Category2022 elections

All candidates for San Jose Unified Board of Education Area 2 in California complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for San Jose Unified Board of Education Area 2 in California — incumbent Jose Magañaand Andres Macias — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office. 

According to the San Jose Unified School district website, “seven trustees, elected from your communities, and two student representatives elected by their respective campuses govern the San Bernardino Community College District. Trustees serve a four-year term, while the non-voting student trustees serve a one-year term.”

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office?  

Magaña:       

  • “This work is personal. My life story serves as an example of the power of a public education system that prepares our students academically, and to be productive members of society.”
  • “I am an education policy and finance expert. I know what it takes to run effective school systems and I have what it takes to find tangible solutions, bring resources to our district, and improve student outcomes.”
  • “MAGA Trump Republicans are targeting our school boards all across Santa Clara County. My opponent is one of those MAGA Republicans who wants to bring his extreme politics to SJUSD.” 

Macias:   

  • “I am ready to raise the academic standard in our community. District proficiency drops every year and our leadership is the reason why.”
  • “I’m running to represent the long disregarded parent community. Parents in our district are tired of being ignored by their so called “representatives” who are more focused on their careers than serving students and families.”
  • “It’s time to start building positive, friendly learning environments in every school. Kids cannot learn when they are stressed, scared, anxious or distracted by social media and smart devices.”

Click on the candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

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All candidates for San Bernardino Community College District Area 4 in California complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for San Bernardino Community College District Area 4 in California —incumbent Nathan D. Gonzales and Christian Thomas Shaughnessy — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office. 

According to the San Bernardino Community College district website, “seven trustees, elected from your communities, and two student representatives elected by their respective campuses govern the San Bernardino Community College District. Trustees serve a four-year term, while the non-voting student trustees serve a one-year term.”

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office?  

Gonzales:       

  • “Eliminating barriers to student access and success is my top priority. Whether that’s through generous financial aid, our books+ program, which pays for the entire cost of books and course materials, or programs designed to make an impact in students lives and strengthen their chances of success, I’m committed to giving students the tools they need to achieve a life-changing education.”
  • “SBCCD must be a leader and partner in addressing regional issues – our district already makes an economic impact of more the. $600 million in the Inland Empire, and with the power of KVCR we can turn this news desert into our news oasis.”
  • “We must be ever mindful to ensure fiscal accountability and sustainability in order to maintain the trust and confidence instilled in us by you, the taxpayers who make sure our community colleges get the funding they deserve.”

Shaughnessy:   

  • “I will promote official mentoring programs to keep our youth permanently away from the path to violence and on the path of graduation and employment.”
  • “I will help create vocational centers on every campus that will provide paid apprenticeships to students who want to enter the trades, avoid student debt, and get inflation resistant jobs.”
  • “As a trustee I will look forward to ensuring that our wonderful support staff and faculty get the thriving wages and benefits they deserve to live happy and fulfilling lives with their families in the region while having the remote work flexibility to watch their children grow up and attend to their elders in their old age.”

Click on the candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

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All candidates for Attorney General of Ohio complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Attorney General of Ohio—incumbent Dave Yost (R) and Jeff Crossman (D) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office. 

This is one of 30 attorney general seats on the ballot in 2022. All 50 states have an attorney general who serves as the state’s chief legal officer. The attorney general enforces state law and advises the state government on legal matters. Ohio is one of 27 states with a Republican attorney general, and one of 23 states with a Republican party triplex.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office?  

Yost:               

  • “Protecting the unprotected”
  • “Upholding the rule of law”
  • “Defending the Constitution”

Crossman:           

  • “Ohioans are constantly being ripped off and our cost of living is rising due in part to the inept Columbus politicians, statehouse corruption, and bad faith politics.”
  • “Protecting our civil rights and inherent freedoms is paramount as Attorney General.”
  • “We must fight for Ohio workers and make sure Ohio remains a “workers first” state.”

Click here to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

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All candidates for Florida’s 10th Congressional District complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

All four of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Florida’s 10th Congressional District completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office. 

The candidates are: Maxwell Alejandro Frost (D), Calvin Wimbish (R), Jason Holic (I), and Usha Jain (I).  

