Category2022 elections

All candidates for Wake County School Board District 7 in North Carolina complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

All three of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Wake County School Board District 7 in North Carolina — incumbent Chris Heagarty, Jacob Arthur, and Katie Long — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office.

According to the Wake County county public school system website, the school board is made up of nine members who “set policy for the school system implemented by the superintendent and administrative staff. The board also adopts an annual budget proposal that includes its request for local funding from the Wake County Board of Commissioners as well as its plan for using state and federal funds.”

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What areas of public policy are you personally passionate about?

Heagarty:   

“Since joining the Board of Education I have been passionate about improving mental health services for students, to ensure that all children feel safe and supported and are in the best mindset to learn and grow in school. This advocacy has led to the adoption of our district’s first mental health policy for student and increased hiring of school counselors, school psychologists, school nurses, and social workers.”

Arthur:               

“There is no reason Wake County Public Schools should not be the best in the nation. For far to long, the school board has flown under the radar to implement there social agenda rather than focusing on sound education. This has resulted in falling proficiency rates in reading and math, year over year for the past decade. It is time to change leadership and head in a new direction by empowering parents, investing in students and supporting teachers.”

Long:

“Our school system requires reformation to meet today’s challenges. I will work with fellow board members along with parental involvement, shifting our focus to helping our children achieve academic proficiency, providing transparency in academic achievement reporting, and improving how resources are spent. We must ensure that our students have the highest quality education possible by running a school system that best prepares them for their future success.”

Click on candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

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All candidates for Nevada Board of Regents District 11 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Nevada Board of Regents District 11 — Jeffrey Downs and Steve Laden — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office.

The Nevada State Board of Regents is an elected executive agency of the Nevada state government, responsible for managing the state’s system of higher education.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What areas of public policy are you personally passionate about?

Downs:   

“I would like to see NSHE focus on growing its mission to serve the people of Nevada through educational opportunities. Too often the focus of the board has been on the two universities and especially the sports teams. NSHE is supposed to serve Nevada by offering programs to help people to include workforce development. NSHE, through the colleges, has been expanding dual enrollment connections for high school students, but this, too, can be expanded.”

Laden:               

“I am most passionate about public policy relating to education at all levels. Since the Nevada System of Higher Education is populated mainly by Nevada citizens, what happens at the K-12 level is of utmost importance to Nevada’s colleges and universities. In the long-run, how we educate our students at all levels is one of the primary factors in determining the quality of our state, economy and society as a whole.”

Click on candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

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All candidates for Colorado State Board of Education District 6 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Colorado State Board of Education District 6 — incumbent Rebecca McClellan (D) and Molly Lamar (R) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office.  

The Colorado State Board of Education is an elected executive agency of the Colorado state government, responsible for managing the state’s public K-12 education. The board’s stated mission is “to provide all of Colorado’s children equal access to quality, thorough, uniform, well-rounded educational opportunities in a safe and civil learning environment.”

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office?    

McClellan:           

  • “Academic growth and achievement are my top priority. I’m pleased to have successfully advocated to prioritize our state’s ESSER funds on proven strategies like high impact tutoring.”
  • “Working with parents, I have supported the bipartisan READ Act to deliver evidence-based literacy instruction to more Colorado students, including students with dyslexia.”
  • “I am endorsed by parents, teachers, and school leaders for my demonstrated commitment to academic excellence and opportunity for all Colorado Students.”

Lamar:       

  • “Parent engagement and partnerships. Across our state we are facing a crisis concerning student performance. Currently, 60 percent of Colorado third graders cannot read at grade level. 70 percent are not proficient in math. What we are doing is not working.”
  • “Improving academic outcomes. School districts are spending exorbitant amounts of money on divisive programs that do little to improve academic outcomes.”
  • “School safety. I will collaborate with school districts and law enforcement in implementing safety measures such as additional cameras, locks on all exterior doors, and School Resource Officers (SROs) to ensure the safety of our children.”

