Category2022 elections

Rate of contested state legislative primaries increases in New Hampshire

New Hampshire has 89 contested state legislative primaries this year, 20% of the total number of possible primaries, and a 31% increase from 2020.

The rate of contested primaries this year is at its highest point compared to the four preceding election cycles.

Of the 89 contested primaries, there are 20 for Democrats and 69 for Republicans. For Democrats, this is down from 30 in 2020, a 33% decrease. For Republicans, the number is up 82% from 38 in 2020.

One hundred sixteen incumbents face primary challenges, representing 38% of all incumbents running for re-election. This is higher than in 2020 and 2018, but lower than 2016 when 41% of incumbents faced contested primaries.

Of the 116 incumbents in contested primaries, 26 are Democrats and 90 are Republicans.

Overall, 904 major party candidates—430 Democrats and 474 Republicans—filed to run. All 400 House and 24 Senate seats are up for election.

One hundred twenty-six of those seats are open, meaning no incumbents filed. This guarantees that at least 30% of the legislature will be represented by newcomers next year, the largest such percentage since at least 2014.

New Hampshire has had a Republican trifecta since 2020 when the party won control of both chambers of the legislature. Republicans currently have a 203-179-1 majority in the House with 17 vacancies. The party has a 13-10 majority in the Senate with one vacancy.

New Hampshire’s trifecta status has changed four times since 2010.

New Hampshire’s state legislative primaries are scheduled for Sept. 13, the 17th and final statewide primary date of the 2022 state legislative election cycle.

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Reclaim Idaho withdraws Proposition 1 from the ballot; Idaho legislature sends an advisory question on income and corporate taxes and education funding to voters

On Sept. 7, Reclaim Idaho withdrew Proposition 1 from the November ballot after the state Legislature passed House Bill 1 (HB 1) during its special legislative session on Sept. 1.

Proposition 1 qualified for the 2022 ballot on July 22. It would have increased the tax on income above $250,000 for individuals, trusts, and estates and above $500,000 for couples filing jointly to $16,097 plus 10.925%. It would have established the Quality Education Fund to collect the additional tax revenues to allocate toward public education.

HB 1 changes the income and corporate tax rates to one flat tax rate of 5.8%; provides a tax rebate equalling the greater of 10% of the taxes paid by a couple or individual in 2020 or $600 per joint filer or $300 for an individual; exempts the first $2,500 from taxation for single filers or $5,000 for joint filers; and allocates $410 million of the state’s sales tax revenue to the public school income fund and in-demand careers fund. The tax changes will take effect on January 3, 2023.

HB 1 also included a provision to send a nonbinding advisory question to the November ballot asking voters if they approve or disapprove of the tax changes and additional education funding.

Idaho law does not provide for or prohibit the Idaho State Legislature from placing an advisory question on the ballot. Since 1995, the state legislature has sent two advisory questions to voters in 1998 and 2006. In these two instances, the advisory questions were a provision of an enacted law that received at least a simple majority vote in both the Idaho State Senate and the Idaho House of Representatives.

The 2006 advisory question was related to property taxes and was approved by 72.4% of voters. The 1998 advisory question was related to ballot access requirements for state and local officials and was approved by 53.16%.

HB 1 passed the state House on Sept. 1, 2022, by a vote of 55-15. It passed in the senate on the same day by a vote of 34-1. It was signed by Gov. Brad Little (R) on Sept.1.

Gov. Little released a statement saying, “I am proud of my legislative partners for confronting the substantial impacts of inflation head-on by putting our record budget surplus back in the pockets of Idahoans while responsibly funding education at historic levels to ensure we are meeting our constitutional and moral obligation to Idaho students and families both in the short-term and the long-term.”

After the passage of HB 1, Luke Mayville, the founder of Reclaim Idaho, which sponsored Proposition 1, said, “There are two ways a ballot initiative can win. One way is by securing a majority of the vote at the ballot box. Another way is by forcing the Legislature to do something they would never have otherwise done. By placing [Proposition 1] on the ballot, the citizens of Idaho have forced the Legislature to make the largest investment in Idaho public schools in a generation.”

Currently, Idaho has a graduated income tax structure with the top income bracket taxed at 6%. The corporate income tax rate is also 6%.

