have pain in your chest, listen to it.”

  • Warren gave details of her account of experiencing pregnancy discrimination after the Washington Free Beacon published documents stating that Warren’s contract to teach had been renewed and that she had resigned in 1971. Warren maintained that she was fired after her pregnancy began to show that year.

Republicans

  • Mark Sanford said on Fox Business that he thinks there “will be a financial storm the likes of which we’ve never seen” within the next four years.

  • Donald Trump said of his decision to remove U.S. troops from the border of Syria, “We may be in the process of leaving Syria, but in no way have we Abandoned the Kurds, who are special people and wonderful fighters.” He said he had campaigned on ending wars. 

  • Joe Walsh was interviewed by Boston station WBZ. He discussed his criticisms of Trump and his past support for Trump. Asked whether Trump should be impeached, Walsh said, “Hell yes.”

  • Bill Weld published a piece in Foreign Affairs saying, “I am running against Trump for the Republican nomination for president in part to return the United States to the stable, bipartisan foreign policy that brought the United States through the Cold War.”

Flashback: October 9, 2015

Hillary Clinton’s campaign had aired around 5,500 TV ads in Iowa and New Hampshire—about one-quarter of ads in the 2016 presidential race to date from any source, including Democratic and Republican candidates, political parties, and super PACs, The Center for Public Integrity reported.

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How did the 2010 elections affect the last redistricting cycle?

Trifecta control changed in 12 states in 2010 where state legislatures were responsible for redistricting

Eleven states are holding gubernatorial elections in 2020, and 44 are holding state legislative elections. In a majority of these states, the officials elected in 2020 will play a part in redrawing legislative maps governing elections for the subsequent 10 years.

The process by which legislative district boundaries are drawn is called redistricting. Every 10 years, the U.S. Census Bureau delivers detailed population datasets to the states. Redistricting authorities in the states use these datasets to redraw congressional, state legislative, and even local district maps.

In 34 states holding state legislative elections in 2020, the legislatures themselves will play a significant role in that state’s 2020 redistricting. In eight of next year’s gubernatorial elections, the winner will have veto authority over the state legislative or congressional district plans approved by legislatures.

Redistricting authorities in the United States

Redistricting authorities in the United States

The 2010 election and redistricting cycle illustrate how elections can affect the redistricting process.

Trifecta control—where one party controls the governorship and both chambers of a state’s legislature— changed as a result of the 2010 elections in 12 states where legislatures were responsible for redistricting. Prior to these elections, seven of the 12 were Democratic trifectas and the rest had divided governments.

  • Six states changed from a Democratic trifecta to divided government—Colorado, Iowa, New Hampshire, North Carolina, Oregon, Wisconsin.
  • Five states changed from divided government to a Republican trifecta—Alabama, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio, Pennsylvania.
  • One state—Maine—changed from a Democratic to Republican trifecta.

Of the 12 states which saw trifecta control change in 2010, three—Alabama, Indiana, and Ohio—are currently Republican trifectas. Three states have become Democratic trifectas—Colorado, Oregon, and Maine. The rest are divided governments.

Our briefing yesterday discussed which states have changed their redistricting processes since the 2010 cycle, recent federal and state court decisions regarding partisan gerrymandering, and the upcoming 2020 Census. If you weren’t able to attend, click here to view the recording. 

Learn more

Local Roundup 

At Ballotpedia, we provide election coverage of all officeholders in the nation’s 100 largest cities—including mayors, city council members, and other municipal officers. We also cover every election on the ballot in these cities, such as county officials and local ballot measures.

Here’s our weekly summary of the local news we’re covering. Email me to suggest some interesting local election coverage in your area—I’d love to hear about it!

Raleigh, North Carolina

Former at-large councilwoman Mary-Ann Baldwin finished first with 38% of the vote and attorney Charles Francis finished second with 31% in Raleigh’s mayoral general election October 8. Since no candidate received a majority of the vote in the six-candidate field, a runoff will be held on November 5 if Francis requests it. Second-place finishers have until October 17 to ask for a runoff.

Raleigh also held elections for all seven city council seats—two at-large and five district seats. Six of seven incumbents ran for re-election. Three incumbents won outright in the primary, one was defeated, and two incumbents—at-large councilman Russ Stephenson and District D councilwoman Kay Crowder—qualified for a runoff. Neither Stephenson nor Crowder has said whether they will request a runoff.

Birmingham, Alabama 

Two incumbent Birmingham City Council members appeared to win special elections October 8 and a third incumbent advanced to a November 19 runoff. The three incumbents had all been appointed by the council in 2018 to fill vacancies after the previous members had resigned. The winners of these elections will serve until all nine council seats will next be up for regular election in 2021.