Click on the candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

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Democratic party committees surpass Republican party committees in cumulative fundraising for first time since June 2021

Six party committees have raised a combined $1.5 billion thus far in the 2022 election cycle. In September, the committees raised $133 million, according to recent filings with the Federal Election Commission. 

In September, the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee (DSCC) raised $28.8 million and spent $38.2 million, while the National Republican Senatorial Committee (NRSC) raised $16.9 million and spent $37.7 million. So far in the 2022 election cycle, the DSCC has outraised the NRSC $213.6 million to $211.0 million. At this point in the 2020 election cycle, the DSCC led in cumulative fundraising with $209.0 million to the NRSC’s $200.4 million. 

The Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee (DCCC) raised $27.6 million and spent $79.0 million in September. The National Republican Congressional Committee (NRCC) raised $16.9 million and spent $37.7 million. So far in the 2022 election cycle, the DCCC leads in fundraising with $296.0 million to the NRCC’s $257.4 million. At this point in the 2020 cycle, the DCCC had raised $278.3 million and the NRCC had raised $214.1 million.

Between the national committees, the Democratic National Committee (DNC) raised and spent more than the Republican National Committee (RNC) in September. The RNC raised $20.4 million and spent $16.9 million, while the DNC raised $22.4 million and spent $21.1 million. So far in the 2022 election cycle, the RNC has raised $296.8 million to the DNC’s $266.8 million. At this time in the 2020 election cycle, the RNC led in fundraising with $604.5 million in cumulative receipts to the DNC’s $357.0 million.

This election cycle, the DNC, DSCC, and DCCC have raised 1.5% more than the RNC, NRSC, and NRCC ($776.5 million to $765.2 million). 

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Ballotpedia is tracking 377 rematches this year between candidates who last faced each other in 2018 or 2020

Ballotpedia is tracking 377 rematches this year between candidates who last faced each other in 2018 or 2020. That’s down from 2020, when there were 402 rematches from 2018 alone.

This year’s rematches include:

  • 340 between candidates running for offices with two-year terms who last faced off in 2020; and,
  • 37 between candidates running for offices with four-year terms who last faced off in 2018.

The offices contested in these rematches include:

  • 51 U.S. House districts;
  • Five state executive offices;
  • 287 state legislative seats; and,
  • 34 local offices.

Of this total, 111 rematches (29%) were decided by 10 percentage points or fewer during their last contests.

Of the 51 U.S. House rematches, Democrats won 36 in 2020, and Republicans won 15. Ten of those elections were decided by 10 percentage points or fewer.

Of the five state executive rematches, the following parties won those offices when they were last up for election:

  • Democrats won one, the governorship of Connecticut; and,
  • Republicans won four, including the governorship of Georgia and the lieutenant governorship of Texas

Of the 287 state legislative rematches, the following parties won those offices when they were last up for election:

  • Democrats won 156;
  • Republicans won 127; and,
  • Minor party and independent candidates won four.

Of the 34 local election rematches, the following parties won those offices when they were last up for election:

  • Democrats won 17;
  • Republicans won two; and,
  • Nonpartisan and independent candidates won 15

In addition to head-to-head rematches between two candidates running for a single seat, 197 elections this year feature two or more candidates running in a multi-member district who also ran against each other in 2018 or 2020. They include:

  • Two candidates running for at-large seats in a multi-member state executive board
  • 360 candidates running in 139 multi-member state legislative districts; and,
  • 136 candidates running in 57 multi-member municipal districts.



Wiley Nickel (D), Bo Hines (R) running in North Carolina’s 13th Congressional District

Wiley Nickel (D) and Bo Hines (R) are running in the November 8, 2022, general election for North Carolina’s 13th Congressional District. Incumbent Rep. Ted Budd (R) did not run for re-election, instead running for U.S. Senate in North Carolina.

Spectrum News‘ Reuben Jones wrote North Carolina’s 13th “is one of a limited number of swing districts around the country, so both national parties are focusing on it, with control of the U.S. House potentially hinging on the outcome.”

The district lines of North Carolina’s 13th changed substantially after redistricting, with the new district containing none of the old 13th district. According to FiveThirtyEight, the old 13th district had an R+38 partisan lean, while the new district has an R+3 lean. A partisan lean indicates the difference between how a state or district votes and how the country votes overall.

Mitchel Northam and Jeff Tiberii wrote for North Carolina Public Radio, “This district has been newly reconfigured — and essentially relocated — by redistricting. […] Now, the new 13th District is Triangle-centric. It includes the southern half of Wake, all of Johnston, and portions of Harnett and Wayne Counties — spanning from Apex to Mount Olive.”

Nickel, a criminal defense attorney, has represented District 16 in the North Carolina State Senate since 2019. Nickel previously worked in several district attorney offices and as advance staff for former President Barack Obama (D). In a campaign ad, Nickel said, “I’ll stand up to the extremes in both parties to get things done. Like increasing funding for police and cutting taxes for the middle class, while lowering healthcare and prescription costs.”

Hines, a former college football player for North Carolina State University, interned for Indiana Gov. Eric Holcomb (R) and U.S. Sen. Mike Rounds (R-S.D.). This race marks his first run for political office. A Hines campaign ad said, “North Carolinians deserve a leader who puts in the hours like we do — fighting inflation, creating jobs, standing up to Joe Biden, and protecting North Carolina values.”

The outcome of this race will affect the partisan balance of the U.S. House of Representatives in the 118th Congress. All 435 House districts are up for election. As of October 23, 2022, Democrats held a 220-212 majority in the U.S. House with three vacancies. Republicans need to gain a net of five districts to win a majority in the chamber.

Daily Kos calculated what the results of the 2020 presidential election in this district would have been following redistricting. Joe Biden (D) would have received 50.1% of the vote in this district and Donald Trump (R) would have received 48.4%.



Luria, Kiggans running in general election for Virginia’s 2nd Congressional District

Incumbent U.S. Rep. Elaine Luria (D) and state Sen. Jennifer Kiggans (R) are running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Virginia’s 2nd Congressional District.

13News Now’s Preston Steger wrote, “While Luria won her 2018 election by two points and her 2020 election by nearly six points, her district became less favorable to Democrats after the lines were redrawn following the 2020 Census. The district encompasses Virginia Beach, Chesapeake, Suffolk, Franklin, Isle of Wight County and the Eastern Shore.”

Luria was first elected to Congress in 2018. Previously, she served in the U.S. Navy from 1997 to 2017, reaching the rank of commander, and worked as a small business owner. Luria said her role on the Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the United States Capitol was part of why she was running for re-election: “It’s a very big responsibility and a very big responsibility for our democracy, for my constituents here in the district, and it does motivate me to understand that my service is incredibly important and we can’t allow those who would not uphold the rule of law to take over Congress in the future. That really is the foundation of why I’m motivated to continue this service.” Luria has campaigned on supporting veterans, strengthening the Affordable Care Act, increasing the federal minimum wage, and opposing oil drilling off Virginia’s coast.

Kiggans was first elected to the Virginia State Senate in 2019. Kiggans has worked as a geriatric nurse practitioner since 2012. Before that, she served in the U.S. Navy from 1993 to 2003. Kiggans has campaigned on cutting inflation and growing the economy, prioritizing border security, improving education, and pushing back “against Democrats’ efforts to defund or abolish our police departments.” Kiggans said, “The wasteful spending and tax increases must stop. The government mandates and expansion into our lives and business must stop. To stop these things and get our country back on track, we must have a change of leadership in Congress, and in the Second District, that starts with flipping this seat and firing Nancy Pelosi.” Kiggans completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. Click here to read her responses.

Kiggans said Luria has campaigned as a moderate but voted with Democratic leadership: “The first vote she cast is for Nancy Pelosi as speaker of the house, and then she continues to vote with Pelosi 99% of the time.” Luria has criticized Kiggans for being one of four Republicans in the state Senate to vote for a failed budget amendment that would have allocated $70 million to an audit of Virginia’s 2020 general elections: “People really do understand what a threat this is to our democracy. My opponent is somebody who won’t say Joe Biden won the election—she’s like, ‘Well, he lives in the White House, but I wish he didn’t.'”