With the passage of HB 1, Idaho will join 13 other states that either have a flat income tax or are in the process of implementing one. Forty-four states levy a state corporate income tax ranging from 2.5% in North Carolina to 18.28% in New York.

According to the Education Data Initiative, as of June 2022, Idaho spent on average $6,212 per pupil ($1.93 billion total), and local governments funded on average $2,266 per pupil ($703.7 million total). The state received $891 per pupil ($276.7 million) from the federal government.

Four other ballot measures related to education funding are certified for the 2022 ballot in four other states—California, Colorado, Massachusetts, and New Mexico. Two measures were citizen-initiated and two were referred to the ballot by the legislature.

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Rhode Island sees first open U.S. House seat since 2010

The filing deadline for candidates running for Congress in Rhode Island this year was July 15, 2022. Nine candidates are running for Rhode Island’s two U.S. House districts, including seven Democrats and two Republicans. That’s 4.5 candidates per district, more than the 2.5 candidates per district in 2020 and the three in 2018.

Here are some other highlights from this year’s filings:

  • This is the first election to take place under new district lines following the 2020 census. Rhode Island was apportioned two districts, the same number it was apportioned after the 2010 census.
  • The nine candidates running this year are four more than the five who ran in 2020 and three more than the six who ran in 2018. Seven candidates ran in 2016, six in 2014, and 12 in 2012.
  • There is an open seat for the first time since 2010. Rep. Jim Langevin (D), the incumbent in the 2nd district, is retiring.
  • Seven candidates—six Democrats and one Republican—are running to replace Langevin, the most candidates running for a seat this year. 
  • Rep. David Cicilline (R), the incumbent in the 1st district, is running for re-election and is not facing any primary challengers. 
  • The Democratic primary in the 2nd district is the only contested primary this year. That number is a decade low. There were two contested primaries in 2020, 2018, 2016, and 2014. There were four contested primaries in 2012.
  • Democratic and Republican candidates filed to run in both districts,  so no seats are guaranteed to either party this year.

Rhode Island and two other states—Delaware and New Hampshire—are holding their congressional primaries on September 13, 2022. In Rhode Island, the winner of a primary election is the candidate who receives the greatest number of votes, even if he or she does not win an outright majority of votes cast.



All candidates for Superior Court of Los Angeles County Office 67 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Superior Court of Los Angeles County Office 67 —Fernanda Maria Barreto and Elizabeth Lashley-Haynes— completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office.

The Superior Court of Los Angeles County is one of 58 superior courts in California. It has jurisdiction over Los Angeles County and conducts all original trials in the county, except in cases where the appellate level courts have original jurisdiction. 

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What do you believe are the core responsibilities for someone elected to this office?              

Barreto:       

“Justice should be accessible to everyone and as a judge, I will endeavor to fairly and equitably apply the law to every person that enters the courtroom, whether they are a plaintiff, a defendant, or a witness. I recognize there are specific and systemic issues within the justice system that need to be addressed to truly achieve justice for all, but for my part, I will give each person that comes before me an opportunity to be heard. I will take the time to listen to the parties and make knowledgeable, thoughtful rulings. The justice system is often scary and confusing for the people who use it and I will strive to guide individuals and families through this unfamiliar system and direct them to available resources.“

Lashley-Haynes:       

“Judges preside over trials and hearings. They enforce the rules of the court and hear arguments from attorneys, receive and review evidence and listen to witness testimony. Throughout the trial, judges must make accurate rulings on whether evidence or testimonies are admissible and relevant to the trial. Throughout the entire judicial process, judges must remain impartial. They must put aside all personal feelings and beliefs and make all rulings and decisions based on the evidence and relevant laws. In addition, a judge may not preside over a case if it involves her family, friends, or past or current employees or business associates. In those cases, the judge “recuses” herself and asks that another judge handle the matter.”  

Click on candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

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All candidates for Colorado House of Representatives District 27 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Colorado House of Representatives District 27—incumbent Brianna Titone (D) and Jacob Luria (L)— completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office.

Eighty-eight of the country’s 99 state legislative chambers will hold regularly scheduled elections in 2022. The Democratic Party controls both chambers of Colorado’s state legislature. Colorado is one of 14 states with a Democratic trifecta.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: Who are you? Tell us about yourself.               