Vote counting on election night was delayed because voting machine memory cards that contained results were inadvertently placed in sealed boxes with paper ballots in certain precincts. The results on those cards were tabulated after the sealed boxes were opened the following day after a judge’s order.

 Voters also appeared to approve three ballot measures renewing property taxes for the city’s public schools. Election night results showed all three measures ahead with about 90 percent of voters approving them. The total tax rate renewed by the propositions was $0.98 per $100 of taxable property for 25 years. Birmingham City Schools reported that the taxes generate about $32 million per year—14% of its annual budget. The taxes were last approved in 1991 and were set to expire in September 2021.

Quiz: How many Louisiana state legislative seats switched partisan control in 2015?

Our Brew story Tuesday previewing Louisiana’s October 12 state legislative primary elections—happening alongside the gubernatorial and other state executive primaries—said that contested elections will be held in 94 seats this year, more than either the 2011 or 2015 election cycles. There were 70 contested state legislative elections in 2015 and 81 in 2011.

Louisiana voters will elect all 144 members of the state legislature—39 state Senators and 105 state Representatives—using what’s known as a blanket primary, where all candidates appear on the ballot, regardless of party. Any candidate that receives more than 50 percent of the primary vote wins the election outright. If not, a general election will be held for the top two finishers Nov. 16.

This caused me to wonder—and quiz our Brew readers—how many Louisiana state legislative seats switched partisan control in 2015?

A.  3 →
B.  5 →
C.  8 →
D.  11 →
 


California had the fewest propositions this decade in the state’s history

This decade featured the fewest California ballot propositions in the state’s history

Since California has finalized its 2019 general election ballot, I wanted to share the results of our analysis of the number of ballot measures in the state this decade. 

  • Between 2010 and 2019, there were 69 statewide ballot measures in California, which means this decade featured the fewest number of measures since voters adopted the initiative process in 1911. 
  • The number of citizen-initiated measures—51—was the third-most over the previous 11 decades.
  • Over the last ten years, the state legislature passed fewer constitutional amendments, referred statutes, and general obligation bonds decided by voters. 

After peaking at 142 ballot measures in the 1970s, the number of ballot measures appearing on the ballot in California has decreased each decade. The average decade featured 116 ballot propositions, of which 39 were citizen-initiated.

In 1912, California voters decided the first citizen-initiated measures. Since then, there have been 1,271 ballot measures. Of those, 428—or 34%—were put on the ballot through citizen petitions which came either through the initiative or the veto referendum process.

The approval rate for all ballot measures in California—citizen-initiated measures and legislative referrals—from 1912 to 2019 is 57%. The approval rate for citizen initiatives during this time is 36%. 

California propositions by decade

Due to turnout in California’s 2018 gubernatorial election—which determines the number of signatures required for the two successive general elections—signature requirements increased by 70.3%. During the next two cycles—2020 and 2022—citizen-initiated measures will require the largest number of signatures to make the ballot in the state’s history. An initiated constitutional amendment will require 997,139 valid signatures and an initiated statute or veto referendum will require 623,212 valid signatures. 

Learn more

Louisiana’s 94 contested legislative elections this fall outpaces 2011 and 2015

Louisiana voters head to the polls October 12 (yes, this Saturday) to cast their ballots in the state’s legislative primaries. There are 94 contested legislative elections this year — more than there were in either the 2011 or 2015 election cycles.

There are 11 state Senate and 39 state House races that are uncontested in 2019, which is less than the number in the last two election cycles. In 2015, 21 Senate and 53 House races had a single candidate, while in 2011, 20 Senate and 43 House races had one candidate. In addition to elections for governor, six other statewide executive offices, and eight seats on the state board of education, Louisiana voters will elect all 39 members of the state Senate and 105 representatives in the state House. These are the first state legislative elections since 2015.  

Louisiana uses what’s known as a blanket primary, where all candidates in any race appear on the ballot Oct. 12—regardless of party. A candidate can win the election outright by receiving more than 50 percent of the primary vote. If not, then a general election for the top two finishers will be held Nov. 16.

Here’s how many races were decided in the primary versus the general election in the last two cycles:

  • There were 18 contested elections for state Senate seats in 2015. Fourteen races were decided in the primary and four in the general election. 
  • There were 19 contested state Senate elections in 2011—with 15 races decided in the primary and four in the general election.
  • Fifty-two state House seats featured contested elections in 2015 with 37 races decided in the primary election and 15 in the general election.
  • Of the 62 contested state House elections in 2011, 41 were decided in the primary election and 21 in the general election.

