Category2022 elections

All candidates for Colorado House of Representatives District 55 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Colorado House of Representatives District 55— Damon Davis (D) and Rick Taggart (R)— completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office.

Eighty-eight of the country’s 99 state legislative chambers will hold regularly scheduled elections in 2022. The Democratic Party controls both chambers of Colorado’s state legislature. Colorado is one of 14 states with a Democratic trifecta.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office?

Davis:           

  • “I will fight for affordable housing. I addition to affordable rentals, we need to build affordable starter homes by removing barriers to higher density, lower cost housing, and funding the development of such housing if necessary.”
  • “I will fight for worker rights and policies that will put more money in worker’s pockets and less stress on their lives. This includes strengthening unions to put workers on an even footing with companies, and better enforcing existing worker protections.”
  • “I will fight for more affordable higher education, including reducing in-state tuition rates for state colleges and promoting affordable vocational training for those who want to enter the trades.”

Taggart:           

  • “Fiscal Conservative- as an entrepreneur and life long business leader I know what it means to keep expenses down, prioritize investments and grow revenue. As an elected official, I believe in the principles of Tabor and i have a consistent record in defending it. Voters deserve the opportunity to weigh in on any tax increase.”
  • “Students of Western Colorado deserve a more equitable funding mechanism for Districts like ours. District 51 is always underfunded and I want to do something about this. Parents should be empowered to make choices when it comes to educating their children.”
  • “The primary role of government is keeping people safe. Colorado is demonstrably less safe than we were four years ago. As an elected official I have prioritized public safety and helped develop a financial plan to hire more police officers and firefighters. Municipalities can only do so much on this front it also needs to be a priority of the state.”

Click on candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

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All candidates for Colorado House of Representatives District 62 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Colorado House of Representatives District 62— Matthew Martinez (D) and Carol Riggenbach (R)— completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office.

Eighty-eight of the country’s 99 state legislative chambers will hold regularly scheduled elections in 2022. The Democratic Party controls both chambers of Colorado’s state legislature. Colorado is one of 14 states with a Democratic trifecta.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What areas of public policy are you personally passionate about?            

Martinez:           

  • “Protecting water rights in the San Luis Valley and opposing any plan that removes water from the San Luis Valley
  • Investing in rural Colorado to ensure that their economic success is valued just as much as the metro area
  • Improving access to affordable healthcare in rural Colorado
  • Improving state support for Veterans mental health care”

Riggenbach:           

“The first public policy that I am personally passionate about is healthcare. Our healthcare freedoms are being attacked from every front. I have worked within the healthcare field for 30 years. I am ready to make policy to protect our rights to choose what healthcare we accept and deny. The Veterans of The United States of America paid a dear price for our freedoms. We will take back our medical freedom and patient rights. My second public policy I have a burning passion for is the rights of parents and their right to raise their children as they determine.”

Click on candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

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All candidates for Florida’s 23rd Congressional District complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

All four of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Florida’s 23rd Congressional District completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office.

The candidates are Jared Moskowitz (D), Joe Budd (R), Mark Napier (I), and Christine Scott (I).

The outcome of this race will affect the partisan balance of the U.S. House of Representatives in the 118th Congress. All 435 seats in the House are up for election. As of September 3rd, 2022, Democrats hold a 220-210 advantage in the U.S. House with five vacant seats. Florida’s current congressional delegation consists of 16 Republicans, 10 Democrats, and 1 vacancy.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What areas of public policy are you personally passionate about?            

Moskowitz:           

“Gun violence prevention is personal to me because of the shooting at my alma mater, Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School. It’s a scar on our community and like our neighbors, my wife and I feel the constant fear that our children are at risk. In America, I believe we should be able to make parents a simple promise: when you drop your kids off at school, you get to pick them up alive. Our community deserves that peace of mind. I championed the Florida gun violence prevention law after the Parkland school shooting, and I want to build on the recently passed federal bill by banning assault weapons.” 

Budd:           

“I’ve often said, “Society cannot pay enough for what is earned by an honest police officer”. Liberal cities which have gone down the road of wokeness by defunding police and instituting criminal justice reforms quickly releasing violent criminals back on the streets are reaping the chaos of a substantial rise in crime. I will always have the backs of the men and women who wear a uniform. It’s one of my priorities. It’s personal.”

