Category2022 elections

All candidates for Kentucky’s 30th Circuit Court Division 8 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Kentucky’s 30th Circuit Court Division 8 — Karen Faulkner and Jessica Stone — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office. 

Kentucky District Courts are trial courts of limited jurisdiction in Kentucky. Matters heard by the district courts include city and county ordinance violations, juvenile matters, traffic offenses, misdemeanors, probate, preliminary felony hearings, small claims and civil cases involving $4,000 or less. Along with the family courts, the district courts hear cases of domestic violence. 

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office?                        

Faulkner:       

  • “Everyone should be treated with Fairness in the Court system.”
  • “We need to support alternative resolutions and treatment options, including Restorative Justice, Treatment Courts, and other ways to curb recitivism.”
  • “Access to the Courts and transparency within the system should become a focus and the norm.”

Stone:       

  • “Prioritizes Public Safety: If you want a judge who is going to hold people accountable and keep dangerous criminals off our streets, vote STONE for a safer city!”
  • “Committed to Equal Justice for All – restoring faith and confidence in our justice system can only be done with fairness and open mind”
  • “Public Servant – I am doing this to further serve my hometown community and save our city.”

Click on the candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

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City elections in Louisville, Kentucky, 2022



All candidates for California’s 16th Congressional District complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

All three of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for California’s 16th Congressional District — incumbent Anna Eshoo (D) and Rishi Kumar (D) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office. 

All 435 seats in the House are up for election. As of October 20th, 2022, Democrats hold a 220-212 advantage in the U.S. House with three vacant seats. California’s current congressional delegation consists of 42 Democrats and 11 Republicans.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office?    

Eshoo:       

  • “Protect Our Democracy. Today, our democracy, the rule of law, and the democratic ideals of equality and justice for all are under assault.”
  • “Heal Our Nation. Our nation is deeply divided and this division is mirrored in Congress. Last year a vicious mob, incited by the former president, attempted to stop the counting of Electoral ballots and upend the peaceful transition of power, a hallmark of our democracy. In the case of the Covid-19 pandemic, political polarization has resulted in a deadly “pandemic of the unvaccinated.” 
  • “Strengthen Our Economy. The pandemic has wreaked havoc on our economy and taken a disproportionate toll on small businesses and essential workers for whom remote work is not an option.”

Kumar:           

  • “As the first tech-savvy representative from this district, I will grow our economy, bring American jobs back to restore our supply chain integrity and ensure that our innovation economy thrives as the world’s innovation hub.”
  • “I will leverage the extraordinary technical and financial resources of the richest, most innovative congressional district in America to act on our burning issues.”
  • “I will push for a cleanup of Washington with term limits, ban congressional insider trading, establish a collaborative problem-solving approach, not divisive partisan politics, with a people-centric agenda, not lobbyist-centric.”

Click here to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

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All candidates for the Colorado State Board of Education’s at-large seat complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

All four of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for the Colorado State Board of Education’s at-large seat completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office. 

The candidates are: Kathy Plomer (D),  Dan Maloit (R), Ryan Van Gundy (L), and Eric Bodenstab (Unity Party).

The Colorado State Board of Education is an elected executive agency of the Colorado state government, responsible for managing the state’s public K-12 education. The board’s stated mission is “to provide all of Colorado’s children equal access to quality, thorough, uniform, well-rounded educational opportunities in a safe and civil learning environment.”

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office?    

Plomer:               

  • “My first key issue as a State Board member is to ensure academic excellence for all Colorado Students.”
  • “Second, we need to elevate the teaching profession to attract and retain the best educators.”
  • “Third is promoting accountability and transparency through partnerships of students, parents and the community to create the best outcomes for all students by using student achievement data, budget priorities and shared goals.”

Maloit:           

  • “All of our children deserve an education that is at the peak of academic excellence, focusing on literacy, math, science, and history.”
  • “Teachers are professionals that should be well compensated and enabled with the skills to serve our children.”
  • “Parents deserve to have choices in, and control over, the schools that serve their children.”

