Category2022 elections

All candidates for Gavilan Joint Community College District Board of Trustees Area 7 in California complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Gavilan Joint Community College District Board of Trustees Area 7 in California —incumbent Irma Gonzalez and Jose Martinez-Saldana — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office. 

According to the Gavilan community college website, “the Board of Trustees is responsible for setting policy for the District. Registered voters in geographical divisions elect the seven Board members for four-year terms.”

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office?  

Gonzalez:       

  • “Advocating for Quality Education”
  • “Advocating for Student Success.”
  • “Just In Time Mobile Food Pantry”

Martinez-Saldana:               

  • “My priority is and has always been student success. So I commit to do everything possible to expand access to Gavilan College for SBC residents and work with district and community leaders to upgrade district instructional facilities.”
  • “I want to see Gavilan continue on a path to fiscal health.”
  • “I will work hard to build effective and productive collaborative partneships that will place the District’s service to the community as the guiding principle.”

Click on the candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

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Colorado ballot measure committees have raised $41.45 million

As of October 28, Ballotpedia identified $1.01 billion in contributions to support or oppose statewide measures on ballots in 2022. Colorado was among the top five states with the most ballot measure campaign contributions.

According to campaign finance reports due on October 31, which covered information through October 26, 15 committees supporting and opposing eight of the 11 measures on the ballot raised a combined $41.46 million and spent a combined $40.96 million.

Of the 15 committees, three were registered as committees opposing five of the measures. These committees raised $1.1 million. Keeping Colorado Local is a committee opposing all three alcohol initiatives on the November ballot.

The top donors to Colorado initiative campaigns this year included:

  • Colorado Fine Wine & Spirits LLC, which gave $11.59 million, and Robert and David Trone, who gave $1.8 million to Colorado Consumer Choice and Retail Fairness supporting Proposition 124 to expand retail liquor licenses;
  • Several grocery store companies gave $11.59 million to Wine in Grocery Stores, which supports Propositions 125 and 126 to allow wine sales in grocery stores and allow third-party delivery of alcohol. The companies included InstaCart ($4.36 million), DoorDash ($3.58 million), Target ($1.2 million), Albertsons Safeway ($1.36 million), and Kroger ($1.07 million).
  • New Approach PAC, which gave $3.89 million to Natural Medicine Colorado, which supports Proposition 122 to create a psychedelic plant and fungi access program; and
  • Gary Ventures Inc. and Gary Community Advocacy, which gave $2.55 million to Coloradans for Affordable Housing Now, which supports Proposition 123 to implement funding for housing projects through existing tax revenue.

In total, campaigns for six initiatives spent a combined $7.36 million on signature-gathering costs to put their initiatives on the ballot. The Wine in Grocery Stores PAC, which sponsored Proposition 125 and Proposition 126, paid Scotch Strategies $50,000 for the purpose of signature gathering. The PAC reported $3.19 million in expenditures to various entities for the purpose of consultant and professional services, which can include signature-gathering expenditures. Ballotpedia could not determine whether those additional expenditures were signature-gathering costs.

The next campaign finance report for Colorado ballot measure committees is due on December 13.

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In final FEC report before Election Day, six party committees report $1.6 billion in cumulative fundraising for 2022 election cycle

Six party committees raised a combined $1.6 billion so far in the 2022 election cycle. During the first half of October, the committees raised $108 million, according to recent filings with the Federal Election Commission. 

In the first half of October, the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee (DSCC) raised $37 million and spent $40 million, while the National Republican Senatorial Committee (NRSC) raised $15 million and spent $15 million. So far in the 2022 election cycle, the DSCC has outraised the NRSC with $251 million in receipts to the NRCC’s $235 million. At this point in the 2020 election cycle, the DSCC led in cumulative fundraising with $244 million to the NRSC’s $220 million. 

The Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee (DCCC) raised $28 million and spent $50 million in the first half of October. The National Republican Congressional Committee (NRCC) raised $5 million and spent $39 million. So far in the 2022 election cycle, the DCCC leads in fundraising with $324 million to the NRCC’s $262 million. At this point in the 2020 cycle, the DCCC had raised $291 million and the NRCC had raised $226 million.

Between the national committees, the Democratic National Committee (DNC) raised and spent more than the Republican National Committee (RNC) in the first half of October. The RNC raised $11.2 million and spent $14 million, while the DNC raised $11.3 million and spent $26 million. So far in the 2022 election cycle, the RNC has raised $308 million to the DNC’s $278 million. At this time in the 2020 election cycle, the RNC led in fundraising with $643 million in cumulative receipts to the DNC’s $394 million.

This election cycle, the DNC, DSCC, and DCCC have raised 5.8% more than the RNC, NRSC, and NRCC ($853 million to $805 million). 