Napier:

“Political partisanship, in addition to “The Wall” between the Intelligence Community and Law Enforcement have jeopardized our freedoms. The CV-19 pandemic alone demonstrated how far one party will go to weaponize a virus for political control and over our everyday lives. I would reconstruct that wall again. I would pursue more protections for Whistleblowers and prohibit efforts by our own government to unwittingly collect information–even DNA via heritage test kits or facial recognition, unless incarcerated or consent.” 

Scott:

“Abortion: I believe in a woman’s right to choose. It just needs to be done in the first trimester. Killing babies is not a viable or necessary option. With the advent of cheap pregnancy tests, the day after pill and contraceptive options, there is no reason we cannot protect both women rights and that of the unborn child.”

Click here to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

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All candidates for Georgia House of Representatives District 39 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Image of the Georgia State Capitol in Atlanta, Georgia.

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Georgia House of Representatives District 39 —Terry Cummings (D) and Olivia Angel (R) —completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office.

Eighty-eight of the country’s 99 state legislative chambers will hold regularly scheduled elections in 2022. The Republican Party controls both chambers of Georgia’s state legislature. Georgia is one of 23 states with a Republican trifecta government.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What areas of public policy are you personally passionate about?            

Cummings:           

“As your next state representative, I will work to:

  • Preserve the rights of all Georgian’s regardless of race, nationality, religion, or sexual orientation.
  • Ensure all Georgians have access to affordable housing which includes bringing rent control back to Georgia, and livable wages.
  • Ensure women and men receive appropriate sex education, are provided fertility options and birth control. I will also fight to ensure women retain the right to make decisions concerning their own bodies.”

Angel:           

“I am worried about the future of our community so I jumped in this political race, I want to advance a conservative Republican ideas to keep our community prosperous and to keep our peaceful living. I want to listen my constituents issues in the community and make or vote laws of what resonates in my House District 39 when I get elected. Friends and Family, please allow me to serve you by electing me in this coming election.”

Click on the candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

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North Dakota term limits initiative certified for November ballot

Voters in North Dakota will decide on an initiative to establish term limits for state legislators and the governor in November. In March, the Secretary of State Al Jaeger (R) announced that proponents did not submit a sufficient number of valid signatures. However, proponents appealed to the North Dakota Supreme Court. On Sep. 7, the court ruled 5-0 that the initiative must be placed on the ballot for November 8.

North Dakota for Term Limits, the campaign behind the measure, submitted 46,366 signatures to the North Dakota secretary of state’s office on February 15. To qualify for the ballot, 31,164 of the signatures needed to be valid.

On March 22, Jaeger announced that proponents did not submit a sufficient number of valid signatures and that the measure would not appear on the ballot. Jaeger found that of the 46,366 signatures submitted, 17,625 were valid — 13,539 less than the requirement. Signatures were invalidated for notary errors; address, full name, and date omissions; duplicate signatures; and for petitions signed by those with out-of-state addresses. The secretary of state’s office and the North Dakota Bureau of Criminal Investigation said they suspected signatures of being forged and that petition circulators were being paid per signature, which is against state law. Jaeger invalidated 21,634 signatures that had been notarized by Zeph Toe, a notary public, after finding that some of the signatures notarized by Toe contained inconsistencies.

Sponsors of the measure wrote a letter to Secretary of State Al Jaeger saying that he rejected signatures unlawfully, stating, “In your opinion, roughly 29,101 of the signatures submitted by the Committee were invalid for various reasons. Just five days prior, in a meeting in your office with Jared Hendrix (chairperson of the Committee), you indicated that your office had determined that roughly 7,000 signatures were invalid and would not be counted. An additional 22,000 signatures were ‘disqualified’ in the five days between March 17 and March 22. No expense was spared in attempting to disqualify this petition, and the full scope of the use of taxpayer resources to frustrate the will of the electors is only beginning to come into focus. The state’s validation process here should be subject to a full inquiry.”

On Aug. 12, initiative sponsors asked the North Dakota Supreme Court to order Secretary of State Al Jaeger to place the measure on the November ballot, arguing that Jaeger improperly invalidated signatures. The state Supreme Court ordered a district court to review the claim, which found that Jaeger was correct in invalidating the signatures. District Judge James S. Hill wrote, “Because of these obvious errors, Secretary Jaeger could not, with confidence, state that the other petitions notarized by Toe were without errors or fraud. Therefore, he determined that all of the affidavits notarized by Toe were untrustworthy and none of them could be counted.”