The outcome of this race will affect the partisan balance of the U.S. House of Representatives in the 118th Congress. All 435 seats in the House are up for election. As of November 3, 2022, Democrats hold a 220-212 advantage in the U.S. House with three vacant seats. Florida’s current congressional delegation consists of 9 Democrats and 16 Republicans.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office?  

Frost:       

  • “Ending Gun Violence 40,000 Americans die due to gun-related deaths each year. The most vulnerable members of our society account for the majority of those deaths.”
  • “Medicare For All The United States has failed to provide a basic social minimum to its citizens.”
  • “Environmental Justice The greatest challenge facing our country and the world is the climate crisis.”

Wimbish:               

  • “I Heard You! I’m answering the call to put on the ARMOR OF GOD to defend our Homeland from all enemies!”
  • “We’re at war to unseat corrupt political leaders who push systematically transforming America into a socialist nation!”
  • “In the same spirit of ‘Frederick Douglas, Martin Luther King and Ronald Reagan’, let’s be active in defending conservative values and join me in the “Call to Action” 

Holic:

  • “No Party. When politicians reach across the aisle, they risk fighting in a tug of war, and that’s a scenario in which someone inevitably loses – more often than not, it’s the people those politicians serve.”
  • “No Politics. Candidate should be free from the influence of money.”
  • “Just Solving Problems. Candidates that are free of monetary and political influence are free to express a wider range of ideas without repercussion.”

Jain:

  • “Patient’s right to chose the doctor and not the insurance company. Doctor should be in charge to do the required tests for the diagnosis and treatment.”
  • “I want to fight for equal rights and justice for all specially small businesses and empower to stand up for your rights.”
  • “In the education system, teachers and parents should be incharge and curriculum should not be dictaed by the Govt.”

Click here to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

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Ballot measure campaign contributions top $1 billion

In 2022, 140 state ballot measures were certified for the ballot, including 132 for November 8. As of November 1, Ballotpedia identified $1.03 billion in contributions to support or oppose this year’s statewide measures. In 2020, for comparison, $1.24 billion was raised through December 31, 2020, to support or oppose 129 state ballot measures.

California accounts for 69.5% of the cumulative contributions across the states. In California, $713.5 million has been raised for seven ballot propositions. The next four states with the most contributions are:

  • Michigan, where three measures are on the ballot, at $93.6 million or 9.1% of the cumulative total.
  • Massachusetts, where four measures are on the ballot, at $57.3 million or 5.6% of the cumulative total.
  • Colorado, where 11 measures are on the ballot, at $41.5 million or 4.0% of the cumulative total.
  • Nevada, where three measures are on the ballot, at $21.1 million or 2.1% of the cumulative total.

In 2020, the top three states were California (61.58%), Illinois (9.96%), and Massachusetts (4.97%). In 2018, the top three states were California (31.12%), Nevada (10.76%), and Florida (10.63%). 

The chart below compares total contributions between 2018, 2020, and 2022, along with the amount associated with campaigns in California:

California Proposition 27 has seen the most contributions at $418.5 million between supporters and opponents. Proposition 27 would legalize online and mobile sports betting in the state. Between Proposition 27 and Proposition 26, which would legalize sports betting at licensed racetracks at American Indian-owned casinos, campaigns surrounding the sports betting issue in California have received $462.2 million. Several PACs are spending funds supporting or opposing both initiatives. The San Manuel Band of Mission Indians is the largest donor to a ballot measure committee in 2022, providing $103.1 million to oppose Proposition 27.

Outside of California, the most expensive ballot measure is Michigan Proposal 3, a citizen-initiated measure to provide a state constitutional right to reproductive freedom – a term defined to include abortion, contraceptives, and other pregnancy-related matters. Supporters raised $45.75 million, including $5.51 million from the Sixteen Thirty Fund and $5.25 million from the ACLU. Opponents raised $17.35 million, including $9.43 million from Right to Life Michigan and $6.07 million from the Michigan Catholic Conference. 

Campaigns surrounding the following 10 ballot measures have received the most contributions:



Kaptur faces Majewski in one of 13 U.S. House districts Democrats are defending that Donald Trump won in 2020

Incumbent Marcy Kaptur (D) and J.R. Majewski (R) are running in the general election for Ohio’s 9th Congressional District on November 8, 2022.