Van Gundy:   

  • “Efficient robust education that fits all citizens. Allowing for school of choice, as well a STEAM oriented curriculum.”
  • “Educator hiring and retention.”
  • “Safer schools and making CO the number 1 state for education”

Bodenstab:       

  • “Unity in Education”
  • “No politics K-12”
  • “Be prepared”

Click on the candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

Additional reading:

Colorado State Board of Education elections, 2022



All candidates for Massachusetts Governor’s Council District 7 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Massachusetts Governor’s Council District 7 — incumbent Paul DePalo (D) and Gary Galonek (R) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office. 

The Massachusetts Governor’s Council is a state executive advisory board in the Massachusetts state government consisting of eight elected members. The lieutenant governor serves as an ex officio member of the council. The council records advice and consent regarding gubernatorial appointments, warrants for the state treasury, and pardons and commutations.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office? 

DePalo:           

  • “Address youth trauma in our justice system. Get kids on paths of opportunity, not incarceration.”
  • “Mental health and addiction treatment are part of public safety. We need experts throughout the system.”
  • “Defend choice and human rights. Protect bodily autonomy and lgbtq rights.”

Galonek:

  • “There is currently no reaged for the work of the men and women of law enforcement, or victim’s rights, on the governor’s Council.”
  • “There is a lack of transparency on the current GC. They voted to stop livestreaming hearings back in April of 2022, and only began livestreaming them again after intense pressure form the media.”
  • “This council is far more concerned with the comfort and rights of the accused and the incarcerated than they are of the victims and the lifelong trauma they have to deal with as the result of violent crimes.”

Click on the candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

Additional reading:

Massachusetts Governor’s Council elections, 2022



Oklahoma marijuana legalization initiative will appear on the ballot on March 7, 2023

Oklahoma voters will decide on State Question 820, an initiative to legalize marijuana, on March 7, 2023.

Oklahomans for Sensible Marijuana Laws, proponents of State Question 820, were initially targeting the 2022 ballot and submitted enough signatures to qualify for the ballot. However, due to legal challenges and statutory deadlines, the measure could not be placed on the 2022 ballot and was set to be voted on at a later election date. On October 18, Gov. Kevin Stitt (R) called a special election for the measure on March 7, 2023.

State Question 820 would legalize marijuana for adults 21 years old and older. The Oklahoma Medical Marijuana Authority would be responsible for marijuana business licensing and regulations. Individuals would be allowed to possess, transport, and distribute up to one ounce (28.35 grams) of marijuana, eight grams of marijuana in a concentrated form, and/or eight grams or less of concentrated marijuana in marijuana-infused products. Marijuana sales would be taxed at 15%. Under State Question 820, individuals could possess up to six mature marijuana plants and up to six seedlings. The initiative would also provide a process for individuals to seek the expungement or modification of certain previous marijuana-related convictions or sentences.

Tax revenue generated from marijuana sales would be used to finance the Oklahoma Medical Marijuana Authority’s implementation of the initiative with the remaining funds to be appropriated as follows:

  • 30% to the state general fund;
  • 30% to grants for public school programs to support student retention and performance, after-school and enrichment programs, and substance abuse prevention programs;
  • 20% to grants for government agencies and not-for-profit organizations to fund drug addiction treatment and overdose prevention programs;
  • 10% to the state judicial revolving fund; and
  • 10% to the municipalities or counties where the marijuana was sold.

In 2020, Gov. Kevin Stitt (R) ordered State Question 802, a Medicaid expansion initiative, to appear on the June 30 primary ballot rather than the November 3 general election ballot. In 2018, Gov. Mary Fallin (R) placed State Question 788, a medical marijuana initiative, on the June primary ballot. Prior to 2018, a governor had not selected a date different from the general election for an initiative since 2005.

As of October 2022, 19 states and Washington, D.C., had legalized the possession and personal use of marijuana for recreational purposes.

  • In 11 states and D.C., the ballot initiative process was used to legalize marijuana.
  • In one state, the legislature referred a measure to the ballot for voter approval.
  • In seven states, bills to legalize marijuana were enacted into law.

In November 2022, five more states will decide on marijuana legalization ballot measures. In the central U.S., voters in Arkansas, Missouri, North Dakota, and South Dakota will consider citizen-initiated measures to legalize marijuana. These four states are Republican trifectas. In Maryland, which has a divided government, the state Legislature voted to put the issue before voters.