On Sep. 7, the state Supreme Court reversed the district court’s ruling, finding that Jaeger misapplied the law when invalidating the signatures, writing, “The Secretary of State applied the logical inference of the common law maxim ‘false in one thing, false in all things.” The court found that over 15,000 invalidated signatures should have been certified; therefore, proponents had submitted enough signatures to qualify the measure for the ballot.

The initiative would limit the governor to serving two terms. It would limit state legislators to serving eight years in the state House and eight years in the state Senate. A member of the House or Senate could not serve a term or remaining portion of a term if it would cause the legislator to have served a cumulative time of more than eight years in the chamber. The measure would only apply to individuals elected after approval of the amendment. The measure would provide that the amendment’s provisions can only be amended by citizen-initiated measures and not by the Legislature.



4.7% of state legislative incumbents who filed for re-election have lost in primaries

So far this year, 205 state legislative incumbents—58 Democrats and 147 Republicans—have lost to primary challengers.

Across the 43 states that have held primaries, 4.7% of incumbents running for re-election have lost, an elevated level of incumbent losses compared to previous cycles.

These totals include data from state legislative elections held in Massachusetts on Sept. 6. No incumbents lost to primary challengers but eight races featuring incumbents—seven Democrats and one Republican—remain uncalled.

This year, Republican incumbents have lost at a higher rate than Democrats. Of the 2,366 Republican incumbents who filed for re-election, 147 (6.2%) have lost to primary challengers. For Democrats, 58 of the 2,019 who filed for re-election (2.9%) have lost.

Forty-six of these 205 incumbent defeats (22%) were guaranteed due to redistricting. When states redraw legislative lines, incumbents can oftentimes end up in a new district with other incumbents leading to incumbent v. incumbent primaries or general elections. Since, in these races, there are more incumbents running than nominations or seats available, at least one incumbent must lose.

Of the 43 states that have held primaries so far, 11 have Democratic trifectas, 21 have Republican trifectas, and 11 have divided governments. Across these 43 states, there are 5,679 seats up for election, 90% of the nationwide total.

The figures for 2022 will likely increase. In addition to the uncalled races in Massachusetts, there are two other uncalled primaries featuring incumbents: one Democratic and one Republican.



All candidates for Georgia House of Representatives District 55 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Image of the Georgia State Capitol in Atlanta, Georgia.

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Georgia House of Representatives District 55 — Inga Willis (D) and Samuel Lenaeus (R) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office.

Eighty-eight of the country’s 99 state legislative chambers will hold regularly scheduled elections in 2022. The Republican Party controls both chambers of Georgia’s state legislature. Georgia is one of 23 states with a Republican trifecta government.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: Please list below 3 key messages of your campaign. What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office?            

Willis:               

  • “Ready to Lead. Prepared to Fight.”
  • “Business Executive. Community Leader. Public Servant.”
  • “Expanding Opportunities for All”

Lenaeus:               

  • “I’ll help preserve the Uniqueness of your Neighborhood”
  • “Government of the People”
  • “Safety First”

Click on candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

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All candidates for Colorado House of Representatives District 24 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Colorado House of Representatives District 24—incumbent Lindsey Daugherty (D) and Bill Patterson (R)— completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office.

Eighty-eight of the country’s 99 state legislative chambers will hold regularly scheduled elections in 2022. The Democratic Party controls both chambers of Colorado’s state legislature. Colorado is one of 14 states with a Democratic trifecta.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What areas of public policy are you personally passionate about?            

Daugherty:       

“I am very passionate in the areas of investing in public education, creating jobs to ensure Colorado is an affordable place for families to thrive, and reforming the juvenile criminal justice system. I believe that a strong economy starts with strong public education. This means equipping students for the 21st century economy, having well-paid and well-trained teachers, and increasing access to affordable college. As someone who grew up with two generations of educators, I understand the importance of schools for our entire state.”