The partisan composition of the 9th District changed following redistricting after the 2020 census. Joe Biden (D) defeated Donald Trump (R) in the old 9th District, 59% to 40%. Trump defeated Biden in the redrawn 9th District 51% to 48%, making it one of 13 U.S. House districts Democrats are defending that Trump won in 2020.

Kaptur was first elected in 1982, making her the longest-tenured woman in the 117th Congress. Kaptur says strengthening the economy is her top priority, saying, “unfair trade agreements, Wall Street recklessness, and federal policies favoring large corporations and the wealthy have decimated America’s middle-class … It’s time to put people first again.”

Majewski works in the nuclear industry in project management positions. In a Candidate Connection survey submitted to Ballotpedia, Majewski described himself as “the America First Candidate” and said he would “Bring back good paying American jobs … Maintain a strong national defense and stop the endless wars.” Read his full responses here.

The outcome of this race will affect the partisan balance of the U.S. House of Representatives in the 118th Congress. All 435 House districts are up for election. As of November 1, 2022, Democrats held a 220-212 majority in the U.S. House with three vacancies. Republicans need to gain a net of five districts to win a majority in the chamber.



Lierman and Glassman running for Maryland comptroller on Nov. 8

Brooke Elizabeth Lierman (D) and Barry Glassman (R) are running for Maryland comptroller on Nov. 8, 2022. Incumbent Peter Franchot (D) ran for election for governor of Maryland. He lost in the Democratic primary on July 19, 2022.

Lierman has represented District 46 of the Maryland House of Delegates since 2015. She also worked as a disability and civil rights attorney and field organizer for U.S. Sen. Paul Wellstone (D) and former presidential candidate Howard Dean (D). “As one of only three statewide, independently-elected officials,” Lierman said, “I will provide strong independent oversight of our state’s financial resources and be an advocate for families, communities, and small businesses.” Lierman’s endorsers include U.S. Rep. Jamie Raskin (D), U.S. Rep. John Sarbanes (D), and The Baltimore Sun.

Glassman represented District 35 of the Maryland State Senate from 2009 to 2015 and served in the Maryland House of Delegates from 1999 to 2008. In 2014, Glassman was elected as county executive of Harford County. His professional experience includes working as a claims investigator for Travelers Insurance Company. On his campaign website, Glassman said, “Maryland’s budget is nearly $50 billion. As your Comptroller, I will hold the state accountable for spending money responsibly and in your best interest.” Glassman’s endorsers include Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan (R), the Maryland Farm Bureau, and The Washington Post.

Lierman and Glassman both made statements regarding environmental, social, and corporate governance (ESG) issues. Lierman said she would “ensure that any outside investment management firms reflect the diversity of our state, and ensure our investments are prudent while also reflecting our progressive values” and that “[m]aking climate resilience one of the key pillars of the Comptroller’s Office will ensure that all decision-making and functions have a ‘climate lens’ by which to define future actions.” Glassman said, “The state constitution sets that office up as a non-partisan CFO. A bookkeeper — more than a bookkeeper — a tax collector, revenue-estimator, all those fiscal duties. The comptroller is not intended to be a partisan position,” and said, “I don’t think a carbon neutral or a new policy such as that is probably realistic going forward.”

The comptroller’s main duties are to collect all of the revenues from state programs, to provide information technology services for most of the state agencies, and to regulate the state’s alcohol, tobacco, and motor fuel industries. The officer also serves as a member of many state boards and commissions, such as the board of revenue estimates, the board of public works, and the board of trustees of the State retirement and pension system. Additional responsibilities of the office include registering wills, performing compliance audits for taxpayers, handling delinquent tax collection, and enforcing license and unclaimed property laws. The comptroller oversees agency efforts to publicize forgotten bank accounts, insurance benefits, and other unclaimed assets of state taxpayers.



Stitt, Hofmeister face off in Nov. 8 election for governor of Oklahoma

Incumbent Kevin Stitt (R), Joy HofmeisterNatalie Bruno (L), and Ervin Yen (Independent) are running in the November 8, 2022, general election for governor of Oklahoma.