Republicans currently hold a 25-14 majority in the state Senate. There are 60 Republicans, 39 Democrats, and five independents—with one vacancy in the state House. Heading into the elections, Louisiana is under a divided government; Gov. John Bel Edwards is Democratic while Republicans control both legislative chambers.

Click the link below to learn more about Louisiana’s 2019 elections.

 

Warren leads Democratic presidential candidates in Ballotpedia pageviews for second consecutive week

As part of our coverage of the presidential race, we track and report the number of views the candidates’ 2020 presidential campaign pages receive to show who is getting our readers’ attention. 

For the week ending Oct. 5, Elizabeth Warren’s campaign page on Ballotpedia received 3,071 pageviews, more than any other Democratic candidate. This was the second consecutive week Warren’s page received the most pageviews among the Democratic field. 

Andrew Yang’s page had the second-most pageviews during this week and Joe Biden’s page was third.  The only Democratic candidate to receive more pageviews last week than the week before was Tom Steyer, whose pageviews increased by 33.6%.

Andrew Yang remains the leader in overall pageviews among Democratic presidential candidates in 2019 with 124,790. He is followed by Pete Buttigieg, Kamala Harris, Joe Biden, and Warren. Those five candidates have each had more than 100,000 pageviews this year.

See the full data on all presidential candidates below.

 



Amy Klobuchar raised $4.8 million in Q3 2019

 

 

Ballotpedia's Daily Presidential News Briefing

October 8, 2019: Amy Klobuchar’s campaign raised $4.8 million last quarter. Next Tuesday’s 12-candidate Democratic debate in Westerville, Ohio, will be the largest single primary debate ever.

 

In the past century, which presidential election had the highest estimated voter turnout?

Notable Quote of the Day

“One thing we can say for sure is that something has changed in the race in the wake of Sanders’ heart attack. The burden of proof has now shifted directly to Sanders and, to a slightly lesser extent, Biden and Warren. Rather than their opponents needing to find some non-tacky way to raise the age question, that trio now has to find ways to address voter concerns about it. Which is a subtle but important shift — particularly given that it is very hard to ask questions about whether candidates are too old without getting major blowback.”

—Chris Cillizza, CNN

Democrats

  • The next Democratic primary debate is in one week on Tuesday, October 15. Twelve candidates will be on stage, making it the largest single presidential primary debate ever. Tulsi Gabbard and Tom Steyer are the only two candidates who will participate that did not qualify for the September debate. The event takes place at Otterbein University in Westerville, Ohio. Erin Burnett, Anderson Cooper, and Marc Lacey will moderate. 
  • Michael Bennet campaigned in New Hampshire, canvassing neighborhoods with a local school board candidate.
  • Joe Biden released a higher education proposal on Tuesday that would guarantee two years of free community college or technical training.
  • Cory Booker campaigned in Cedar Rapids and Iowa City, part of a four-day swing through the state. He spoke at a climate change forum in Cedar Rapids and a town hall in Iowa City.
  • Pete Buttigieg called for an end to the war in Afghanistan Monday, on the 18th anniversary of the beginning of the war.
  • Julián Castro visited a refugee camp across the border from Brownsville, Texas, where he criticized the Trump administration’s immigration policy.
  • Gabbard held a town hall in Fairfield, Iowa.
  • Kamala Harris campaigned in Des Moines, Ames, and Ankeny, attending a story time event at an elementary school and a town hall.
  • Amy Klobuchar announced $4.8 million in fundraising for the third quarter of 2019. That figure is more than her $3.9 million from Q2 but less than her $5.2 million from Q1.
  • Beto O’Rourke appeared on NPR’s All Things Considered on Monday.
  • Joe Sestak appeared on WMUR’s The Trail podcast. He discussed his foreign policy experience among the Democratic primary field.
  • Steyer released an economic plan calling for a $15 minimum wage, repealing the Trump tax cuts, and implementing a 1 percent wealth tax on individuals worth more than $32 million. His plan also includes congressional term limits and repealing Citizens United, which Steyer said would limit corporate power in the U.S. economy.
  • Elizabeth Warren released a plan that she says would “strengthen the integrity and impartiality of the federal judiciary.” It calls for a new recusal process, banning judges from holding stock, and requiring written explanations of recusal decisions from Supreme Court Justices.
  • Marianne Williamson spoke to supporters in Claremont, New Hampshire. She spoke about having a referendum to require one year of national service for adults under 30 and her plans to create a U.S. Department of Peace.
  • Andrew Yang appeared at Rich Brian’s The Sailor Tour in New York City.

What We’re Reading

Flashback: October 8, 2015

CNN Business detailed then-candidate Donald Trump’s (R) efforts to prevent the use of his trademarked phrase “Make America Great Again” on merchandise sold by vendors other than his official campaign website.