Marijuana legalization initiatives targeting the 2023 and 2024 ballots have also been filed in Ohio, Wyoming, Florida, and Nebraska and could be filed in Idaho, Mississippi, Nebraska, and Utah.

As of October 20, two statewide ballot measures were certified for the ballot in two states for elections in 2023. From 2011 to 2021, an average of 33 statewide ballot measures — five initiated measures and 28 referred measures — appeared on ballots in odd-numbered years.



Cisco Aguilar (D), Jim Marchant (R), Ross Crane (L), and Janine Hansen (I) are running for Nevada secretary of state on November 8, 2022

Cisco Aguilar (D), Jim Marchant (R), Ross Crane (L), and Janine Hansen (I) are running for Nevada secretary of state on November 8, 2022. Incumbent Barbara Cegavske (R) can not run for re-election due to term limits. According to the Las Vegas Review-Journal, this race is “arguably the most important on the statewide ballot in November, outside of only the races for U.S. Senate and governor, as the victor will be able to exert control over how elections are conducted in Nevada for the next four years.”

Aguilar worked as special legal counsel to the chancellor of the Nevada System of Higher Education and the Andre Agassi Foundation for Education. Former governors Jim Gibbons (R) and Brian Sandoval (R) both appointed Aguilar to the Nevada Athletic Commission as a boxing and mixed martial arts regulator. Aguilar says he is running for secretary of state because “[m]ore than ever, we need to defend every eligible American’s right to vote, remove barriers to voter participation, and make our elections as transparent as possible to maintain the public trust…I am committed to building on the work that many have started in a bi-partisan way, including modernizing, safeguarding and strengthening our democracy, our elections process and the voting rights of every Nevadan.” Aguilar has said Marchant would “use this position in a political way, and that’s detrimental…It really should be neutral, it should be impartial, it should be nonpartisan.”

Marchant represented District 37 in the Nevada State Assembly from 2017 to 2021. Marchant says he is running for secretary of state because “Nevadans want to see the Secretary of State address their concerns about doing business and conducting fair and transparent elections in our state. I’m listening.” Marchant’s campaign website says, “In 2020 [he] ran for Congress for Nevada’s Congressional District 4 and was a victim of election fraud.” According to Marchant, “We haven’t, in Nevada, elected anybody since 2006…They have been installed by the deep state cabal.” If elected, Marchant says his “number one priority [would] be to overhaul the fraudulent election system in Nevada” by repealing universal mail-in voting, requiring voter ID, allowing candidates to request election audits at their own expense, and mandating the use of paper ballots instead of electronic voting machines.

This is one of 27 elections for secretary of state taking place in 2022. All but three states have a secretary of state. Although the specific duties and powers of the office vary from state to state, secretaries of state are often responsible for the maintenance of voter rolls and for administering elections. Other common responsibilities include registering businesses, maintaining state records, and certifying official documents. There are currently 27 Republican secretaries of state and 20 Democratic secretaries of state. Click here for an overview of all 27 secretary of state elections taking place in 2022.

A state government triplex refers to a situation where the governor, attorney general, and secretary of state are all members of the same political party.

As of October 17, 2022, there are 23 Republican triplexes, 18 Democratic triplexes, and 9 divided governments where neither party holds triplex control. Nevada does not have a state government triplex.



All candidates for Minnesota State Senate District 47 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Minnesota State Senate District 47 — Nicole Mitchell (D) and Dwight Dorau (R) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office. 

Eighty-eight of the country’s 99 state legislative chambers will hold regularly scheduled elections in 2022. The Republican Party controls the Senate in Minnesota’s state legislature. Minnesota is one of 13 states with a divided government.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office?            

Mitchell:       

  • “I support our teachers and our public schools. As a mother and foster parent to a special needs child, I believe every student deserves a world–class education.”
  • “I will protect our environment and work to mitigate the impacts of climate change, impacts which I am uniquely aware of as a meteorologist.”
  • “I will work to protect the health and safety of Minnesotans. This means ensuring affordable and accessible healthcare, making sure that women retain the freedom to make their own reproductive decisions, and helping to keep our communities safe from gun violence.”