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Deluzio, Shaffer, and Sluzynsky face off for open seat in Pennsylvania’s 17th Congressional District on Nov. 8

Christopher Deluzio (D), Jeremy Shaffer (R), and write-in candidate Walter Sluzynsky (Independent) are running in the general election in Pennsylvania’s 17th Congressional District on November 8, 2022.

Incumbent Conor Lamb (D), first elected in a March 2018 special election, ran for the U.S. Senate and did not seek re-election. Lamb defeated Sean Parnell (R) in the 2020 general election 51% to 49%.

Insider‘s Hanna Kang wrote, “Pennsylvania’s 17th Congressional District encompasses the Pittsburgh suburbs of Mt. Lebanon, Penn Hills, and Beaver Falls. President Joe Biden had a 30 percentage point margin of victory under the district’s previous boundaries in 2020 — before it was redrawn to slightly extend its southeastern tip and take in more of the Penn Hills area in Allegheny County in redistricting following the 2020 Census, making it slightly more Democratic.”

Deluzio is an attorney and the policy director of the University of Pittsburgh Institute for Cyber Law, Policy, and Security. He received a bachelor’s degree from the United States Naval Academy and a J.D. from Georgetown Law School. His previous work experience includes serving as an active-duty naval officer and working at the Brennan Center for Justice. Deluzio told the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette that he ran for Congress because “Washington is broken and we need leaders willing to stand up to the corporate giants who are gouging us and against extremism that limits people’s rights…I also think the fundamental rights I served to protect in the military are in jeopardy. From voting rights to abortion rights, we must defend them against those who would attack our freedom.”

Shaffer is an engineer and an executive at Bentley Systems, an infrastructure engineering software company. He received a bachelor’s degree from Tulane University, a master’s and Ph.D. in electrical and computer engineering from Carnegie Mellon University, and an M.B.A. from the University of North Carolina. His previous work experience includes co-founding a software company that provided inspection management services for bridges and roads. Shaffer told the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette that he was “a bipartisan problem-solver, [that] will work with those on both sides who want to deliver common-sense solutions and real reforms.” He said he ran for Congress because “Politics has become a blood-sport in which our country and average Americans are the losers. We desperately need leaders who will work together and make the tough decisions to put America back on track.”

The outcome of this race will affect the partisan balance of the U.S. House of Representatives in the 118th Congress. All 435 House districts are up for election. As of October 2022, Democrats held a 220-212 majority in the U.S. House with three vacancies. Republicans need to gain a net of five districts to win a majority in the chamber.

Daily Kos calculated what the results of the 2020 presidential election in this district would have been following redistricting. Joe Biden (D) would have received 52.3% of the vote in this district and Donald Trump (R) would have received 46.5%. As of October 2022, 50% of the district’s active voters were registered Democrats, 36% were registered Republicans, and 15% were either registered with some other party or unaffiliated.

Additional reading:

https://ballotpedia.org/Pennsylvania%27s_17th_Congressional_District_election,_2020

https://ballotpedia.org/Pennsylvania%27s_18th_Congressional_District_special_election,_2018



Incumbent Aaron Ford (D) and Sigal Chattah (R) running for Nevada Attorney General

Incumbent Aaron D. Ford (D) and Sigal Chattah (R) are running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Nevada Attorney General. John T. Kennedy (L) unofficially withdrew from the race in September 2022.

In September 2022, Sabato’s Crystal Ball released an analysis of state attorney general election competitiveness. Nevada’s attorney general election was rated as at least somewhat competitive: “[Democrat] Ford is polished, well-funded, and has largely avoided any major hiccups in office. But he won only narrowly in the Democratic wave year of 2018, and for 2022, Nevada is one of the states where Democrats are concerned about possible GOP gains. On the Republican side, attorney Sigal Chattah has attracted notice for suing the state over COVID restrictions; she won one case but lost the others.”

Ford was first elected in 2018, defeating Wesley Duncan (R) 47.2% to 46.8%. Ford previously worked as an attorney and served in the Nevada State Senate from 2013 to 2019. In an interview with The Record-Courier, Ford said he was running because, “As Nevada’s People’s Attorney and Top Law Enforcement Officer, I believe there is no task greater than the pursuit of justice. Under my leadership, the Nevada Attorney General’s Office has proven there is no criminal too ruthless and no corporation too powerful to take on if they are hurting Nevadans.”

Chattah is a civil and criminal defense attorney who previously served on the City of Las Vegas Planning Commission and as a member of the Southern Nevada Disciplinary Board of the State Bar of Nevada. In an interview with The Record-Courier, Chattah said she was running “To end Government public corruption, restore public safety, protect our children from wrongful indoctrination at schools, and provide the people of the State of the Nevada government transparency that they are entitled to.”

Before Ford was elected in 2018, Adam Laxalt (R) held the position of Nevada Attorney General. The attorney general is Nevada’s chief legal counsel. He or she represents the people of Nevada in civil and criminal matters in court. The attorney general also serves as legal counsel to state officers and to most state agencies, boards, and commissions. In addition, the attorney general establishes and operates projects and programs to protect Nevadans from fraud or illegal activities that target consumers or threaten public safety, and enforces laws that safeguard the environment and natural resources.

This is one of 30 elections for attorney general taking place in 2022. There are currently 27 Republican attorneys general and 23 Democratic attorneys general. Heading into the 2022 elections, there are 23 Republican triplexes, 18 Democratic triplexes, and nine divided governments where neither party holds triplex control. A state government triplex refers to a situation where the governor, attorney general, and secretary of state are all members of the same political party.



Kentucky voters will decide an abortion-related constitutional amendment on November 8

On November 8, Kentucky voters will decide on two statewide constitutional amendments on the ballot. Amendment 2, if approved, would amend the Kentucky State Constitution to say that nothing in the constitution creates a right to abortion or requires government funding for abortion. These types of amendments are designed to address previous and future state court rulings on abortion that have prevented or could prevent legislatures from passing certain abortion laws.

In 2022, six statewide ballot measures address abortion. Five of them—in California, Kentucky, Michigan, Montana, and Vermont—will be decided on November 8. Another abortion-related ballot measure, in Kansas, was rejected by voters in August.

The Kansas amendment is similar to Amendment 2. If the Kansas constitutional amendment had been approved, it would have said that nothing in the state constitution creates a right to abortion or requires government funding for abortion, as well as stating that the legislature has the authority to pass laws regarding abortion. Kansas voters rejected the amendment by a vote of 58.97%-41.03%.

“We were looking at Kansas as a sort of bellwether for how things could potentially go here in Kentucky,” said Heather Ayer, the campaign coordinator for the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) of Kentucky.

Organizations like the ACLU of Kentucky, Human Rights Campaign PAC, Planned Parenthood Action Fund, and the League of Women Voters of Kentucky are opposing Amendment 2. The campaign opposing the amendment, Protect Kentucky Access, has reported $5.30 million in contributions and $4.48 million in expenditures.

“We’re going to do our best to make sure this issue is front and center when people go into the voting booths Nov. 8,” said Rachel Sweet, the campaign manager for Protect Kentucky Access, “I think we have the opportunity to make a really compelling case as to why this policy is bad for Kentucky and why it should be rejected.”

The campaign supporting Amendment 2, Yes for Life, has reported $1.00 million in contributions and $557,525 in expenditures. Organizations like Kentucky Right to Life, the Catholic Conference of Kentucky, the Commonwealth Policy Center, and The Family Foundation of Kentucky are supporting the amendment.

“The constitutional amendment is very clear,” said Addia Wuchner, the executive director of Kentucky Right to Life and chair of the Yes for Life Alliance, “It protects taxpayer dollars, and it makes sure there is not an interpreted right of abortion in the constitution. It allows the lawmakers to be the lawmakers and make the laws that reflect the values of the people of Kentucky.”

Kentucky state lawmakers met on October 27 to discuss Amendment 2. Rep. Nancy Tate (R-27) said that the amendment does not ban abortion. She said, “The amendment does not allow abortion or does not outlaw abortions. It does not outlaw abortions in all cases. Under current Kentucky law, abortion is legal if necessary to preserve the life or health of a pregnant woman.”

Gov. Andy Beshear (D) said that Amendment 2 would keep Kentucky’s current abortion laws in place. He said, “Constitutional Amendment 2 would protect and keep in place the most extreme law in the country when it comes to abortion services.”

Courts in at least nine states—Alaska, California, Florida, Illinois, Kansas, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Montana, and New Jersey—have ruled that a right to abortion exists under the state constitution. Four states—Alabama, Louisiana, Tennessee, and West Virginia—have constitutional amendments stating that no right to abortion exists under the state constitution. 

In August, the Kentucky Supreme Court ruled that two laws banning abortion would remain in place while it reviews the arguments challenging both laws. One law bans abortion at six weeks, and the other bans abortion except to prevent serious risk to the health of the mother or to save the mother’s life. The Kentucky Supreme Court is scheduled to review the case on November 15, 2022.

Additional reading:

https://ballotpedia.org/History_of_abortion_ballot_measures



All candidates for New Hampshire House of Representatives Belknap 3 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for New Hampshire House of Representatives Belknap 3 — incumbent Juliet Harvey-Bolia (R) and Sheryl Anderson (D) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office. 

Eighty-eight of the country’s 99 state legislative chambers will hold regularly scheduled elections in 2022. The Republican Party controls both chambers of New Hampshire’s state legislature. New Hampshire is one of 23 states with a Republican trifecta.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office?            

Harvey-Bolia:     

  • “A proven Live Free or Die candidate who is committed to improving the Sanbornton and Tilton communities. Decreased the State-Wide Education Property Tax (SWEPT) by $100 million directly resulting in lower property tax bills for constituents across the state with no effect on the dollars going to schools.”
  • “Juliet successfully spearheaded an initiative to reopen our schools during the shutdown. She has worked for years to improve Main Street while keeping tax-payers costs down.”
  • “‘Man is not free unless government is limited’ – Ronald Reagan’s Farewell Address to the American People”

Anderson:           

  • “I believe that we are all more alike than we are dissimilar. I care deeply about the future we are creating for our children and all the succeeding generations. I believe we are living at a pivotal moment.”
  • “I pay attention to what is going on. I am a listener and am willing to change my mind as I learn more about an issue.”
  • “I believe we will sink or swim together. Our future is a shared future, and problems anywhere ultimately affect everyone everywhere.”

Click on the candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

Additional reading:

New Hampshire House of Representative elections, 2022



All candidates for New Hampshire House of Representatives Grafton 4 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for New Hampshire House of Representatives Grafton 4 — Heather Baldwin (D) and Steven Babin (R) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office. 

Eighty-eight of the country’s 99 state legislative chambers will hold regularly scheduled elections in 2022. The Republican Party controls both chambers of New Hampshire’s state legislature. New Hampshire is one of 23 states with a Republican trifecta.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office?            

Baldwin:           

  • “I am a retired educator who will work to keep our public school systm strong and free from censor.”
  • “I am committed to preserving and protecting the natural riches of this area, and will work to safeguard our natural resources.”
  • “I am committed to promoting respectful political discourse and am eager to work toward bipartisan solutions to the state’s issues.”

Babin:               

  • “Acountability”
  • “New Hampshire Constitution”
  • “Civility”

Click on the candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

Additional reading:

New Hampshire House of Representative elections, 2022



All candidates for Rhode Island House of Representatives District 7 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Rhode Island House of Representatives District 7 — incumbent David Morales (D) and Christopher Ireland (I) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office. 

Eighty-eight of the country’s 99 state legislative chambers will hold regularly scheduled elections in 2022. The Democratic Party controls both chambers of Rhode Island’s state legislature. Rhode Island is one of 14 states with a Democratic trifecta.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office?            

Morales:       

  • “Universal Healthcare: For far too long, working people in Rhode Island have been denied the healthcare treatment they deserve as over 47,000 of people are uninsured and even more are ‘underinsured’.”
  • “I remain focused on repealing our state’s tax-cuts for the rich and using these funds to reinvest in our communities by expanding behavioral healthcare, making public transportation free, and further investing in our public schools by revising our state’s inequitable education funding formula.”
  • “Fair Taxation: We are in an affordable housing crisis as working people are being priced out of our community, first-generation homeownership is unattainable, and the state continues to invest in market-rate housing, as opposed to real affordable housing.”

Ireland:               

  • “When elected, I will focus on what’s right for the state and for the people”
  • “When elected, I will not be influenced by outside political factors that would not benefit the people of Rhode Island”
  • “I will represent all of Rhode Island decisions that will improve our state for all”

Click on the candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

Additional reading:

Rhode Island House of Representatives elections, 2022



All candidates for Ohio Sixth District Court of Appeals complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Ohio Sixth District Court of Appeals— Tom Puffenberger (D) and Charles Sulek (R) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office. 

The District Courts of Appeal are the intermediate appellate courts for the state of Ohio. The courts are established by Article IV, Section 1 of the Ohio Constitution, and their jurisdiction is outlined in Article IV, Section 3. The District Courts of Appeal primarily hear appeals from the Common Pleas, Municipal and County courts. 

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office?            

Puffenberger:

  • “Experience matters. I have experience in all areas of the law, including civil and criminal jury trial experience.”
  • “I am committed to deciding cases based on the law, regardless of my personal beliefs or opinions. There is no place for politics in the judiciary.”
  • “I am committed to the area in which I would serve. I am extremely active in the community and have a vested interest in keeping Northwest Ohio safe, and keeping it a wonderful place to raise a family.”

Sulek:

  • “Charlie’s experience, which includes working as a Judicial Attorney at the Ohio Supreme Court, an assistant prosecuting attorney, and in private practice as a civil litigation attorney, has prepared him to be your judge. He will be effective from day one.”
  • “Charlie will be fair and impartial, will uphold the rule of law, and will protect the rights of all individuals.”
  • “Charlie believes we need judges that are competent, hardworking, and committed to making decisions based on the law.”

Click on the candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

Additional reading:

Ohio intermediate appellate court elections, 2022