Category2022 elections

All candidates for Santa Clara Valley Water District Board of Directors District 7 in California complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Santa Clara Valley Water District Board of Directors District 7 in California — incumbent Gary Kremen and Rebecca Eisenberg — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office. 

According to the Santa Clara Valley Water website, the board is “comprised of seven members, each elected from equally-divided districts drawn through a formal process. The purpose of the Board, on behalf of Santa Clara County, is to provide Silicon Valley safe, clean water for a healthy life, environment and economy.”

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office?            

Kremen:       

  • “I help keep our area with safe, clean and affordable water”
  • “I worked on keeping our creeks clean during homelessness (1/4 of all homeless live in the creeks).”
  • “I brought in a $484 million state grant for emergency water storage”

Eisenberg:

  • “I Believe Water is a Human Right. Every person deserves access to safe and clean water, regardless of financial circumstances or social status”
  • “I Believe in Climate Action & Social Justice. We must stop destroying and start repairing our natural environment.”
  • “I believe in clean government, transparency, and fiscal responsibility.”

Click on the candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

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All candidates for Santa Clara County Board of Education Trustee Area 7 in California complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Santa Clara County Board of Education Trustee Area 7 in California  — Raeena Lari and Natalie Prcevski — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office. 

According to the Santa Clara County Office of Education website, the “Board of Education has seven members who serve four-year terms and are elected from different trustee areas in the county​.”

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office?            

Lari:

  • “Preparing each and every student for the future by meeting students where they are: When a student requires individualized attention to catch up or advanced level coursework to stay engaged, our job is to provide them what is neccessary for their growth and enrichment.”
  • “Prioritizing mental and physical health and wellness: As a Health Advisory Commissioner, I recognize that children cannot learn and teachers cannot teach if they are not doing well.”
  • “Advocating for equitable pay for teachers and access to affordable housing in the neighborhoods they work in: Studies have shown that higher teacher pay is linked to better learning outcomes. When educators are less stressed, they can focus on their students.”

Prcevski:               

  • “Propelling student achievement for all students and all levels of learners. Let’s teach the real-world skills our students need to be successful in school and in life. They deserve the opportunity to move forward.”
  • “Creating safe, healthy environments where students and teachers can thrive. Mental health awareness and support is fore front post pandemic. We need infrastructure in place to be inclusive, fair, present and listening to ALL.”
  • “Partnering together with parents and the community to rebuild trust in our public schools. I am a product of public school. My child is in public school. Schools should be centers of our community. Together we lay the foundation for our students to navigate the evolving and complex world before us.”

Click on the candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

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Incumbent Cartwright, Bognet face off in Pennsylvania’s 8th District in rematch of 2020 race

Incumbent Matt Cartwright (D) and Jim Bognet (R) are running in the general election in Pennsylvania’s 8th Congressional District on Nov. 8, 2022.

Emily Wilkins wrote in Bloomberg Government that Cartwright’s “district not only supported [Donald] Trump in 2016 and 2020, but Cartwright won it in 2016, 2018 and 2020 — the only Democratic lawmaker running this year who can make that claim. While other candidates in purple districts look to Cartwright as an example, he isn’t taking his past success for granted this year.”

Wilkins also wrote, “Bognet is working to capitalize on Biden’s low poll numbers. His ads blame Biden for high inflation and highlight Cartwright’s record of voting with Biden’s policies 100% of the time.”

Cartwright is an attorney who was first elected to the U.S. House from the 17th Congressional District in 2012. After the Pennsylvania Supreme Court adopted a new congressional district map in 2018, Cartwright was elected to the 8th Congressional District in 2018 and 2020. Cartwright said that he “is a fighter for all hardworking northeastern Pennsylvanians, standing up to corporate special interests and Washington insiders to lower prices, protect and expand access to health care, and grow our local economy.”

Bognet owns a political consulting and communications firm and worked in President Trump’s administration. Trump endorsed Bognet over Mike Marsicano in the district’s 2022 Republican primary. Bognet said on his campaign website that he was running “to empower American families and small businesses, unleash American energy independence, and create good jobs at good wages.”

This is one of 18 U.S. House districts in 2022 where the same candidates ran against each other in consecutive election cycles. Cartwright defeated Bognet in 2020, 52% to 48%. This is also one of 13 U.S. House districts Democrats are defending that Donald Trump (R) won in 2020.