Election forecasters consider the district a Toss-up. The district has changed party hands four times since 2000. A Democrat has won the district in three of the last 11 elections, while a Republican has won the district in eight of the last 11 elections.

The outcome of this race will affect the partisan balance of the U.S. House of Representatives in the 118th Congress. All 435 House districts are up for election. As of October 10, 2022, Democrats held a 220-212 majority in the U.S. House with three vacancies. Republicans need to gain a net of five districts to win a majority in the chamber.

Daily Kos calculated what the results of the 2020 presidential election in this district would have been following redistricting. Joe Biden (D) would have received 50.1% of the vote in this district and Donald Trump (R) would have received 48.2%.



All candidates for Oregon House of Representatives District 53 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Oregon House of Representatives District 53 —  Emerson Levy (D) and Michael Sipe (R) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office.

Eighty-eight of the country’s 99 state legislative chambers will hold regularly scheduled elections in 2022. The Democratic Party controls both chambers of Oregon’s state legislature. Oregon is one of 14 states with a Democratic trifecta.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office?  

Levy:               

  • “School Safety and Gun Safety: I consider school safety and gun safety as the fight of my life.”
  • “Reproductive Rights: I am the only pro-choice candidate in this race.”
  • “Homelessness: Everyone deserves to feel safe in our community.”

Sipe:   

  • “Government Overreach”
  • “The Economy & Small Business”
  • “Law and Order / Public Safety”

Click on candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

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All candidates for Oregon House of Representatives District 12 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Oregon House of Representatives District 12 —  Michelle Emmons (D) and Charlie Conrad (R) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office.

Eighty-eight of the country’s 99 state legislative chambers will hold regularly scheduled elections in 2022. The Democratic Party controls both chambers of Oregon’s state legislature. Oregon is one of 14 states with a Democratic trifecta.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office?

Emmons:           

  • “Strong Local Economies”
  • “Access to Healthcare, EMS, and Public Safety”
  • “Climate Resiliency and Sustainable Lands Management”           

Conrad:       

  • “People come before politics – the government is there to enforce the rule of law, provide public goods, and maintain equal opportunities for everyone.”
  • “Taxes need to be spent wisely and which provide a positive return on investment for the tax payers.”
  • “The focus should be developing and providing opportunities for the working class – they are the backbone of our economy.”

Click on candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

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All candidates for Oregon House of Representatives District 49 complete Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey

Both of the candidates running in the November 8, 2022, general election for Oregon House of Representatives District 49 —  incumbent Zach Hudson (D) and Randy Lauer (R) — completed Ballotpedia’s Candidate Connection survey. These survey responses allow voters to hear directly from candidates about what motivates them to run for office.

Eighty-eight of the country’s 99 state legislative chambers will hold regularly scheduled elections in 2022. The Democratic Party controls both chambers of Oregon’s state legislature. Oregon is one of 14 states with a Democratic trifecta.

Here are excerpts from candidates’ responses to the question: What are the main points you want voters to remember about your goals for your time in office?  

Hudson:       

  • “Support public safety and reduce unauthorized camping by getting resources to East County and better coordinating resources between the state, county and cities.”
  • “Support education, including increased mental health supports for students and expanded vocational pathways.”
  • “Stand up for working families by increasing access to affordable housing, medical care and childcare.”

Lauer:               

  • “Homelessness Epidemic. The problems of Portland are filtering East into neighborhoods and workplaces at a drastic rate.”
  • “The Need For Public Safety. The Portland-Metro area is making national headlines for the increasing crime rates with no resolution in sight.”
  • “A Logical & Rational End to the Pandemic Response. The regulations and mandates from Governor Brown and the staff at the Oregon Health Authority, have gone on long enough.”

Click on candidates’ profile pages below to read their full responses to this and other questions.

We ask all federal, state, and local candidates with profiles on Ballotpedia to complete a survey and share what motivates them on political and personal levels. Ask the candidates in your area to fill out the survey.

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