Stitt was elected governor in 2018. Stitt has run on his record, saying “the momentum that we’ve created, and the momentum that we have to be a top 10 state—we’re halfway there. And I want to keep that momentum going. It’s unfinished business.” Stitt has campaigned on lowering the cost to do business in the state, improving public education quality, and increasing public safety. Stitt said, “We’ve been holding government accountable. We believe in small government, lower taxes.”

Hofmeister was elected superintendent of public instruction in 2014. Hofmeister has made education the centerpiece of her campaign, saying, “It’s time for an education governor.” Hofmeister has also campaigned on lowering the cost of healthcare and investing in infrastructure. Hofmeister registered as a Democrat on October 7, 2021, when she announced her bid for governor. She was previously registered with the Republican Party. In an interview, she described herself as “an aggressively moderate Democrat.”

Education policy has been a subject of disagreement in the election. In early 2022, Stitt endorsed and promised to sign Senate Bill 1647, which would have allowed eligible public school students to use state funding to pay for education services, including private-school tuition. The Oklahoma State Senate defeated the bill 24-22 in March 2022. Hofmeister opposed the bill. Stitt said, “We’re going to continue to invest in schools, but we want some of that funding to be fungible to fund the student, not necessarily the ZIP code where they ‘belong.’ Some of these school districts have high dropout rates or low test scores. They’re not going to fix themselves from within. We have to allow parents to vote with their feet.”

Hofmeister said, “We can’t afford to have someone profiting and take funds outside for private use when we do not have what we need right now for Oklahoma public school kids.”

At the time of the election, former Gov. Brad Henry (D), who left office in 2011 after serving two consecutive terms, was the last Democrat elected to statewide office in Oklahoma.

This is one of 36 gubernatorial elections taking place in 2022. The governor serves as a state’s top executive official and is the only executive office that is elected in all 50 states. There are currently 28 Republican governors and 22 Democratic governors. 



All candidates for California State Senate District 10 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for California State Senate District 10 —Lily Mei (D) and Aisha Wahab (D) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office. 

Eighty-eight of the country’s 99 state legislative chambers will hold regularly scheduled elections in 2022. The Democratic Party controls both chambers of California’s state legislature. California is one of 14 states with a Democratic trifecta.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What areas of public policy are you personally passionate about?            

Mei:   

“Nothing is more important to me than keeping our communities safe and ensuring all kids have opportunities to succeed. That’s why I secured millions to improve our schools, expanded Safe Routes to School programs, and increased funding for public safety.

At a time when fierce political division threatens meaningful progress, my approach is to bring people together across party and ideological lines to solve our region’s toughest challenges.”

Wahab:       

“​​Income inequality and opportunity inequality continue to cripple the entire Bay Area. The divide between the haves and the have-nots is growing, and this will have severe consequences for our businesses, schools, and livelihoods. I will support policies that bridge this divide by raising wages and creating jobs that provide a living wage and stable benefits so that families are not priced out of the region. I’ll also work to expand support like affordable child care and paid leave.”

Click on the candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

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All candidates for Chula Vista City Council District 2 in California complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Chula Vista City Council District 2 in California —Jose Preciado and Steve Stenberg — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office. 

The Chula Vista City Council is the city’s primary legislative body. It is responsible for approving and adopting the city budget, levying taxes, and making or amending city laws, policies, and ordinances. The city council consists of five members including the mayor. All are elected to four-year terms and are limited to serving two terms of office. 

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office?  

Preciado:   

  • “Public safety is a top priority. I will partner with law enforcement, social agencies and the community to address the root causes of crime – and ensure Measure A sales tax dollars go toward hiring officers.”
  • “Home prices are skyrocketing. As President of a local nonprofit, I advocate for fair housing and affordable options. I will expand services for unhoused people and housing options for young adults, working families and seniors.”
  • “Revitalize West Chula Vista by attracking new employers and supporting micro business development.”

Stenberg:           

  • “I will prioritize public safety by ensuring our neighborhoods are adequately staffed with police and firefighters to maintain quick response times during crisis.”
  • “I support Chula Vista’s small business community to ensure a strong local economy and more revenue for quality city service.”
  • “Improve and update infrastructure in Northwest Chula Vista and ensure our older communities receive their fair share of resources.”

Click on the candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

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