The outcome of this race will affect the partisan balance of the U.S. House of Representatives in the 118th Congress. All 435 House districts are up for election. As of October 10, 2022, Democrats held a 220-212 majority in the U.S. House with three vacancies. Republicans need to gain a net of five districts to win a majority in the chamber.

Daily Kos calculated what the results of the 2020 presidential election in this district would have been following redistricting. Joe Biden (D) would have received 48.0% of the vote in this district and Donald Trump (R) would have received 50.9%.[4] As of October 2022, 47% of the district’s active voters were registered Democrats, 38% were registered Republicans, and 15% were either registered with some other party or unaffiliated.

Additional reading:

https://ballotpedia.org/Pennsylvania%27s_8th_Congressional_District_election,_2020

https://ballotpedia.org/Matt_Cartwright

https://ballotpedia.org/Jim_Bognet



Four candidates running for Wisconsin secretary of state

Incumbent Doug La Follette (D), Amy Loudenbeck (R), Sharyl McFarland (G), and Neil Harmon (L) are running for Wisconsin secretary of state on Nov. 8, 2022.

Duties of the Wisconsin secretary of state include recording the official acts of the governor and the executive department, compiling and keeping laws and resolutions adopted by the legislature, having custody of the state’s records, and authenticating certain documents. According to Wisconsin Public Radio‘s Shawn Johnson, “[M]ost of the office’s responsibilities have been outsourced to other state agencies that answer to the governor.”

The responsibilities of the office have been a central issue in this race, particularly concerning election administration. Wisconsin is one of five states where the secretary of state has no election-related duties. The legislature transferred election administration responsibilities from the secretary of state to a nonpartisan elections board in 1974. Since 2016, the bipartisan Wisconsin Elections Commission has overseen the state’s election administration. La Follette and Loudenbeck disagree about whether the secretary of state should have a role in the state’s election system.

La Follette was first elected secretary of state in 1974 and served one term before an unsuccessful run for lieutenant governor in 1978. He was elected secretary of state a second time in 1982 and has since served 10 consecutive terms. La Follette says that maintaining the state’s independent election system is “[t]he critical issue in this campaign for Secretary of State.” He said, “The state of Wisconsin has been a pivotal battleground in several of the past presidential elections. … For this reason, it’s more important than ever that we elect a Secretary of State that will defend our democracy over party. As America’s longest-serving incumbent Secretary of State, I have the track record and deep well of experience to do it.”

La Follette also says he wants the secretary of state’s office to again have responsibility for business-related functions. He said, “I have long maintained that we need to make Wisconsin more business friendly. An important step in that direction is to have Wisconsin’s business functions handled as they are in other states. To do this, we should consolidate all such ‘business functions’ in the Office of the Secretary of State.”

Loudenbeck was first elected to represent District 31 in the Wisconsin State Assembly in 2010. Her campaign website states, “The Secretary of State’s office has fallen into disrepair and disfavor thanks to the neglect of Democrat Doug La Follette who has been in that office for forty-four years.” Loudenbeck says, “[M]y goal would be to modernize the office, to be responsive to requests for authentication of documents, to be a billion dollar board member for the Board of Commissioners of Public Lands and actively engage in the role that currently exists for the secretary of state that I see as being neglected right now.”

Loudenbeck has said she would advocate for abolishing the Wisconsin Elections Commission and moving ministerial election duties such as training, guidance, voter roll maintenance, and voter outreach to the secretary of state’s office.

To change the duties of the secretary of state, the legislature would have to pass a bill and the governor would have to sign it into law. Wisconsin currently has a divided government, with Republican majorities in the Senate and Assembly, and Democrat Tony Evers holding the governorship. According to the Associated Press‘ Todd Richmond, “Republican Assembly Speaker Robin Vos … has said he supports the [Wisconsin Elections Commission] and opposes giving the secretary of state election powers.”

In 2018, Democrats gained a state government triplex in Wisconsin when Democratic candidates defeated Republican incumbents in the elections for governor and attorney general, and La Follette was re-elected. All three offices are up for election again in 2022.

There are currently 23 Republican triplexes, 18 Democratic triplexes, and 9 divided governments where neither party holds triplex control.

This is one of 27 elections for secretary of state taking place in 2022. All but three states have a secretary of state.



Rhode Island voters to decide three bond measures totaling $400 million in November

On Nov. 8, voters in Rhode Island will be deciding on three bond measures totaling $400 million. 