Dorau:

  • “I will vote for tougher criminal sentencing and I will fully fund our law enforcement agencies. I oppose de-funding police efforts.”
  • “I will vote for across-the-board tax cuts for Minnesota families and businesses. The inflation we have witnessed in the past two years has forced over 60 percent of Americans to live paycheck to paycheck, with many taking on added credit card debt to make ends meet.”
  • “I understand the crucial importance of public education in Minnesota–it’s our greatest legacy.”

Click on the candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

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All candidates for Minnesota State Senate District 42 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Minnesota State Senate District 42 — Bonnie Westlin (D) and Paul Hillen (R) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office. 

Eighty-eight of the country’s 99 state legislative chambers will hold regularly scheduled elections in 2022. The Republican Party controls the Senate in Minnesota’s state legislature. Minnesota is one of 13 states with a divided government.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office?            

Westlin:   

  • “In our community, we believe every person should have the freedom to decide when and if to have a family; to vote for the government they want and deserve; and to marry the preson they love.”
  • “As a single mom, I understand the burdens that higher prices put on our family budgets. We have seen wealthy corporations use the pandemic to engage in price gouging resulting in record profits, while working people struggle to make ends meet. Wealthy corporations need to pay what they owe and contribute to the costs of a high quality public education system, infrastructure and the many other benefits they receive in Minnesota.”
  • “Our schools should have increased funding, higher teacher pay, and more school counselors to support our children. Extremists want to ban books, attack school boards and teachers, and instill extremist ideology in classrooms, driving many good educators away from teaching.”

Hillen:

  • “I will address the high cost of living. Gas prices are up 60% since last year. Inflation is costing MN families over $830/month. MN has the 5th highest tax collections per person and is ranked near last at 45th out of 50 for business taxes.” 
  • “I will bring a common-sense approach and work to (a) ensure existing laws are enforced, (b) stop arrest and release and no cash bail policies, (c) fully fund and support the police, (d) create a juvenile justice system that teaches kids to be responsible for their actions, and helps get them back on track, and (e) make our schools safe.”
  • “I will work to (a) create a focus on core academics & evidence-based methods, (b) eliminate political, ideological, & opinion-based curriculum, let’s let parents raise their kids, (c) push for legislative approval of academic standards, and (d) improve equality of opportunity for all students and families by expanding school choice.”

Click on the candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

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All candidates for Minnesota State Senate District 40 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Minnesota State Senate District 40 — incumbent John Marty (D) and Rachel Japuntich (R) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office. 

Eighty-eight of the country’s 99 state legislative chambers will hold regularly scheduled elections in 2022. The Republican party controls the Senate in Minnesota’s state legislature. Minnesota is one of 13 states with a divided government.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What areas of public policy are you personally passionate about?            

Marty:           

“I am passionate about protecting our democracy and giving people a voice. If we work together, we can build a better future for all. I know we can make our communities safer so people don’t need to worry about violent crime; I know that we can provide healthcare for all, a clean environment, and a fair shake for those who have been left behind.”

Japuntich:

“I am passionate about building a better future for Minnesota families through improving education, improving public safety, and reducing financial tax burdens. I am a new leader with new ideas and will collaborate to solve the problems our state is facing right now.”

Click on the candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

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All candidates for Minnesota State Senate District 32 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Minnesota State Senate District 32 — Kate Luthner (D) and Michael Kreun (R) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office. 

Eighty-eight of the country’s 99 state legislative chambers will hold regularly scheduled elections in 2022. The Republican Party controls the Senate in Minnesota’s state legislature. Minnesota is one of 13 states with a divided government.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office?            

Luthner:           

  • “Public education funding is my top priority.”
  • “Reproductive rights need to be protected in our state”
  • “In all things; equity and ethics”

Kreun:

  • “I will secure funding to improve Highway 65 in Blaine and Ham Lake to relieve congestion and improve safety.”
  • “I support providing tax relief to all Minnesotans, including the elimination of the state tax on social security.”
  • “I will support law enforcement and get Minnesota’s unacceptable crime rate under control.”   

Click on the candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

Additional reading: