Category2022 elections

All candidates for Washington House of Representatives District 35-Position 2 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Washington House of Representatives District 35-Position 2  — Sandy Kaiser (D) and Travis Couture (R) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office.

Eighty-eight of the country’s 99 state legislative chambers will hold regularly scheduled elections in 2022. The Democratic Party controls both chambers of Washington’s state legislature. Washington is one of 14 states with a Democratic trifecta.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office?                

Kaiser:           

  • “I believe in hard work, love of family, community and country and making sure that everyone in our rural district has the same opportunities for success as in other parts of western Washington.”
  • “We need to create better conditions for local business to thrive and grow, create more family-wage jobs, improve our schools and expand rural broadband.”
  • “It’s critically important that we fund our local sheriffs and first-responders, so they can be there in an hour of need.”

Couture:           

  • “Constitutional Rights – Following the Constitution is my top priority. I will always defend your rights and freedoms, and protect your liberties.”
  • “Public Safety – We need to get tough on rising crime and reverse laws that make our communities vulnerable. I respect our police and first responders, and will help them keep us safe.”
  • “Quality Education – Every child should feel safe at school, with all the resources to learn. I will oppose unfunded mandates that crush school budgets, and support policies that focus on strengthening core skills comprehension, safety, and school choice.”

Click on candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

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All candidates for Washington House of Representatives District 17-Position 1 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Washington House of Representatives District 17-Position 1  —Terri Niles (D) and Kevin Waters (R) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office.

Eighty-eight of the country’s 99 state legislative chambers will hold regularly scheduled elections in 2022. The Democratic Party controls both chambers of Washington’s state legislature. Washington is one of 14 states with a Democratic trifecta.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What areas of public policy are you personally passionate about?                    

Niles:           

“Our economy is foundational to other issues we sometimes view as separate. My support for a strong regional economy is rooted in investing in our communities. Jobs, healthcare, housing, championing new infrastructure, public safety and education. What may seem like huge and diverse topics can be dealt with a focus on common issues affecting them all. As a healthcare provider I know that our healthcare system is broken and we need to find real solutions. Many people living in the 17th LD do not have access to healthcare. This will be a top priority for me.”

Waters:

“I am passionate about Economic Growth and the policies that support and not hinder it. I am also passionate about Police having the proper tools and policy to be able to do their jobs. I am also passionate about energy policy and making sure we do not have a failing power grid and support our dams. We need to make sure that we can continue to supply power to all at a reasonable rate and not bloated because of policies that do not bring reasonable rates and power for all.”

Click on candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

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Incumbent Rep. Annie Kuster (D) and Bob Burns (R) running in NH-02

Incumbent Rep. Annie Kuster (D) and Bob Burns (R) are running for New Hampshire’s 2nd Congressional District on Nov. 8, 2022.

Kuster first took office in 2013. She said, “I will protect access to safe, legal abortion, and my opponent, Mr. Burns, won’t, and that’s the difference. That’s what’s on the ballot this November.” Kuster is also campaigning on her record in Congress, saying she has put New Hampshirites over partisan politics, including by working with both parties to increase economic opportunities and by supporting a ban on members of Congress trading stock.

Burns said, “Managing taxpayer money as the Hillsborough County Treasurer and managing the payroll at Burns Automation is the type of real-world experience that is needed now more than ever in Congress.” Burns said people won’t want to vote for Democrats due to high oil costs this fall. He said he would like to ban abortion but didn’t think it was going to happen and that he supports “a fetal heartbeat bill. That’s abortion up to 12 weeks.”

Kuster defeated Steve Negron (R) 54% to 44% in 2020 and 56% to 42% in 2018. That year, Burns placed fourth in the 2nd District Republican primary with 16%.

The outcome of this race will affect the partisan balance of the U.S. House in the 118th Congress. All 435 House districts are up for election. Democrats hold a 221-212 majority. Republicans need to gain a net of six districts to win a majority in the chamber.

Daily Kos calculated what the 2020 presidential election results in this district would have been following redistricting. Joe Biden (D) would have received 53.6% of the vote in this district and Donald Trump (R) would have received 44.7%.



Incumbent Josh Kaul (D) and Eric Toney (R) running for Wisconsin attorney general

Incumbent Josh Kaul (D) and Eric Toney (R) are running for Wisconsin attorney general on Nov. 8, 2022.

Kaul was elected in 2018, defeating incumbent Brad Schimel (R) 49.4% to 48.8%. Before Kaul took office, a Republican had held the office since 2007.

Sabato’s Crystal Ball senior columnist Louis Jacobson named this election as one of the five most competitive attorney general elections in 2022, writing, “When Kaul won the office in 2018, his vote margin was narrow and tracked the showing of Democratic gubernatorial nominee Tony Evers. Evers is facing a tough reelection in 2022, and so is Kaul. … [U]ltimately, [Kaul’s] fate will probably mirror whatever happens to Evers in November, and possibly the result of the U.S. Senate race between GOP incumbent Ron Johnson and Democratic Lt. Gov. Mandela Barnes.”

Kaul’s campaign website says, “As Attorney General, Josh’s top priority is public safety. … [H]is administration has investigated and/or prosecuted some of the most serious offenses in the state, including homicides, sexual assaults, robberies, internet crimes against children, and drug trafficking.” The website says, “[Kaul’s] administration has fought crime, protected our natural resources, and defended our rights, taking on tough issues and getting results.” Kaul’s career before he was elected attorney general included working as an assistant U.S. attorney in the U.S. District Court for the District of Maryland and as a voting rights attorney. Kaul’s mother, Peggy Lautenschlager (D), served as attorney general from 2003 to 2007.

Toney was elected district attorney in Fond du Lac County in 2012 and was re-elected in 2016 and 2020. Toney’s campaign website says he is running for attorney general to “restore the Department of Justice’s mission to fight crime, support law enforcement, protect families, and enforce the rule of law,” saying that Kaul had “failed to support law enforcement, politicized the Department of Justice, failed to defend our election laws, has rejected the title of Wisconsin’s ‘Top Cop’ and has begun to systematically defund the Department of Justice’s ability to prosecute cases[.]”

The attorney general is the head of the Wisconsin Department of Justice and the chief legal officer for the state. During their campaigns, Kaul and Toney have addressed issues such as public safety, Department of Justice and law enforcement funding, crime in Milwaukee, the state’s 1849 abortion law, drug trafficking, election access and security, and firearm regulations.

In 2018, Democrats gained a state government triplex in Wisconsin when Democratic candidates defeated Republican incumbents in the elections for governor and attorney general, and the Democratic secretary of state was re-elected. All three offices are up for election again in 2022.

Across the U.S., 23 states have Republican triplexes, 18 have Democratic triplexes, and 9 have divided governments where neither party holds triplex control.

This election is one of 30 attorney general elections taking place in 2022. All 50 states have an attorney general who serves as the state’s chief legal officer. In 43 states, the office is an elected post. There are currently 27 Republican attorneys general and 23 Democratic attorneys general.



All candidates for Iowa Secretary of State complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Iowa Secretary of State —incumbent Paul Pate (R) and Joel Miller (D) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office.

This is one of 27 secretary of state seats on the ballot in 2022. Iowa’s secretary of state serves as the state commissioner of elections, maintains corporations’ records, registers trademarks, commissions notaries public, and preserves original documents. Iowa is one of 26 states with a Republican secretary of state, and one of 9 states with a divided government triplex.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office?        

Pate:           

“Continuing to protect the sanctity and security of Iowa’s elections are my top priorities. while increasing voter registration and participation. Iowa was recently named one of the top three states in the nation for election administration. I’d like us to be #1. We’ve made it easy to vote but hard to cheat. Under my watch, that will continue.

Under my watch, Iowa has set record highs for voter registration and participation multiple times. Iowa is a national leader in both. We implemented Iowa’s online voter registration system in 2016, making it faster and easier to register than ever. We also created the Safe at Home address confidentiality program, so survivors of domestic violence, sexual abuse, trafficking, stalking and assault can vote without fear of their address becoming public.”

Miller:

“Make Voting Easy Again! But to do so, Iowans must #FirePaulPate. Why? 

  • 1> Pate pocket vetoed two proposed amendments to the Iowa Constitution by failing to publish them in official newspapers. Pate blamed the mistake on staff and fired a top appointee. Legislature took away Pate’s duty to publish amendments.
  •  2> Pate negligently inactivated 17-year-olds not eligible to vote in the November 2020 election. Pate blamed the Legislature for making the law. Legislature changed law to prohibit Pate from inactivating 17 year-olds in the future. 
  • 3> Pate silent on voter suppression contained in 2021 election law changes. No leadership. Did not register For/Against/Neutral on law during debate or after passage.”

Click here to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

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Chabot, Landsman running in general election for Ohio’s 1st Congressional District

Incumbent Steve Chabot (R) and Greg Landsman (D) are running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Ohio’s 1st Congressional District.

The Cincinnati Enquirer’s Scott Wartman wrote, “a change in district boundaries through redistricting has given Democrats a slight edge in numbers for what had been a reliably Republican district over the last decade.” Daily Kos calculated what the results of the 2020 presidential election in this district would have been following redistricting. Joe Biden (D) would have received 53.5% of the vote in this district and Donald Trump (R) would have received 45.0%. According to Cleveland.com’s Sabrina Eaton, “The new configuration of the district Chabot represents includes all of Cincinnati, its eastern Hamilton County suburbs and all of Warren County.”

Chabot was first elected to represent the 1st Congressional District in 1994. He lost his 2008 re-election bid but was elected again in 2010. Chabot said, “Nancy Pelosi’s policies, along with the Biden administration, have done a lot of damage to the country. We need to fix that damage. We need to reverse a lot of things.” Chabot said his top goals are “improving the economy and reducing inflation and keeping taxes as low as possible.” Chabot said, “I actually reach out to Democrats, even though I’m a Republican and a conservative Republican at that. The best way to get things done in Congress is to reach across the aisle. And when I offer legislation, I almost always get a Democrat to be a lead sponsor with me.”

Landsman is a member of the Cincinnati City Council, a position to which he was first elected in 2017. Before joining the city council, Landsman was the executive director of the StrivePartnership. Landsman said, “the opportunity in this election is not just to have somebody who’s going to vote to protect our democracy, who’s going to end this chaos, who’s going to codify Roe, but somebody who’s going to not just vote with them and for their interests, but also who’s there all the time, in their neighborhoods, working on their issues.” Landsman has campaigned on reducing inflation and raising the minimum wage, strengthening labor union laws, and supporting the “codification of the rights afforded by Roe v. Wade on the federal level.”

In a campaign ad, Chabot said Landsman “not only worked for Nancy Pelosi, he supports more of her tax-and-spend agenda.” Landsman said, “we can no longer be represented by someone who voted against relief checks for families, voted against rebuilding the Brent Spence Bridge, voted against funding to reopen schools and support for frontline workers, and voted against certifying the 2020 presidential election.”

The outcome of this race will affect the partisan balance of the U.S. House of Representatives in the 118th Congress. All 435 districts in the House are up for election. As of September 20, 2022, Democrats hold a 221-212 advantage in the U.S. House with two vacancies. 



All candidates for Ohio House of Representatives District 14 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Ohio House of Representatives District 14 — Sean Brennan (D) and Jolene Austin (R) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office.

Eighty-eight of the country’s 99 state legislative chambers will hold regularly scheduled elections in 2022. The Republican Party controls both chambers of Ohio’s state legislature. Ohio is one of 23 states with a Republican trifecta.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What areas of public policy are you personally passionate about?            

Brennan:           

“My focus has been and will continue to be on supporting public education, the right of workers to organize, bolstering local government funding, fiscal responsibility, building the best safety forces, improving infrastructure, adding amenities, beautification, and attracting businesses to the area.”

Austin:           

“The over inflated taxes we our paying on our homes is pushing people to sell and leave their beloved community. The amount of levies and bonds we are forced to pay every election cycle is out of control. Wasted tax dollars on bills full of earmarks is leaving little to actually help us residents.”

Click on candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

  1. Sean Brennan
  2. Jolene Austin

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

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Ohio House of Representatives election, 2022



All candidates for Ohio House of Representatives District 16 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Ohio House of Representatives District 16 — incumbent Bride Rose Sweeney (D) and Michael Lamb (R) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office.