Question 1 would issue $100 million in bonds for the University of Rhode Island Narragansett Bay Campus’ marine discipline education and research needs. The University of Rhode Island is leading the Vote Yes on 1 campaign in support of Question 1. Marc Parlange, president of the University of Rhode Island, said, “Rhode Islanders have a generational opportunity to position Rhode Island and New England as the global leader in a new Blue Economy with URI as the engine that fuels that activity.”

Voters last approved a bond issue for the University of Rhode Island Narragansett Bay Campus in 2018 with the passage of Question 2, which authorized the issuance of $45 million for the campus.

Question 2 would issue ​​$250 million in bonds for the construction and renovation of state public school buildings. In 2018, Rhode Island voters approved Question 1, which authorized $250 million in bonds over five years to fund school housing aid and the school building authority capital fund. It was approved with 76.7% of the vote.

Question 3 would issue $50 million in bonds for environmental and recreational purposes. The projects include the Small Business Energy Loan Program, Narragansett Bay and watershed restoration projects, forest restoration projects, and the Roger Williams Park and Zoo. Yes on 3 is leading the campaign in support of Question 3. It has received endorsements from the Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management, Audubon Society of Rhode Island, Clean Water Action, Climate Jobs Rhode Island, and Rhode Island Land Trust Council.

To put a legislatively referred bond question before voters, a simple majority vote is required in both the Rhode Island State Senate and the Rhode Island House of Representatives. In Rhode Island, the state General Assembly must ask voters to issue general obligation bonds over $50,000, except in the case of war, insurrection, or invasion.

The bond measure was introduced into the Rhode Island General Assembly as a provision of Article 5 of House Bill 7123 (HB 7123) on January 16, 2022. 

On June 16, 2022, Article 5 of HB 7123 passed in the state House by a vote of 69-1 with five members not voting. On June 23, 2022, the state Senate voted 33-0 with five not voting.

Governor Daniel McKee (D) signed HB 7123 on June 27, 2022, certifying the three bond measures for the ballot.

Between 2008 and 2021, voters in Rhode Island decided on 29 bond measures totaling $1.7 billion ($1,710,915,000) in principal value. Voters approved all of the bond measures, with support ranging from 55.23% (Question 2 of 2010) to 83.89% (Question 3 of 2016). As of 2021, voters had not rejected a bond measure since 2006, when 50.56% of electors rejected a $4.0 million bond for improvements in Fort Adams State Park.



All candidates for San Diego County Assessor/Recorder/County Clerk complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for San Diego County Assessor/Recorder/County Clerk — Barbara Bry and Jordan Marks — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office. 

According to the San Diego County website, the office is responsible for “fair and uniform assessments of all taxable property in accordance with property tax laws; to provide for the orderly and expeditious recordation, archiving and retrieval of legal documents submitted and to provide for the efficient distribution to the public.”

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office?            

Bry:       

  • “Equity—treat everyone fairly, ensure that all properties are appraised at their fair value on a timely basis according to our current laws and that corporate property owners pay their fair share.”
  • “Transparency and integrity—to act in the public interest. A current senior official has plead guilty for funneling contracts to his wife.”
  • “Modernization—make the website easier to use, bring in new technology to better track and produce records, and develop new tools to improve customer service online, in-person and over the phone.”

Marks:           

  • “Endorsed by Firefighters and Public Safety for being the only qualified candidate they trust to protect taxpayers from overtaxed and ensuring customers continue to receive great customer service!”
  • “Since joining the office, I’ve enhanced our customer experience, receiving a 98.6% “outstanding” customer feedback rating.”
  • “Protect the law limiting annual property tax increases on homeowners and renters -ensuring a more affordable San Diego!”

Click on the candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

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All candidates for Lexington City Council District 2 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Lexington City Council District 2 — Shayla Lynch and Josh McCurn — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office. 

The Lexington City Council, which is more commonly known as the Urban County Council, is the city’s primary legislative body. It is responsible for adopting the city budget, approving mayoral appointees, levying taxes, and making or amending city laws, policies, and ordinances.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office?            

Lynch:           

  • “For over 17 years I have found fulfillment in serving our community in various capacities and I want to continue this work as your city council member.”
  • “When making decisions on behalf of our community, I will give voice to those whose opinions are frequently ignored. I’m inspired to keep fighting because there is hope for a brighter future.”
  • “As a member of your city council, I invite you to join me at the table as we work to build thriving communities in our city. There’s no need to get pull up a chair; I’ve got one just for you! Let’s get this job done together!” 