Patterson:       

“CRIME: Arvada is experiencing a terrible crime wave induced, in part, by very bad state legislation regarding fentanyl, reducing the severity of crimes and hostility to the police. This must be reversed. Increase Affordability through permanent reduction in fees and regulations. Fees and regulations are a hidden tax. The Democrat controlled state legislature and governorship cynically reduced fees for 1 year and expires AFTER the November 2022 election. The Democrat governor also cynically brought forward TABOR refunds (which is our money) to be delivered just before ballots arrive at the voters’ homes.”

Click on the candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

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All candidates for California State Assembly District 55 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for California State Assembly District 55 —incumbent Isaac Bryan (D) and Keith Cascio (R)— completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office.

Eighty-eight of the country’s 99 state legislative chambers will hold regularly scheduled elections in 2022. The Democratic Party controls both chambers of California’s state legislature. California is one of 14 states with a Democratic trifecta government.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What areas of public policy are you personally passionate about?                

Bryan:       

“Economic Justice Environmental Justice Criminal Justice Reform Housing/Homelessness. All the historic areas of inequity have been exacerbated by the Covid 19 pandemic. Now is the time for intersectional policy solutions that center those who have been most impacted by failed policies of the past.”

Cascio:       

“The three greatest concerns facing our beautiful district in 2022, all of which can be addressed with a commitment to economic justice and racial justice, are (1) emerging victorious from the scourge of COVID-19, (2) rebalancing of public safety and renewal of the community’s relationship with our law enforcement agencies, (3) compassion and discernment in improving the housing security of our neighbors in a time of housing scarcity.”

Click on candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

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Incumbent Galvin defeats Sullivan in Massachusetts’ secretary of state Democratic primary

Incumbent William Galvin defeated Tanisha Sullivan in the Democratic primary for Massachusetts secretary of state on Sept. 6. Galvin was first elected secretary of state in 1994 and won re-election in 1998, 2002, 2006, 2010, 2014, and 2018.

Galvin will face Rayla Campbell—who was unopposed in the Republican primary—in the general election for secretary of state on Nov. 8.

Before being elected secretary of state, Galvin worked at a car dealership, as an aide on the Massachusetts Governor’s Council, and served as a state Representative. He had faced Democratic primary opposition in two previous re-election campaigns—defeating John Bonifaz, 83% to 17%, in 2006 and Josh Zakim, 67% to 33%, in 2018. Matt Stout of the Boston Globe wrote in April 2022 that Galvin was “the only incumbent Democratic secretary of state being targeted within his own party.”

Galvin had said his experience was important given the increased focus on elections, saying to the Boston Globe, “This is a critical time for democracy. That’s why I think I can provide a unique service. Probably the biggest shift is the national climate, the importance of elections. I believe I can continue to do it effectively. I don’t believe anyone else can [do it as well] at this point.”

In June 2022, Sullivan received the Democratic Party’s official endorsement with the support of 62.4% of delegates at the state convention. According to Colin A. Young of the State House News Service, Sullivan “was supported by more than 2,500 delegates while Galvin was backed by about 1,500 delegates.”

Sullivan’s professional experience included serving as the Chief Equity Office for Boston Public Schools, president of the Boston Branch of the NAACP, a corporate counsel for Sanofi Genzyme, and a fellow for CEO Action for Racial Equity. Before the primary, she said she would do more to promote voting among minority communities, saying at the state party convention, “Despite record voter turnout in 2020, hear me on this, voters from some of our most vulnerable communities still saw the lowest voter turnout across Massachusetts, leaving behind far too many voices…Simply put, Massachusetts needs a secretary of state who fights on the ground with us every day, fighting for the democracy we deserve.”

Prior to the 2022 elections, the last Republican that served as secretary of state in Massachusetts was Frederick Cook, who left office in 1949.

The secretary of state is a state-level position in 47 of the 50 states. The position does not exist in Alaska, Hawaii and Utah. Voters directly elect the secretary of state in 35 states. In the other 12, the secretary is appointed by either the governor or the state legislature. Although the duties and powers of the secretary of state vary from state to state, a common responsibility is management and oversight of elections and voter rolls, which are assigned to the secretary of state in 41 states. Other common responsibilities include registration of businesses, maintenance of state records, and certification of official documents.

There are 27 secretary of state seats on the ballot in 2022. There are 13 Republican-held secretary of state offices, 13 Democratic-held secretary of state offices, and one independent office on the ballot in 2022.

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