Eighty-eight of the country’s 99 state legislative chambers will hold regularly scheduled elections in 2022. The Republican Party controls both chambers of Ohio’s state legislature. Ohio is one of 23 states with a Republican trifecta.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What areas of public policy are you personally passionate about?            

Sweeney:           

  1. “I am running for re-election because Ohio needs more leaders who are committed to finding real solutions to the problems we face, not finding more ways to divide us.”
  2. “Since taking office, I have consistently been a much-needed voice of reason at the Ohio Statehouse, pushing back against extremists and derailing bad policy ideas on issues ranging from guns to voting rights.”
  3. “The newly drawn House District 16 is a very competitive open seat that leans only a few points Democratic. I initially decided to run in this seat in March to avoid a Democratic Primary and give Ohioans the best possible chance at breaking the Republican Supermajority, which has been so destructive to the State of Ohio.”       

Lamb:       

  1. “I am running to make sure that Cuyahoga County is no longer ignored in Columbus. The building blocks are still in place t make this the center of business growth in the country.”
  2. “We need to remove unnecessary bureaucratic red tape. Make it simple for small business to be formed, current business to grow here, and business that which to move here find an easy path to do so.”
  3. “We must provide our children with the opportunity for a superior education. This can be both through college prep class, or skilled trades. We should partner with business, both blue collar and white collar to have internships starting in high school to give students an understanding of what it takes to achieve success when they leave school.”

Click on candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

  1. Bride Rose Sweeney
  2. Michael Lamb

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

Additional reading:

Ohio House of Representatives election, 2022



All candidates for Ohio House of Representatives District 24 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Ohio House of Representatives District 24 — Dani Isaacsohn (D) and Adam Koehler (R) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. Thesesurvey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office.

Eighty-eight of the country’s 99 state legislative chambers will hold regularly scheduled elections in 2022. The Republican Party controls both chambers of Ohio’s state legislature. Ohio is one of 23 states with a Republican trifecta.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What areas of public policy are you personally passionate about?            

Isaacsohn:           

  1. “Economy and Careers: Free Community College and Apprenticeships.”
  2. “Gun Violence and Safety: Common Sense Solutions.” 
  3. “Universal Pre K.” 

Koehler:       

  1. “Education”
  2. “Affordable housing”
  3. “Safety”

Click on candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

  1. Dani Isaacsohn
  2. Adam Koehler

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area tofill out the survey.

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Ohio House of Representatives election, 2022



All candidates for Tennessee House of Representatives District 26 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Tennessee House of Representatives District 26 —incumbent Greg Martin (R) and Allison Gorman (D) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office.

Eighty-eight of the country’s 99 state legislative chambers will hold regularly scheduled elections in 2022. The Republican Party controls both chambers of Tennessee’s state legislature. Tennessee is one of 23 states with a Republican trifecta.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What areas of public policy are you personally passionate about?            

Martin:           

  1. “Public Safety – I am committed to safe homes, neighborhoods, and schools. Those that protect us deserve the best equipment, good benefits, and a fair wages.”
  2. “Economic Development/Jobs – I am a committed capitalist. Government has a responsibility to provide roads, schools, sewers, and other infrastructure where businesses can thrive to provide economic opportunity for our citizens. I know that more people realize the American Dream from Main Street than Wall Street.”
  3. “Public Education – The best schools are the ones where parents are engaged in their children’s education. Parents need numerous choices in public education for their family.”

Gorman:               

  1. “Everyone in Tennessee has seen or personally experienced the medical and financial damage caused by lack of access to health care.”
  2. “Tennessee has been disinvesting from public schools for years. That’s economically disastrous. When we give our children a good education, we put them on track to become successful adults: the skilled workers who attract major employers, the entrepreneurs who start new businesses, the visionaries who lift up communities.”
  3. “People are disgusted with government, and D26 offers the perfect example of why. First, it’s not an extreme right-wing district—on the contrary, it’s politically diverse—but the laws pushed and passed by our state reps have been extreme, completely out of step with the majority of constituents.”

Click on candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

  1. Greg Martin
  2. Allison Gorman

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

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Tennessee House of Representatives election, 2022