McCurn:           

  • “Public Safety- Getting a handle on crime and the activity that is happening in our community begins by addressing what is working and to make it better, and what is not working and finding solutions.”
  • “Lexington is a community where I want you to work, play, learn, and live. Every culture and background is welcome in Lexington and ensuring that the needs of the community are met, especially with affordable housing, is vital to the growth of our city.”
  • “Building a stronger, more unified Lexington has been a passion of mine before running for office. Building bridges and tearing down divisions, we are a community as a whole and need the opportunity to understand our neighbors.”

Click on the candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

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All candidates for Lexington City Council District 4 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Lexington City Council District 4 — J. Brack Marquette and Brenda Monarrez — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office. 

The Lexington City Council, which is more commonly known as the Urban County Council, is the city’s primary legislative body. It is responsible for adopting the city budget, approving mayoral appointees, levying taxes, and making or amending city laws, policies, and ordinances.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office?            

Marquette:       

  • “Trusted and Proven Leadership in Government, Business, and Civic Engagement with Integrity, Transparency, and Extraordinary Accessibility for Everyone”
  • “Support for Enhanced Public Safety and Innovative Ways to Lead Neighborhoods to Reduced Crime and Violence”
  • “Commitment to Balanced and Sustainable Growth for our Great Community with a Strong Commitment to Inclusion and Diversity”

Monarrez:   

  • “My endorsement by Public Safety officials means I will be receptive to an open dialogue that contributes to decreasing crime and helping them (Fire, 911 operators, Corrections and Police) be more effective and efficient, while still being open and transparent.”
  • “Affordable Housing – Rent in areas of Lexington, according to a recent Herald Leader article, has increased as much as 35%.”
  • “Accessibility, Openness and Transparency -: I am the only candidate that has made my contact information available and has responded to absolutely every inquiry from all constituents.”

Click on the candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

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All candidates for Montana Public Service Commission District 5 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Montana Public Service Commission District 5 — John Repke (D) and Ann Bukacek (R) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office. 

The Montana Public Service Commission is a five-member board responsible for regulation of energy, telecommunications, water/sewer, transportation, and pipeline utilities in the state. 

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office?            

Repke:       

  • “Experience Matters – For a position like Public Service Commissioner, candidates should have the experience and expertise necessary to be competent and effective in the job.”
  • “Integrity is a Must – All Montanans should expect that their elected officials carry out their responsibilities with integrity, honesty, and professionalism.”
  • “Professionalism makes it work – For a position like Public Service Commissioner professionalism means taking the work seriously, being fully engaged, keeping an open mind to expert opinions, deliberating in good faith, and fostering a healthy, ethical work environment for the agency staff.”

Bukacek:

  • “Almost every vital component of our lives relies on access to energy and water. Keeping Montana energy-independent is key to keeping the lights on and the water running.”
  • “The combination of business owner, old fashioned doctor and seasoned advocate for citizens is a great combination for the PSC position.”
  • “Having been involved with Montana legislators every session since 2009, I am familiar with the legislative process, have helped craft and draft bills, testified for or against bills and garnered legislative and citizen support for same.”

Click on the candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

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All candidates for Jordan Board of Education Precinct 3 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Jordan Board of Education Precinct 3 — incumbent Tracy Miller and Robyn Barnhill — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office. 

According to the Jordan School District website, the board of education “works with students, parents and District employees to provide students with educational opportunities, prepare for the world of work, and develop attributes of citizenship necessary in a democratic society.”

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office?            

Miller:

  • “My primary focus is student success. All students should have the opportunity to learn and succeed in a safe and positive environment.”
  • “I support our teachers. We need to retain our great teachers and attract high quality teachers to the profession. I have consistently voted for increased compensation, more prep time, and additional resources to support our teachers.”
  • “I am fiscally responsible. I voted against the recent Jordan District tax increase because it was too high. I have supported modest increases in the past.”

Barnhill:       

  • “Parents need to have a more effective way of being heard and having their ideas implemented”
  • “Teachers need better support. No more irrelevant and unnecessary trainings. Keep it short, sweet and to the point so they can spend enough time prepping and teaching!”
  • “Better financial oversight, especially at the higher levels. Lets make sure salaries are appropriate and that we are keeping the money with the kids!”

Click on the candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

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