Titone:       

“Representative Brianna Titone is running for her third term to serve HD27. Before getting involved in the political environment, Brianna studied Physics, Geology, and Software Development. She serves as the chair of the Legislative LGBTQ+ caucus, Chair of the Joint Technology Committee, and as a member of the Energy & Environment, Health & Insurance, and Agriculture, Livestock & Water Committees. She also serves on the SIPA Board, the JeffCo Schools STEM Advisory Board, the NCSL Energy and Environment and Transportations committees, as well as on the Western Regional Democrat Rep of the NCSL Women’s Legislative Network Executive Board, the CSG West Energy & Environment, Canada Relations, and Colorado River Forum Advisory Committees and the Energy Council, a non-partisan legislative organization comprised of 14 energy-producing states in the United States and two Canadian provinces.” 

Luria:       

“I am running for CO House District 27 to give voters another choice and a better option than the Democrats and Republicans. I am currently 32 years old living in Golden Colorado. I will be getting married and I want to work to help build a better world for the family I am starting. I am originally from New York but moved to Colorado years ago and fell in love with the state and the spirit of independence I found here. I left New York because of the corrupt government thats continue to destroy the state. I don’t want to leave Colorado. I want to stay and fight and make the future better for all of Colorado.”

Click on candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

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All the candidates for Colorado House of Representatives District 42 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Colorado House of Representatives District 42—incumbent Mandy Lindsay (D) and Cory Parella (R)— completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office.

Eighty-eight of the country’s 99 state legislative chambers will hold regularly scheduled elections in 2022. The Democratic Party controls both chambers of Colorado’s state legislature. Colorado is one of 14 states with a Democratic trifecta.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What characteristics or principles are most important for an elected official?            

Lindsay:       

“Ability to seek out experts (know what you don’t know), loyalty to people not profits, ability to make hard choices” 

Parella:       

“I want a decisive official, so I am decisive. I want a transparent official, so I am transparent. I want an accessible official who listens, so I listen.”

Click on candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

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All candidates for Colorado House of Representatives District 55 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Colorado House of Representatives District 55— Damon Davis (D) and Rick Taggart (R)— completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office.

Eighty-eight of the country’s 99 state legislative chambers will hold regularly scheduled elections in 2022. The Democratic Party controls both chambers of Colorado’s state legislature. Colorado is one of 14 states with a Democratic trifecta.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office?

Davis:           

  • “I will fight for affordable housing. I addition to affordable rentals, we need to build affordable starter homes by removing barriers to higher density, lower cost housing, and funding the development of such housing if necessary.”
  • “I will fight for worker rights and policies that will put more money in worker’s pockets and less stress on their lives. This includes strengthening unions to put workers on an even footing with companies, and better enforcing existing worker protections.”
  • “I will fight for more affordable higher education, including reducing in-state tuition rates for state colleges and promoting affordable vocational training for those who want to enter the trades.”

Taggart:           

  • “Fiscal Conservative- as an entrepreneur and life long business leader I know what it means to keep expenses down, prioritize investments and grow revenue. As an elected official, I believe in the principles of Tabor and i have a consistent record in defending it. Voters deserve the opportunity to weigh in on any tax increase.”
  • “Students of Western Colorado deserve a more equitable funding mechanism for Districts like ours. District 51 is always underfunded and I want to do something about this. Parents should be empowered to make choices when it comes to educating their children.”
  • “The primary role of government is keeping people safe. Colorado is demonstrably less safe than we were four years ago. As an elected official I have prioritized public safety and helped develop a financial plan to hire more police officers and firefighters. Municipalities can only do so much on this front it also needs to be a priority of the state.”

Click on candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

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All candidates for Colorado House of Representatives District 62 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Colorado House of Representatives District 62— Matthew Martinez (D) and Carol Riggenbach (R)— completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office.

Eighty-eight of the country’s 99 state legislative chambers will hold regularly scheduled elections in 2022. The Democratic Party controls both chambers of Colorado’s state legislature. Colorado is one of 14 states with a Democratic trifecta.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What areas of public policy are you personally passionate about?            

Martinez:           

  • “Protecting water rights in the San Luis Valley and opposing any plan that removes water from the San Luis Valley
  • Investing in rural Colorado to ensure that their economic success is valued just as much as the metro area
  • Improving access to affordable healthcare in rural Colorado
  • Improving state support for Veterans mental health care”

Riggenbach:           

“The first public policy that I am personally passionate about is healthcare. Our healthcare freedoms are being attacked from every front. I have worked within the healthcare field for 30 years. I am ready to make policy to protect our rights to choose what healthcare we accept and deny. The Veterans of The United States of America paid a dear price for our freedoms. We will take back our medical freedom and patient rights. My second public policy I have a burning passion for is the rights of parents and their right to raise their children as they determine.”

Click on candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

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All candidates for Florida’s 23rd Congressional District complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

All four of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Florida’s 23rd Congressional District completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office.

The candidates are Jared Moskowitz (D), Joe Budd (R), Mark Napier (I), and Christine Scott (I).

The outcome of this race will affect the partisan balance of the U.S. House of Representatives in the 118th Congress. All 435 seats in the House are up for election. As of September 3rd, 2022, Democrats hold a 220-210 advantage in the U.S. House with five vacant seats. Florida’s current congressional delegation consists of 16 Republicans, 10 Democrats, and 1 vacancy.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What areas of public policy are you personally passionate about?            

Moskowitz:           

“Gun violence prevention is personal to me because of the shooting at my alma mater, Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School. It’s a scar on our community and like our neighbors, my wife and I feel the constant fear that our children are at risk. In America, I believe we should be able to make parents a simple promise: when you drop your kids off at school, you get to pick them up alive. Our community deserves that peace of mind. I championed the Florida gun violence prevention law after the Parkland school shooting, and I want to build on the recently passed federal bill by banning assault weapons.” 

Budd:           

“I’ve often said, “Society cannot pay enough for what is earned by an honest police officer”. Liberal cities which have gone down the road of wokeness by defunding police and instituting criminal justice reforms quickly releasing violent criminals back on the streets are reaping the chaos of a substantial rise in crime. I will always have the backs of the men and women who wear a uniform. It’s one of my priorities. It’s personal.”

Napier:

“Political partisanship, in addition to “The Wall” between the Intelligence Community and Law Enforcement have jeopardized our freedoms. The CV-19 pandemic alone demonstrated how far one party will go to weaponize a virus for political control and over our everyday lives. I would reconstruct that wall again. I would pursue more protections for Whistleblowers and prohibit efforts by our own government to unwittingly collect information–even DNA via heritage test kits or facial recognition, unless incarcerated or consent.” 

Scott:

“Abortion: I believe in a woman’s right to choose. It just needs to be done in the first trimester. Killing babies is not a viable or necessary option. With the advent of cheap pregnancy tests, the day after pill and contraceptive options, there is no reason we cannot protect both women rights and that of the unborn child.”

Click here to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

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All candidates for Georgia House of Representatives District 39 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Image of the Georgia State Capitol in Atlanta, Georgia.

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Georgia House of Representatives District 39 —Terry Cummings (D) and Olivia Angel (R) —completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office.

Eighty-eight of the country’s 99 state legislative chambers will hold regularly scheduled elections in 2022. The Republican Party controls both chambers of Georgia’s state legislature. Georgia is one of 23 states with a Republican trifecta government.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What areas of public policy are you personally passionate about?            

Cummings:           

“As your next state representative, I will work to:

  • Preserve the rights of all Georgian’s regardless of race, nationality, religion, or sexual orientation.
  • Ensure all Georgians have access to affordable housing which includes bringing rent control back to Georgia, and livable wages.
  • Ensure women and men receive appropriate sex education, are provided fertility options and birth control. I will also fight to ensure women retain the right to make decisions concerning their own bodies.”

Angel:           

“I am worried about the future of our community so I jumped in this political race, I want to advance a conservative Republican ideas to keep our community prosperous and to keep our peaceful living. I want to listen my constituents issues in the community and make or vote laws of what resonates in my House District 39 when I get elected. Friends and Family, please allow me to serve you by electing me in this coming election.”

Click on the candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

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